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January 12, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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January 12, 1922
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT QRTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1922 NUMBER 36 CHARGES TO CAPITALISTS Co-operative Ass&apos;n. Speaks At Meet- of Local Membersm Unity. paralysis, thru which is passing at tins time, is result of the action o the class, in the opinion of J. director o1' the Eqmty Co- Exchange, of St. Paul, who principal speaker at the :meet- stockholders of the local held in this city last Satur- one of the highest an- of this class made the state- boastfully, " said Mr. Kelly, had accomplished in the way more in one year during than was accomplished in ten fter the close of the civil war." statement Mr. Kelly believed and the cause-of this deflation, Pinion is not only perfectly ap- es regards agricultural inter- as regards every other busi- industry as well. the result of this, Mr. Kelly out that eight million men the streets of American idle and mostly starving. is not because of high he stated, nor because of tax but because thru of deflation the farmer has )acitated from buying. conditions are apparent to in Washington and ac- they have appropriated one to rehabilitate declin- agriculture, Mr. Kelly said, and called conferences monthly past six months. The most conference is expected in called by President Harding 14. that when a person-lost that the best place to look where it was lost, the speaker, the undoing of the mis- has been done and gave the united action of far- support of co-operative or- with the inevitable re- they secure a living price products. bills have been introduced in- said Mr. Kelly, "having aims the establishment of a price, or in other words the cost to the farmer plus a rofit. It is believed that of agriculture and as well should support leas.,, Mr. Kelly's talk, Mr. A. was called upon to explain of the newly organized body as "The Big Stone County Co- Livestock Association,' Was perfected recently for the of securing financial aid thl Finance Corporation. TOWNSHIP BOYS TO COMEDY AT ORPHEUM comedy, "When Smith Out," will be given on Fri- January 13 at the Orpheum in this city by eight young Malta township. crowd which greeted the they staged their show at Friday night prompted engage the Orpheum, and of those who withes- COmedy there it is not unlike- many people from the north the county will again attend is shown here. three acts there will be between acts in the which drew much at the Clinton engagement. for the show which starts eight o'clock, are set at and 25c for children. ; 0000cE-00o00vzRs DUO, JAN 17 Circuit Lyceum Bur- resent Miss Arual Lebby lma Russel, two dainty art- talent in musical and nes, in a program at the Stone City, on Tues- efforts of the Tennessee order. Miss Lebby extensively in eastern a.nd filled special engage: wl h the Boston Symphony RUssel is the possesor of a and a most radiant say noted critics. 11 Pound Pike. near the K. C. Han- north of town, on Monday, landed a pike weigh- and three quarters pounds, ; that has been brought thru ice this season. Besides Pike, those who have been report good luck in other species of the. finny as bass and Imlh. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH ELECTS OFFICERS MONDAY The annual ,meeting of the First Congregational church of this city was held at the Odd Fellows Hall, Monday evening with about forty-five members in attendance. Reports of the church clerk and treasurer of both the church and the Ladies' Aid were read and approved, after which the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Mary A. Mogren, clerk; A. L. Moore, treasur- er; Mrs. J. Karn, Mrs. Gee. Shuma- ker, Mm. H. W. Palm, Dr. C C Olson and R. F. Walker, trustees; F. Shu- maker, honorary deacon; Henry Ea- ton and R. F. Walker, deacons; Mrs. Ed. Shult and' Mrs. J. Karn, deacon- esses, Edna Shumaker, Music direc- tor; Belva Kaercher, assistant music director, and Martha Rothwell, Sun- day school superintendent. A new church constitution was read . and adopted. Following the election of officers Rev. Paul J. Bockoven, the pastor. gave an interesting address In the course of discussion which followed it was brought to the attention of the meeting that there had been some skepticism as to the continued activi- ties of the church with a slight degree of hesitancy on the part of some to affiliate themselves with the church for this reason. This was overcome, however, by the report which showed the church to be in excellent financial condition with no indebtedness and a balance on hand. Members of the Ladies' Aid were paid a compliment for their work in continuing to conduct food sales, and taking active interest during the time when fhe church was without a pastor, which is largely responsible for the present standing of the affairs of the church Thru their efforts they suc- ceeded in paying off a mortgage on the parsonage amounting to $686.00; decorating, paintin llumbing, on the house, $346.00. besides minor items, the total paymentsamounting to $1,- 135.69. Increased membership and freedom from debt has been realized in a re- markably short period of time and the progress of the church during the coming year, with Rev. Paul Beck- oven as pastor, in all likelihood will continue. J. F. Reed Elected Farm Bureau Head Lac Qui Parle County Farmer Chosen On First Ballot At Annual Convention. J. F. Reed, Lae qul Parle county farmer, is the new president of the Minnesota Farm Bureau federation. He was elected on the first ballot in the third annual convention of the federation at the state capitol. F. E. Lammers of Lakeville, Dakota county, was elected vice-president. V.. I. Anderson of Wheaten, treasurer of the state federation was re-elected without opposition. New members of the executive board of the federation are M. L. War- ner of Warren, Marshall county, elec- ted for a term of three years, and Mrs. E. V. Ripley of Park Rapids, Hubbard county, for one year. Thom- as E. Cashman of Owatonna was re- elected to the board for a three year term, and J. D. Pyle of Madison, Lac qui Parle county, J. J. Jacobsen of Bowlus, Morrison county, and Gee. Freeman of Zumbrota, Goodhue coun- ty, also were re-elected. Mr. Jacob- son and Mr. Freeman are to serve two year terms, and Mr. Pyle a one year term; the terms of these three direc- tors were decided by lot. The new president of the Minneso- ta Farm Bureau federation is 58 years old; he was born in Marshall county, Iowa, and came to Minnesota in 1893. He owns and actually runs two farms in Lac qui Parle county, one of 36 acres, and the other a half section. The western line of the farm on which Fhe lives forms the western boundary of the state. Because the postoffice at Gary, just over the line in South Dakota, serves two Minnesota town- ships, Mr. Reed's nailing address is Gary, S. D. "Any farmer would be unresponsive indeed if he did not appreciate the honor you have conferred on me," Mr. Reed said in his speech to the dele- gates, accepting the presidency. "I believe we are entering a period of great importance for the farm bu- reau of this state. I am willing to devote What poor ability I may have to further the organization. "I be of you your earnest co-opera- tion and help. I expect every director a]ad every farm bureau member pres- ent to o home with the idea of a more solid organization. "Azriculture i passing thrn its reatest crisis. If we are going to lift the pall of gloom that is over the farmers now, we must bring to this work stout hearts, clear heads and wil- ling hands. It is a l#eculiar condition of affairs that the farmer always has been subject to conditions over which he has had no control. He has had to haul his crops to market and huts- (Continued on page 8) Co-Operative Livestock Association Perfected Better System of Credit For BEARDSLEY AND GRACEVILLE ON LEGION B. B. SCHEDULE Farmer Possible Now Un- der New Organization Is Claimed. Organization of the Big Stone County Co-operative Livestock Asso- ciation was completed Wednesday af- ternoon at a meeting held in the of- rice of A. B. Kacrcher & Co., here Ar- ticles of incorporation which had been previously drawn were signed by the incorporators and the new institution, incorporated with a capital of $100,- 000.00, put well on its way. The main purpose of the corpora- tion will be to procure a better system of credit for the farmer, an opinion having been received from Ger- ard C. Henderson, general counsel of the War Finance Corpora- tion at Washington, to the effect that the government money could be loaned to such a corporation, for ad- vances made for agricultural purposes. Mr. Henderson's letter reads in art: "I see no reason why a corporation such as you propose (o form, wlth a paid-in capital of $100,000 should not be legally eligible to obtain advances from the War Finance Corporation. We are not making advances to co- operative associations, except upon the security of negotiable public ware- house receipts representing such com- modities as cotton, wheat, etc. In view of the substantial capital which your company will have we could, however, recognize it as a financing institution under Section 26 of the War Finance Corporation act." The section referred to says: "Whenever in this act the words, "bank, banker or trust company' are used, they shall be deemed to include any reputable and responsible financing institution in- corporated under the laws of any state or of the United States with resources adequate to the undertaking contemplated." The new institution will function oft practically the same plan as the Fed- eral Land Banlcs, which have proven (By Heck) Fans here are assured of two royal battles in basketball on Monday and Wednesday of next week when Beards- ley and Graceville come here to con- quer the Legion quint. Beardsley is credited with one vic- tory over Ortonville so far this sea- son and will present the same strong line-up. Their team is identically the same as that which won the high school district championship in 1915- 14L Since then they have been intact, playing as an independent team Altho defeated by the Legion team early in the season a hard game can be expected from the Graceville K. C's. They are never lacking in fighting spirit. Last week Beardsley barely won over them by a three-point mar- gin. This evening the locals are at Ben- son to take the district laurels from last year's chmmps. Benson is just as strong, if not stronger, than last year, and have turned back all comers with the exception of the Wildcats. PACKED HOUSE GREETING EVANGELIST DAY AT M. E. C. -Space at the Methodist church in i this city during the past week has l been at a premmm. On Wednesday night many were turned away on ac- count of lack of room. Evangelist Day, who has conducted a series of meetings here has .met with a capacity house most every evening and at the 'present time interest ]s at "high tide." A large number of young people form the choir which is an added at- traction, together with the special numbers by the children's chorus. Rev. Day's sermon subject for the remainder of the series follows: Thursday, "What has become of Hell." Friday, "You Can't Get In" These services at 7:45 p. m. Sunday, 10:30 a. m., "The Jewels of Jesus;" 12:00 m., Sunday school; 3:00 p. m., "The Withered Hand;" 7:00 p. an absolute success. Far, hers desiring m., Epworth League. Devotional; 7:45 loans upon chattel securities, ap-._  ,,v^.  