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January 14, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial cc00mment GUEST EDITORIAL... Tax cut (Submitted by reader Alvin Schwarze of Milbank, SD) This is a VERY simple way to understand the tax laws. Read on - it does make you think! Let's put tax cuts in terms everyone can understand. Suppose that every day, 10. men go out for dinner. The bill for all 10 comes to $100. If they paid their bill the way we pay our taxes, it would go something like this... The first four men - the poorest - would pay nothing; the fifth.would pay $1, the sixth would pay $3, the seventh $7, the eighth $12, the ninth $18, and the tenth man - the richest - would pay $59. That's what they decided to do. The 10 men ate dinner in the restaurant every day and seemed quite happy with the arrangement - until one day, the owner threw them a curve (in tax language, a tax cut). "Since you are all such good customers," he said, "I'm going to reduce the cost of your dai!y meal by $20." So now dinner for the I0 only cost $80. The group still wanted to pay their bill the way we pay out taxes. So the first four men were unaffected. They would still eat for free, but what about the other six - the payinq customers? How could they di ,v, up the $20 windill so that everyone would get his ' fair share?' The six men realized that $20 divided by six is $3.33. But if they subtracted that from everybody's share, then the fifth man and the sixth man would end up being PAID to eat their meal. So the restaurant owner suggested that it would be fair to reduce each man s bill by roughly the same amount and he proceeded to work out the amounts each should pay. And so the fifth man paid nothing, the sixth pitched in $2, the seventh paid $5, the eighth paid $9, the ninth paid $12, leaving the tenth man with a bill of $52 instead of his earlier $59. Each of the six was better off than before. And the first four continued to eat for free. But once outside the restaurant, the men began to compare their savings, "I only got a dollar out of the $20," declared the sixth man, but he, pointing to the tenth, "But he got $7!" "Yeah, that's right," exclaimed the fifth man, "I only saved a dollar, to .... It's unfair that he got seven times more than me!" "That's true!" shouted the seventh man, "Why should he get $7 back when I got only $2? The wea!!hy get all the breaks!" " Wait a minute," yelled the first four men in unison, "We didn't get anything at all. The system exploits the poor!" The nine men surrounded the tenth and beat him up. The next night he didn't show up for dinner, so the nine sat down and ate without him. But when it came time to pay the bill, they discovered, a little late, what was very important. They were $52 short of meeting the bill! Imagine that! And that, boys and girls, journalists and college instructors, is how the tax system works. The people who pay the highest taxes get the most benefit from a tax reduction. Tax them too much, attack them for being wealthy, and they just may not show up at the table anymore. Where would that leave the rest? Unfortunately, most taxing authorities anywhere cannot seem to grasp this rather straightforward logic. -T. Davies, Professor of Accounting & chair, Division of Accounting and Business Law The Universit of South Dakota School of Business Economic Update By Roger K. Bird Executive Vice President Big Stone Area Growth recently received a check for $3,000 from Aquila, Inc. the local gas company which will be used for economic development. Aquila, Inc purchased Peoples Natural Gas and wants to see the area prosper. "We really appreciate their attitude and their grant contribution to help make Big Stone County become more economically viable. This is another example of business helping business. Extension report I II Doug Helen Regional Extension Educator Ag Production Systems-Crops West Ottertaii County Fergus Falls, MN 56537 218/739-7130 2003 CROP YEAR BEGINS WITH VARIETY SELECTION Typically, the beginning of the new year begins the second flush of preparations towards the upcoming growing season. Equipment repairs, moving grain, field planning, fertilizer and fuel orders, and variety selections. In this column, I will focus on the identification and selection process of seed to plant. The process begins with the hope of correctly matching genetics with environments to achieve maximum yield. Crop productivity can be divided into four categories which determine bushels available at harvest time. The first is Absolute yield, which is defined as the yield possible with no limiting factors except genetic potential of the given variety. Yield can never exceed this point. The second level is Attainable yield, which is the yield possible in any given environment, year, and area. Production will be limited by factors we cannot manage such as climate, weather, and soils. The third level of yield is Affordable. This is identified as limitations through economics and is determined by the potential value of the actual yield offset by the price paid to achieve that yield. Examples are factors we manage such as pesticides, tillage, varieties, and fertility. The final component is Actual yield. This is the outcome of the ability of the crop to take advantage of the growing