Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
January 12, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 7     (7 of 8 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
January 12, 1922
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




JANUARY 12, 1922 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE $ &apos; Strong Demand FARMERS PAGE l00or Stock " DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. / I 800 MINNESOTANS IN To Farm u Ills Is n..o,,,af In the seven weeks period ending 1J[O, LLU with the holiday season, U. S. Grain . [Grower solicitors in Minnesota ob- .... i, ....... tained 810 members, despite the fact tommltcee rrupv that in some counties, the work had Credits Department In All Land Banks. aiming to solve the far- problem in permanent worked out by the con- joint committee on agricul- it developed today fol- an address by Congressman Anderson, chairman of the before the Minnesota Farm federation late yesterday. Be- for Washington last ! Anderson told members of that a bill had been his committee and will be in both houses of congress days along with a special re- the committee on the sub- rural credits. Proposed act, Mr. Anderson s to give the farmer the same businessmen now receive federal reserve system. It the federal farm loan act a farm credits depart- every federal land bank. Thru the bank will discount proceeds of which have strictly agricultural pur- ad which are based on assets grain, livestock or other pro- to be marketed immediate- L loans now may be made by but are difficult to negotiate be carried by the banks as ' Under the proposed act the COuld rediscount them. Simi- now are being handled thru Finance corporation as an under the Kel- to that law. we purpose," said Mr. An- put into every federal land arm credits department which for making loans precise- to agricultural demands." of these loans is to be than six months nor more years, according to Mr. An- is proposed, he said, to aoney for the loans by sell- in the open market, the farmers' obligations. address yesterday, Mr. An- Urged farmers to organize so as to control the mar- their products. He opposed fixing 'or govern- of farm products for the market. "Farmers," as much right to take among themselves to sta- as manufacturers have. If method could be worked agricultural produc- to the demand for farm eliminating market wreck- farmers undoubtedly the right to adopt it. farm organization and more co-operation would do prevent such disastrous con- as face the farmers now." (ROWERS TO OPEN SALES OFFICE to begin immediate opening sales agencies, will be in St. Paul or was voted last week by of the U. S. Grain Growers, to an announcement by the Northwest head- f the company. The cam- members have pledged bushels of grain, of which crones from the advisory board of far- be named, the members to from among omcers of co- elevators, Grain Grower as- or other fainer-owned lo- marketing companies. authorization is sufficiently permit the purchase of exchanges and as are necessary to cam- regulations of such insti- unify organization work also were taken. will meet in Chicago 18 to prepare for the of members, which there on March 21. It been announced that would be held on Mar. _ RS TO RENT 0-ACRE FARM FOR NE TURKEY PER ACRE S. D., January 3.--A vicinity has offered to in a new and novel man- states he will rent the 160 a tenant on the sole condi- the tenant shall turn over for each acre of by the land owner dur- weeks of 1921 brought to $10 each. He believes method he would be get- end" of the bargain at the end of 1922 ent with 160 turkeys.--Pio- been in progress only a fortnight. Thus far, twenty elevators in the state have become affiliated with the move- ment. Nationally, the movement entered the holiday season with 34,229 mem- bers and 849 elevator and local grow- er association contracts. Illinois is first with 8,500, Nebraska second with 6,700 members, and North Dakota 3rd with 4,800. This aggregate member- ship has been obtained during a per- lad ranging from seven months in some states and seven weeks in others. Minnesota and Iowa were last to start. In Minnesota, grower contracts have been circulated with marked success in Lyon, Kittson, Watonwon and Red- wood counties. Some work has been (tone in Wright county. In Lyon comi- ty, where the first soliciting was done. more than 400 contracts have been obtained and in townships where the work has been completed, 85 per cent of the grain acreage has been signed up, solicitors report. In Kittson coun- ty, many of the leading wheat grow- ers of the section have become mem- bers. In Redwood and Watonwon counties, the work was well started when the holiday vacation interrupted. BABY BEEF COMMANDS BEST MARKET PRICES Baby beef production can be made most profitable on land worth not more than $150 an acre, of which at least 50 per cent is easily cultivated, says W. H. Peters, acting chief'of the animal husbandry division of the Uni- versity of Minnesota. By baby beef production, he says, is meant the growing, fattening and ,marketing of beef calves at ages ranging from 12 to 24 months, 16 to 18 months being the most economical at which to sell. "With sufficient fat on them when placed on the market, baby beeves are always market toppers," Professor Peters says. "Baby beef production al- lows raising of more calves on the same amount of land than does pro- duction of stock or feeder cattle. Each good baby beef steer should sell for $30 to $50 more when one and one-half years old than the average feeder steer will bring at two and one-half years of age. "The cows should be fed thru the winter just as cows would be in stock- er and feeder production. Because it is important to get calves as early in the spring as is consistent with the opportunity of giving them sufficient care, the bull may be turned out with the cow herd June first. Before wean- ing them the calves should be started on grain by the use of a creep in the pasture. Until they are put on full feed about November first calves should run with their mothers." Sixty per cent shelled corn or ground barley, 25 per cent oats and 15 per ent linseed oiLrneal, according to Professor Peters, make a good ra- tion, along with alfalfa or clover hay and a little silage. Baby beeves can usually be sold to the best advantage in June, July or August, but may be carried up to the early part of De- cember and sold for the Christmas beef market. 36 STUDENTS TAKING "U" CREAMERY COURSE Laying special emphasis on efficien- cy of operation and creamery account- ing, 36 students at University Farm are registered in the creamery opera- tors' short course, which began Jan. 2 and will end Feb. 11. While the course is given primarily for begin- ners, according to Prof. J. R. Keithley, who is in charge, many of the stu- dents have had wide experience in creamery work. With a large amount of new equipment installed, students will have an opportunity in getting practical experience with latest and most modern machinery. The course will be devoted entirely to instruction in creamery work, and will include cream grading, pasteuri- zation and ripening; use of starters in )reducing desired flavors; proper methods of making butter in order to control its composition with reference to moisture, fat, and salt; proper treatment and preparation of butter containers to eliminate mold and pre- vent shrinkage; and the importance and relation of accuracy in weights and tests to the success of creameries. The demand for well trained men in creamery work is greater than the supply, according to Professor Keith- ley. Followng the close of the present course the cheese plant operators' short course, which begins February 13 and ends March 11, will be given. Bring your dull safety razor blades to us for sharpening. We harpen all blades and guarantee them to shave as ood as new ones. J. D Ross & Co. Minn. Stocker and Feeoer Buyers Outbid Packers for Cattle Supplies. Hog Receipts Heavy. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 1,700. Market closing weak to 25c lower on beef steers and butch- er she stock, stackers and feeders strong to 25c higher. Calves 2,300. Market closing steady, bulk best lights $7.00, s6me extra choice vealers $7.50. Hogs 14,700. Market steady to 25c lower. Sheep 1,000. luarl<et steady to strong. So. St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 10. 1922:-- Altho dressed beef trade continues rather dull and large packers and other killers are forcing prices of fat cattle lower, country demand or stackers and feeders continues rela- tively broader than normal and prices of these latter are working upward, country buyers sometimes outbidding packers for some cattle on the fat cattle order for feeding purposes. Practically no good beef steers are coming, only a few of these consist- ing of five head of yearling steers and heifers averaging around 660 lbs. selling' in thi. week's trade to city butchers at $8.25. A fair showing of beef steers of a medium grade have sohl from $6.25, with the bulk being common grade at $5.25 to $6.00. Most sales of beef steers show losses of 25 to 50c compared with last week's close. Sales of butcher she stock show about the same amount of loss as beef steers, bulk selling at $3.25 to $4.75, some of the better offerings $5.00 to $6.00. Canners and cutters have held steady at $2.25 to $3.00, and bologna bulls are strong at $3.25 to $4.00. Veal calves have also heht steady, most best lights selling at $7.00, some ex- tra choice vealers up to $7.50. Prac- tically no stackers and feeders are selling under $4.00, bulk going from $4.50 to $5.50. Same sales of good to choice kinds on the fat cattle order are made from $5.75 o $6.25. Most sales of stackers and feeders are showing gains or around 25c or more over last week's. Hog receipts are heavy and prices are showing moderate declines altho an unusually broad shipping demand is acting as a strong prop in the mar- ket. Bulk of good light sorts today around $7.50 to $7.75, few $7.85. good butchers mostly $6.75 to $7.00, heavy packers $5.50 to $6.00, good pigs $8.25. Sheep and lamb values continue on a strong basis, best fed lambs to- day $11.35, bulk native lambs $10.50 to $11.25, bulk fat ewes $5.00 t $5.75. Kale from the Chief. (From the Chicago Herald-Examiner President Harding will have to pay an income tax of $18,000 a year on his salary. This may help to strengthen the belief that it is better to be right than to be President. HIDES - FURS W,k* v. Mzs'r  B _U  8peld lalmuttlou i ! IIBi. ,11,, .th ltw URIff, L'EIlr I t HOU IN THE WELT. I UIHEIT 'RIC/glIIEOIATI  I We will pay the following prices for junk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brag4e to 8c per pound. Old Rags,  cent per pound. Old Rubberx and Tire,  omt to I vent  pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA, ProP. Phone IT'S GOOD I YOU NEED--WE'LL FURNISH iT WITH PROPUI 5rt'O! ' HEN it come to deliver- ing the gods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs---lum- ber sawed to the proper length and width--lumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier L(lmber Co. Ortonville Minn. LOCAL MARKET Farmers Elevator and Fuel Company Northern No. 1 ...................... $1.11 Flax .......................................... 1.74 Oats ........................................... 24 Rye ............................................. 57 Corn ........................................... 30 Barley ....................................... 33 Tracy-Shumaker Co. Turkeys, No. 1 dressed ........... 36 Geese  ........................................... 12 Ducks ......................................... 17 Springs ....................................... 17 Old Roosters ........................... 09 Hens ........................................... 19 Eggs ........................................... 22 Ortonville Creamery Butterfat (unsettled). --Do you read the ads in the Inde- pendent ? They contain money-saving news for you. Break colds with vapors The favored treatment now is a salve rubbed on, that gives off penetrating, healing fumes. i i ii ii i Try the vaporizing treatment for colds--Vicks VapoRub. At the first sign of a cold, ap- y Vimks ove throat and chest. b well in. Lay on a flannel cloth. Apply again at night and arrange the bedclothes like a funnel, so that the vapors, [ released by the body heat, will be freely inhaled. This is the treatment favored today by doctors and nurses for ! colds, bronchitis, tonsilitis, i i ii l spasmodic croup, sore throat and, in modified form, for catarrh and asthma. -Vieks contains the old, time- tested remedies--Camphor, Men- thol, Eucalyptus, etc.--combined by special process, so that while they penetrate and stimulate the skin, the ingredients are also released as vapors by the body heat and are breathed right into the lungs. Juat'rub it on and VVOKuB' A.OR breathe in the vapors o rt ur  v.d r ii Anker-Holth Cream Separators The Self-Balanced Bowl What is a self-balancing bowl ? It is a bowl that IS NOT balanced by placing little lead weights at different points, either at s6me point inside the bowl hood or at some other point on the bowl. All other Separator bowls are hand balanced, the ANKER-HOLTH is the only self-balanced bowl. In the ANKER-HOLTH the discs are loose so that they may shift and find their own center. The discs also point domward, giving the ANKER- HOLTH larger capacity for its size and weight be- cause the milk and cream only passes thru the bowl once. The cream outlet of the ANKER-HOLTH is at the bottom of the bowl and the skim milk outlet at the top. There is no chance for the skim milk and cream to intermix after they are once separated. When thru skimming, the bowl drains itself thru the cream outlet and flush holes at the bottom of tle bowl. The cleaning chamber o top of the discs is an absolute clarifier.. It takes all mpurities out of the milk. before it enters the discs. A CLEAN SKIMMER. Other things being equal a cream separator with the bowl in perfect balance is the cleanest skimmer. The ANKER-HOLTH bowl can never get out of bal- ance. From actual tests we know the ANKER- HOLTH is a close skimmer. One test at the Minne- sota Agricultural College showed one-fifth of one one-hundredth per cent butter-fat in the skim milk. It can't be beat. J. D. Ross & Co. Ortonville, Minnesota. IIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllilllflllllllllflllHllillflllllllHllli THE safety of a Bank !s not better expressed m its financial statement than in the character and stand- of its Officers and Dir- ectors. We invite your considera- tion of the sa[ e t y of this Bank under any test. Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH For [xpert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressin neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. O JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER [ Brick Layer and Plasterer [ Stone Mason and All Kinds of [ Cement Work. [ Ortonviile, Minn. R.F.D.