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January 7, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment ._ButNot "" JIA|! porg00fen.F -t t no'tqutm ®  i'neLpTop Ill 1838, a new Los Angeles Ordinance "  --t ? required men to obtain a permit before i   serenading a woman, t ! In 1836 , health experts petitioned Congress to prohibit the manufacture, importation and sale of cigarettes. A Senate Committee, while agreeing that cigarettes were a public health hazard, determined that only the states had authority to act. In 1667, Paris established the world's first police force. In 1946, the world's first all-electronic computer was unveiled at the University of Pennsylvania's Moore School of Electrical Engineering. The Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer -ENIAC for short - weighed 30 tons and stood ao feet tall. Design a flag contest for County Historical While the Board .of Directors at the Big Stone County Historical Society Museum worked on the improvements made on the grounds, they received a donation of another flag pole. A suggestion was made to design a flag pertinent to Big Stone county. i All residents of Big Stone County are encouraged to send in their flag design entries of what is important in Big Stone county. Deadline for entries is March 1, 2003. They may be sent or dropped off at the Museum at Hilltop. Prizes will be awarded the winner (or winners if portions of sepai'ate entries are used). Make history happen by entering this contest and designing a flag for Big Stone County! ulll TUBBS SOFT WATER • Drinking Water syst00s:+:: +,: • Iron Removal Systems • Salt Delivery Appleton, MN Phone 289-1999 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII JUST-IN • -Hot Cereals Leather Billfolds - 10 Reg. +29-$39 • Primo "Hearty *Chips/Snacks (Men's & Women's) Soups" -Arts/Crafts & -Medicines -Spices School Supplies *Body Spray & *Tool Department -Cleaning Supplies Shower Gel 8oz & Much, Much More *Perfumes ii tl ii ii i i ii i i Gospel .Jubilee! Sunday, Jan. 12 Central United Methodist Church 6:30 p.m. • Fellowship Hall Join us for an evening of inspirational singing and entertainment FEATURING: God's+Country...Vocal & Instrumental The Dialtones Quartet...Vocal Harmony The Melody Kings...Vocal, Instrumental & Inspirational Reading SPECIAL GUEST:. The Norwegian Singing Cowboy from Alexandria, MN Free Will Offering Lunch Served During The Performance I I I I I Ill II "Circle of Pride" awarded to Cenex C-Store Extension report I Kirby Hettver Regional Extension Educator General Livestock-Ag Production Systems Stevens County Morris, MN 56267 320/589-7423 IMPORTANCE OF COMPREHENSIVE MARKETING PLAN Last time I sat down to write you, I I period that offered cattle producers to lock in prot'its for operations utilizing yearling feeders. This research included the years 1990-1999 and broke the data down by month. For example, the average number of days that producers could lock in profits for cattle harvested in March was 90 as compared to 42 for those cattle harvested in the July time frame. Now that we have brushed over discussed the comprehensive marketing plan for grain and livestock producers. Since that time, the commodity market has offered some opportunities to h e d g e commodities at a profitable level. importance of a how timing influences the profitability of cattle feeding operations, let's examine what tools can help us attain those profitable levels. Again, Dr. Lawrence has looked into the tools afforded to cattle producers. Lawrence evaluated six price risk strategies including: cash sales, Futures, 50 percent Futures and some options strategies. After analyzing data from a 1 4-year period (January 1987 through December 2000), the cash sales strategy provided the highest average return with the 50 percent cash - 50 In particular, the cattle market has offered market levels that could allow producers to lock in profits that have not been seen in quite some time. Now that advantageous pricing levels are present, how do we proceed from here? Many producers have asked, "How should we lock in profits?" Others have simply asked if they should use the "board" (in this case referring to the Chicago Mercantile Exchange) or use some other type of price discovery. I have taken the opportunity to look at some research that offers some insight as to which price risk management technique may or may not work for you. Before we look at the "tools" we can use to offset price risk, let us first take a look at profitability and how often it is offered in the cattle industry. According to Dr. John Lawrence, Extension livestock economist and director of the Iowa Beef Center, "there are certain months (March and April) that generate a breakeven or better hedge year after year. June, July, August, and December, however, have lower chances." Lawrence's research looked Cenex, a division of CHS Cooperatives St. Paul, awarded our Ortonville Cenex convenience-store, with special "Circle of Pride" convenience-store recognition for exceeding standards related to retail