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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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January 14, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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January 14, 2003
 

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Ortonville "Town with a heart" O'ff00 INDE: ENDEN !" "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" Isrud luckily escapes th in Iowa plane crash man, 42-year-old, escaped death injury last Wednesday his small single-engine a Cessna 150J, flipped and on its top after experiencing Problems. hap happened in a corn of Britt, Iowa. flying alone in the plane just purchased in heading back to Ortonville crash took place. taken to Hancock County Hospital in Britt, where be and released, according to County Sheriff's Dept. A former Big Stone County Agent, and Independent reader, now owner- publisher of the Northwood Anchor weekly newspaper in Northwood, Iowa, sent us news of the crash as it appeared in the Globe Gazette daily newspaper in Mason City/Clear Lake, IA. Lloyd writes that "Paulsrud was flying into a 30-mile-per-hour head- wind. I saw the plane and he was a mighty lucky man. I enjoy your paper, and I still correspond with my old buddy, JR Parker in Big Stone City." According to the Globe-Gazette report, "Paulsrud tried to land in a plowed field whcn the plane's engine failed. The plane struck the ground, flipped and landed on its top, facing northwest", according to a report from the Sheriff's Dept. "The Federal Aviation Administration and the Britt Police Dept. assisted the Sheriff's Dept. in the crash investigation." "Paulsrud walked away from the crash-landing. The plane, which had flipped, had been righted and secured at the Lee Marachand farm when the accompanying photo was taken by Angle Johannsen of the Britt News- Tribune." Paulsrud is reportedly back in Orlonville today. unty financially sound as year appointments set Wade Athey first County Commis- eeting of the Jan. 7, year on aUnty Board elected the new nd Vice-chair for the ..year. Maas was elected chair, tave rSon will act as vice-chair. were made to the vari- COmmittees and represen- the county were named to (See Board minutes in zSSUe of the Independent) Commissioners voted to reject a bid to tear down the building known as Ed's Feed Store in the city of Graceville due to questions as to the viability of an adjoining wall. Adja- cent property owner, Todd Tritz voiced his concern that in removing the vacant building, the common wall would compromise his building. Bill Watson, County Attorney explained that Tritz held an easement to use the common wall as long as the county's building existed, but the county held benefit set for Friday of Clinton was recently lymphocytic leukemia and continues to at the MeritCare ND. be a free-will donation Supper and ent Auction on Friday, Jan. he CBG High School in prior to the CBG vs. Trojan basketball game to medical costs. Serving :30 9.m. The Basket g will conclude of the Varsity Game. and items have donated including: tickets, Less Kouba signed print, Wolverine Basket, Trojan Basket, Bath and Body Works Basket, Sweetheart Basket and more. For more information on the Benefit, or to donate a basket, call Jill Doschadis at 320-748-7605 in the evening or 320-748-7233 during the day. MeritCare Hospital sponsors a website through a website program called Caring Bridge. The website includes updates on Bill's condition, journal contribution's from Bill's fam- ily, and a guestbook link for friends to send e-mails to Bill and the Martig family. The website address is: www.caringbridge.org/mn/billmartig IE COUNTY BOARD of Commissioners elected Alvin Maas, vice.chair for 2003. Shown above, (back i i,)ner Bruce Swigerd and Dick Lane. Seated I Torgerson, Alvin Maas and Wade Athey. no responsibility in removing their building. Tritz is thus responsible to determine what actions will be neces- sary to protect his adjacent building in the process of demolition of the coun- ty's building and to determine the extent of repair to the common wall to insure it's viability after demolition of the building. The Commissioner's will reissue requests for bids after Tritz has investigated his options. Commissioner Dave Torgerson reported to the Board for the County Weed Inspector, Harold Nelson, that no spray will be used this summer in controlling leafy spurge. Nelson reported that the use of leafy spurge beetles has been very successful and was deemed to be the most effective means of controlling the weed. Nick Anderson, County Highway Engineer provided the County Corn- (Continued on page 13) Retail meet today Ortonville's Retail Committee meeting will be at 7:30 a.m. this Tuesday, Jan. 14, at the Dancing Bean. 3 Please Note!