t,^^_a, .p. m., . uu ,,," What About it ?" proved by the loan board are reqaireu| ....... to take a small amount of stock m',   [ et'a the company, the amount of stock 'to]-] PN.Qf T be limited to 10 shares to each mere-I k-F--- ffi --vw. 0 ber, no member to have over one vote, regardless of the amount of stock owned. The Board of Directors have the power to accept or reject applica tions for stock. The following well known citizens of the county signed as incorporators: Luke J. Keating, Lewis A. Lien and Henry Heidecker of Graceville; A. B. Kaercher, Wayne Kelly, Geier Bros., W. H. Matthews. F. L. Cliff, Dr. F. W. Dunn and William Wellendorf of Ortonville; Earl M. Johnson, Jacob Frey, O. J. Loftus, Thee. Hundeby, Mrs. Wm. M. Moroney and K. G. Kundson of Beardsley; and Chas. A. Matthews, and T. J. Anderson of Clin- ton. Officel elected were: Luke J. Keating, Gracevi!le, president; Cha. A. Matthews. Clinton, first vice-presi- dent; Earl Johnson of Beardsley, sec- ond vice-president; and A. B. Kaer- chef of this city, secretary-treasurer. Those in attendance at the meeting were very enthusiastic over the possi- bilities of the new company, and ex- pressed the belief that with the proper support, a great deal of good can be done for the agricultural industry in the county. Farmers and business men of Madi- son, hearing of the formation of the association, are to hold a mass meet- ing in that city this afternoon at two o'clock, with the idea of adopting the plan there. Luke J. Keating, and A. B. Kaercher will attend the Madison meeting. Business men who wish to help the farmer solve his present problem, with the consequent stimulation nf business in general, are urged by the incorporators of the new institution to investigate and get behind the movement with all possible energy. Minstrel Jan. 19-20 FIRE DEPARTMENT PLANS TO PURCHASE PULMOTOR Addition of a pulmotor to the pres- ent equipment o the city Fire De- partrnent is expected within a short time, providing one-half of the cost of same is met by the city council, it was decided at the annual meeting held on Tuesday night. A committee was appoinedo bring the matter before the council at their next regular meeting and also to secure the removal of the fire siren front its present location on the fire hall to either the county jail site or the power house. Deflectors were added to the siren in the hopes that the sound waves would be carried to all parts of the city but no improvement has been no- ticed. By placing the instrument on the power house it is believed that this will be overcome as the location is much lower than where it is now. Officers elected were Wayne Kelly, chief; August Lindert, assistant chief; E. N. Sehoen, cretary, and Ch Scofleld  ta'amn'or. LOCAL BOWLING TEAM WIN CLOSE GAME WITH MILBANK With but twenty pins in their fa- vor the local bowling team annexed another victory in the contest played on the Palace alleys here with Mil- bank on Friday evening of last week. This was the third victory for the Ortonville team, having won previ- ously over Madison on two occasions. A return game will be played with Milbank on their alleys sometime within the next few days, after which it is planned to stage a tournamem in this city. Invitations will be ex- tended to the teams of the adjoining towns and it is expected that a large number will participate. Plans of the local team at the pres- ent time include a trip to Fargo to take part in the Northern Bowling association's tournament at that city which is to be held from January 21 to 29. The score as it stood at the close of the contest with Milbank follows: Milbank Me,tree ........................ 190 191 160 Fairchild 171 165 190 Howe ............................ 224 189 223 Hamon .......................... 188 117 130 Petterman ......... : ........ 201 210 148 Totals ...................... 974 872 851 Total pins .................................... 2697 Ortonville-- Wiley ............................ 225 182 167 Schoen (Bob) ............ 158 201 175 Stucke .......................... 212 178 184 Zwiener. ....................... 150 153 142 Kelly ............................ 192 208 190 Totals ...................... 937 932 858 Total pins .................................... 2717 BUREAU TO GIVE INSITUTES AND SHORT COURSES SOON Arrangements have been made thru the Farm Bureau office to hold a series of five farm institutes and short coures in different parts of the county with- in the next two months, it was an- nounced today by M. P. Roske, county agent. Problems covering the cost of pro- ducing a pound of butterfat, pound of CLUB LEADERS MAKE PLANS .FOR '22 ENCAMPMENT Chautauqua Park Again Se- lected As Meeting Place For Boys' and Girls' Club Work Members. Chautauqua Park, on Big Stone Lake, will again be the meeting place of over three hundred members of the Boys' and Girls' Club Work it was decided at a meeting of club lead- ers of Minnesota and South Dakota held in this city on Friday afternoon. Dates for the 1922 encampment have been set from July 5 to 9, inclusive. "The encampment held at the park last summer was so successful that it has been decided to make it an an- nual event," said Mr. R. A. Gibbs, district club leader, of Morris. Mr. Gibbs represents clubs in nineteen counties in this state This action met with the approval of Mr. Valen- tine of Brookings, assistant state club leader for South Dakota, who was al so in attendance at the meeting. This encampment will be conducted at absolutely cost to the boys and girls, Mr. Gibbs explained, besides in- structions in club projects, such as garment making, cooking and garden- ing for the girls and beef and pork production, judging work and grow- ing crops for the boys, the encamp- ment furnishes them a splendid oppor- tunity for recreation. A part of each afternoon is give to play, such as swimming contests and baseball games, and the meeting coming at a time when most of the boys and girls are otherwise confined to hone work serves a two-fold pur- pose. Instrucgion will be given by club leaders and professors of the Exten- sion DiviSion of both Minnesota and South Dakota. beef or pork, the value of legumes The Program for the 1922 encamp- ment will be gaven out at a later date and soil fertility and other subjects .... " will be dscussed by men who are[..h.e. mP leted. An boy or girl dora club work thoroly competent along these lines. }! ) " , " g %lI[dble to membership m the corn- Every farmer is asked to attend  : " " encampmbdt and Mr Gibbs i these meetings as they promise to bg]:, " " - v " TUcn interested in havin ever oI much alue. . . '. g l girl make apphcatmn thrn Announcements as to dates Will be " " made later. -., /, ODESSA FARMERS' HARDWARE STORE NOW DOING BUSINESS Reorganization of the Odessa Far- mers' Mercantile Conpany, of Odessa, was perfected at a meeting of the stockholders and directors held Fri- day, with the result that the store, which had been,closed for a short time due to abuse.of credit, was reopened on Saturday. Paul" Pinkert, of this city was elec- "Fun-Makers" Working, Hard In Fi- nal Rehearsals To Give Public Real Treat. Determined to put their minstrel show over big, members of Ralph M. Spink Post of the American Legion, are devoting much time in learning their parts amt in rehearsing for the ted president, H. H. Reimt] of Odessa, first public appearance on Friday eve- secretary-treaSurer, and Albert Swan- ning, January 19, at the Orpheum son, Alex Semrau and Simon Karels, theatre in this city, and the assurance directors. Both the president and sec- of every Legion member is given o retary also ate membersof the board the effect that it will be even better of director. than other entertainments which have With the opening of the store un- borne the Legion name. de, the name of Farmers' Hardware Sale or reserved seats starts on and Lumber Company, with Alex Wa- Monday, January 16, at the Gunder- haske as temporary manager, a .mark- ed increase in confidence among the stockholders is said to be voted and the prospects for a healthy business is believed to be good. DRAINAGE DIRECTORS WILL MEET AT MONTE JAN. 18 For the purpose of considering a petition for the construction of dams at the foot of Big Stone Lake, Lac. qui Parle Lake, Redwood Falls, and on the Cottonwood river, a meeting of the directors of the Minnesota Val- ley Drainage and Conservancy Dis- trict has been called at Montevideo on January 18. In addition to taking up the mat- ters mentioned the body will also transact other business. Those who will be at the meeting as directors, are A. B. Kaercher, presi- dent; A. P. Graft, New Ulm, vice- president; S. S. Striker, LeSueur, treasurer, J. H. MacBeth, Mankato, secretary; and O. P. Flaten of Granite Fails. son Drug Store, with the price of ad- mission fixed at 25, 50, and 75c. In order that all .may have the priv- ilege of witnessing the show it was decided to stage it on two evenings. This action was taken because of the theatre having been packed to over- flowing with a one night stand when appearing in "The Windmills of Hol- land," last year. The program with characters, un- der the direction of Dr. E. N. Schoen, follows: First Part-- lnterlocutorEarl W. Miller. Ends, Elmer Hausauer, Ralph Hip- pie, Willard Tweet, Robert Price. ChorusH. N. Tragethon, Ray Gowan, Paul J. Bockoven, Leonard Kollitz, Claud Gowan, J. ,A. Jacobson, Lewis Lundgren, Chester Pflueger, Win. Randall, Walter Elms, Curtis Cele, Joe Petrick. DirectorDr. E. N. Schoen. Second Part--Farce. "THE CRACKED SQUAD" Characters Sargeant Drillem, a sergeant in the U. S. Army, Dick Weed. Miekey Louder ...... Kenneth Cummens Archibald Aloysius Montgomery .... ........................................ Edgar Orion Abraham Washington White ............ ...................................... Arthur Keuhn Yeas Y. Y. Y. Y. Yeysen ................ .......................................... Herb Bolsta Patrick O'Murhpy ................ Gee. Tyler Izzy Cohen ...................... Chic Zwiener M. T. Filbert ....... -. ...... Harry Peterson Silag Corntassel ................ Floyd Atha Orchestra will furnish music. Or- chestration by Mrs. C. A. Zwiener, F. W. Engdahl, Jack Mielke, Ed. Hones Chic Zwiener. Curtain each evening at 8:15. The Yeoman Lodge are planning Masquerade party for their members and friends to be held on their ext meeting night in the Odd Fellows all, Wednesday, January 25. A charge of 40 cents will be made which will include lunch. Lodges Elect Officers. At the joint installation of the Odd Fellows and Rebekahs held" Tuesday evening the following officers were in- stalled by R. F. Walker and Mrs. W. R. Mountford; N. G., U. J. Stotesbery; V. G., David Johnson; secretary, Ed. Shult; treasurer, O. E. Hahn; R. S. N. G., A. H. Sturges; L. S. N. G., C. F. Miller; Warden, C. C. Murphy; Conductor, Sam Arnquist; I. G., Ed. Martinson; O. G., J. P. Johnson; R. S. V. G., H. O. Peterson; L. S. V. G, Ed. Schnieder; R. S. S., C. A. Beard and L. S. S., J. H. Hadley The Re- bekahs were N. G., Linda Wilkins; V. G., Sopha LaCombe; secretary, Mar- tha Rothwell; Ella Sanders, treasurer: warden, Ruth Wilkins; Conductress Nettle Kriesel; Chaplain, Nellie Me- Lane; R. S., Mary Mogren; L. S.. Martha Rothwell; R. S. V. G., Edna Anderson; L. S. V. G., Ethel Vipond; L G., Georgia Mittelstead; O, G., Anna Stutler. county agent or club leader. Equity Decides New Elevator Unnecessary Matters Relative to Solicitation of Stock Fully Discussed By C. B. Swanson. More than 100 farmers were in at- tendmme at the meeting of the Equi- ty Exchange held at the Odd Fel- lows Hall acre last Saturday, which was called for the purpose of explain- ing a misunderstanding on the part of some of the stockholders relating to the erection of a new elevator. C. B. Swanson, department mana- ger, of the Equity of St. Paul, ex- plained in detail the circumstances surrounding the solicitation of stock, which was claimed by some as a mis- representation, giving as a basis for their complaint a representation on the part of the solicitors to the effect i that the ,amount subscribed was to go toward btfilding a new elevator on the ttonville tracks. How the misunderstanding origina- i ted and how it developed was taken up i in detail by Mr. Swanson in a very able manner, with all facts openly .;., discussed. In the face of present conditions and with the view of evident decrease in the production of small grain s han- dled by elevators it was the unani- mous opinion of all present at the meeting that the erection of a new elevator at an approximate expense of $30,000 would mean a Imrden to the farmers that would not be justS- fled and it was shown that the pres- ent facilities are sufficient at last for the time being. J. M. Hegge was elected to atben the annual meeting of theEqulty Ex- change and U. S. Grain Growers a Fargo, with John Heffernon, substi- tute. QUARTER MILE CHANNEL MADE FOR ICE HARVEST The annual harvest of Big Stone Lake ice commenced on Monday with the filling of the local ice houses. To facilitate in the prompt ship- ment of the ice to other points a chan- nel twenty feet in width and one-quar- ter mile long has been made from the loading platform to a point where the ice will be taken from the lake. By the use of this channel it will be possible to keep a continuous flow of ice at the loading elevator and the company wall not be subject to the un- certainty which results when team are depended upon to do the hauling, The channel will permit the Passage of five cakes of ice rhle hy stde The adoption of this method Is the ve1 labest in the ice harvesting THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT QRTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1922 NUMBER 36 CHARGES TO CAPITALISTS Co-operative Ass'n. Speaks At Meet- of Local Membersm Unity. paralysis, thru which is passing at tins time, is result of the action o the class, in the opinion of J. director o1' the Eqmty Co- Exchange, of St. Paul, who principal speaker at the :meet- stockholders of the local held in this city last Satur- one of the highest an- of this class made the state- boastfully, " said Mr. Kelly, had accomplished in the way more in one year during than was accomplished in ten fter the close of the civil war." statement Mr. Kelly believed and the cause-of this deflation, Pinion is not only perfectly ap- es regards agricultural inter- as regards every other busi- industry as well. the result of this, Mr. Kelly out that eight million men the streets of American idle and mostly starving. is not because of high he stated, nor because of tax but because thru of deflation the farmer has )acitated from buying. conditions are apparent to in Washington and ac- they have appropriated one to rehabilitate declin- agriculture, Mr. Kelly said, and called conferences monthly past six months. The most conference is expected in called by President Harding 14. that when a person-lost that the best place to look where it was lost, the speaker, the undoing of the mis- has been done and gave the united action of far- support of co-operative or- with the inevitable re- they secure a living price products. bills have been introduced in- said Mr. Kelly, "having aims the establishment of a price, or in other words the cost to the farmer plus a rofit. It is believed that of agriculture and as well should support leas.,, Mr. Kelly's talk, Mr. A. was called upon to explain of the newly organized body as "The Big Stone County Co- Livestock Association,' Was perfected recently for the of securing financial aid thl Finance Corporation. TOWNSHIP BOYS TO COMEDY AT ORPHEUM comedy, "When Smith Out," will be given on Fri- January 13 at the Orpheum in this city by eight young Malta township. crowd which greeted the they staged their show at Friday night prompted engage the Orpheum, and of those who withes- COmedy there it is not unlike- many people from the north the county will again attend is shown here. three acts there will be between acts in the which drew much at the Clinton engagement. for the show which starts eight o'clock, are set at and 25c for children. ; 0000cE-00o00vzRs DUO, JAN 17 Circuit Lyceum Bur- resent Miss Arual Lebby lma Russel, two dainty art- talent in musical and nes, in a program at the Stone City, on Tues- efforts of the Tennessee order. Miss Lebby extensively in eastern a.nd filled special engage: wl h the Boston Symphony RUssel is the possesor of a and a most radiant say noted critics. 11 Pound Pike. near the K. C. Han- north of town, on Monday, landed a pike weigh- and three quarters pounds, ; that has been brought thru ice this season. Besides Pike, those who have been report good luck in other species of the. finny as bass and Imlh. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH ELECTS OFFICERS MONDAY The annual ,meeting of the First Congregational church of this city was held at the Odd Fellows Hall, Monday evening with about forty-five members in attendance. Reports of the church clerk and treasurer of both the church and the Ladies' Aid were read and approved, after which the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Mary A. Mogren, clerk; A. L. Moore, treasur- er; Mrs. J. Karn, Mrs. Gee. Shuma- ker, Mm. H. W. Palm, Dr. C C Olson and R. F. Walker, trustees; F. Shu- maker, honorary deacon; Henry Ea- ton and R. F. Walker, deacons; Mrs. Ed. Shult and' Mrs. J. Karn, deacon- esses, Edna Shumaker, Music direc- tor; Belva Kaercher, assistant music director, and Martha Rothwell, Sun- day school superintendent. A new church constitution was read . and adopted. Following the election of officers Rev. Paul J. Bockoven, the pastor. gave an interesting address In the course of discussion which followed it was brought to the attention of the meeting that there had been some skepticism as to the continued activi- ties of the church with a slight degree of hesitancy on the part of some to affiliate themselves with the church for this reason. This was overcome, however, by the report which showed the church to be in excellent financial condition with no indebtedness and a balance on hand. Members of the Ladies' Aid were paid a compliment for their work in continuing to conduct food sales, and taking active interest during the time when fhe church was without a pastor, which is largely responsible for the present standing of the affairs of the church Thru their efforts they suc- ceeded in paying off a mortgage on the parsonage amounting to $686.00; decorating, paintin llumbing, on the house, $346.00. besides minor items, the total paymentsamounting to $1,- 135.69. Increased membership and freedom from debt has been realized in a re- markably short period of time and the progress of the church during the coming year, with Rev. Paul Beck- oven as pastor, in all likelihood will continue. J. F. Reed Elected Farm Bureau Head Lac Qui Parle County Farmer Chosen On First Ballot At Annual Convention. J. F. Reed, Lae qul Parle county farmer, is the new president of the Minnesota Farm Bureau federation. He was elected on the first ballot in the third annual convention of the federation at the state capitol. F. E. Lammers of Lakeville, Dakota county, was elected vice-president. V.. I. Anderson of Wheaten, treasurer of the state federation was re-elected without opposition. New members of the executive board of the federation are M. L. War- ner of Warren, Marshall county, elec- ted for a term of three years, and Mrs. E. V. Ripley of Park Rapids, Hubbard county, for one year. Thom- as E. Cashman of Owatonna was re- elected to the board for a three year term, and J. D. Pyle of Madison, Lac qui Parle county, J. J. Jacobsen of Bowlus, Morrison county, and Gee. Freeman of Zumbrota, Goodhue coun- ty, also were re-elected. Mr. Jacob- son and Mr. Freeman are to serve two year terms, and Mr. Pyle a one year term; the terms of these three direc- tors were decided by lot. The new president of the Minneso- ta Farm Bureau federation is 58 years old; he was born in Marshall county, Iowa, and came to Minnesota in 1893. He owns and actually runs two farms in Lac qui Parle county, one of 36 acres, and the other a half section. The western line of the farm on which Fhe lives forms the western boundary of the state. Because the postoffice at Gary, just over the line in South Dakota, serves two Minnesota town- ships, Mr. Reed's nailing address is Gary, S. D. "Any farmer would be unresponsive indeed if he did not appreciate the honor you have conferred on me," Mr. Reed said in his speech to the dele- gates, accepting the presidency. "I believe we are entering a period of great importance for the farm bu- reau of this state. I am willing to devote What poor ability I may have to further the organization. "I be of you your earnest co-opera- tion and help. I expect every director a]ad every farm bureau member pres- ent to o home with the idea of a more solid organization. "Azriculture i passing thrn its reatest crisis. If we are going to lift the pall of gloom that is over the farmers now, we must bring to this work stout hearts, clear heads and wil- ling hands. It is a l#eculiar condition of affairs that the farmer always has been subject to conditions over which he has had no control. He has had to haul his crops to market and huts- (Continued on page 8) Co-Operative Livestock Association Perfected Better System of Credit For BEARDSLEY AND GRACEVILLE ON LEGION B. B. SCHEDULE Farmer Possible Now Un- der New Organization Is Claimed. Organization of the Big Stone County Co-operative Livestock Asso- ciation was completed Wednesday af- ternoon at a meeting held in the of- rice of A. B. Kacrcher & Co., here Ar- ticles of incorporation which had been previously drawn were signed by the incorporators and the new institution, incorporated with a capital of $100,- 000.00, put well on its way. The main purpose of the corpora- tion will be to procure a better system of credit for the farmer, an opinion having been received from Ger- ard C. Henderson, general counsel of the War Finance Corpora- tion at Washington, to the effect that the government money could be loaned to such a corporation, for ad- vances made for agricultural purposes. Mr. Henderson's letter reads in art: "I see no reason why a corporation such as you propose (o form, wlth a paid-in capital of $100,000 should not be legally eligible to obtain advances from the War Finance Corporation. We are not making advances to co- operative associations, except upon the security of negotiable public ware- house receipts representing such