image, cleanliness, and customer service. Ortonville's C-Store will receive special recognition within a variety of Cenex and CHS Cooperatives publications, at annual meeting, and on various company web sites. "We're very proud of Ortonville, and we hope to see the number of "Circle of Pride" award winners grow every year," said Darin Hunhoff, at the number of days within a feeding marketing manager for retail development and refined fuels at " percent Futures offering the second highest. HOWEVER, using the cash market for price discovery also provides one with the most risk. When evaluating the frequency of returns, we observe that utilizing a Futures hedge and/or a 50 percent cash - 50 percent Futures, provide the greatest return between breakeven and $2.50/cwt. Now that I have everyone thoroughly confused, I'll try and summarize for you. Although research shows that cattle producers would get the greatest return if selling in the cash market, they are also at the greatest risk for a significant loss. Using Futures or a combination of 50 percent Futures and 50 percent cash in this research allowed producers to offset risk more effectively and reduce their price risk exposure in years when feeding cattle was not profitable. The question producers must ask themselves is, "Can I survive those bad years for slightly more profit in the good ones?" Kirbey Hettver is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in General Livestock serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. Cenex. The Cenex convenience-store chain, comprised of CENEX®/AMPRIDE® convenience stores, is now the 16th largest in the United States. At the core of the "Circle of Pride" award is a mystery shopper visit program. Stores had to achieve a score of 98% on the independent "Customer Service Audit," and meet all image requirements, to receive this first time award. Every one of the 1,200 convenience stores, in Cenex's 28-state territory, was covertly shopped and graded in a customer service audit performed by an independent, third party consulting firm. Everyone at our store is thrilled to receive this Circle of Pride award. It is a compliment to everyone, from the newest employee to our management staff, and that extends to the community, because that's where we find such great, hard working people," exclaims Manager Kim Sykora. "Who wouldn't be proud to be one in a select group of convenience- stores spread over half of the U.S., to receive an award for image, quality, cleanliness, and customer service? It's something we strive to instill in our employees from the very beginning, and it's gratifying to see that it paid off," Kim added. ........ Library corner i i ONCE AGAIN .. • MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Ronaid & Mary Duros Charlie Radermacher Fern Marohl Connie Propst Karon Giese Lucille Nelson Centennial Group Beth Swezey Marjorie Parker Pastor Bob Gravley Dana Boldenow Gene Anderson Alice Eilingson Velinda Zemple Eivin Randall Karen Hardwick Donald Nelson Bill Nelson Vivian Hudson Rep. Doug Peterson Mike Abraham Marilyn Athey Dale Athey Teresa Athey Les Athey Mike Dorry Sara Reinke A! & Lisa Ross Jerome & Dean Schuelke Sue Christensen Gerhardt Karels llll "  S ..... I I i II I II III ++--" - . ....... , : • .•  +++ + . :The library hours are Monday - stster's approa+hitt+ wedding nulls + r+ Thursday 12 - 8 p.m. and Friday and to which her mother strongly objects. + Sarday 10 - 3 p.m. ' New in Inspiration is "chicken Soup for the Christian Woman's Soul". Shares inspirational stories of women from a range of denominations who found strength in their faith during painful challenges, in a collection that follows such themes as friendship healing, mak!ng a difference, and family life. New in General Fiction is Thomas Kinkade and Katherine Spencer's "Home Song: A Cape Light Novel". Finding herself pulled in every direction with no room for her own dreams and goals, Cape Light mayor Emily Warwick struggles to balance town conflicts, the local election, and a family feud between her mother and sister, a situation exacerbated by her New in Historical Fiction is James Lee Burke's "'White Doves at Morning". Despite their misgivings about "the Cause", Willie Burke and his best friends, three young men from New Iberia, Louisiana, enlist in the Confederate Army and head off to war, in a novel that reflects the events and personalities of the Civil War from a Southern perspective and is drawn from the author's own family history. New in Romance is Sandra Brown's "Rana Look". Tired of being treated as a commodity, Rana Ramsey, a top fashion model, decides to escape the limelight and assume a new identity in a small Texas town, where she meets handsome quarterback Trent Gamblin. J INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS!I[ ORTONVILLE, MN HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-5PM PHONE (320) 839-2653 25 LB. BEEF BUNDLE 20 LB. PORK BUNDLE $49.95 ;34.95 Pioneer's Own - Per Lb. SUMMER SAUSAGE ............... $2.79 Per Lb. DEU TURKEY ......... 