| .. @ PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn. Kodak PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderat Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN , One block uphill from Gunderson s rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatmentx (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonviile, Minnesota @ Belva Kaercher TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY Ortonville, Minn. FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DP F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Slflnographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bid[. Ortonville, Minn. t.,, Col. Wm. Weilendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' experience. No practiv- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on u early date. Ortonville, MlnneNt YOUR AUCTIONEER COL. J. W. BELZER Real Estate, Merchandise, Pure Bred Stock and Farm Sales A Specialty 'or dates write me at Ortonville. Graduate of Jones Auction School J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Reiden- 194 Furniture Store - 88 All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minnesota. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY "THE WELL DIGGER" lifteen Yeas' ][ Ortonviile, Minn. R, F. D. t ELECTRIC SHOE [ SHOP [ Shoes repaired neatly and preempt-| ly. Our Work Guaranteed. [ GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. JANUARY 12, 1922 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE $ ' Strong Demand FARMERS PAGE l00or Stock " DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. / I 800 MINNESOTANS IN To Farm u Ills Is n..o,,,af In the seven weeks period ending 1J[O, LLU with the holiday season, U. S. Grain . [Grower solicitors in Minnesota ob- .... i, ....... tained 810 members, despite the fact tommltcee rrupv that in some counties, the work had Credits Department In All Land Banks. aiming to solve the far- problem in permanent worked out by the con- joint committee on agricul- it developed today fol- an address by Congressman Anderson, chairman of the before the Minnesota Farm federation late yesterday. Be- for Washington last ! Anderson told members of that a bill had been his committee and will be in both houses of congress days along with a special re- the committee on the sub- rural credits. Proposed act, Mr. Anderson s to give the farmer the same businessmen now receive federal reserve system. It the federal farm loan act a farm credits depart- every federal land bank. Thru the bank will discount proceeds of which have strictly agricultural pur- ad which are based on assets grain, livestock or other pro- to be marketed immediate- L loans now may be made by but are difficult to negotiate be carried by the banks as ' Under the proposed act the COuld rediscount them. Simi- now are being handled thru Finance corporation as an under the Kel- to that law. we purpose," said Mr. An- put into every federal land arm credits department which for making loans precise- to agricultural demands." of these loans is to be than six months nor more years, according to Mr. An- is proposed, he said, to aoney for the loans by sell- in the open market, the farmers' obligations. address yesterday, Mr. An- Urged farmers to organize so as to control the mar- their products. He opposed fixing 'or govern- of farm products for the market. "Farmers," as much right to take among themselves to sta- as manufacturers have. If method could be worked agricultural produc- to the demand for farm eliminating market wreck- farmers undoubtedly the right to adopt it. farm organization and more co-operation would do prevent such disastrous con- as face the farmers now." (ROWERS TO OPEN SALES OFFICE to begin immediate opening sales agencies, will be in St. Paul or was voted last week by of the U. S. Grain Growers, to an announcement by the Northwest head- f the company. The cam- members have pledged bushels of grain, of which crones from the advisory board of far- be named, the members to from among omcers of co- elevators, Grain Grower as- or other fainer-owned lo- marketing companies. authorization is sufficiently permit the purchase of exchanges and as are necessary to cam- regulations of such insti- unify organization work also were taken. will meet in Chicago 18 to prepare for the of members, which there on March 21. It been announced that would be held on Mar. _ RS TO RENT 0-ACRE FARM FOR NE TURKEY PER ACRE S. D., January 3.--A vicinity has offered to in a new and novel man- states he will rent the 160 a tenant on the sole condi- the tenant shall turn over for each acre of by the land owner dur- weeks of 1921 brought to $10 each. He believes method he would be get- end" of the bargain at the end of 1922 ent with 160 turkeys.--Pio- been in progress only a fortnight. Thus far, twenty elevators in the state have become affiliated with the move- ment. Nationally, the movement entered the holiday season with 34,229 mem- bers and 849 elevator and local grow- er association contracts. Illinois is first with 8,500, Nebraska second with 6,700 members, and North Dakota 3rd with 4,800. This aggregate member- ship has been obtained during a per- lad ranging from seven months in some states and seven weeks in others. Minnesota and Iowa were last to start. In Minnesota, grower contracts have been circulated with marked success in Lyon, Kittson, Watonwon and Red- wood counties. Some work has been (tone in Wright county. In Lyon comi- ty, where the first soliciting was done. more than 400 contracts have been obtained and in townships where the work has been completed, 85 per cent of the grain acreage has been signed up, solicitors report. In Kittson coun- ty, many of the leading wheat grow- ers of the section have become mem- bers. In Redwood and Watonwon counties, the work was well started when the holiday vacation interrupted. BABY BEEF COMMANDS BEST MARKET PRICES Baby beef production can be made most profitable on land worth not more than $150 an acre, of which at least 50 per cent is easily cultivated, says W. H. Peters, acting chief'of the animal husbandry division of the Uni- versity of Minnesota. By baby beef production, he says, is meant the growing, fattening and ,marketing of beef calves at ages ranging from 12 to 24 months, 16 to 18 months being the most economical at which to sell. "With sufficient fat on them when placed on the market, baby beeves are always market toppers," Professor Peters says. "Baby beef production al- lows raising of more calves on the same amount of land than does pro- duction of stock or feeder cattle. Each good baby beef steer should sell for $30 to $50 more when one and one-half years old than the average feeder steer will bring at two and one-half years of age. "The cows should be fed thru the winter just as cows would be in stock- er and feeder production. Because it is important to get calves as early in the spring as is consistent with the opportunity of giving them sufficient care, the bull may be turned out with the cow herd June first. Before wean- ing them the calves should be started on grain by the use of a creep in the pasture. Until they are put on full feed about November first calves should run with their mothers." Sixty per cent shelled corn or ground barley, 25 per cent oats and 15 per ent linseed oiLrneal, according to Professor Peters, make a good ra- tion, along with alfalfa or clover hay and a little silage. Baby beeves can usually be sold to the best advantage in June, July or August, but may be carried up to the early part of De- cember and sold for the Christmas beef market. 