/ Unless you are an exception,] either because you're attending I school or for some other specif. ] ic reason, your subscription to | The Ortonvllle Independent | will be due Feb, 1, 2003. I Please take note that this I announcement will be the ONLY NOTICE of renewal you will receive! We will not be mailing out due notices.., so we will be looking forward to receiving your check for renewal by Feb. 1 and look for- ward, as usual, to keeping you on our "readership." Thank you. I Rates are: $30.00 per year | in Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, | Traverse and Swi Counties in | Minnesota, Gt  Roberts I Counties In South Dakota; I $34.00 per year for all other [ counties in Minnesota and l South Dako,.'and 8,00 per I year for all others. | Thank you. I JHE INDEPENDENT STAFF Warm temps, high winds cause open water on Big Stone Lake Fisherman advised to use caution despite colder temps Even the most experienced fisher- man on Big Stone Lake are confused by this year's dangerous ice condi- tions. Bob Stenzel of Big Stone City, SD has been fishing on the lake for years: "Oh, out of 365 days, 1 suppose I'm out there fishing about 250 of them." But this year, "I've never seen the ice quite so changeable, and a person just doesn't know where to go." With last week's warm weather, several fish houses went through the ice. Stenzel's was one of them. "The house was sitting on 12 inches of ice the day before, and by Thursday it was floating like a cork," said Stenzel. Bruce Nelsen, Conservation Officer for Big Stone County explains that the fish houses are dropping through the ice due to a combination of the warm weather and wind. "All it takes is about a 1/2 inch of water melted around the house, and wind circulates the waves until the water eats right through the ice," explains Nelsen. "Out on Lac qui Parle Lake, 25 to 40 fish houses were affected in the same way. With the warm tempera- tures there was a lot of water on the ice, and the wind just wore away at the ice until they were all bobbing in the water." Stenzel was able to pull his fish house out of the water by using a little creativity, a powerful 4-wheeler with studded tires and a couple volunteers. "It was a struggle for that 4-wheeler. We pulled it part way out of the water, let" it drain to lighten the load, and managed to pull it out without much of a loss, other than one heck of a lot of wet tackle." i i i !i:+!i,: i!!! ICE SHACKS FLOATING on area lakes was a common site Thursday. This shack was one of several taking the plunge near Shady Beach on the South Dakota side of Big Stone Lake. Bill Dwyer of Milbank lost his portable fish house last week in the lake as well. Strong winds blew his portable into open water but he man- aged to salvage everything, and helped pull out three others as well. Rod Gustafson was another who lost his fish house to the water for a short time. Rod's 7 x 12 foot house was about half submerged m open water near Goose Isle. "Lots of styro- foam and air in the tires kept the house up until we managed to get it out," said Rod. "I was real lucky. No one got hurt, and I only lost two fish- ing rods and one slipper. But I won't be going out again soon." Norm lqaukos, Ortonville Area Fisheries Supervisor suggested that with the warm temperatures and the lack of snow, pressure ridges are form- ing and the conditions become right tbr the ice to open up. The high winds (Continued on page 3) AN AERIAL VIEW of Big Stone Lake last Tuesday showed the large area near the islands with only a thin layer of ice. Geese had kept the water open. The area was completely open Thursday with 50 degree temperatures on Wednesday and high winds Thursday. There is open water all over the lake. Anglers are adv,sed to use extreme cautmn when venturing onto the lake. Big Stone City, SD receives $200,000 Block Grant to finance waterline Courtesy of Grant County Review In order to receive the funding of the State Block Grant, Big Stone City res- idents must conduct a survey of 60 percent (150) of the households in the it}: Big Stone Cit), Roundtable Club members will be conducting the sur- vey over the next.few weeks by tele- phone. Roundtable members will be asking two questions. How many are in your household? And based on the answer, they will ask if the household income is below or above a specific amount. Your participation is appreciated, as receipt of the State Block Grant for the city 3 water line is dependent on completion of the survey. Governor William