82.99 LOCALLY GROWN BEEF - Per Lb. QUARTERS OR SIDES ............... S 1.49 Locally Grown -Per Lb. HALF A HOG ................. 89 € Per Lb WHOLE FRYER CHICKENS ...................................... : ........... 69 € 1/8, 1/4 or 1/2 Live Weight - Per Lb BUFFALO MEAT ............................................................. S 1•00 LET US CATER YOUR EVENT/ Reunions * Anniversaries * Weddings • Special Gatherings f The Ortonville Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) **.De JAMES D. KAERCHER Publisher/Managing Editor Editor and Advertising Sales ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition Superv EMILEE OKESON Compositor/Receptionist ARDIE ECKARDT Reporter/Photographer O BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Jan. 7, 2003 Vol. 84; No. Continuing the ORTONVILLE JOURNAL ST, = Published Every Tuesday at 29 2nd St. N.W, Ortonville, MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortonville, MinneS( SUBSCRIPTION RATES $30.00 per year in Big Stone, Lac  Parle, Traverse and Swift Counti Minnesota, Grant and Roberts Cou in South Dakota. $34.00 for all o counties in Minnesota and South Dak˘ All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address changes The Ortonville Independent, Box 3 Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE - ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE BASED A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE DATE- Big Stone, Lac qul Parle, Traver˘ Swift Counties in Minnesota and Grant and Roberts In South February ........... 3000 August .............. 1! March ................ 2750 September ........ 1: April .................. 25.00 October ............. tl May ................... 22.50 November ........... ; June .................. 20,00 July ................... 17.50 Januar ALL OTHERS IN MINN. AND SO. OA February ........... 34.00 August .............. 17. + May ................... 25.58 November ........... 8{ June .................. 22.72 December ........... 5.1 July ................... 19.88 January ............. 2r; ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MINN. AND SO. DAK. February ........... 38.00 August .............. 19. I March ................ 34.87 September ........ 15J April .................. 31.70 October ............. 12J May ................... 28.53 November ........... g! June .................. 2536 December ........... July ................... 22.19 January ............... ' "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FOR ERROI l-:Publisher shall not be liable for sl chances or typographical errors not lessen the va ue of an advert sere ThO Publisher's liability for other errorl omissions in connection with an ad tisement is strictly limited to publicatior the advertisement in any subseq# issue or the refund of any monies paid the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be too late to classify.) OFFICE HOURS  Monday: 8 AM-5 PM Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 pI A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 PM A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM Holidays may affect office hours. LETTERS POLICY Letters to the editor discussing c munity issues are encouraged. L4 writers should be aware that Independent reserves the right to and/or condense letters for print, isaper also reserves the right not to I h letters that are unsuitable or for w it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain the 3rinted or typed name. s= address and telephone Addresses and telephone numbers not be published. Letter writers are asked selves to one letter per month. keep letter bdef, perferably not over words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independent determining what is advertising is news is based on one sire It an individual business or zation charges for admission to an for an tem or for a serv ce, it will be !sidered advertising. In other you charge, we charge. Advertising is paper. Without it a newspaper cease to exist. The money a receives for subscriptions and paper sales is used to, pay for the ink 11 paper used in prod. ucmg the no longer does so oecause of increases. It still covers the and e small portion of the Advertising to a newspaper is crops and livestock to farmers; meat products to the grocer; dresses, and underwear to the soft-line arl plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those items, articular business would not be in noes. ADS: We reserve the right to refuse advertising without obligation to our decision. POLICIES: A News: Our goal is to report the fully and accurately as possible. staff's opinions will appear only opinion page. A Editorials: Opinions published on mage, whether locally written or m other sources s intended late thinking and discussion among readers• Opinions expressed by tor are her own and of other staff members. O expressed in items from other tions may be contradictory to own views, but are offered for their eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 or fax :' 839-3761 to sifted Ortonville Inde S/ Page 4 