36 STUDENTS TAKING "U" CREAMERY COURSE Laying special emphasis on efficien- cy of operation and creamery account- ing, 36 students at University Farm are registered in the creamery opera- tors' short course, which began Jan. 2 and will end Feb. 11. While the course is given primarily for begin- ners, according to Prof. J. R. Keithley, who is in charge, many of the stu- dents have had wide experience in creamery work. With a large amount of new equipment installed, students will have an opportunity in getting practical experience with latest and most modern machinery. The course will be devoted entirely to instruction in creamery work, and will include cream grading, pasteuri- zation and ripening; use of starters in )reducing desired flavors; proper methods of making butter in order to control its composition with reference to moisture, fat, and salt; proper treatment and preparation of butter containers to eliminate mold and pre- vent shrinkage; and the importance and relation of accuracy in weights and tests to the success of creameries. The demand for well trained men in creamery work is greater than the supply, according to Professor Keith- ley. Followng the close of the present course the cheese plant operators' short course, which begins February 13 and ends March 11, will be given. Bring your dull safety razor blades to us for sharpening. We harpen all blades and guarantee them to shave as ood as new ones. J. D Ross & Co. Minn. Stocker and Feeoer Buyers Outbid Packers for Cattle Supplies. Hog Receipts Heavy. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 1,700. Market closing weak to 25c lower on beef steers and butch- er she stock, stackers and feeders strong to 25c higher. Calves 2,300. Market closing steady, bulk best lights $7.00, s6me extra choice vealers $7.50. Hogs 14,700. Market steady to 25c lower. Sheep 1,000. luarl<et steady to strong. So. St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 10. 1922:-- Altho dressed beef trade continues rather dull and large packers and other killers are forcing prices of fat cattle lower, country demand or stackers and feeders continues rela- tively broader than normal and prices of these latter are working upward, country buyers sometimes outbidding packers for some cattle on the fat cattle order for feeding purposes. Practically no good beef steers are coming, only a few of these consist- ing of five head of yearling steers and heifers averaging around 660 lbs. selling' in thi. week's trade to city butchers at $8.25. A fair showing of beef steers of a medium grade have sohl from $6.25, with the bulk being common grade at $5.25 to $6.00. Most sales of beef steers show losses of 25 to 50c compared with last week's close. Sales of butcher she stock show about the same amount of loss as beef steers, bulk selling at $3.25 to $4.75, some of the better offerings $5.00 to $6.00. Canners and cutters have held steady at $2.25 to $3.00, and bologna bulls are strong at $3.25 to $4.00. Veal calves have also heht steady, most best lights selling at $7.00, some ex- tra choice vealers up to $7.50. Prac- tically no stackers and feeders are selling under $4.00, bulk going from $4.50 to $5.50. Same sales of good to choice kinds on the fat cattle order are made from $5.75 o $6.25. Most sales of stackers and feeders are showing gains or around 25c or more over last week's. Hog receipts are heavy and prices are showing moderate declines altho an unusually broad shipping demand is acting as a strong prop in the mar- ket. Bulk of good light sorts today around $7.50 to $7.75, few $7.85. good butchers mostly $6.75 to $7.00, heavy packers $5.50 to $6.00, good pigs $8.25. Sheep and lamb values continue on a strong basis, best fed lambs to- day $11.35, bulk native lambs $10.50 to $11.25, bulk fat ewes $5.00 t $5.75. Kale from the Chief. (From the Chicago Herald-Examiner President Harding will have to pay an income tax of $18,000 a year on his salary. This may help to strengthen the belief that it is better to be right than to be President. HIDES - FURS W,k* v. Mzs'r  B _U  8peld lalmuttlou i ! IIBi. ,11,, .th ltw URIff, L'EIlr I t HOU IN THE WELT. I UIHEIT 'RIC/glIIEOIATI  I We will pay the following prices for junk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brag4e to 8c per pound. Old Rags,  cent per pound. Old Rubberx and Tire,  omt to I vent  pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA, ProP. Phone IT'S GOOD I YOU NEED--WE'LL FURNISH iT WITH PROPUI 5rt'O! ' HEN it come to deliver- ing the gods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs---lum- ber sawed to the proper length and width--lumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier L(lmber Co. Ortonville Minn. LOCAL MARKET Farmers Elevator and Fuel Company Northern No. 1 ...................... $1.11 Flax .......................................... 1.74 Oats ........................................... 24 Rye ............................................. 57 Corn ........................................... 30 Barley ....................................... 33 Tracy-Shumaker Co. Turkeys, No. 1 dressed ........... 36 Geese  ........................................... 12 Ducks ......................................... 17 Springs ....................................... 17 Old Roosters ........................... 09 Hens ........................................... 19 Eggs ........................................... 22 Ortonville Creamery Butterfat (unsettled). --Do you read the ads in the Inde- pendent ? They contain money-saving news for you. Break colds with vapors The favored treatment now is a salve rubbed on, that gives off penetrating, healing fumes. i i ii ii i Try the vaporizing treatment for colds--Vicks VapoRub. At the first sign of a cold, ap- y Vimks ove throat and chest. b well in. Lay on a flannel cloth. Apply again at night and arrange the bedclothes like a funnel, so that the vapors, [ released by the body heat, will be freely inhaled. This is the treatment favored today by doctors and nurses for ! colds, bronchitis, tonsilitis, i i ii l spasmodic croup, sore throat and, in modified form, for catarrh and asthma. -Vieks contains the old, time- tested remedies--Camphor, Men- thol, Eucalyptus, etc.--combined by special process, so that while they penetrate and stimulate the skin, the ingredients are also released as vapors by the body heat and are breathed right into the lungs. Juat'rub it on and VVOKuB' A.OR breathe in the vapors o rt ur  v.d r ii Anker-Holth Cream Separators The Self-Balanced Bowl What is a self-balancing bowl ? It is a bowl that IS NOT balanced by placing little lead weights at different points, either at s6me point inside the bowl hood or at some other point on the bowl. All other Separator bowls are hand balanced, the ANKER-HOLTH is the only self-balanced bowl. In the ANKER-HOLTH the discs are loose so that they may shift and find their own center. The discs also point domward, giving the ANKER- HOLTH larger capacity for its size and weight be- cause the milk and cream only passes thru the bowl once. The cream outlet of the ANKER-HOLTH is at the bottom of the bowl and the skim milk outlet at the top. There is no chance for the skim milk and cream to intermix after they are once separated. When thru skimming, the bowl drains itself thru the cream outlet and flush holes at the bottom of tle bowl. The cleaning chamber o top of the discs is an absolute clarifier.. It takes all mpurities out of the milk. before it enters the discs. A CLEAN SKIMMER. Other things being equal a cream separator with the bowl in perfect balance is the cleanest skimmer. The ANKER-HOLTH bowl can never get out of bal- ance. From actual tests we know the ANKER- HOLTH is a close skimmer. One test at the Minne- sota Agricultural College showed one-fifth of one one-hundredth per cent butter-fat in the skim milk. It can't be beat. J. D. Ross & Co. Ortonville, Minnesota. IIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllilllflllllllllflllHllillflllllllHllli THE safety of a Bank !s not better expressed m its financial statement than in the character and stand- of its Officers and Dir- ectors. We invite your considera- tion of the sa[ e t y of this Bank under any test. Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH For [xpert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressin neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. O JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER [ Brick Layer and Plasterer [ Stone Mason and All Kinds of [ Cement Work. [ Ortonviile, Minn. R.F.D.| .. @ PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn. Kodak PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderat Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN , One block uphill from Gunderson s rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatmentx (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonviile, Minnesota @ Belva Kaercher TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY Ortonville, Minn. FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DP F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Slflnographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bid[. Ortonville, Minn. t.,, Col. Wm. Weilendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' experience. No practiv- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on u early date. Ortonville, MlnneNt YOUR AUCTIONEER COL. J. W. BELZER Real Estate, Merchandise, Pure Bred Stock and Farm Sales A Specialty 'or dates write me at Ortonville. Graduate of Jones Auction School J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Reiden- 194 Furniture Store - 88 All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minnesota. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY "THE WELL DIGGER" lifteen Yeas' ][ Ortonviile, Minn. R, F. D. t ELECTRIC SHOE [ SHOP [ Shoes repaired neatly and preempt-| ly. Our Work Guaranteed. [ GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGJ $ Professional and BRsiness Directory C. E. SIGLOH r0r hpert Pho 284-L Or t enville, JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonvill6 Tailoring Co. g d atly done. Ortonvflle, ELECTRIC SHOE I SHOP I Shoem ret maired atly and prpt I ly. Wo Gun--teed. | I GUS. E. ANDERSON, Pre JOHN SPANYERS Lighf Hauling of all Kindz Expels and Baggeqge Telephone 287 Ortonvflle, Minn PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Ste Man and All Kind of Cement Wk. OrtonvilIe* Minn, PETERSON & SON Pray Line Big Stene Lake It* Phone 38 OI4omvill Mhxs Kodak PRINTINGDE ....... G ENLARGING Prompt. qualit S THE REED STUDIO Or toaville MJn, OSTEOPATHIC One bleak u l 1 store F. L BROWN ThE $EWLE Or tenville, Belva Kaercher TEACIIER OF PIANO AND HARMONY Octvill MinL FOR TRUCK SERVICE md My kind of lilht and hvy ]raylng HERsauer Eros. PHONE 268 MI Orders (vea Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attvmey at Law Odd Fellows Braiding Ortonvllte, Minn. DR. F. W. DIEN. CHIROPRACTOR D* D. WHITE D. C PH, C. Sgpb 12-I$-1&1-1 Sbtmlaker BI. OrtvflJe, Miar CoL Win. Weg,i,. AUCIONEBIg 80,mrs'eam'ztencL No aat wnrMmeea17 aadgetiaam datL Onsvifle. ]mmmts YOUR AUCPIONFR COL. J. W. BELZER Real tale. M Pure Stock add Farm SakG A Sat7 For datms vTtte me at Ortonvin eMs Auction Sehoa J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND RBPAIRING PHONES--- . lg4 lemldtm fm,e . M All Work mu'stmd Ortmstt linuotL WILL FINCH Ezlwelmd Ptet Pme U6-L All Werk itmntel FARMERS PAGE i DEVOTE D ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. d Farm i Ills Is Drafted Committee Propo I Jta Irtm m In al Joint ommitt on agrlcl- imlng to solve the f- )blem in peent worked out by the con- l, it developed toda fol-I ea address by Congresn' Andeon, chadian of the Washington It d members of bill had been ite and will be t in both hours of congress with a special re- the eommitt on the sub- act, gr. Anderon new recolve ;ystem. It federal farm ]ogn act a farm cdits depgt- every federal land bank. Th td which a based on assets grain, ]ivestk or other p2- be marketed immediat Loans now may he hut are difficult to negotiate ev.rrled by the bnnks as act the diount them. SLmi- now are being handled tb ,t Finance eorpotion as der the Kel- m credits department which r of these loans is to be than six months nor mo yea, aordlag to Mr. An- ts pposed, he said, to by sell- market, addss yesterday Mr, An- orga to ntl he mar- He opposed produet for right to t.1<e , among thallus to sta- method could be worked to the demand for farm eliminating rket wck- fae undoubtedly ht to dopt i f& organizaion ad more eperatlon would do eh disastr ov face the fe now." OPE r SALES OFFICE to heg;n ses agendes, I be in t. :f the U. z th Northwest head- 0o MINNESOTANS IN U, In the seven wks period ending with the holiday sn, U. S. Groin Grower solicitors in Miesota ob- mined 810 members, despite the lt be in progress only a fortnight. Fhus far, twent meat. Nationally, the movement the holiday ber and 849 r aociation contrts. IllneSs is rst with 8,600, Nebska cond with ,7OO members1 qth 4,8OO. This aggregate shif led raging from even months i some tates and ven weeks b, others Minnesota and Iowa were last to start. In Min.esota, grower contract have been in Lyon, Kittson, 'cl countlo lone in Wright unty, In Lyon eoun- , whom the first soliciting was done. more than OO contract* have been ebtalne and in townehips where the work has bee. completed, 5 per vent of the grain acreage has been eined up, soIicto report. ty, ma.y of the earl ng wheat grow- bern. n Redwood and Wato.wen eountles, the work was well started when the holiday vacation intepted BABY BEEF COMMANDS Baby beef most pmfltabh on Iad worth net mo th $150  acre, el which at lst 50 per cent is iLv eultlvaed, ys W. H. Pete, ting ehle4 of the ity of Minsota. By baby bf predation, he ys, is met the growing, fattening and keting of bf calves at ages n#ng from I2 to 24 months, 16 to t8 months being the most nomical at whish to lh "With sufficient fat sn plated on the market> baby beeves n always market toppers," Pete eays. "Baby bf pd.cton al Iowa raising of mo calves on the e unt of laud than does pin- ged bah) $30 to $; yearn old than the arage steer 11 bring at two and yea of age. er and feeder predueon. is impoxtant to get enlves as early in the spring as is consienl opportunity of ging them care, the bull m the cow herd Je first ing them the calves on grmn by the  ef a sp i. the pastu. Unl they a put feed about November fit Sixty per nt shelled ground barley, 25 per nt ts 15 per ent linseed ottmeal, odinS to Proesor Peters, make a good ra lion, alo.g uaIly in Ju, JJy or Augur, carried up to the early part of De and old The veto- pledged "u" CREAMERy COURS Laying speciaI phasis on effiden- t advisory ey of operation and emery avount ha named, ing, 36 stents at