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Ortonville, Minnesota
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January 7, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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January 7, 2003
 

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Ortonvflle "Town with a heart" ]N,..Ooo.,rDuc,,ve,ewsEoa,er,n.,iveCo00muEni,,. N DENT RTONVILLE HIGH SCHOOL cheerleiders held a clinic i d fans. The youngsters performed at half-time of the Trojan SaturdaYvarsity game.m°rning for elementary cheerleaders Cross bloodmobile here, 0 blood in demand rnerican Red Cross blood drives ill be taking place this week in tone Count • Y" [Collechons are expected to go tty Well according to Larry Wieser, °ntact person, but as always the or blood is still great and we every pint that we can collect g the County Drive," said Liz Big Stone County Red Cross rnaan. Pecially in demand is type "O" • The local drives this time will 00orus to sing Wednesday -.ornrnunity Chorus will be g lng at the Orton'ille Senior r this Wednesday, Jan. 8th at a.m. be using a new registration method that the Red Cross has started using, so it should be interesting to see how things go at this drive. A long time donor has been quoted saying, "There are four simple rea- sons to donate blood: 1. It doesn't hurt. 2. It doesn't cost anything. 3. It makes you feel better physically and emotionally. 4. It helps save lives." If you are 17 years of age, weigh about 100 pounds, and are feeling physically fine come and donate a pint of blood to help a person in need. Here is a list of times and places for this week: Tue., Jan. 7th: Ortonville at the New Life Baptist Church. 1-7 PM. Wed., Jan. 8th: GraceviUe at Holy Rosary Parish Hall. 1-7 PM. Thurs., Jan. 9th: Clinton at the Clinton Memorial Building: 1:30- 6:30 PM. Fri., Jan. 10th: Beardsley at the City Aud. 8 AM-12 PM. Pastor Hesse installed at Bellingham area churches "I'm one of those second career guys," Pastor James Hesse explained. He was brought up on a farm in the North Branch area, after high school went to vo-tech school in auto mechanics, ended up working at Unysis in St. Paul for 16 years as an engineering assistant, and finally in 1989 at 38 years of age entered Concordia Seminary in Fort Wayne, IN. Pastor ttesse was installed on Dec. 15 at Trinity Town Walter Lutheran Church, and will also be serving St. Peter's Lutheran in Bellingham. After graduating in '93, Pastor Hesse first served in a dual parish in rural Wisconsin. The two churches, St. Lukes and St. Johns were similar to the two parishes he will serve in the Bellingham area. "I grew up on a farm, lived in rural areas and around rural people. Coming out here is exactly the kind of parish I most efijoy." Pastor Hesse served for a year in New Rockford, ND during his train- ing, and compares that community to the Bellingham area. "The two communities face the same issues of diminishing popula- tions, and the loss of the young peo- ple. They also share the friendliness and warmth of the people. It's the kind of community and people that I want to be a part of. Coming to Bellingham, and living "out" here is almost too good to be true." "Fewer and fewer people grasp what rural life is all about• It's become almost antique to some people. As far as I'm concerned we don't find it very often and we should hold on to the qualities it represents• After all, rural life was the real backbone of our country." Pastor Hesse raised four children• His oldest son serves as a pastor in Amarillo, TX. "I was thrilled to par- ticipate in my son's ordination. His experience in the urban church with 1100 members is far different from my service here. I prefer the rural church." Doug Tomschin honored as c°u00i00ate?eL00!ny00,n?00le00e00?ssau00'0000 retires from Navy Reserves the girl was spending the night• According to court documents, the fol- lowing day, her mother took her to the Northside Medical Center for exami- nation at which point a social worker called the Big Stone County Sheriff's office to report the alleged incident. No date has been set for any court was charged with criminal sexual mis conduct in the 3rd and 4th degree for alleged assaulting a 15 year old Ortonville girl on Dec. 23 according to Big Stone County court documents. Arturo Madrigal, requested a court appointed attorney and posted bond of $7,500. 