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan. 7, k Editorial comment ._ButNot "" JIA|! porg00fen.F -t t no'tqutm ®  i'neLpTop Ill 1838, a new Los Angeles Ordinance "  --t ? required men to obtain a permit before i   serenading a woman, t ! In 1836 , health experts petitioned Congress to prohibit the manufacture, importation and sale of cigarettes. A Senate Committee, while agreeing that cigarettes were a public health hazard, determined that only the states had authority to act. In 1667, Paris established the world's first police force. In 1946, the world's first all-electronic computer was unveiled at the University of Pennsylvania's Moore School of Electrical Engineering. The Electronic Numerical Integrator And Computer -ENIAC for short - weighed 30 tons and stood ao feet tall. Design a flag contest for County Historical While the Board .of Directors at the Big Stone County Historical Society Museum worked on the improvements made on the grounds, they received a donation of another flag pole. A suggestion was made to design a flag pertinent to Big Stone county. i All residents of Big Stone County are encouraged to send in their flag design entries of what is important in Big Stone county. Deadline for entries is March 1, 2003. They may be sent or dropped off at the Museum at Hilltop. Prizes will be awarded the winner (or winners if portions of sepai'ate entries are used). Make history happen by entering this contest and designing a flag for Big Stone County! ulll TUBBS SOFT WATER • Drinking Water syst00s:+:: +,: • Iron Removal Systems • Salt Delivery Appleton, MN Phone 289-1999 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII JUST-IN • -Hot Cereals Leather Billfolds - 10 Reg. +29-$39 • Primo "Hearty *Chips/Snacks (Men's & Women's) Soups" -Arts/Crafts & -Medicines -Spices School Supplies *Body Spray & *Tool Department -Cleaning Supplies Shower Gel 8oz & Much, Much More *Perfumes ii tl ii ii i i ii i i Gospel .Jubilee! Sunday, Jan. 12 Central United Methodist Church 6:30 p.m. • Fellowship Hall Join us for an evening of inspirational singing and entertainment FEATURING: God's+Country...Vocal & Instrumental The Dialtones Quartet...Vocal Harmony The Melody Kings...Vocal, Instrumental & Inspirational Reading SPECIAL GUEST:. The Norwegian Singing Cowboy from Alexandria, MN Free Will Offering Lunch Served During The Performance I I I I I Ill II "Circle of Pride" awarded to Cenex C-Store Extension report I Kirby Hettver Regional Extension Educator General Livestock-Ag Production Systems Stevens County Morris, MN 56267 320/589-7423 IMPORTANCE OF COMPREHENSIVE MARKETING PLAN Last time I sat down to write you, I I period that offered cattle producers to lock in prot'its for operations utilizing yearling feeders. This research included the years 1990-1999 and broke the data down by month. For example, the average number of days that producers could lock in profits for cattle harvested in March was 90 as compared to 42 for those cattle harvested in the July time frame. Now that we have brushed over discussed the comprehensive marketing plan for grain and livestock producers. Since that time, the commodity market has offered some opportunities to h e d g e commodities at a profitable level. importance of a how timing influences the profitability of cattle feeding operations, let's examine what tools can help us attain those profitable levels. Again, Dr. Lawrence has looked into the tools afforded to cattle producers. Lawrence evaluated six price risk strategies including: cash sales, Futures, 50 percent Futures and some options strategies. After analyzing data from a 1 4-year period (January 1987 through December 2000), the cash sales strategy provided the highest average return with the 50 percent cash - 50 In particular, the cattle market has offered market levels that could allow producers to lock in profits that have not been seen in quite some time. Now that advantageous pricing levels are present, how do we proceed from here? Many producers have asked, "How should we lock in profits?" Others have simply asked if they should use the "board" (in this case referring to the Chicago Mercantile Exchange) or use some other type of price discovery. I have taken the opportunity to look at some research that offers some insight as to which price risk management technique may or may not work for you. Before we look at the "tools" we can use to offset price risk, let us first take a look at profitability and how often it is offered in the cattle industry. According to Dr. John Lawrence, Extension livestock economist and director of the Iowa Beef Center, "there are certain months (March and April) that generate a breakeven or better hedge year after year. June, July, August, and December, however, have lower chances." Lawrence's research looked Cenex, a division of CHS Cooperatives St. Paul, awarded our Ortonville Cenex convenience-store, with special "Circle of Pride" convenience-store recognition for exceeding standards related to retail image, cleanliness, and customer service. Ortonville's C-Store