com- modities as cotton, wheat, etc. In view of the substantial capital which your company will have we could, however, recognize it as a financing institution under Section 26 of the War Finance Corporation act." The section referred to says: "Whenever in this act the words, "bank, banker or trust company' are used, they shall be deemed to include any reputable and responsible financing institution in- corporated under the laws of any state or of the United States with resources adequate to the undertaking contemplated." The new institution will function oft practically the same plan as the Fed- eral Land Banlcs, which have proven (By Heck) Fans here are assured of two royal battles in basketball on Monday and Wednesday of next week when Beards- ley and Graceville come here to con- quer the Legion quint. Beardsley is credited with one vic- tory over Ortonville so far this sea- son and will present the same strong line-up. Their team is identically the same as that which won the high school district championship in 1915- 14L Since then they have been intact, playing as an independent team Altho defeated by the Legion team early in the season a hard game can be expected from the Graceville K. C's. They are never lacking in fighting spirit. Last week Beardsley barely won over them by a three-point mar- gin. This evening the locals are at Ben- son to take the district laurels from last year's chmmps. Benson is just as strong, if not stronger, than last year, and have turned back all comers with the exception of the Wildcats. PACKED HOUSE GREETING EVANGELIST DAY AT M. E. C. -Space at the Methodist church in i this city during the past week has l been at a premmm. On Wednesday night many were turned away on ac- count of lack of room. Evangelist Day, who has conducted a series of meetings here has .met with a capacity house most every evening and at the 'present time interest ]s at "high tide." A large number of young people form the choir which is an added at- traction, together with the special numbers by the children's chorus. Rev. Day's sermon subject for the remainder of the series follows: Thursday, "What has become of Hell." Friday, "You Can't Get In" These services at 7:45 p. m. Sunday, 10:30 a. m., "The Jewels of Jesus;" 12:00 m., Sunday school; 3:00 p. m., "The Withered Hand;" 7:00 p. an absolute success. Far, hers desiring m., Epworth League. Devotional; 7:45 loans upon chattel securities, ap-._  ,,v^.  t,^^_a, .p. m., . uu ,,," What About it ?" proved by the loan board are reqaireu| ....... to take a small amount of stock m',   [ et'a the company, the amount of stock 'to]-] PN.Qf T be limited to 10 shares to each mere-I k-F--- ffi --vw. 0 ber, no member to have over one vote, regardless of the amount of stock owned. The Board of Directors have the power to accept or reject applica tions for stock. The following well known citizens of the county signed as incorporators: Luke J. Keating, Lewis A. Lien and Henry Heidecker of Graceville; A. B. Kaercher, Wayne Kelly, Geier Bros., W. H. Matthews. F. L. Cliff, Dr. F. W. Dunn and William Wellendorf of Ortonville; Earl M. Johnson, Jacob Frey, O. J. Loftus, Thee. Hundeby, Mrs. Wm. M. Moroney and K. G. Kundson of Beardsley; and Chas. A. Matthews, and T. J. Anderson of Clin- ton. Officel elected were: Luke J. Keating, Gracevi!le, president; Cha. A. Matthews. Clinton, first vice-presi- dent; Earl Johnson of Beardsley, sec- ond vice-president; and A. B. Kaer- chef of this city, secretary-treasurer. Those in attendance at the meeting were very enthusiastic over the possi- bilities of the new company, and ex- pressed the belief that with the proper support, a great deal of good can be done for the agricultural industry in the county. Farmers and business men of Madi- son, hearing of the formation of the association, are to hold a mass meet- ing in that city this afternoon at two o'clock, with the idea of adopting the plan there. Luke J. Keating, and A. B. Kaercher will attend the Madison meeting. Business men who wish to help the farmer solve his present problem, with the consequent stimulation nf business in general, are urged by the incorporators of the new institution to investigate and get behind the movement with all possible energy. Minstrel Jan. 19-20 FIRE DEPARTMENT PLANS TO PURCHASE PULMOTOR Addition of a pulmotor to the pres- ent equipment o the city Fire De- partrnent is expected within a short time, providing one-half of the cost of same is met by the city council, it was decided at the annual meeting held on Tuesday night. A committee was appoinedo bring the matter before the council at their next regular meeting and also to secure the removal of the fire siren front its present location on the fire hall to either the county jail site or the power house. Deflectors were added to the siren in the hopes that the sound waves would be carried to all parts of the city but no improvement has been no- ticed. By placing the instrument on the power house it is believed that this will be overcome as the location is much lower than where it is now. Officers elected were Wayne Kelly, chief; August Lindert, assistant chief; E. N. Sehoen, cretary, and Ch Scofleld  ta'amn'or. LOCAL BOWLING TEAM WIN CLOSE GAME WITH MILBANK With but twenty pins in their fa- vor the local bowling team annexed another victory in the contest played on the Palace alleys here with Mil- bank on Friday evening of last week. This was the third victory for the Ortonville team, having won previ- ously over Madison on two occasions. A return game will be played with Milbank on their alleys sometime within the next few days, after which it is planned to stage a tournamem in this city. Invitations will be ex- tended to the teams of the adjoining towns and it is expected that a large number will participate. Plans of the local team at the pres- ent time include a trip to Fargo to take part in the Northern Bowling association's tournament at that city which is to be held from January 21 to 29. The score as it stood at the close of the contest with Milbank follows: Milbank Me,tree ........................ 190 191 160 Fairchild 171 165 190 Howe ............................ 224 189 223 Hamon .......................... 188 117 130 Petterman ......... : ........ 201 210 148 Totals ...................... 974 872 851 Total pins .................................... 2697 Ortonville-- Wiley ............................ 225 182 167 Schoen (Bob) ............ 158 201 175 Stucke .......................... 212 178 184 Zwiener. ....................... 150 153 142 Kelly ............................ 192 208 190 Totals ...................... 937 932 858 Total pins .................................... 2717 BUREAU TO GIVE INSITUTES AND SHORT COURSES SOON Arrangements have been made thru the Farm Bureau office to hold a series of five farm institutes and short coures in different parts of the county with- in the next two months, it was an- nounced today by M. P. Roske, county agent. Problems covering the cost of pro- ducing a pound of butterfat, pound of CLUB LEADERS MAKE PLANS .FOR '22 ENCAMPMENT Chautauqua Park Again Se- lected As Meeting Place For Boys' and Girls' Club Work Members. Chautauqua Park, on Big Stone Lake, will again be the meeting place of over three hundred members of the Boys' and Girls' Club Work it was decided at a meeting of club lead- ers of Minnesota and South Dakota held in this city on Friday afternoon. Dates for the 1922 encampment have been set from July 5 to 9, inclusive. "The encampment held at the park last summer was so successful that it has been decided to make it an an- nual event," said Mr. R. A. Gibbs, district club leader, of Morris. Mr. Gibbs represents clubs in nineteen counties in this state This action met with the approval of Mr. Valen- tine of Brookings, assistant state club leader for South Dakota, who was al so in attendance at the meeting. This encampment will be conducted at absolutely cost to the boys and girls, Mr. Gibbs explained, besides in- structions in club projects, such as garment making, cooking and garden- ing for the girls and beef and pork production, judging work and grow- ing crops for the boys, the encamp- ment furnishes them a splendid oppor- tunity for recreation. A part of each afternoon is give to play, such as swimming contests and baseball games, and the meeting coming at a time when most of the boys and girls are otherwise confined to hone work serves a two-fold pur- pose. Instrucgion will be given by club leaders and professors of the Exten- sion DiviSion of both Minnesota and South Dakota. beef or pork, the value of legumes The Program for the 1922 encamp- ment will be gaven out at a later date and soil fertility and other subjects .... " will be dscussed by men who are[..h.e. mP leted. An boy or girl dora club work thoroly competent along these lines. }! ) " , " g %lI[dble to membership m the corn- Every farmer is asked to attend  : " " encampmbdt and Mr Gibbs i these meetings as they promise to bg]:, " " - v " TUcn interested in havin ever oI much alue. . . '. g l girl make apphcatmn thrn Announcements as to dates Will be " " made later. -., /, ODESSA FARMERS' HARDWARE STORE NOW DOING BUSINESS Reorganization of the Odessa Far- mers' Mercantile Conpany, of Odessa, was perfected at a meeting of the stockholders and directors held Fri- day, with the result that the store, which had been,closed for a short time due to abuse.of credit, was reopened on Saturday. Paul" Pinkert, of this city was elec- "Fun-Makers" Working, Hard In Fi- nal Rehearsals To Give Public Real Treat. Determined to put their minstrel show over big, members of Ralph M. Spink Post of the American Legion, are devoting much time in learning their parts amt in rehearsing for the ted president, H. H. Reimt] of Odessa, first public appearance on Friday eve- secretary-treaSurer, and Albert Swan- ning, January 19, at the Orpheum son, Alex Semrau and Simon Karels, theatre in this city, and the assurance directors. Both the president and sec- of every Legion member is given o retary also ate membersof the board the effect that it will be even better of director. than other entertainments which have With the opening of the store un- borne the Legion name. de, the name of Farmers' Hardware Sale or reserved seats starts on and Lumber Company, with Alex Wa- Monday, January 16, at the Gunder- haske as temporary manager, a .mark- ed increase in confidence among the stockholders is said to be voted and the prospects for a healthy business is believed to be good. DRAINAGE DIRECTORS WILL MEET AT MONTE JAN. 18 For the purpose of considering a petition for the construction of dams at the foot of Big Stone Lake, Lac. qui Parle Lake, Redwood Falls, and on the Cottonwood river, a meeting of the directors of the Minnesota Val- ley Drainage and Conservancy Dis- trict has been called at Montevideo on January 18. In addition to taking up the mat- ters mentioned the body will also transact other business. Those who will be at the meeting as directors, are A. B. Kaercher, presi- dent; A. P. Graft, New Ulm, vice- president; S. S. Striker, LeSueur, treasurer, J. H. MacBeth, Mankato, secretary; and O. P. Flaten of Granite Fails. son Drug Store, with the price of ad- mission fixed at 25, 50, and 75c. In order that all .may have the priv- ilege of witnessing the show it was decided to stage it on two evenings. This action was taken because of the theatre having been packed to over- flowing with a one night stand when appearing in "The Windmills of Hol- land," last year. The program with characters, un- der the direction of Dr. E. N. Schoen, follows: First Part-- lnterlocutorEarl W. Miller. Ends, Elmer Hausauer, Ralph Hip- pie, Willard Tweet, Robert Price. ChorusH. N. Tragethon, Ray Gowan, Paul J. Bockoven, Leonard Kollitz, Claud Gowan, J. ,A. Jacobson, Lewis Lundgren, Chester Pflueger, Win. Randall, Walter Elms, Curtis Cele, Joe Petrick. DirectorDr. E. N. Schoen. Second Part--Farce. "THE CRACKED SQUAD" Characters Sargeant Drillem, a sergeant in the U. S. Army, Dick Weed. Miekey Louder ...... Kenneth Cummens Archibald Aloysius Montgomery .... ........................................ Edgar Orion Abraham Washington White ............ ...................................... Arthur Keuhn Yeas Y. Y. Y. Y. Yeysen ................ .......................................... Herb Bolsta Patrick O'Murhpy ................ Gee. Tyler Izzy Cohen ...................... Chic Zwiener M. T. Filbert ....... -. ...... Harry Peterson Silag Corntassel ................ Floyd Atha Orchestra will furnish music. Or- chestration by Mrs. C. A. Zwiener, F. W. Engdahl, Jack Mielke, Ed. Hones Chic Zwiener. Curtain each evening at 8:15. The Yeoman Lodge are planning Masquerade party for their members and friends to be held on their ext meeting night in the Odd Fellows all, Wednesday, January 25. A charge of 40 cents will be made which will include lunch. Lodges Elect Officers. At the joint installation of the Odd Fellows and Rebekahs held" Tuesday evening the following officers were in- stalled by R. F. Walker and Mrs. W. R. Mountford; N. G., U. J. Stotesbery; V. G., David Johnson; secretary, Ed. Shult; treasurer, O. E. Hahn; R. S. N. G., A. H. Sturges; L. S. N. G., C. F. Miller; Warden, C. C. Murphy; Conductor, Sam Arnquist; I. G., Ed. Martinson; O. G., J. P. Johnson; R. S. V. G., H. O. Peterson; L. S. V. G, Ed. Schnieder; R. S. S., C. A. Beard and L. S. S., J. H. Hadley The Re- bekahs were N. G., Linda Wilkins; V. G., Sopha LaCombe; secretary, Mar- tha Rothwell; Ella Sanders, treasurer: warden, Ruth Wilkins; Conductress Nettle Kriesel; Chaplain, Nellie Me- Lane; R. S., Mary Mogren; L. S.. Martha Rothwell; R. S. V. G., Edna Anderson; L. S. V. G., Ethel Vipond; L G., Georgia Mittelstead; O, G., Anna Stutler. county agent or club leader. Equity Decides New Elevator Unnecessary Matters Relative to Solicitation of Stock Fully Discussed By C. B. Swanson. More than 100 farmers were in at- tendmme at the meeting of the Equi- ty Exchange held at the Odd Fel- lows Hall acre last Saturday, which was called for the purpose of explain- ing a misunderstanding on the part of some of the stockholders relating to the erection of a new elevator. C. B. Swanson, department mana- ger, of the Equity of St. Paul, ex- plained in detail the circumstances surrounding the solicitation of stock, which was claimed by some as a mis- representation, giving as a basis for their complaint a representation on the part of the solicitors to the effect i that the ,amount subscribed was to go toward btfilding a new elevator on the ttonville tracks. How the misunderstanding origina- i ted and how it developed was taken up i in detail by Mr. Swanson in a very able manner, with all facts openly .;., discussed. In the face of present conditions and with the view of evident decrease in the production of small grain s han- dled by elevators it was the unani- mous opinion of all present at the meeting that the erection of a new elevator at an approximate expense of $30,000 would mean a Imrden to the farmers that would not be justS- fled and it was shown that the pres- ent facilities are sufficient at last for the time being. J. M. Hegge was elected to atben the annual meeting of theEqulty Ex- change and U. S. Grain Growers a Fargo, with John Heffernon, substi- tute. QUARTER MILE CHANNEL MADE FOR ICE HARVEST The annual harvest of Big Stone Lake ice commenced on Monday with the filling of the local ice houses. To facilitate in the prompt ship- ment of the ice to other points a chan- nel twenty feet in width and one-quar- ter mile long has been made from the loading platform to a point where the ice will be taken from the lake. By the use of this channel it will be possible to keep a continuous flow of ice at the loading elevator and the company wall not be subject to the un- certainty which results when team are depended upon to do the hauling, The channel will permit the Passage of five cakes of ice rhle hy stde The adoption of this method Is the ve1 labest in the ice harvesting THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT )RTONVILLE. MINN. THURSDAY. JANUARY 12, 19t2 NUMBER 36 CHARGES TO : CAPITALISTI Co-operative of Local Members-- palyis, thin which at tnes Ume, is the opfmon 4mty Co- St. patS, wh stkhoidem of the local in this city lt Sater- of the hghest au- lss made the state- - s$id Mr, Kelly, tplibed in the way in one year during t statemen Mr. Keny of this dentation, y perfectly ap- industry  well. result of this, Mr. Kelly that eight rMBion men ly starving becau of high stated, nor bau el apparent tc in Washington to The is expted h, p]e 'her e it was lt, the speaker o the un of the ntis. h with the inevitable secu a livlug I haw been introdttd l Said Mr. KelLy, "bsvtnl stablihment qff I 1nice, or it plm e profit. Jt Is betleved thai at grilture and lpport] ,s ta]k, Mr. A. pen to explain of the newly otavlted body I "The Big Stone Comty C Lv AodaClon,' s perfected recently f the f mog financial ald th Finance Corporation. TOWNSHIp BOYS TO COMEDY AT ORFHgUM -act omdy, "When Smith at," will be giv on F- 3auuary 13 at the Orphe L this city by eight yog stated the they staged their show at Friday night pmpti entge the Orphtmm, le from the noth nty will again t tim tB thta will  2gagvmL for the how DUO. JAN 17 CIuGt  Bur- Boston Symphony he lsser ef a nd a mot diant l his saor who ha ,good hk L CHURCH ELE(W8 OFFICER8 MONDAY The annum aeeting of the First Congregatiol chh of this city was held at the Odd Fellows Hall, Monday over'rig with about forty-five members in attendance. Reports of the chuh clerk and ,th the ehuh and the rpad and approwd, Mary A. Mogren, clerk; A. L. Moo, tasur- or; Mrs. J. Karn, M. Gee. Shuma- her, M. H. W. PaIm, Dr. C C Olson maker, honorary deaoon; Henry deans; Mr F.am, den- Ed Shumaker, Music dire- torl Belts Kaeher, sistant music dirtor, md Martha Rothwell, S- day hl super[ntenden A n church consUtution w ad 'and adopted, i Following the election of om Rev. Paul J. Boekoven, the pastor. gave  interesthag addss. In the ceur of diussJon wMeh followed It was bught to the attention of the mtig that the had been some skepticism as to the continued ti,. of hesitancy on the part of se to themlves vfith the ehuh This s eye.nine, hoer, by the report whteh showed hand. Members ef the taxli' dd wm paid z mpliment for their work in continuing to conduct food sales, and taking tive interns during the time pastor, which is largely,sponsible for the preens standing of the affai of the Thin their efforts they suc- ceeded in paying off a mortgage on the parsoge smelting to $686.OO; decorating, palntlnlbing, on the hour, $346.OO, besides minor lteme, the total payment%amounting to $1,- Increased membehp d fedom rom debt has been alied In a re. =arkahig short peod of time m,d the progress of the church ding the coming year, with Ray. Paul Rk- wen  pastor, in all Ikellho will F. Reed Faected Farm Bureau Head Lac Qot Parle County Farmer Che On Fit Ballot At Annal ConvtlolL J. F. Reed, Lac qui Parle county faer, is the n pident of the linnetS& Fan Bureau fedetion. He e elected on the flt haBot at the elate capito L F. E. Lammez of Lakevilie, Dakota ounty, w elected vlcpresidelvL V, . Anderson of Wheaten, treur of the state fedatton war lted without opposition. New mbe of the exutive  are M. L. War- ner of War.n, Ms.all county, e ted foe a te of thee years, and Mrs, E, V. Ripley of Park Rapids, Hbbard ty, for one er. Thora- E. Cahm of Owatna s - electql to the board for a three year te, end L D. PyIe of Madn, La* qui Parle enty, J. ft. Jobson of Bowhm, Moron unty, and Ceo, Frsm cf Zumbta. Goodhue coun- ty, also were lected. Mr. Job- son and Mr. Freeman a to e two Fear terms, and Mr, Pyle a one year terra; e tee of teee three did- aid; ho a barn in Ms.hall County, lows. and carnie,to Mlnmota Dt 1193, I ewr.e and asll tn I  Parle eount, o of 3 d the other a half t/om fos the western boundary of the state, Bue the postomee at Gary, just over the line in South Dakot SGs two MIneta wn. sldpa, Hr. Road's *mmlng address b Gary, 8. D "Any ?VTa ld be untesponlv* if he dld not arlat the honor you have nferred on ." Mr. Reed said tn his h to ates, eeptJng the preaidec of great su of, thi stae. @at poor ability ! may haw organitton 1 expect every director Co-Operative Livestock Association Perfected -- BIARDSLE AND GRACEVILLE Better System of Credtt For ON LEGION B. R. Farmer possible Now Un- der New Organization Is Claimed. Organition of the Big StOne County Co-operative Livestock As- iatlon w mgiet'd wednesday af- ternoon at aweeting held in the of_ fl of A. B. Kneher & CO,, he. A ticles of inrporation which had been pviously drawn were signed hy the inrpotors and the new institution, incorporated with a pital of $100,- 000.0o, put 11 on its way. The rmn purpose of the corpora- ion will be to peure a better system of credit for the faer, an opi#o having be*n ived from Ger- d C, Hendeon. general eol f th War Fee Corpora- tion at Washington, te the effect that the gornmt money uld he loaned to such a rotion, for ad. s made for agrioultural purpo% Mr. Hendern's ietter ds in ar: "I  no len why a corporation such  you ppoe o fo, wth paid-in pita] of $100,000 should not be legally eigibie to obtain advans fm the War Flnsn Corporatiom We a not makm advauces to c operative asiaflons, eept upon the surity of negotiah pxolic W house eipts psenting sh com- modities as cotton, wheat, et In view of the substantial capital which your mpany will have we could, however, ognd it  a fighting institution under Stton 26 of the War Financp Corporation act." tion ferd to sVS: in this act the words, ',bank, or tt mpy' arp used, they shall be deemed to in ude any mputabIe and relain fie fin nein instit orpomted under the lws tete er of contemplated." The new institution will pratilt era] Land Banks, which ha upon chattel rities. proved by to take s smII the company, the amount of be Limited her, no member to have over one vote, gardless of the amount of stock owned. The Board of Dito have the power to pt or jeot apgiic tions for st0ek. The following of the county sig'aed as ineorto : Luke J. Kting, Lewis A. Lien md Henry Heidecker of Gmviile A. B. Kaeber, WaYne Kelly, Geir Bro, W. B. Mattns, F. L. Cliff, Dr. F. Ortonville; Earl M. Johnson, Job Fray. O. J. Loftus, The. Huudeby, Mrs. Win. IVL Momney and K, G, Kundson of Brdley; and Chae+ A. Matthows, and T. J. Andeou of Cliu- ton. Omee elected were: Kting, Graccvil]e, presidont; Cha. A. Matthewe, Clinton, first vice presi- dent; end vi-presidt; and A. B. Kr. char of this city, tary-tmur. were very bflitles of the nw cpany, and ex- done for the agriilra[ industry in the couut. Fe ad husins men son. hearing ins in that city o'elk, with the idea of adopting the plan them. Luke J. Keating, d L lg Kaercher will attend the mtlng. Bulse raem who wish to help th armer ] his present problem nqut bus]ne in general. tnrprsto of the new to inveltigte and gt behind th movement with all possible ener..y. y Fi partent Is ex within a short time, providing on.half of the east of  is met by tl city ciL it was decided st the n[ mung held on Tuesday night A committee w appolntddRo bring and also to the fin sLrea f its present Inaction on hall to either the ty Jall site or he lmwr ho. in the hopes that the tdd be rfled to all parts of the .Aty but no impmment ha been no. y plvin g "Ariultu iS passing th I razest cfs. If   going t lift the pall of farmer now, we must bng to thh clear hds ad wll of afhdrt that the farmer alway lma is much lower than whre it ia n. tm,m tmbJeet to ltons cv*r wMeh  eltetl  Wa Kll h ht ha4 no control. He hu had thkff. Autst Llndet2, usltant eh (Catttl o Imp 8) Seotld' W. (By Heck) Fans he are assud of two royal battles in basketball on Monday d Wednesday of next week when Beard ley and Graeevlle come qeer the Legion qein Beardsley is credited son end will preens the same strong llne-u Their team is identieaily the e as that which won the high ehool district ehampiensldp in 191S- 14. 