conditions and limit the effects of production hazards such as weeds, diseases, and insects. The goal in this system is to II have Actual yield equal attainable yield plus affordable yield in a sustainable production system. As pointed out above, probably the most important decision is variety selection. A good start to successful production is selecting varieties best adapted to specific areas. I believe that goes further and includes selecting the best genetics for specific fields based on yield potential and stresses associated with sites. Regardless of crop, when a producer asks for variety recommendations, I return with the question "what are the top three performances you want or expect from your varieties?" Priorities differ widely with the considerations commonly focused on yield, disease susceptibility, quality, standiblity, cost of seed, maturity, and Other stress tolerances, Selection of specific varieties should be a result of evaluating expected performance and demonstrated performances through a credible testing program. Selecting varieties that perform in the top group (top 1/3) of several locations over years has proven the most reliable compared to the top producer at a given location. It gives producers the best genetic by environment information which illustrates strength across multiple growing conditions. To minimize production risk, I often refer to the advantages of genetic diversity. For each crop grown, two to four varieties should be incorporated to protect against specific stresses and spread out work load of critical timed operations. In theory, a good past producing variety, a strong current one, and the experimenting with a variety displaying promise is a good way to mix up genetics and advance with new lines. Utilize the MN Varietal Trials Results publication produced by the U of MN Agricultural Experiment Stations and available at Extension Offices. Doug Helen is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Crops, serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. Court report II (Week of Jan. 7, 2003) ORTONVILLE POLICE DEPT. Robert Lee Swint, Jr., Ortonville, Poss. Cont. Sub Crim/4th, Fined $750, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10, Jail/Prison: 90 days. Jacquline Kay Odegaard, Sioux Falls, SD, Cunsumption/Non-Driver, Failure to Appear, DL Suspended. Jesse James Folk, Ortonville, Minor consump/Non-Driver, Fined $100, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. Gregory Julian Vangsness, Ortonville, Underage/Passeng, Fined $100, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. MN HIGHWAY PATROL Stella Rae Driscoll, Browns Valley, Speeding 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15 ..... Jeffery T. Sveen, Aberdeen, SD, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Tonia Ann Gist Poirier, Rogers, Speeding 69155, Fined $45, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Maynard LeRoy Rasmussen, Watertown, SD, Speed 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Linda Marie Spanier, Bloomington, Speeding 71/55, Fined $55, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Tyler Joe Albertson, Ortonviile, Speed 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Valerie Ann Schumacher, Maple Grove, Speed 78/55, Fined $65, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. BIG STONE CO. SHERIFF Richard Michael Ritter, East Gull Lake, Speed 65155, Fined $40, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. Steven Richard Altrich, Graceville, Speed 65/55, Fined $40, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. Donald Lee Veldhouse, Yankton, SD, Speed 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Clinton Clay Harshman, Maplewood, Speed 71/55 (3rd/Yr), Fined $55, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Shawn Matthew Kane, Hastings, Drive After Suspension, Failure to Appear. Library meet The Pioneerland Library System Board will meet this Thursday, Jan. 16, 2003, 7:30 p.m., in the multipurpose room of the Willmar Public Library, 410 Fifth Street SW, Willmar. i ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Sr. Bertha Karels Ervin Mikkelson Matt Pond James Johnson Herbert Streich Floyd Guse Wilber Athey Darlene Wilde Dwayne Koehntopp Ann Boals C. Benkofske Paul Lindahl Joyce Wilkening James WeUnitz Ruth Osen Doris Johnson Gene Olson Arloene Hamilton. Paul R. Moen Henry Lubbesmeyer Ardis Brehmer Dick's Cycle Shop ] ] ]]]] ]H Letters E//ssa by the late Rev. George P. W D.D. (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. Ihno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the island of Sumatra, Rev. Werner passed away late in the year 2000. ***** "THE GREAT DEPRESSION" (continued from last week) Coupled with the depression years were the dust bowl years. We watched helplessly as the dust blew across the fields, roads and towns blowing what little top soil there was on the land far to the east. It was so dry that it didn't pay to plant the seed and watch it blow away. Farmers lost their farms. They tried to pour their milk in ditches to drive up the price. Grain sold for 10 a bushel; chickens were a dime apiece. People were des- perate. That is, all but my uncle R.A. When farmers could not pay their mortgage, he would carry them tbr awhile, but after a time he tbreclosed