00C/OCDC annual ""'Wet --rhursday The alleged incident took place in a ler,°nville's Development Corp. .he Ortonville Community Financial Aid meet loprnent Corp. ODC/OCDC a! meeting will be held at 12 gcg this Thursday, Jan 9, at the Ortonville High School Counselor, [ Tim Marthaler, announces that a P Care in Ortonville. ' Financial Aid Meeting will be held next Monday, Jan. 13th, from 6:30- illJI 1lira= pu-winter 7:45 p.m: in the Ortonville High School Commons. earance now Sturdevant s proceedings. at OHS Monday Gary McFarland, the Financial Aid Director from Alexandria Technical College, will be here to go over both the paper and electronic forms for Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and answer any questions• He has had over twenty-five years experience and is familiar with all state and federal programs typically used to pay post-secondary education• Everyone in the area who is interested is invited to attend•  rnid-winter clearance sale on i A Auto Parts items is underway at Sturdevant,s Auto Parts of :1 lp. Full details can be found )w_°a,€.c.k.page of this issue. sal]er e hd Kelly reminds all that ,_ ;: -,ts only until Jan. 14th, a rrorn tOday. The meeting is designed for parents of high school seniors but would be helpful for anyone who will be attending college next year and who might need help completing all the paperwork necessary to apply for financial aid. C Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com ) 00heriff's office awarded for uperior traffic enforcement Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) Safe & Sober Challenge program. Big Stone County Sheriff's Office grnt traffic safety activities Big Stone County has warranted a fed- of $1,000 from the demonstrated extraordinary commit- ment and achievement in reducing traffic related deaths and injuries in 2002. The grant was presented last Thursday to Sheriff Joe Berning by the DPS Office of Traffic Safety rep- resentative Jean Ryan. The Sheriff's Office plans to use the grant to con- tinue to support the community's traf- fic safety effort. The grants are awarded based on activities that law enforcement agen- cies conducted this year, including traffic safety community programs, enforcement, officer training, public and media relations, and presentations Big Stone County Sheriff's Office took giant steps in their traffic safety efforts last year--they truly showed a dedicated effort in keeping their roads safe," said Kathryn Swanson, director of the Office of Traffic Safety. "They should be proud of their work because of their traffic safety initia- tives, lives have been saved in their community." Big Stone County Sheriff's Office was one of 34 winning agencies from across the state; a total of $66,000 in grants was awarded. This makes the third year this office, under Sheriff Berning has received the award, the other two years being 1988 and 1999. SHI:I|,-,,,, erni'ng"i; :hOFFICE HONORED. Big Stone County Sheriff Joe h-,: .ount" own receiving .... a Dla¢lue designating a $1,000 grant, to he ---- E y from the M'nnesota Dent. of Public Safety. Present,ng oo00Waro at r.,ght is Jean Ryan €;f the Office of Traffic Safety. ..,- on at left is Brad Kollmann Law Enforcement Liaison of m'nnesota Safe & Sober" from Northfieid. Reflecting back on his career in the Navy, Douglas Tomschin, Big Stone County Veteran's Service Officer, who just retired after 16 years in the Naval Reserves said that joining the Navy in 1974 turned out be a very good thing. "There's a certain cama- raderie that develops among veterans, that if you haven't served, you could- n't possibly understand. A person is changed by the experience." Tomshin served his original four years in the Navy Intelligence Com- munity, specifically trained for under water sound surveillance, listening for the movement of Russian and French ships• He learned a great deal about how sound travels in water, and how to interpret those messages, and was given an opportunity to see a few places and meet a few people, he wouldn't have if not for the Navy. Doug met his wife, Amanda while serving in Broawdy Wales. After a few years hiatus, Doug joined the Navy Reserves out of Fargo, ND. Over the next 16 years he logged some 73,000 miles, and a total of two and half years in service away from home. On Dec 14, he was honored for his contributions as part of his retirement ceremony. His awards include the Navy Achievement medal for good conduct. The Navy Reserve Medal for Meritous Service with three bronze stars, the National Defense award with one bronze star, the Human- itarian Service Medal, Outstanding nil Please Note! o j Unless you are an exceptt n, I either use you!R ain. :1 school or for some or specif-: I ic reason, yo subscrl[on to I The Ortonville Independent | will be due Feb 1.2003; I Please take note that this " annoe neement will rene 6y Feb. I andlook for I ward, as al, to keeping you I on our "readership;" Thank [ you. " I As Veteran's Service Officer for Big Stone County, Doug Tomschin pursues every option to provide veterans with the services they deserve. Doug recently retired after 16 years with the Navy Reserve. Volunteer Service Medal, the Armed Forces Reserve Medal with an hour ii Circulars inside I * Carlson Thrifty White Drug glass device, Expert Rifle and Expert Pistol, and the Secure Under Water Sound Surveillance Award• Veteran Gary Speakermeier says, "Doug has done just a great job. He's applied for grants, researches eyery (Continued on page 3) FIRST BABY OF 2003 born at the Ortonville Hospital is Gracie Mac VanHoorn M:i|bank, SD. She is the first baby for Phil VanHoorn and Leslie Hoium. Gracie was delivered by Dr. Ronald Beyer at 1:15 a.m. She