Unirsity Fa regterod In the crer tors' short urse, which began J or other farmer-owned will e[ Feb. 1L ul is given primarily for begin It.horltlon n, ording to ProL J. R. Ke[thley, pta-mlt the 1 who is n charge, ny of the *tu- had Wide experten T to tracery work. equipment installed, student* Will hve an opportunity in getting , mlf orsanizati protocol eHenee with al were taken. ost medem mhinery. C'gt Th e course WiIl be devoted entirely ry work, and . wlde} iH include em graJng, pateuri. ration and rlperdng; pduclng desired flavors; proper methods of making butter n order to ntrol its cmpssitian with refnee m tsture, fat. md salt: RENT treatment d Id p vent shrinkage; d the lmportan 1 d relation of acuraey in weight k. S, D., ffuar 8,-- tad tests to the suess of creameries. for ll trained men in work is gent th the ttes he Will pgiy, according to tnt on lay. Fog the f each the ch vlt operath' begins Febrtmry , the land esvnr dur- be iven. to$10eae. --Bring your lull safety r to us for sharpening, wo sharpen a2I blad and ffaaranfe vh at the d Ortonvle. nn. Strong Demand  .... R ......................................... -- Dk s ................................. 17 ' Stock Cattle s ............................................ 0 r Nrhe Old Rooster .... 09 Ft ................................... 1.74 Hens .......................................... 19 and Fer Buyers Packers for Cattle Supplies Hog Reipts Heavy. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle L700. Market elosing weak er she stock, stockers and steong to 2 higher. Calves 2,3OO. Market closing steady, bulk best lights $7,OO, sa extra ehoi vlere $7.5O. Hogs 14.700, Market steady to 2 lower. Shp 1,000. ret steely to strong. So. St. Pa, Minn., Jan. 10, t922:-- Altho dsd rather dull ad large packers and cattle lower, untry demand lee stokers and feedem continues rela- tively broader than noal and prie of these latter are working upwanl, country b.yers ssmetimes ontbklding packers for some cattle on the fat cattle order for feeding Practically .o good beef steers are coming, only a few of these censist- of yearling strs ii sellin in this week's trade to city $8.2. A fair showing of beef steers of a medium gade ha sold fm $625. with the bulk being common grade at $5.25 to $6OO. Mot Sales of butcher nut s meamo, steers, bulk selling at $3.25 to $4.75, $6.OO. Cnnem steady at $2.25 to $S.00 bulls are strong at $3.25 to $4.OO. Veal also held steady, most best Ughts selling at $7.5O, some ex- tra choice venlers up to $7.5. Pmc- tically no stockers and feeders a selllng under $4.OO, bvlk goi.g fm $4.5O to $5.5O. S sales of good to choice kinds on the fat cattle ordei ang feeders nr over last wk's. Hog ips are heavy and prices a showig moderate dlines althe unuslly bad is acting as a stng pp in the mar- ket Bulk of good light sortg today ad $7.50 to $7,75, few $7.8, good but*hers mostly $ 75 to $7.00, packers $5.8O to $6.00, good $8.25, Sheep en n rrocg basis, day $1L35, bulk native lambs $1o.5o tc $11.25, hulk fat ewes $500 t $5-75- Kale frgm the Chief. (From the Chicago HeraM-Exiner) President Haling will have to pa an income tax of $18,000 a year on hi salary. This may help to stngher ighl HIDES. FUR We win Imy l'tea fe |kt Old Im SU0 t il0.e0 I tea Cepper ud heavy BeMte te 8  eee te 1 ett per I Pipe FItttng BraM Ge BeRing and Hen dd t. ated Aeetylle Walden|. The Ortonville Foundry w.F. MUMACA. Pm0. IPItem t$ Oats ..................... 24 Egg s .................................... 22 Rye .............................. 7 Or tenville Creery Corn ...................................... 3O Butterfat (unsettled). Barley .............. 3 Trsey-Shumker Co. pendent? They eontain money- vlnt Turkeys, NO. 1 dresd ........... 36 news for yo [Break colds with vapors][ [ The favored treatment now is a salvo rubbed l| ] on,thatgivesoffpenetrating, heallngf ..... /I Try the v ._'ng treatmtmt odic croup, sore threat for coldVtcl VapoRub. and. in modified fu, far calash At the first sign of a cold, ap- and asthma. b wall in. Lay.on a flannel testedremedies--Camphor Men- ly Vims ove throat and cbest.  Vicks contahus the o1 the- cloth. Apply n at n'wht thol Eucalyptuetc.bied a funnel, so that the vapoes, oy spec prcces set hat ram eleased b the  heat will they penetrate and stunulatc the Th i the tretcmt lavord released  vapors by the body be fiely ie]ed, Y ' skin. the ingti,t are gio today by doctor and nurv for I heat and m breathed right into cMds, bronchitis, tonsilitis, lthehml Illll Anker-Holth [ Cream Separators The Self-Balanced Bowl What is a self-haleing bowl ? It is a bowl that IS NOT balanced by placing little lead weights at Uffent points, either at me poing inside the bowl hood or t so other point on the bowl. All other Separator bwls a hand balanced. the ANKER-HOLTH Is the only ]f-balaneed howl In the ANKER-HOLTH the dia a la so that they y shift and find their own center. The dics &lso point doward, giving the ANKR. HOLTH larger enpity for its size and weight be- ease the mgk and em only pss th the bowl nce. The cm outlet of the ANKER-HOLTH is ntthe bottom of the bowl and the skim nilk outlet at th top, The is no chan for the skim rlk d e to inteIx after they a on separated. When th s]dmming, the bowl drains itself tbr the cam outlet and flush holes at the bottom of the bowl. The cloning dmmbsr  top of the di is an absolute elalifler.. It takes all tpitiea out of the milts before t ente the ds. A CLEAN SKIMMER, Other things bfing equal a c separator With the bowl in perft baan is the eleest stmalraer. The ANKE]HOLTH bowl n never get out of bal- . From act] tets we know the ANKER. HOLTH is a elo kimmer. One teat at the Min ta Agrilturnl Collie showti on.fifth of one one-hundredth per cent butter-fat in the klm milk. It c't be bea J. D. Ross & Co. Ortonville, Minnesota. iT V we're there, tts all. For big Joba  imli Jobs--lum- legih and wldtb--Imbt r for ery prtill p,lle prat Geier Limber C Ortonvilh Minn. TH000#ety is ' better expressed in its financhl statement than in the character and stand- ing of its Officers and Dir- ectors. We invite your considera- tion 0[ the safety of this Bank under any test. EOLMER UgY .YE LL DIGGIt  toavtU Mlm l F* ID. II JANUARY 12, 1922 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE $ ' Strong Demand FARMERS PAGE l00or Stock " DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. / I 800 MINNESOTANS IN To Farm u Ills Is n..o,,,af In the seven weeks period ending 1J[O, LLU with the holiday season, U. S. Grain . [Grower solicitors in Minnesota ob- .... i, ....... tained 810 members, despite the fact tommltcee rrupv that in some counties, the work had Credits Department In All Land Banks. aiming to solve the far- problem in permanent worked out by the con- joint committee on agricul- it developed today fol- an address by Congressman Anderson, chairman of the before the Minnesota Farm federation late yesterday. Be- for Washington last ! Anderson told members of that a bill had been his committee and will be in both houses of congress days along with a special re- the committee on the sub- rural credits. Proposed act, Mr. Anderson s to give the farmer the same businessmen now receive federal reserve system. It the federal farm loan act a farm credits depart- every federal land bank. Thru the bank will discount proceeds of which have strictly agricultural pur- ad which are based on assets grain, livestock or other pro- to be marketed immediate- L loans now may be made by but are difficult