and before long the bank owned the farm. 1 believe that most of the farms in North Dakota were at one time owned by the banks in the state. So my genial and likeable uncle R.A. rose above the vicelike grip of the great depression, but he was the only one of our family to do so. Our three years in the Odessa/ Yellowbank appointment passed quickly enough and my father was appointed to the Worthington charge. This was a much larger town in southwestern Minnesota, the county seat of Nobles County situated in a rich farming area just 10 miles north of the Iowa state line. The brick church at 4th Ave. and 14th St. was quite new and the farmers and mer- chants more prosperous than those around Odessa. Though 1 did not want to leave Odessa this appoint- ment proved to be a godsend to me. I entered the graduating class in Worthington and graduated in 1935, almost mid center in the great depres- sion which did not actually end until the beginning of WWlI, despite all of FDR's efforts to jump start the econ- omy with his many social programs. Because no money was available to send me to college, I went to work after graduation driving a tractor for John T. Doeden's threshing rig. I was happy to be making $1 each day as we went from farm to farm on our threshing circuit and I went off to college armed with $40 as a down payment ..... ...... If we had remained in Odessa, l am sure that the gates to a college life would firmly have been closed to me. Westmar College in LeMars, Iowa was within hitchhiking distance (about 80 miles) so I could hitchhike home each weekend and work as the janitor of my father's church, making $10 each month, enough to keep pay- ing on my college bills. The great depression never worded me because jobs always seemed to come my way, and though they never brought in much money, they kept me solvent and resourceful. I lived what one might describe by any terms a frugal life, though I usually saved in small ways, that I might invest in larger enterprises like an education. I was given a student appointment in my third year of college and this made it possible for me to buy a car and trav- el in style each weekend between Minnesota and Iowa to my church in Slayton, another county seat north of Worthington. In order to accelerate my college program, 1 took usually 21 credit hours each semester, getting two majors (English and Music) and completed my college requirements in three years. And so I left Minnesota and Iowa never to return, except for annual family visits, and drove my little 1929 Chevrolet coupe to Naperville, 111. where my father had gone for his higher learning 46 years before 1 matriculated in the Evangelical Theological Seminary. Dad graduated in 1898 from what was then the Union Biblical Institute where all classes were taught in German by Heer Docktor Professors of what was truly "the old school." In 1938 the effects of the great depression lingered in the Chicago area, but I got a job that summer painting houses for 40 an hour, liv- ing (free of charge) in the married students dorm and working nights for my meals in the only restaurant in town. (Now Naperville is one of the most upscale western suburbs in the Chicago area - quite a contrast from the little town 1 knew in Seminary.) But again, I only knew the depression aJ a stimulant to more aggressive I action in working my way through college, seminaries and the University of Chicago. I In 1939 1 took the Greyhound bus to New York City and entered the New York Theological Seminary where I taught at the venerable Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, played the piano at an all girls hotel in Greenwich Village, directed a choir in a German Baptist Church in Brooklyn, tutored in German, operat- ed the seminary switchboard and worked a few hours each week as the seminary elevator operator. I left New York in 1940 to com- plete my seminary work at Naperville and to accept a student iappointment in Peoria, IlL during last year in seminary. The Lord : ly works in wondrous ways because after earning my seminary degree, I was able to earn two degrees in I diverse fields at the great University of Chicago, acquiring five academic degrees along my way (and one hon- orary) from mid-point in the Great Depression and well into the 1940s. [ Adversity either can weaken or it can strengthen, depending on what we do with our resources, however slender they may be. We all have gifts and talents which can be invest- ed in developing and increasing those : resources in order that we may share i them with others. I Ill Cloverbuds sessions for Jan. Afterschool Cloverbud sessions for Big Stone County are just around the corner! The dates are January 21 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. at the Clinton Elementary School; and, on January 23rd from 3:15-4:30 p.m. in the Early Childhood Classroom at the Ortonville Elementary School. This month's session will have a Big Stone County 4-Her as guest speaker. Sarah Diekmann will share some of her experiences from her trip to Japan as a foreign exchange student this past summer. A nutritional snack and discussion on nutrition will be led by Heidi Torgerson, Families That Work Nutrition Education Assistant. Afterschool Cioverbuds is for youth in grades K - 3. The purpose of the Cloverbud