8in then they have hn intact, 4aging as au ndepandent te Altho deted by the Legion team etdy in the be expted from the Grville K. C's. They am never lking in fighting iri Last week Beardsley barely won over th hy a thrpoint mar- aim Tbls evening the loIs are at Ben- n to take the dstret lt year's chps. Bep.son is jt M strong, if not stronger, th ast year, and have ted back all me with the eeption of the Wldt this dry dnrng the pt wk een at a pmi night ny count of lack of om. Evangelist Day, who h ndted a meetings erng and at the A large number of young people o the e true'on, together with the numbers by the child mn' hos. Ray. Day's semen subject for the maindr o the r s f llows: Thursday, "What h become Friday, "Yen Can't Get In," Thee services at 7:45 p. m. Sunday, 10:S0  m., 7:0O p Wb About it ?' Minstrel Jam 19-3 Wlng, Hrd In FL ual Remals To Cite Public Real Treat. Datelined to put their show over big, mbe of Ralph Sgink post of the Amerlc Legion am devoting much time their parts v diu hea fit public a pea  m rfing, Janry 19, at the Orpbeun theatre in this city, md the ass of every Legion member is given to the effect that it will be even hatter thm other entertainments which have borne the Legion name. Sale or reserved sts etarts on Monday, January 16, at the Gder- son Drag Stem, with the price of ad mission fixed at 25, 5, xd 75c. in order that vii may have the priv- ilea of witnessing the show it was decided to stage it on t ening. Tbds tion was taken buv, e of the theatre hanna been packed to over- fiodng with a one night stand when appearing In 'qae Windmills of Hob The pgr th follows: Fit rt-- lnterlocutor--arl W. Miller. Ends, Elmer Hagsaner, Rtflph Hip gie, WiRrd Tweet, lbert Frlt ChoruH. N. Tragethea, Ray Go, Paul 3, Botkoven, Leonard Lewis Load.-am, Chester Pfluegr. m. Randall. Wate Etm, petMet sed Pa-Fa "THE CRACKED SQUAD" CharMta U. S. Army, Dick Weed. Mickey Louder Archibald AIoFM Montdore*evy CLUB LEADERS with another tory in the nte played hank oa Friday eing of last wk. This was the third victory for the havig .[ ouly A tum game ll be played wit on their alleys days, fret whie it is planned to stage in tls dry. lwAtations number will participate. Plans of the Ial team Fargo tc take *rt in the Northe to be held from Juary 21 The  as it stood at the elos the ntest with MJlbank follows :ibankr Mor ........................ 190 191 Fair*hlld ................... 171 165 owe ............ 224 189 mou ......... 188 117 ttet I .. .... 01 210 Totals .. 4 S72 Wiley ................. 225 182 8chela (Bob) ............ 1 S01 .................... 212 178 150 1 192 2O8 ...................... 937 932 Total plr .................................... BUREAU TO GIVE INSITUTES AND SHORT COURSES in different parts of the county vth- , It w an- nounced today by M. P. Roske. county agent, Problems covering the cost of pro- dueing a pond of butterfat, pound of beef  prk, the val of legumes and il fertility and other eubjeets witl be diecsed by men who a Shelly mpetent along these ]lne Every faer is asked to the meetings as they pmi to I of much vae. : Announcemt  to ares ill b ODESSA FARMERS' HARHWbRE STORE NOW DOING BUSINESS L Reorganltion of the 30mpay, of Odeas at a meetin of the d direo hem F- day, with the Jemflt that te ato, which had bn Josed *or t short time due to abu f t, "s opened , on Snmrday: ' . Pagl P[hke  this city w elec- ted pritlert  ]. Reind] of Odeh. etm'y-tr, and A]hert Swan- son, Alex 8emu and Simon tls, [reors. Rbth the president and sec- r of dtreeto With thd opening Cf the store un- der the name of Farmers' Hnniw,e d Lmher Cpmpany, with Alex Wa- haske as tempormT mager, a .mrk- ed increase in confidence among the stockholde is said to be voted d the pspects for a healthy busss is belleved to be good. DRAINAGE DIRECTORS WILL MEET AT MONTE JAN. petition for the st the foot of Big tone Lake, L. qul Parle Lake. the af lay Drainage MAKE PLANS F0R '22 ENCAMPMENT hautuqua Park Agai Se lected As Meeting Place For Boys' and Girls' Club Work Members. Chautauqua park. on Big Stoa* Lake, will again be th mting three hundrad membe f the Boys' and Girls' Club work k as dide al a mttng of club lead- are of Mi ne 0tg d South Dakota held in thi  y on Friday ftern Dates for the 1922 enpnt hnv been set fm Jiffy  to 9, ine]i "The pment held at the park lt sr w so eeftd thee it has been deded to make it  !nun] et," said Mr. R. A* Olbbt b i district club leader, of Morris. Mr. [Gibbs pnte eiub$ in i co.ties in this sts This actio net with the appl of {r. Valen- tne of Bn, ietant ata club ttnd at the mting. This epnt will be covdueted st ablteiy t "to th boys and girls, Mr. Gibbs explained, bede il etnlctio in club pjeets aueh ea garment making, king d gade tug for the girls and beef d pork prodorion, Judging work and g*tow ins pe for the boy, the eveamp. giendid oppor- tity for ati. A pa of eh aftem is giv to play, such  sdmmln ntests and baseball ges, and the meettalg coming at  time when most of boys and girls  otherwise eonfme a two-fold pu po. : Instratn Will be given by club ds d pmfs0 of the Exten- sion IX,dion of both Minnesota and South Dakota. The Pewram far the 192Z enmp- girl i club work In the cete .. u Mr. Gibbs is_L <v : n having ery iiii. un y   dub leade *;] - , Decides New Matte Reltive to St41dtti M Stock Fully Dctmled By C.  swm More than leo farmers vm ta at- tendance at the tmg of the Equi- ty xchange held at the Od d peA- tows Hall er last Sat which was lle(I for the purpo of explain- ing a miudetandmg on the of me of the stockholders relating to the erection of t n elevator. C, B. SWain, "department nm,l_ get, of the Eqvity o 8L paal . plained in detail the ittm3st.Reu sdlng the lieitati6n of atk. wMeh  dedmed by e as a peutation, giqng as a bMia f thor mgialnt a presentatiott on the part of the sollelters to the effect that thestxmnt subscribed was to go toward bmldin g a new daystar on the I nvflle traek. How the mlsdetandlr ox'i ted and how it develo w taklm up in detail by Mr, Swast iu a very b er, ith all fts openly dieusseA l the f of  ditor lind with tt view of vident deeime i the pmdetie  emm  ha Y. Y. Y, Yeys ......... Patrick O'Murhpy ................ Gee. Tyler ly Coh ................. Chic Zwlener ,y peten Floyd Atha Ohtra will furrdsh mui Or- eheslon hy Mr C. A. Zwiener. F. W, Engdahi, Jack elke. Ed. Hanes, Chic gwlener. Curtain tch ening at 8:15. The Yeoman Lodg am plar, ntng a Ruth Wflklna; Candler.s eorm94m Wtll ot   o the tra- M for th#lr members Nett.le griel; Chaplain, ellie Me [ lce nty wie t  and flends to  hem on tltr llex raeetng rd#nt in the Odd Fellows MartYat RothwoB; R. S. V. G., IMe [ The tllantt  a'Mt tim $aa11, Wa', J*muar 2. . gndeon;h.&V.G.,K'thlVigoadi[ofeddlwal@ag Tim eha of  nta will b ms& LG.,GtorgiaMittlattal:O.O..Anna ado of thb th tt1 whl lll Lueludo lpeh.  In tt ka ht ImafaM Fargo, with John a gd. MADE Felt IC E[ARVqY nual hsrvt of Big Strum emmeuee  Mday with the ruling of the ke I bousea To faettate in the F=empt O. G.,' J, P. ffohnn; R H. O. pete; h. S. V. G. tar nd}e long has betm raaG fromthe R. S. S.. C. A. Bea Ioadint.latform to a point wher the S.. J. H. Hadley e wil%e taken from the lala Ldnda Wilkins; V 8 the  ot this ehanrl R will be possfele to k#e tfaum fl of i t the Ioadiltl elewtter ud the Lodg Elt om Rebekah held Teeday ewvnr the following ameer  In- stalled by l Mountford N.G.U.J. Stotesbery; V. G., Dad" Johnson; mtary, Ed, O, E. Hahn: R. S. N, G., A. H. Sturges; F. Miller: Warden. dled by eletom it w the finavl- Juary 18. mous eton e all prme at the In dltion to taking up the mat- nmetg that thle  e the body will  m Those who will be at the meeting of t3o,ee0 wmld mma blinks,re , A B. Kz r, lwe- that wee net he JustS. P, Gruff. New p4dat; S S. Strlker, LeS, th time belq. treaster. &. H. th* THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT QRTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JANUARY 12, 1922 NUMBER 36 CHARGES TO CAPITALISTS Co-operative Ass'n. Speaks At Meet- of Local Membersm Unity. paralysis, thru which is passing at tins time, is result of the action o the class, in the opinion of J. director o1' the Eqmty Co- Exchange, of St. Paul, who principal speaker at the :meet- stockholders of the local held in this city last Satur- one of the highest an- of this class made the state- boastfully, " said Mr. Kelly, had accomplished in the way more in one year during than was accomplished in ten fter the close of the civil war." statement Mr. Kelly believed and the cause-of this deflation, Pinion is not only perfectly ap- es regards agricultural inter- as regards every other busi- industry as well. the result of this, Mr. Kelly out that eight million men the streets of American idle and mostly starving. is not because of high he stated, nor because of tax but because thru of deflation the farmer has )acitated from buying. conditions are apparent to in Washington and ac- they have appropriated one to rehabilitate declin- agriculture, Mr. Kelly said, and called conferences monthly past six months. The most conference is expected in called by President Harding 14. that when a person-lost that the best place to look where it was lost, the speaker, the undoing of the mis- has been done and gave the united action of far- support of co-operative or- with the inevitable re- they secure a living price products. bills have been introduced in- said Mr. Kelly, "having aims the establishment of a price, or in other words the cost to the farmer plus a rofit. It is believed that of agriculture and as well should support leas.,, Mr. Kelly's talk, Mr. A. was called upon to explain of the newly organized body as "The Big Stone County Co- Livestock Association,' Was perfected recently for the of securing financial aid thl Finance Corporation. TOWNSHIP BOYS TO COMEDY AT ORPHEUM comedy, "When Smith Out," will be given on Fri- January 13 at the Orpheum in this city by eight young Malta township. crowd which greeted the they staged their show at Friday night prompted engage the Orpheum, and of those who withes- COmedy there it is not unlike- many people from the north the county will again attend is shown here. three acts there will be between acts in the which drew much at the Clinton engagement. for the show which starts eight o'clock, are set at and 25c for children. ; 0000cE-00o00vzRs DUO, JAN 17 Circuit Lyceum Bur- resent Miss Arual Lebby lma Russel, two dainty art- talent in musical and nes, in a program at the Stone City, on Tues- efforts of the Tennessee order. Miss Lebby extensively in eastern a.nd filled special engage: wl h the Boston Symphony RUssel is the possesor of a and a most radiant say noted critics. 