to negotiate be carried by the banks as ' Under the proposed act the COuld rediscount them. Simi- now are being handled thru Finance corporation as an under the Kel- to that law. we purpose," said Mr. An- put into every federal land arm credits department which for making loans precise- to agricultural demands." of these loans is to be than six months nor more years, according to Mr. An- is proposed, he said, to aoney for the loans by sell- in the open market, the farmers' obligations. address yesterday, Mr. An- Urged farmers to organize so as to control the mar- their products. He opposed fixing 'or govern- of farm products for the market. "Farmers," as much right to take among themselves to sta- as manufacturers have. If method could be worked agricultural produc- to the demand for farm eliminating market wreck- farmers undoubtedly the right to adopt it. farm organization and more co-operation would do prevent such disastrous con- as face the farmers now." (ROWERS TO OPEN SALES OFFICE to begin immediate opening sales agencies, will be in St. Paul or was voted last week by of the U. S. Grain Growers, to an announcement by the Northwest head- f the company. The cam- members have pledged bushels of grain, of which crones from the advisory board of far- be named, the members to from among omcers of co- elevators, Grain Grower as- or other fainer-owned lo- marketing companies. authorization is sufficiently permit the purchase of exchanges and as are necessary to cam- regulations of such insti- unify organization work also were taken. will meet in Chicago 18 to prepare for the of members, which there on March 21. It been announced that would be held on Mar. _ RS TO RENT 0-ACRE FARM FOR NE TURKEY PER ACRE S. D., January 3.--A vicinity has offered to in a new and novel man- states he will rent the 160 a tenant on the sole condi- the tenant shall turn over for each acre of by the land owner dur- weeks of 1921 brought to $10 each. He believes method he would be get- end" of the bargain at the end of 1922 ent with 160 turkeys.--Pio- been in progress only a fortnight. Thus far, twenty elevators in the state have become affiliated with the move- ment. Nationally, the movement entered the holiday season with 34,229 mem- bers and 849 elevator and local grow- er association contracts. Illinois is first with 8,500, Nebraska second with 6,700 members, and North Dakota 3rd with 4,800. This aggregate member- ship has been obtained during a per- lad ranging from seven months in some states and seven weeks in others. Minnesota and Iowa were last to start. In Minnesota, grower contracts have been circulated with marked success in Lyon, Kittson, Watonwon and Red- wood counties. Some work has been (tone in Wright county. In Lyon comi- ty, where the first soliciting was done. more than 400 contracts have been obtained and in townships where the work has been completed, 85 per cent of the grain acreage has been signed up, solicitors report. In Kittson coun- ty, many of the leading wheat grow- ers of the section have become mem- bers. In Redwood and Watonwon counties, the work was well started when the holiday vacation interrupted. BABY BEEF COMMANDS BEST MARKET PRICES Baby beef production can be made most profitable on land worth not more than $150 an acre, of which at least 50 per cent is easily cultivated, says W. H. Peters, acting chief'of the animal husbandry division of the Uni- versity of Minnesota. By baby beef production, he says, is meant the growing, fattening and ,marketing of beef calves at ages ranging from 12 to 24 months, 16 to 18 months being the most economical at which to sell. "With sufficient fat on them when placed on the market, baby beeves are always market toppers," Professor Peters says. "Baby beef production al- lows raising of more calves on the same amount of land than does pro- duction of stock or feeder cattle. Each good baby beef steer should sell for $30 to $50 more when one and one-half years old than the average feeder steer will bring at two and one-half years of age. "The cows should be fed thru the winter just as cows would be in stock- er and feeder production. Because it is important to get calves as early in the spring as is consistent with the opportunity of giving them sufficient care, the bull may be turned out with the cow herd June first. Before wean- ing them the calves should be started on grain by the use of a creep in the pasture. Until they are put on full feed about November first calves should run with their mothers." Sixty per cent shelled corn or ground barley, 25 per cent oats and 15 per ent linseed oiLrneal, according to Professor Peters, make a good ra- tion, along with alfalfa or clover hay and a little silage. Baby beeves can usually be sold to the best advantage in June, July or August, but may be carried up to the early part of De- cember and sold for the Christmas beef market. 36 STUDENTS TAKING "U" CREAMERY COURSE Laying special emphasis on efficien- cy of operation and creamery account- ing, 36 students at University Farm are registered in the creamery opera- tors' short course, which began Jan. 2 and will end Feb. 11. While the course is given primarily for begin- ners, according to Prof. J. R. Keithley, who is in charge, many of the stu- dents have had wide experience in creamery work. With a large amount of new equipment installed, students will have an opportunity in getting practical experience with latest and most modern machinery. The course will be devoted entirely to instruction in creamery work, and will include cream grading, pasteuri- zation and ripening; use of starters in )reducing desired flavors; proper methods of making butter in order to control its composition with reference to moisture, fat, and salt; proper treatment and preparation of butter containers to eliminate mold and pre- vent shrinkage; and the importance and relation of accuracy in weights and tests to the success of creameries. The demand for well trained men in creamery work is greater than the supply, according to Professor Keith- ley. Followng the close of the present course the cheese plant operators' short course, which begins February 13 and ends March 11, will be given. Bring your dull safety razor blades to us for sharpening. We harpen all blades and guarantee them to shave as ood as new ones. J. D Ross & Co. Minn. Stocker and Feeoer Buyers Outbid Packers for Cattle Supplies. Hog Receipts Heavy. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 1,700. Market closing weak to 25c lower on beef steers and butch- er she stock, stackers and feeders strong to 25c higher. Calves 2,300. Market closing steady, bulk best lights $7.00, s6me extra choice vealers $7.50. Hogs 14,700. Market steady to 25c lower. Sheep 1,000. luarl<et steady to strong. So. St. Paul, Minn., Jan. 10. 