Program is to support positive development of children as they explore their world, discover the possibilities, build self-esteem, and practice the basic social skills which will be the basis for a future when they will become competent, caring, contributing citizens. To support this, the Cloverbud Program demonstrates the following characteristics: Reflects a child-centered approach; Is non- competitive; Encourages family and community involvement; Values diversity and is developmentally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate; and Is accessible to all children. To sign your child up for the session at your school, please call your school's Community Ed Director. For more information, please contact Suzanne M. Souza, Big Stone County's 4-H Program Coordinator at UMVRDC Jan. Meet The Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission will hold its regular monthly meeting on Monday, Jan. 20, 2003 at the Appleton Civic Center. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. the Extension Office at 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518. , 1 .Buy life lnsuFance and save on your home and car. hen you buy your life insurance from us through Auto-Owners Insurance, you'll receive special dis- counts on your home, mobile home or car We'll save you money. As an independent Auto-Owners agent, we take great interest in you - as well as your home and car. We are specialists in insuring people - and the things they own. ,.4'uto-Owners/nnwanee Life Home Car Business  IIII II I Tom Kindt Agency 113 NW First Street Ortonvllle, MN Located in the CenBonk buHdtng Phone 320-839-6145 IIIII The Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) ooooe JAMES D. KA Publisher/Managing " SUZETTE KAERCHER-BI. Editor and Advertising Sal ARLENE WIESE l Office Manager | KATHI;LANTIS i Computer and Composition St EMILEE OKESON [ Compositor/eReceptioni  ARDIE ECKARDT l Reporter/Photographer I BILL DWYER l Pressman I BOB SHEROD 1 Presesman ! TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBUC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Jan. 14, 2003 Vol. 84; Continuing Published Every Tuesday at 29 2nd fl Ortonville, MN 56278 Pedodica{s Postage Paid st Orlon'all|e, | $30.00 per year in Bi Pade, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and Roberts in South Dakota. $34.00 for counties in Minnesota and All others, $38.00 per year, Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Independent, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBS( RATE SCHEDULE ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE Big Stone, Lac qul Swift Countlee In Grant and Roberts In South February ........... 30,00 August .i.. Mamh ................ 27,50 Apdl .................. 25.00 October .... May ................... 22.50 November June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 January ...... February ........... :M.00 August Mamh ................ 31.24 april .:.....: .......... 28.40 Oelober ...... May ................... 25.56 November., June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA OUTSIDE AND SO. DAK. February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34,87 April .................. 31.70 October .... May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 December, July ................... 22.19 January.... "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FOR I i Tl,,isher shall no1' chlnes or typographical not lessen the value of an The Publisher's liabilib omissions in tisement is strictly the advertisement in any issue or the refund of the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be tO classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; 1 A Friday: 8AM-5 PM A Holidays may affect office he LETFERS POUCY Letters to the editor munity issues are writers should be aware Independent reserves and/or condense letters for Disahpe r also reserves the right letters that are unsuitable or it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain 1 printed or typed name, address and telephone ! Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are asked to selves to one letter keep letter brief, words, and to the point. AD vs. The Ortonville determining what is advertising I is news is based on one simple If an individual business zation charges for admission'to I for an item or for a service, sidered advertising. In other lou charge, we charge." Advertising is the life-blood )aper. Without it a cease to exist. The money receives for subsiriptions )aper sales is used to pay for paper used in producing th no longer does so increases. It still covers the and a small portion of the Advertising to a crops and livestock to 3roducts to the grocer; and underwear to the and plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those particular business would not I ness. ADS: We reserve the advertising without our decision. POLICIES: A News: Our goal : fully and accurately, as staff's opinions will appear opinion page. A Editorials: Opinions gage, whether locally written or om other sources ts intended late thinking and discussion readers.Opinions expressed tor are her own and not of other staff members. expressed in items from tions may own views, but are eral interest. , , Phone 320-839-6163 ot 1 839-3761 to place aifled advertlaln