11 Pound Pike. near the K. C. Han- north of town, on Monday, landed a pike weigh- and three quarters pounds, ; that has been brought thru ice this season. Besides Pike, those who have been report good luck in other species of the. finny as bass and Imlh. CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH ELECTS OFFICERS MONDAY The annual ,meeting of the First Congregational church of this city was held at the Odd Fellows Hall, Monday evening with about forty-five members in attendance. Reports of the church clerk and treasurer of both the church and the Ladies' Aid were read and approved, after which the following officers were elected for the ensuing year: Mary A. Mogren, clerk; A. L. Moore, treasur- er; Mrs. J. Karn, Mrs. Gee. Shuma- ker, Mm. H. W. Palm, Dr. C C Olson and R. F. Walker, trustees; F. Shu- maker, honorary deacon; Henry Ea- ton and R. F. Walker, deacons; Mrs. Ed. Shult and' Mrs. J. Karn, deacon- esses, Edna Shumaker, Music direc- tor; Belva Kaercher, assistant music director, and Martha Rothwell, Sun- day school superintendent. A new church constitution was read . and adopted. Following the election of officers Rev. Paul J. Bockoven, the pastor. gave an interesting address In the course of discussion which followed it was brought to the attention of the meeting that there had been some skepticism as to the continued activi- ties of the church with a slight degree of hesitancy on the part of some to affiliate themselves with the church for this reason. This was overcome, however, by the report which showed the church to be in excellent financial condition with no indebtedness and a balance on hand. Members of the Ladies' Aid were paid a compliment for their work in continuing to conduct food sales, and taking active interest during the time when fhe church was without a pastor, which is largely responsible for the present standing of the affairs of the church Thru their efforts they suc- ceeded in paying off a mortgage on the parsonage amounting to $686.00; decorating, paintin llumbing, on the house, $346.00. besides minor items, the total paymentsamounting to $1,- 135.69. Increased membership and freedom from debt has been realized in a re- markably short period of time and the progress of the church during the coming year, with Rev. Paul Beck- oven as pastor, in all likelihood will continue. J. F. Reed Elected Farm Bureau Head Lac Qui Parle County Farmer Chosen On First Ballot At Annual Convention. J. F. Reed, Lae qul Parle county farmer, is the new president of the Minnesota Farm Bureau federation. He was elected on the first ballot in the third annual convention of the federation at the state capitol. F. E. Lammers of Lakeville, Dakota county, was elected vice-president. V.. I. Anderson of Wheaten, treasurer of the state federation was re-elected without opposition. New members of the executive board of the federation are M. L. War- ner of Warren, Marshall county, elec- ted for a term of three years, and Mrs. E. V. Ripley of Park Rapids, Hubbard county, for one year. Thom- as E. Cashman of Owatonna was re- elected to the board for a three year term, and J. D. Pyle of Madison, Lac qui Parle county, J. J. Jacobsen of Bowlus, Morrison county, and Gee. Freeman of Zumbrota, Goodhue coun- ty, also were re-elected. Mr. Jacob- son and Mr. Freeman are to serve two year terms, and Mr. Pyle a one year term; the terms of these three direc- tors were decided by lot. The new president of the Minneso- ta Farm Bureau federation is 58 years old; he was born in Marshall county, Iowa, and came to Minnesota in 1893. He owns and actually runs two farms in Lac qui Parle county, one of 36 acres, and the other a half section. The western line of the farm on which Fhe lives forms the western boundary of the state. Because the postoffice at Gary, just over the line in South Dakota, serves two Minnesota town- ships, Mr. Reed's nailing address is Gary, S. D. "Any farmer would be unresponsive indeed if he did not appreciate the honor you have conferred on me," Mr. Reed said in his speech to the dele- gates, accepting the presidency. "I believe we are entering a period of great importance for the farm bu- reau of this state. I am willing to devote What poor ability I may have to further the organization. "I be of you your earnest co-opera- tion and help. I expect every director a]ad every farm bureau member pres- ent to o home with the idea of a more solid organization. "Azriculture i passing thrn its reatest crisis. If we are going to lift the pall of gloom that is over the farmers now, we must bring to this work stout hearts, clear heads and wil- ling hands. It is a l#eculiar condition of affairs that the farmer always has been subject to conditions over which he has had no control. He has had to haul his crops to market and huts- (Continued on page 8) Co-Operative Livestock Association Perfected Better System of Credit For BEARDSLEY AND GRACEVILLE ON LEGION B. B. SCHEDULE Farmer Possible Now Un- der New Organization Is Claimed. Organization of the Big Stone County Co-operative Livestock Asso- ciation was completed Wednesday af- ternoon at a meeting held in the of- rice of A. B. Kacrcher & Co., here Ar- ticles of incorporation which had been previously drawn were signed by the incorporators and the new institution, incorporated with a capital of $100,- 000.00, put well on its way. The main purpose of the corpora- tion will be to procure a better system of credit for the farmer, an opinion having been received from Ger- ard C. Henderson, general counsel of the War Finance Corpora- tion at Washington, to the effect that the government money could be loaned to such a corporation, for ad- vances made for agricultural purposes. Mr. Henderson's letter reads in art: "I see no reason why a corporation such as you propose (o form, wlth a paid-in capital of $100,000 should not be legally eligible to obtain advances from the War Finance Corporation. We are not making advances to co- operative associations, except upon the security of negotiable public ware- house receipts representing such com- modities as cotton, wheat, etc. In view of the substantial capital which your company will have we could, however, recognize it as a financing institution under Section 26 of the War Finance Corporation act." The section referred to says: "Whenever in this act the words, "bank, banker or trust company' are used, they shall be deemed to include any reputable and responsible financing institution in- corporated under the laws of any state or of the United States with resources adequate to the undertaking contemplated." The new institution will function oft practically the same plan as the Fed- eral Land Banlcs, which have proven (By Heck) Fans here are assured of two royal battles in basketball on Monday and Wednesday of next week when Beards- ley and Graceville come here to con- quer the Legion quint. Beardsley is credited with one vic- tory over Ortonville so far this sea- son and will present the same strong line-up. Their team is identically the same as that which won the high school district championship in 1915- 14L Since then they have been intact, playing as an independent team Altho defeated by the Legion team early in the season a hard game can be expected from the Graceville K. C's. They are never lacking in fighting spirit. Last week Beardsley barely won over them by a three-point mar- gin. This evening the locals are at Ben- son to take the district laurels from last year's chmmps. Benson is just as strong, if not stronger, than last year, and have turned back all comers with the exception of the Wildcats. PACKED HOUSE GREETING EVANGELIST DAY AT M. E. C. -Space at the Methodist church in i this city during the past week has l been at a premmm. On Wednesday night many were turned away on ac- count of lack of room. Evangelist Day, who has conducted a series of meetings here has .met with a capacity house most every evening and at the 'present time interest ]s at "high tide." A large number of young people form the choir which is an added at- traction, together with the special numbers by the children's chorus. Rev. Day's sermon subject for the remainder of the series follows: Thursday, "What has become of Hell." Friday, "You Can't Get In" These services at 7:45 p. m. Sunday, 10:30 a. m., "The Jewels of Jesus;" 12:00 m., Sunday school; 3:00 p. m., "The Withered Hand;" 7:00 p. an absolute success. Far, hers desiring m., Epworth League. Devotional; 7:45 loans upon chattel securities, ap-._  ,,v^.  t,^^_a, .p. m., . uu ,,," What About it ?" proved by the loan board are reqaireu| ....... to take a small amount of stock m',   [ et'a the company, the amount of stock 'to]-] PN.Qf T be limited to 10 shares to each mere-I k-F--- ffi --vw. 0 ber, no member to have over one vote, regardless of the amount of stock owned. The Board of Directors have the power to accept or reject applica tions for stock. The following well known citizens of the county signed as incorporators: Luke J. Keating, Lewis A. Lien and Henry Heidecker of Graceville; A. B. Kaercher, Wayne Kelly, Geier Bros., W. H. Matthews. F. L. Cliff, Dr. F. W. Dunn and William Wellendorf of Ortonville; Earl M. Johnson, Jacob Frey, O. J. Loftus, Thee. Hundeby, Mrs. Wm. M. Moroney and K. G. Kundson of Beardsley; and Chas. A. Matthews, and T. J. Anderson of Clin- ton. Officel elected were: Luke J. Keating, Gracevi!le, president; Cha. A. Matthews. Clinton, first vice-presi- dent; Earl Johnson of Beardsley, sec- ond vice-president; and A. B. Kaer- chef of this city, secretary-treasurer. Those in attendance at the meeting were very enthusiastic over the possi- bilities of the new company, and ex- pressed the belief that with the proper support, a great deal of good can be done for the agricultural industry in the county. Farmers and business men of Madi- son, hearing of the formation of the association, are to hold a mass meet- ing in that city this afternoon at two o'clock, with the idea of adopting the plan there. Luke J. Keating, and A. B. Kaercher will attend the Madison meeting. Business men who wish to help the farmer solve his present problem, with the consequent stimulation nf business in general, are urged by the incorporators of the new institution to investigate and get behind the movement with all possible energy. Minstrel Jan. 19-20 FIRE DEPARTMENT PLANS TO PURCHASE PULMOTOR Addition of a pulmotor to the pres- ent equipment o the city Fire De- partrnent is expected within a short time, providing one-half of the cost of same is met by the city council, it was decided at the annual meeting held on Tuesday night. A committee was appoinedo bring the matter before the council at their next regular meeting and also to secure the removal of the fire siren front its present location on the fire hall to either the county jail site or the power house. Deflectors were added to the siren in the hopes that the sound waves would be carried to all parts of the city but no improvement has been no- ticed. By placing the instrument on the power house it is believed that this will be overcome as the location is much lower than where it is now. Officers elected were Wayne Kelly, chief; August Lindert, assistant chief; E. N. Sehoen, cretary, and Ch Scofleld  ta'amn'or. LOCAL BOWLING TEAM WIN CLOSE GAME WITH MILBANK With but twenty pins in their fa- vor the local bowling team annexed another victory in the contest played on the Palace alleys here with Mil- bank on Friday evening of last week. This was the third victory for the Ortonville team, having won previ- ously over Madison on two occasions. A return game will be played with Milbank on their alleys sometime within the next few days, after which it is planned to stage a tournamem in this city. Invitations will be ex- tended to the teams of the adjoining towns and it is expected that a large number will participate. Plans of the local team at the pres- ent time include a trip to Fargo to take part in the Northern Bowling association's tournament at that city which is to be held from January 21 to 29. The score as it stood at the close of the contest with Milbank follows: Milbank Me,tree ........................ 