1922:-- Altho dressed beef trade continues rather dull and large packers and other killers are forcing prices of fat cattle lower, country demand or stackers and feeders continues rela- tively broader than normal and prices of these latter are working upward, country buyers sometimes outbidding packers for some cattle on the fat cattle order for feeding purposes. Practically no good beef steers are coming, only a few of these consist- ing of five head of yearling steers and heifers averaging around 660 lbs. selling' in thi. week's trade to city butchers at $8.25. A fair showing of beef steers of a medium grade have sohl from $6.25, with the bulk being common grade at $5.25 to $6.00. Most sales of beef steers show losses of 25 to 50c compared with last week's close. Sales of butcher she stock show about the same amount of loss as beef steers, bulk selling at $3.25 to $4.75, some of the better offerings $5.00 to $6.00. Canners and cutters have held steady at $2.25 to $3.00, and bologna bulls are strong at $3.25 to $4.00. Veal calves have also heht steady, most best lights selling at $7.00, some ex- tra choice vealers up to $7.50. Prac- tically no stackers and feeders are selling under $4.00, bulk going from $4.50 to $5.50. Same sales of good to choice kinds on the fat cattle order are made from $5.75 o $6.25. Most sales of stackers and feeders are showing gains or around 25c or more over last week's. Hog receipts are heavy and prices are showing moderate declines altho an unusually broad shipping demand is acting as a strong prop in the mar- ket. Bulk of good light sorts today around $7.50 to $7.75, few $7.85. good butchers mostly $6.75 to $7.00, heavy packers $5.50 to $6.00, good pigs $8.25. Sheep and lamb values continue on a strong basis, best fed lambs to- day $11.35, bulk native lambs $10.50 to $11.25, bulk fat ewes $5.00 t $5.75. Kale from the Chief. (From the Chicago Herald-Examiner President Harding will have to pay an income tax of $18,000 a year on his salary. This may help to strengthen the belief that it is better to be right than to be President. HIDES - FURS W,k* v. Mzs'r  B _U  8peld lalmuttlou i ! IIBi. ,11,, .th ltw URIff, L'EIlr I t HOU IN THE WELT. I UIHEIT 'RIC/glIIEOIATI  I We will pay the following prices for junk: Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton Copper and heavy Brag4e to 8c per pound. Old Rags,  cent per pound. Old Rubberx and Tire,  omt to I vent  pound. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA, ProP. Phone IT'S GOOD I YOU NEED--WE'LL FURNISH iT WITH PROPUI 5rt'O! ' HEN it come to deliver- ing the gods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs---lum- ber sawed to the proper length and width--lumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier L(lmber Co. Ortonville Minn. LOCAL MARKET Farmers Elevator and Fuel Company Northern No. 1 ...................... $1.11 Flax .......................................... 1.74 Oats ........................................... 24 Rye ............................................. 57 Corn ........................................... 30 Barley ....................................... 33 Tracy-Shumaker Co. Turkeys, No. 1 dressed ........... 36 Geese  ........................................... 12 Ducks ......................................... 17 Springs ....................................... 17 Old Roosters ........................... 09 Hens ........................................... 19 Eggs ........................................... 22 Ortonville Creamery Butterfat (unsettled). --Do you read the ads in the Inde- pendent ? They contain money-saving news for you. Break colds with vapors The favored treatment now is a salve rubbed on, that gives off penetrating, healing fumes. i i ii ii i Try the vaporizing treatment for colds--Vicks VapoRub. At the first sign of a cold, ap- y Vimks ove throat and chest. b well in. Lay on a flannel cloth. Apply again at night and arrange the bedclothes like a funnel, so that the vapors, [ released by the body heat, will be freely inhaled. This is the treatment favored today by doctors and nurses for ! colds, bronchitis, tonsilitis, i i ii l spasmodic croup, sore throat and, in modified form, for catarrh and asthma. -Vieks contains the old, time- tested remedies--Camphor, Men- thol, Eucalyptus, etc.--combined by special process, so that while they penetrate and stimulate the skin, the ingredients are also released as vapors by the body heat and are breathed right into the lungs. Juat'rub it on and VVOKuB' A.OR breathe in the vapors o rt ur  v.d r ii Anker-Holth Cream Separators The Self-Balanced Bowl What is a self-balancing bowl ? It is a bowl that IS NOT balanced by placing little lead weights at different points, either at s6me point inside the bowl hood or at some other point on the bowl. All other Separator bowls are hand balanced, the ANKER-HOLTH is the only self-balanced bowl. In the ANKER-HOLTH the discs are loose so that they may shift and find their own center. The discs also point domward, giving the ANKER- HOLTH larger capacity for its size and weight be- cause the milk and cream only passes thru the bowl once. The cream outlet of the ANKER-HOLTH is at the bottom of the bowl and the skim milk outlet at the top. There is no chance for the skim milk and cream to intermix after they are once separated. When thru skimming, the bowl drains itself thru the cream outlet and flush holes at the bottom of tle bowl. The cleaning chamber o top of the discs is an absolute clarifier.. It takes all mpurities out of the milk. before it enters the discs. A CLEAN SKIMMER. Other things being equal a cream separator with the bowl in perfect balance is the cleanest skimmer. The ANKER-HOLTH bowl can never get out of bal- ance. From actual tests we know the ANKER- HOLTH is a close skimmer. One test at the Minne- sota Agricultural College showed one-fifth of one one-hundredth per cent butter-fat in the skim milk. It can't be beat. J. D. Ross & Co. Ortonville, Minnesota. IIIIIIlllllllllllllllllllilllflllllllllflllHllillflllllllHllli THE safety of a Bank !s not better expressed m its financial statement than in the character and stand- of its Officers and Dir- ectors. We invite your considera- tion of the sa[ e t y of this Bank under any test. Professional and Business Directory C. E. SIGLOH For [xpert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC REPAIRING Phone 284-L Ortonville, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressin neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. O JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER [ Brick Layer and Plasterer [ Stone Mason and All Kinds of [ Cement Work. [ Ortonviile, Minn. R.F.D.| .. @ PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 38 Ortonville, Minn. Kodak PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderat Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN , One block uphill from Gunderson s rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatmentx (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc.) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonviile, Minnesota @ Belva Kaercher TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY Ortonville, Minn. FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DP F. W. DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C., PH. C. Slflnographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bid[. Ortonville, Minn. t.,, Col. Wm. Weilendorf AUCTIONEER 80 years' experience. No practiv- ing on your property. Call or write me early and get in on u early date. Ortonville, MlnneNt YOUR AUCTIONEER COL. J. W. BELZER Real Estate, Merchandise, Pure Bred Stock and Farm Sales A Specialty 'or dates write me at Ortonville. Graduate of Jones Auction School J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHONES--Reiden- 194 Furniture Store - 88 All Work Guaranteed Ortonville, Minnesota. WILL FINCH Experienced Painter Phone 235-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY "THE WELL DIGGER" lifteen Yeas' ][ Ortonviile, Minn. R, F. D. t ELECTRIC SHOE [ SHOP [ Shoes repaired neatly and preempt-| ly. Our Work Guaranteed. [ GUS. E. ANDERSON, Prop.