J. Janklow, cleaning his desk in mid-afternoon of Dec. 31,2002, his last day in office as governor, offered good news to Big Stone City. In a conference telephone call to Mayor Jim McFarlane and Phyllis Justice, Grant County Review editor, the governor stated that he was approving a $200,000 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to help finance a water line construction project on Big Stone City's Main Street. Mayor McFarlane was very pleased and expressed thanks on behalf of the citizens of Big Stone City. Referring to his new career as a US Senator, Janklow assured McFarlane and Justice that he would be continuing to work hard for South Dakota and was looking forward to the opportunity. The estimated cost of the project will be $650,000. Work will takc place later this year. According to Janet Smith, City Finance Officer, the city has also applied for a CWFC grant to finance the project. To be considered for a CDBG, thc city will have to conduct a survey of the residential structures. Smith states it is very important for residents who receive a questionnaire during the sur- vey to return them as soon as possiblc since whether or not the grant is approved will depend on the results of the survey. This block grant is admin- istered by the State but financed with Federal funds. Wastewater lagoons were complet- ed in 1996. Four water projects were needed to complete the system. The first of these projects was construction of a line which linked Big Stone City with the Ortonville water system known as the Big Stone Lake Area Water Treatment Facility. Big Stone's cost for its part ot' that project was $447,000. A $150,000 grant was received to hclp finance the prCxiect. Thc 50,(X)0 gallon water tower was then replaced with a tank with 100,000 gallon capacity. The cost was $381,000 with a CWFC grant provid- ing $150,000 to help finance it. The 1.ake Strect project to repmce water and sewer lines, extending fr'gm the dike road to Big Stone Power Plant Intake Station, was completed at a cost of $715,(X)0. Bccause the dan- ger of flooding and the possible spillage of sewage into Big Stone Lakc, two grants were received to hclp with that cost. A CWFC grant of $250,000 and a CDBG grant of $400.000 were awarded to the city. When the Main Street project is com- pleted Big Stone City will have a first class water and wastewater disposal system which has cost $3,293,000 and has been fundcd by grants and utility rates. i Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com ) Ortonville "Town with a heart" O'ff00 INDE: ENDEN !" "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" Isrud luckily escapes th in Iowa plane crash man, 42-year-old, escaped death injury last Wednesday his small single-engine a Cessna 150J, flipped and on its top after experiencing Problems. hap happened in a corn of Britt, Iowa. flying alone in the plane just purchased in heading back to Ortonville crash took place. taken to Hancock County Hospital in Britt, where be and released, according to County Sheriff's Dept. A former Big Stone County Agent, and Independent reader, now owner- publisher of the Northwood Anchor weekly newspaper in Northwood, Iowa, sent us news of the crash as it appeared in the Globe Gazette daily newspaper in Mason City/Clear Lake, IA. Lloyd writes that "Paulsrud was flying into a 30-mile-per-hour head- wind. I saw the plane and he was a mighty lucky man. I enjoy your paper, and I still correspond with my old buddy, JR Parker in Big Stone City." According to the Globe-Gazette report, "Paulsrud tried to land in a plowed field whcn the plane's engine failed. The plane struck the ground, flipped and landed on its top, facing northwest", according to a report from the Sheriff's Dept. "The Federal Aviation Administration and the Britt Police Dept. assisted the Sheriff's Dept. in the crash investigation." "Paulsrud walked away from the crash-landing. The plane, which had flipped, had been righted and secured at the Lee Marachand farm when the accompanying photo was taken by Angle Johannsen of the Britt News- Tribune." Paulsrud is reportedly back in Orlonville today. unty financially sound as year appointments set Wade Athey first County Commis- eeting of the Jan. 7, year on aUnty Board elected the new nd Vice-chair for the ..year. Maas was elected chair, tave rSon will act as vice-chair. were made to the vari- COmmittees and represen- the county were named to (See Board minutes in zSSUe of the Independent) Commissioners voted to reject a bid to tear down the building known as Ed's Feed Store in the city of Graceville due to questions as to the viability of an adjoining wall. Adja- cent property owner, Todd