weighed 7 Ibs, 5 3/4 oz, and measured 21 1/4 inches in length. Grandparents are Earlene and Tom Schmieding of Marietta and Fred and Phyllis VanHoorn of Milbank. Ortonvflle "Town with a heart" ]N,..Ooo.,rDuc,,ve,ewsEoa,er,n.,iveCo00muEni,,. N DENT RTONVILLE HIGH SCHOOL cheerleiders held a clinic i d fans. The youngsters performed at half-time of the Trojan SaturdaYvarsity game.m°rning for elementary cheerleaders Cross bloodmobile here, 0 blood in demand rnerican Red Cross blood drives ill be taking place this week in tone Count • Y" [Collechons are expected to go tty Well according to Larry Wieser, °ntact person, but as always the or blood is still great and we every pint that we can collect g the County Drive," said Liz Big Stone County Red Cross rnaan. Pecially in demand is type "O" • The local drives this time will 00orus to sing Wednesday -.ornrnunity Chorus will be g lng at the Orton'ille Senior r this Wednesday, Jan. 8th at a.m. be using a new registration method that the Red Cross has started using, so it should be interesting to see how things go at this drive. A long time donor has been quoted saying, "There are four simple rea- sons to donate blood: 1. It doesn't hurt. 2. It doesn't cost anything. 3. It makes you feel better physically and emotionally. 4. It helps save lives." If you are 17 years of age, weigh about 100 pounds, and are feeling physically fine come and donate a pint of blood to help a person in need. Here is a list of times and places for this week: Tue., Jan. 7th: Ortonville at the New Life Baptist Church. 1-7 PM. Wed., Jan. 8th: GraceviUe at Holy Rosary Parish Hall. 1-7 PM. Thurs., Jan. 9th: Clinton at the Clinton Memorial Building: 1:30- 6:30 PM. Fri., Jan. 10th: Beardsley at the City Aud. 8 AM-12 PM. Pastor Hesse installed at Bellingham area churches "I'm one of those second career guys," Pastor James Hesse explained. He was brought up on a farm in the North Branch area, after high school went to vo-tech school in auto mechanics, ended up working at Unysis in St. Paul for 16 years as an engineering assistant, and finally in 1989 at 38 years of age entered Concordia Seminary in Fort Wayne, IN. Pastor ttesse was installed on Dec. 15 at Trinity Town Walter Lutheran Church, and will also be serving St. Peter's Lutheran in Bellingham. After graduating in '93, Pastor Hesse first served in a dual parish in rural Wisconsin. The two churches, St. Lukes and St. Johns were similar to the two parishes he will serve in the Bellingham area. "I grew up on a farm, lived in rural areas and around rural people. Coming out here is exactly the kind of parish I most efijoy." Pastor Hesse served for a year in New Rockford, ND during his train- ing, and compares that community to the Bellingham area. "The two communities face the same issues of diminishing popula- tions, and the loss of the young peo- ple. They also share the friendliness and warmth of the people. It's the kind of community and people that I want to be a part of. Coming to Bellingham, and living "out" here is almost too good to be true." "Fewer and fewer people grasp what rural life is all about• It's become almost antique to some people. As far as I'm concerned we don't find it very often and we should hold on to the qualities it represents• After all, rural life was the real backbone of our country." Pastor Hesse raised four children• His oldest son serves as a pastor in Amarillo, TX. "I was thrilled to par- ticipate in my son's ordination. His experience in the urban church with 1100 members is far different from my service here. I prefer the rural church." Doug Tomschin honored as c°u00i00ate?eL00!ny00,n?00le00e00?ssau00'0000 retires from Navy Reserves the girl was spending the night• According to court documents, the fol- lowing day, her mother took her to the Northside Medical Center for exami- nation at which point a social worker called the Big Stone County Sheriff's office to report the alleged incident. No date has been set for any court was charged with criminal sexual mis conduct in the 3rd and 4th degree for alleged assaulting a 15 year old Ortonville girl on Dec. 23 according to Big Stone County court documents. Arturo Madrigal, requested a court appointed attorney and posted bond of $7,500. 00C/OCDC annual ""'Wet --rhursday The alleged incident took place in a ler,°nville's Development Corp. .he Ortonville Community Financial Aid meet loprnent Corp. ODC/OCDC a! meeting will be held at 12 gcg this Thursday, Jan 9, at the Ortonville High School Counselor, [ Tim Marthaler, announces that a P Care in Ortonville. ' Financial Aid Meeting will be held next Monday, Jan. 13th, from 6:30- illJI 1lira= pu-winter 7:45 p.m: in the Ortonville High School Commons. earance now Sturdevant s proceedings. at OHS Monday Gary McFarland, the Financial Aid Director from Alexandria Technical College, will be here to go over both the paper and electronic forms for Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and answer any questions• He has had over twenty-five years experience and is familiar with all state