190 191 160 Fairchild 171 165 190 Howe ............................ 224 189 223 Hamon .......................... 188 117 130 Petterman ......... : ........ 201 210 148 Totals ...................... 974 872 851 Total pins .................................... 2697 Ortonville-- Wiley ............................ 225 182 167 Schoen (Bob) ............ 158 201 175 Stucke .......................... 212 178 184 Zwiener. ....................... 150 153 142 Kelly ............................ 192 208 190 Totals ...................... 937 932 858 Total pins .................................... 2717 BUREAU TO GIVE INSITUTES AND SHORT COURSES SOON Arrangements have been made thru the Farm Bureau office to hold a series of five farm institutes and short coures in different parts of the county with- in the next two months, it was an- nounced today by M. P. Roske, county agent. Problems covering the cost of pro- ducing a pound of butterfat, pound of CLUB LEADERS MAKE PLANS .FOR '22 ENCAMPMENT Chautauqua Park Again Se- lected As Meeting Place For Boys' and Girls' Club Work Members. Chautauqua Park, on Big Stone Lake, will again be the meeting place of over three hundred members of the Boys' and Girls' Club Work it was decided at a meeting of club lead- ers of Minnesota and South Dakota held in this city on Friday afternoon. Dates for the 1922 encampment have been set from July 5 to 9, inclusive. "The encampment held at the park last summer was so successful that it has been decided to make it an an- nual event," said Mr. R. A. Gibbs, district club leader, of Morris. Mr. Gibbs represents clubs in nineteen counties in this state This action met with the approval of Mr. Valen- tine of Brookings, assistant state club leader for South Dakota, who was al so in attendance at the meeting. This encampment will be conducted at absolutely cost to the boys and girls, Mr. Gibbs explained, besides in- structions in club projects, such as garment making, cooking and garden- ing for the girls and beef and pork production, judging work and grow- ing crops for the boys, the encamp- ment furnishes them a splendid oppor- tunity for recreation. A part of each afternoon is give to play, such as swimming contests and baseball games, and the meeting coming at a time when most of the boys and girls are otherwise confined to hone work serves a two-fold pur- pose. Instrucgion will be given by club leaders and professors of the Exten- sion DiviSion of both Minnesota and South Dakota. beef or pork, the value of legumes The Program for the 1922 encamp- ment will be gaven out at a later date and soil fertility and other subjects .... " will be dscussed by men who are[..h.e. mP leted. An boy or girl dora club work thoroly competent along these lines. }! ) " , " g %lI[dble to membership m the corn- Every farmer is asked to attend  : " " encampmbdt and Mr Gibbs i these meetings as they promise to bg]:, " " - v " TUcn interested in havin ever oI much alue. . . '. g l girl make apphcatmn thrn Announcements as to dates Will be " " made later. -., /, ODESSA FARMERS' HARDWARE STORE NOW DOING BUSINESS Reorganization of the Odessa Far- mers' Mercantile Conpany, of Odessa, was perfected at a meeting of the stockholders and directors held Fri- day, with the result that the store, which had been,closed for a short time due to abuse.of credit, was reopened on Saturday. Paul" Pinkert, of this city was elec- "Fun-Makers" Working, Hard In Fi- nal Rehearsals To Give Public Real Treat. Determined to put their minstrel show over big, members of Ralph M. Spink Post of the American Legion, are devoting much time in learning their parts amt in rehearsing for the ted president, H. H. Reimt] of Odessa, first public appearance on Friday eve- secretary-treaSurer, and Albert Swan- ning, January 19, at the Orpheum son, Alex Semrau and Simon Karels, theatre in this city, and the assurance directors. Both the president and sec- of every Legion member is given o retary also ate membersof the board the effect that it will be even better of director. than other entertainments which have With the opening of the store un- borne the Legion name. de, the name of Farmers' Hardware Sale or reserved seats starts on and Lumber Company, with Alex Wa- Monday, January 16, at the Gunder- haske as temporary manager, a .mark- ed increase in confidence among the stockholders is said to be voted and the prospects for a healthy business is believed to be good. DRAINAGE DIRECTORS WILL MEET AT MONTE JAN. 18 For the purpose of considering a petition for the construction of dams at the foot of Big Stone Lake, Lac. qui Parle Lake, Redwood Falls, and on the Cottonwood river, a meeting of the directors of the Minnesota Val- ley Drainage and Conservancy Dis- trict has been called at Montevideo on January 18. In addition to taking up the mat- ters mentioned the body will also transact other business. Those who will be at the meeting as directors, are A. B. Kaercher, presi- dent; A. P. Graft, New Ulm, vice- president; S. S. Striker, LeSueur, treasurer, J. H. MacBeth, Mankato, secretary; and O. P. Flaten of Granite Fails. son Drug Store, with the price of ad- mission fixed at 25, 50, and 75c. In order that all .may have the priv- ilege of witnessing the show it was decided to stage it on two evenings. This action was taken because of the theatre having been packed to over- flowing with a one night stand when appearing in "The Windmills of Hol- land," last year. The program with characters, un- der the direction of Dr. E. N. Schoen, follows: First Part-- lnterlocutorEarl W. Miller. Ends, Elmer Hausauer, Ralph Hip- pie, Willard Tweet, Robert Price. ChorusH. N. Tragethon, Ray Gowan, Paul J. Bockoven, Leonard Kollitz, Claud Gowan, J. ,A. Jacobson, Lewis Lundgren, Chester Pflueger, Win. Randall, Walter Elms, Curtis Cele, Joe Petrick. DirectorDr. E. N. Schoen. Second Part--Farce. "THE CRACKED SQUAD" Characters Sargeant Drillem, a sergeant in the U. S. Army, Dick Weed. Miekey Louder ...... Kenneth Cummens Archibald Aloysius Montgomery .... ........................................ Edgar Orion Abraham Washington White ............ ...................................... Arthur Keuhn Yeas Y. Y. Y. Y. Yeysen ................ .......................................... Herb Bolsta Patrick O'Murhpy ................ Gee. Tyler Izzy Cohen ...................... Chic Zwiener M. T. Filbert ....... -. ...... Harry Peterson Silag Corntassel ................ Floyd Atha Orchestra will furnish music. Or- chestration by Mrs. C. A. Zwiener, F. W. Engdahl, Jack Mielke, Ed. Hones Chic Zwiener. Curtain each evening at 8:15. The Yeoman Lodge are planning Masquerade party for their members and friends to be held on their ext meeting night in the Odd Fellows all, Wednesday, January 25. A charge of 40 cents will be made which will include lunch. Lodges Elect Officers. At the joint installation of the Odd Fellows and Rebekahs held" Tuesday evening the following officers were in- stalled by R. F. Walker and Mrs. W. R. Mountford; N. G., U. J. Stotesbery; V. G., David Johnson; secretary, Ed. Shult; treasurer, O. E. Hahn; R. S. N. G., A. H. Sturges; L. S. N. G., C. F. Miller; Warden, C. C. Murphy; Conductor, Sam Arnquist; I. G., Ed. Martinson; O. G., J. P. Johnson; R. S. V. G., H. O. Peterson; L. S. V. G, Ed. Schnieder; R. S. S., C. A. Beard and L. S. S., J. H. Hadley The Re- bekahs were N. G., Linda Wilkins; V. G., Sopha LaCombe; secretary, Mar- tha Rothwell; Ella Sanders, treasurer: warden, Ruth Wilkins; Conductress Nettle Kriesel; Chaplain, Nellie Me- Lane; R. S., Mary Mogren; L. S.. Martha Rothwell; R. S. V. G., Edna Anderson; L. S. V. G., Ethel Vipond; L G., Georgia Mittelstead; O, G., Anna Stutler. county agent or club leader. Equity Decides New Elevator Unnecessary Matters Relative to Solicitation of Stock Fully Discussed By C. B. Swanson. More than 100 farmers were in at- tendmme at the meeting of the Equi- ty Exchange held at the Odd Fel- lows Hall acre last Saturday, which was called for the purpose of explain- ing a misunderstanding on the part of some of the stockholders relating to the erection of a new elevator. C. B. Swanson, department mana- ger, of the Equity of St. Paul, ex- plained in detail the circumstances surrounding the solicitation of stock, which was claimed by some as a mis- representation, giving as a basis for their complaint a representation on the part of the solicitors to the effect i that the ,amount subscribed was to go toward btfilding a new elevator on the ttonville tracks. How the misunderstanding origina- i ted and how it developed was taken up i in detail by Mr. Swanson in a very able manner, with all facts openly .;., discussed. In the face of present conditions and with the view of evident decrease in the production of small grain s han- dled by elevators it was the unani- mous opinion of all present at the meeting that the erection of a new elevator at an approximate expense of $30,000 would mean a Imrden to the farmers that would not be justS- fled and it was shown that the pres- ent facilities are sufficient at last for the time being. J. M. Hegge was elected to atben the annual meeting of theEqulty Ex- change and U. S. Grain Growers a Fargo, with John Heffernon, substi- tute. QUARTER MILE CHANNEL MADE FOR ICE HARVEST The annual harvest of Big Stone Lake ice commenced on Monday with the filling of the local ice houses. To facilitate in the prompt ship- ment of the ice to other points a chan- nel twenty feet in width and one-quar- ter mile long has been made from the loading platform to a point where the ice will be taken from the lake. By the use of this channel it will be possible to keep a continuous flow of ice at the loading elevator and the company wall not be subject to the un- certainty which results when team are depended upon to do the hauling, The channel will permit the Passage of five cakes of ice rhle hy stde The adoption of this method Is the ve1 labest in the ice harvesting