Tritz voiced his concern that in removing the vacant building, the common wall would compromise his building. Bill Watson, County Attorney explained that Tritz held an easement to use the common wall as long as the county's building existed, but the county held benefit set for Friday of Clinton was recently lymphocytic leukemia and continues to at the MeritCare ND. be a free-will donation Supper and ent Auction on Friday, Jan. he CBG High School in prior to the CBG vs. Trojan basketball game to medical costs. Serving :30 9.m. The Basket g will conclude of the Varsity Game. and items have donated including: tickets, Less Kouba signed print, Wolverine Basket, Trojan Basket, Bath and Body Works Basket, Sweetheart Basket and more. For more information on the Benefit, or to donate a basket, call Jill Doschadis at 320-748-7605 in the evening or 320-748-7233 during the day. MeritCare Hospital sponsors a website through a website program called Caring Bridge. The website includes updates on Bill's condition, journal contribution's from Bill's fam- ily, and a guestbook link for friends to send e-mails to Bill and the Martig family. The website address is: www.caringbridge.org/mn/billmartig IE COUNTY BOARD of Commissioners elected Alvin Maas, vice.chair for 2003. Shown above, (back i i,)ner Bruce Swigerd and Dick Lane. Seated I Torgerson, Alvin Maas and Wade Athey. no responsibility in removing their building. Tritz is thus responsible to determine what actions will be neces- sary to protect his adjacent building in the process of demolition of the coun- ty's building and to determine the extent of repair to the common wall to insure it's viability after demolition of the building. The Commissioner's will reissue requests for bids after Tritz has investigated his options. Commissioner Dave Torgerson reported to the Board for the County Weed Inspector, Harold Nelson, that no spray will be used this summer in controlling leafy spurge. Nelson reported that the use of leafy spurge beetles has been very successful and was deemed to be the most effective means of controlling the weed. Nick Anderson, County Highway Engineer provided the County Corn- (Continued on page 13) Retail meet today Ortonville's Retail Committee meeting will be at 7:30 a.m. this Tuesday, Jan. 14, at the Dancing Bean. 3 Please Note!/ Unless you are an exception,] either because you're attending I school or for some other specif. ] ic reason, your subscription to | The Ortonvllle Independent | will be due Feb, 1, 2003. I Please take note that this I announcement will be the ONLY NOTICE of renewal you will receive! We will not be mailing out due notices.., so we will be looking forward to receiving your check for renewal by Feb. 1 and look for- ward, as usual, to keeping you on our "readership." Thank you. I Rates are: $30.00 per year | in Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, | Traverse and Swi Counties in | Minnesota, Gt  Roberts I Counties In South Dakota; I $34.00 per year for all other [ counties in Minnesota and l South Dako,.'and 8,00 per I year for all others. | Thank you. I JHE INDEPENDENT STAFF Warm temps, high winds cause open water on Big Stone Lake Fisherman advised to use caution despite colder temps Even the most experienced fisher- man on Big Stone Lake are confused by this year's dangerous ice condi- tions. Bob Stenzel of Big Stone City, SD has been fishing on the lake for years: "Oh, out of 365 days, 1 suppose I'm out there fishing about 250 of them." But this year, "I've never seen the ice quite so changeable, and a person just doesn't know where to go." With last week's warm weather, several fish houses went through the ice. Stenzel's was one of them. "The house was sitting on 12 inches of ice the day before, and by Thursday it was floating like a cork," said Stenzel. Bruce Nelsen, Conservation Officer for Big Stone County explains that the fish houses are dropping through the ice due to a combination of the warm weather and wind. "All it takes is about a 1/2 inch of water melted around the house, and wind circulates the waves until the water eats right through the ice," explains Nelsen. "Out on Lac qui Parle Lake, 25 to 40 fish houses were affected in the same way. With the warm tempera- tures there was a lot of water on the ice, and the wind just wore away at the ice until they were all bobbing in the water." Stenzel was able to pull his fish house out of the water by using a little creativity, a powerful 4-wheeler with studded tires and a couple volunteers. "It was a struggle for that 4-wheeler. We pulled it part way out of the water, let" it drain to lighten the load, and managed to pull it out without