will receive special recognition within a variety of Cenex and CHS Cooperatives publications, at annual meeting, and on various company web sites. "We're very proud of Ortonville, and we hope to see the number of "Circle of Pride" award winners grow every year," said Darin Hunhoff, at the number of days within a feeding marketing manager for retail development and refined fuels at " percent Futures offering the second highest. HOWEVER, using the cash market for price discovery also provides one with the most risk. When evaluating the frequency of returns, we observe that utilizing a Futures hedge and/or a 50 percent cash - 50 percent Futures, provide the greatest return between breakeven and $2.50/cwt. Now that I have everyone thoroughly confused, I'll try and summarize for you. Although research shows that cattle producers would get the greatest return if selling in the cash market, they are also at the greatest risk for a significant loss. Using Futures or a combination of 50 percent Futures and 50 percent cash in this research allowed producers to offset risk more effectively and reduce their price risk exposure in years when feeding cattle was not profitable. The question producers must ask themselves is, "Can I survive those bad years for slightly more profit in the good ones?" Kirbey Hettver is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in General Livestock serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. Cenex. The Cenex convenience-store chain, comprised of CENEX®/AMPRIDE® convenience stores, is now the 16th largest in the United States. At the core of the "Circle of Pride" award is a mystery shopper visit program. Stores had to achieve a score of 98% on the independent "Customer Service Audit," and meet all image requirements, to receive this first time award. Every one of the 1,200 convenience stores, in Cenex's 28-state territory, was covertly shopped and graded in a customer service audit performed by an independent, third party consulting firm. Everyone at our store is thrilled to receive this Circle of Pride award. It is a compliment to everyone, from the newest employee to our management staff, and that extends to the community, because that's where we find such great, hard working people," exclaims Manager Kim Sykora. "Who wouldn't be proud to be one in a select group of convenience- stores spread over half of the U.S., to receive an award for image, quality, cleanliness, and customer service? It's something we strive to instill in our employees from the very beginning, and it's gratifying to see that it paid off," Kim added. ........ Library corner i i ONCE AGAIN .. • MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Ronaid & Mary Duros Charlie Radermacher Fern Marohl Connie Propst Karon Giese Lucille Nelson Centennial Group Beth Swezey Marjorie Parker Pastor Bob Gravley Dana Boldenow Gene Anderson Alice Eilingson Velinda Zemple Eivin Randall Karen Hardwick Donald Nelson Bill Nelson Vivian Hudson Rep. Doug Peterson Mike Abraham Marilyn Athey Dale Athey Teresa Athey Les Athey Mike Dorry Sara Reinke A! & Lisa Ross Jerome & Dean Schuelke Sue Christensen Gerhardt Karels llll "  S ..... I I i II I II III ++--" - . ....... , : • .•  +++ + . :The library hours are Monday - stster's approa+hitt+ wedding nulls + r+ Thursday 12 - 8 p.m. and Friday and to which her mother strongly objects. + Sarday 10 - 3 p.m. ' New in Inspiration is "chicken Soup for the Christian Woman's Soul". Shares inspirational stories of women from a range of denominations who found strength in their faith during painful challenges, in a collection that follows such themes as friendship healing, mak!ng a difference, and family life. New in General Fiction is Thomas Kinkade and Katherine Spencer's "Home Song: A Cape Light Novel". Finding herself pulled in every direction with no room for her own dreams and goals, Cape Light mayor Emily Warwick struggles to balance town conflicts, the local election, and a family feud between her mother and sister, a situation exacerbated by her New in Historical Fiction is James Lee Burke's "'White Doves at Morning". Despite their misgivings about "the Cause", Willie Burke and his best friends, three young men from New Iberia, Louisiana, enlist in the Confederate Army and head off to war, in a novel that reflects the events and personalities of the Civil War from a Southern perspective and is drawn from the author's own family history. New in Romance is Sandra Brown's "Rana Look". Tired of being treated as a commodity, Rana Ramsey, a top fashion model, decides to escape the limelight and assume a new identity in a small Texas town, where she meets handsome quarterback Trent Gamblin. J INDEPENDENT WANT ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS!I[ ORTONVILLE, MN HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-5PM PHONE (320) 839-2653 25 LB. BEEF BUNDLE 20 LB. PORK BUNDLE $49.95 ;34.95 Pioneer's Own - Per Lb. SUMMER SAUSAGE ............... $2.79 Per Lb. DEU TURKEY ......... 82.99 LOCALLY GROWN BEEF - Per Lb. QUARTERS OR SIDES ............... S 1.49 Locally Grown -Per Lb. HALF A HOG ................. 