and federal programs typically used to pay post-secondary education• Everyone in the area who is interested is invited to attend•  rnid-winter clearance sale on i A Auto Parts items is underway at Sturdevant,s Auto Parts of :1 lp. Full details can be found )w_°a,€.c.k.page of this issue. sal]er e hd Kelly reminds all that ,_ ;: -,ts only until Jan. 14th, a rrorn tOday. The meeting is designed for parents of high school seniors but would be helpful for anyone who will be attending college next year and who might need help completing all the paperwork necessary to apply for financial aid. C Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com ) 00heriff's office awarded for uperior traffic enforcement Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) Safe & Sober Challenge program. Big Stone County Sheriff's Office grnt traffic safety activities Big Stone County has warranted a fed- of $1,000 from the demonstrated extraordinary commit- ment and achievement in reducing traffic related deaths and injuries in 2002. The grant was presented last Thursday to Sheriff Joe Berning by the DPS Office of Traffic Safety rep- resentative Jean Ryan. The Sheriff's Office plans to use the grant to con- tinue to support the community's traf- fic safety effort. The grants are awarded based on activities that law enforcement agen- cies conducted this year, including traffic safety community programs, enforcement, officer training, public and media relations, and presentations Big Stone County Sheriff's Office took giant steps in their traffic safety efforts last year--they truly showed a dedicated effort in keeping their roads safe," said Kathryn Swanson, director of the Office of Traffic Safety. "They should be proud of their work because of their traffic safety initia- tives, lives have been saved in their community." Big Stone County Sheriff's Office was one of 34 winning agencies from across the state; a total of $66,000 in grants was awarded. This makes the third year this office, under Sheriff Berning has received the award, the other two years being 1988 and 1999. SHI:I|,-,,,, erni'ng"i; :hOFFICE HONORED. Big Stone County Sheriff Joe h-,: .ount" own receiving .... a Dla¢lue designating a $1,000 grant, to he ---- E y from the M'nnesota Dent. of Public Safety. Present,ng oo00Waro at r.,ght is Jean Ryan €;f the Office of Traffic Safety. ..,- on at left is Brad Kollmann Law Enforcement Liaison of m'nnesota Safe & Sober" from Northfieid. Reflecting back on his career in the Navy, Douglas Tomschin, Big Stone County Veteran's Service Officer, who just retired after 16 years in the Naval Reserves said that joining the Navy in 1974 turned out be a very good thing. "There's a certain cama- raderie that develops among veterans, that if you haven't served, you could- n't possibly understand. A person is changed by the experience." Tomshin served his original four years in the Navy Intelligence Com- munity, specifically trained for under water sound surveillance, listening for the movement of Russian and French ships• He learned a great deal about how sound travels in water, and how to interpret those messages, and was given an opportunity to see a few places and meet a few people, he wouldn't have if not for the Navy. Doug met his wife, Amanda while serving in Broawdy Wales. After a few years hiatus, Doug joined the Navy Reserves out of Fargo, ND. Over the next 16 years he logged some 73,000 miles, and a total of two and half years in service away from home. On Dec 14, he was honored for his contributions as part of his retirement ceremony. His awards include the Navy Achievement medal for good conduct. The Navy Reserve Medal for Meritous Service with three bronze stars, the National Defense award with one bronze star, the Human- itarian Service Medal, Outstanding nil Please Note! o j Unless you are an exceptt n, I either use you!R ain. :1 school or for some or specif-: I ic reason, yo subscrl[on to I The Ortonville Independent | will be due Feb 1.2003; I Please take note that this " annoe neement will rene 6y Feb. I andlook for I ward, as al, to keeping you I on our "readership;" Thank [ you. " I As Veteran's Service Officer for Big Stone County, Doug Tomschin pursues every option to provide veterans with the services they deserve. Doug recently retired after 16 years with the Navy Reserve. Volunteer Service Medal, the Armed Forces Reserve Medal with an hour ii Circulars inside I * Carlson Thrifty White Drug glass device, Expert Rifle and Expert Pistol, and the Secure Under Water Sound Surveillance Award• Veteran Gary Speakermeier says, "Doug has done just a great job. He's applied for grants, researches eyery (Continued on page 3) FIRST BABY OF 2003 born at the Ortonville Hospital is Gracie Mac VanHoorn M:i|bank, SD. She is the first baby for Phil VanHoorn and Leslie Hoium. Gracie was delivered by Dr. Ronald Beyer at 1:15 a.m. She weighed 7 Ibs, 5 3/4 oz, and measured 21 1/4 inches in length. Grandparents are Earlene and Tom Schmieding of Marietta and Fred and Phyllis VanHoorn of Milbank.