much of a loss, other than one heck of a lot of wet tackle." i i i !i:+!i,: i!!! ICE SHACKS FLOATING on area lakes was a common site Thursday. This shack was one of several taking the plunge near Shady Beach on the South Dakota side of Big Stone Lake. Bill Dwyer of Milbank lost his portable fish house last week in the lake as well. Strong winds blew his portable into open water but he man- aged to salvage everything, and helped pull out three others as well. Rod Gustafson was another who lost his fish house to the water for a short time. Rod's 7 x 12 foot house was about half submerged m open water near Goose Isle. "Lots of styro- foam and air in the tires kept the house up until we managed to get it out," said Rod. "I was real lucky. No one got hurt, and I only lost two fish- ing rods and one slipper. But I won't be going out again soon." Norm lqaukos, Ortonville Area Fisheries Supervisor suggested that with the warm temperatures and the lack of snow, pressure ridges are form- ing and the conditions become right tbr the ice to open up. The high winds (Continued on page 3) AN AERIAL VIEW of Big Stone Lake last Tuesday showed the large area near the islands with only a thin layer of ice. Geese had kept the water open. The area was completely open Thursday with 50 degree temperatures on Wednesday and high winds Thursday. There is open water all over the lake. Anglers are adv,sed to use extreme cautmn when venturing onto the lake. Big Stone City, SD receives $200,000 Block Grant to finance waterline Courtesy of Grant County Review In order to receive the funding of the State Block Grant, Big Stone City res- idents must conduct a survey of 60 percent (150) of the households in the it}: Big Stone Cit), Roundtable Club members will be conducting the sur- vey over the next.few weeks by tele- phone. Roundtable members will be asking two questions. How many are in your household? And based on the answer, they will ask if the household income is below or above a specific amount. Your participation is appreciated, as receipt of the State Block Grant for the city 3 water line is dependent on completion of the survey. Governor William J. Janklow, cleaning his desk in mid-afternoon of Dec. 31,2002, his last day in office as governor, offered good news to Big Stone City. In a conference telephone call to Mayor Jim McFarlane and Phyllis Justice, Grant County Review editor, the governor stated that he was approving a $200,000 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) to help finance a water line construction project on Big Stone City's Main Street. Mayor McFarlane was very pleased and expressed thanks on behalf of the citizens of Big Stone City. Referring to his new career as a US Senator, Janklow assured McFarlane and Justice that he would be continuing to work hard for South Dakota and was looking forward to the opportunity. The estimated cost of the project will be $650,000. Work will takc place later this year. According to Janet Smith, City Finance Officer, the city has also applied for a CWFC grant to finance the project. To be considered for a CDBG, thc city will have to conduct a survey of the residential structures. Smith states it is very important for residents who receive a questionnaire during the sur- vey to return them as soon as possiblc since whether or not the grant is approved will depend on the results of the survey. This block grant is admin- istered by the State but financed with Federal funds. Wastewater lagoons were complet- ed in 1996. Four water projects were needed to complete the system. The first of these projects was construction of a line which linked Big Stone City with the Ortonville water system known as the Big Stone Lake Area Water Treatment Facility. Big Stone's cost for its part ot' that project was $447,000. A $150,000 grant was received to hclp finance the prCxiect. Thc 50,(X)0 gallon water tower was then replaced with a tank with 100,000 gallon capacity. The cost was $381,000 with a CWFC grant provid- ing $150,000 to help finance it. The 1.ake Strect project to repmce water and sewer lines, extending fr'gm the dike road to Big Stone Power Plant Intake Station, was completed at a cost of $715,(X)0. Bccause the dan- ger of flooding and the possible spillage of sewage into Big Stone Lakc, two grants were received to hclp with that cost. A CWFC grant of $250,000 and a CDBG grant of $400.000 were awarded to the city. When the Main Street project is com- pleted Big Stone City will have a first class water and wastewater disposal system which has cost $3,293,000 and has been fundcd by grants and utility rates. i Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com )