89 € Per Lb WHOLE FRYER CHICKENS ...................................... : ........... 69 € 1/8, 1/4 or 1/2 Live Weight - Per Lb BUFFALO MEAT ............................................................. S 1•00 LET US CATER YOUR EVENT/ Reunions * Anniversaries * Weddings • Special Gatherings f The Ortonville Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) **.De JAMES D. KAERCHER Publisher/Managing Editor Editor and Advertising Sales ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition Superv EMILEE OKESON Compositor/Receptionist ARDIE ECKARDT Reporter/Photographer O BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Jan. 7, 2003 Vol. 84; No. Continuing the ORTONVILLE JOURNAL ST, = Published Every Tuesday at 29 2nd St. N.W, Ortonville, MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortonville, MinneS( SUBSCRIPTION RATES $30.00 per year in Big Stone, Lac  Parle, Traverse and Swift Counti Minnesota, Grant and Roberts Cou in South Dakota. $34.00 for all o counties in Minnesota and South Dak˘ All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address changes The Ortonville Independent, Box 3 Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE - ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE BASED A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE DATE- Big Stone, Lac qul Parle, Traver˘ Swift Counties in Minnesota and Grant and Roberts In South February ........... 3000 August .............. 1! March ................ 2750 September ........ 1: April .................. 25.00 October ............. tl May ................... 22.50 November ........... ; June .................. 20,00 July ................... 17.50 Januar ALL OTHERS IN MINN. AND SO. OA February ........... 34.00 August .............. 17. + May ................... 25.58 November ........... 8{ June .................. 22.72 December ........... 5.1 July ................... 19.88 January ............. 2r; ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MINN. AND SO. DAK. February ........... 38.00 August .............. 19. I March ................ 34.87 September ........ 15J April .................. 31.70 October ............. 12J May ................... 28.53 November ........... g! June .................. 2536 December ........... July ................... 22.19 January ............... ' "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FOR ERROI l-:Publisher shall not be liable for sl chances or typographical errors not lessen the va ue of an advert sere ThO Publisher's liability for other errorl omissions in connection with an ad tisement is strictly limited to publicatior the advertisement in any subseq# issue or the refund of any monies paid the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be too late to classify.) OFFICE HOURS  Monday: 8 AM-5 PM Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 pI A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1-5 PM A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM Holidays may affect office hours. LETTERS POLICY Letters to the editor discussing c munity issues are encouraged. L4 writers should be aware that Independent reserves the right to and/or condense letters for print, isaper also reserves the right not to I h letters that are unsuitable or for w it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain the 3rinted or typed name. s= address and telephone Addresses and telephone numbers not be published. Letter writers are asked selves to one letter per month. keep letter bdef, perferably not over words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independent determining what is advertising is news is based on one sire It an individual business or zation charges for admission to an for an tem or for a serv ce, it will be !sidered advertising. In other you charge, we charge. Advertising is paper. Without it a newspaper cease to exist. The money a receives for subscriptions and paper sales is used to, pay for the ink 11 paper used in prod. ucmg the no longer does so oecause of increases. It still covers the and e small portion of the Advertising to a newspaper is crops and livestock to farmers; meat products to the grocer; dresses, and underwear to the soft-line arl plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those items, articular business would not be in noes. ADS: We reserve the right to refuse advertising without obligation to our decision. POLICIES: A News: Our goal is to report the fully and accurately as possible. staff's opinions will appear only opinion page. A Editorials: Opinions published on mage, whether locally written or m other sources s intended late thinking and discussion among readers• Opinions expressed by tor are her own and of other staff members. O expressed in items from other tions may be contradictory to own views, but are offered for their eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 or fax :' 839-3761 to sifted Ortonville Inde S/ Page 4 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan. 7, k