Ortonvllle Inde mail@ Page 4 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan. Editorial cc00mment GUEST EDITORIAL... Tax cut (Submitted by reader Alvin Schwarze of Milbank, SD) This is a VERY simple way to understand the tax laws. Read on - it does make you think! Let's put tax cuts in terms everyone can understand. Suppose that every day, 10. men go out for dinner. The bill for all 10 comes to $100. If they paid their bill the way we pay our taxes, it would go something like this... The first four men - the poorest - would pay nothing; the fifth.would pay $1, the sixth would pay $3, the seventh $7, the eighth $12, the ninth $18, and the tenth man - the richest - would pay $59. That's what they decided to do. The 10 men ate dinner in the restaurant every day and seemed quite happy with the arrangement - until one day, the owner threw them a curve (in tax language, a tax cut). "Since you are all such good customers," he said, "I'm going to reduce the cost of your dai!y meal by $20." So now dinner for the I0 only cost $80. The group still wanted to pay their bill the way we pay out taxes. So the first four men were unaffected. They would still eat for free, but what about the other six - the payinq customers? How could they di ,v, up the $20 windill so that everyone would get his ' fair share?' The six men realized that $20 divided by six is $3.33. But if they subtracted that from everybody's share, then the fifth man and the sixth man would end up being PAID to eat their meal. So the restaurant owner suggested that it would be fair to reduce each man s bill by roughly the same amount and he proceeded to work out the amounts each should pay. And so the fifth man paid nothing, the sixth pitched in $2, the seventh paid $5, the eighth paid $9, the ninth paid $12, leaving the tenth man with a bill of $52 instead of his earlier $59. Each of the six was better off than before. And the first four continued to eat for free. But once outside the restaurant, the men began to compare their savings, "I only got a dollar out of the $20," declared the sixth man, but he, pointing to the tenth, "But he got $7!" "Yeah, that's right," exclaimed the fifth man, "I only saved a dollar, to .... It's unfair that he got seven times more than me!" "That's true!" shouted the seventh man, "Why should he get $7 back when I got only $2? The wea!!hy get all the breaks!" " Wait a minute," yelled the first four men in unison, "We didn't get anything at all. The system exploits the poor!" The nine men surrounded the tenth and beat him up. The next night he didn't show up for dinner, so the nine sat down and ate without him. But when it came time to pay the bill, they discovered, a little late, what was very important. They were $52 short of meeting the bill! Imagine that! And that, boys and girls, journalists and college instructors, is how the tax system works. The people who pay the highest taxes get the most benefit from a tax reduction. Tax them too much, attack them for being wealthy, and they just may not show up at the table anymore. Where would that leave the rest? Unfortunately, most taxing authorities anywhere cannot seem to grasp this rather straightforward logic. -T. Davies, Professor of Accounting & chair, Division of Accounting and Business Law The Universit of South Dakota School of Business Economic Update By Roger K. Bird Executive Vice President Big Stone Area Growth recently received a check for $3,000 from Aquila, Inc. the local gas company which will be used for economic development. Aquila, Inc purchased Peoples Natural Gas and wants to see the area prosper. "We really appreciate their attitude and their grant contribution to help make Big Stone County become more economically viable. This is another example of business helping business. Extension report I II Doug Helen Regional Extension Educator Ag Production Systems-Crops West Ottertaii County Fergus Falls, MN 56537 218/739-7130 2003 CROP YEAR BEGINS WITH VARIETY SELECTION Typically, the beginning of the new year begins the second flush of preparations towards the upcoming growing season. Equipment repairs, moving grain, field planning, fertilizer and fuel orders, and variety selections. In this column, I will focus on the identification and selection process of seed to plant. The process begins with the hope of correctly matching genetics with environments to achieve maximum yield. Crop productivity can be divided into four categories which determine bushels available at harvest time. The first is Absolute yield, which is defined as the yield possible with no limiting factors except genetic potential of the given variety. Yield can never exceed this point. The second level is Attainable yield, which is the yield possible in any given environment, year, and area. Production will be limited by factors we cannot manage such as climate, weather, and soils. The third level of yield is Affordable. This is identified as limitations through economics and is determined by the potential value of the actual yield offset by the price paid to achieve that yield. Examples are factors we manage such as pesticides, tillage, varieties, and fertility. The final component is Actual yield. This is the outcome of the ability of the crop to take advantage of the growing conditions and limit the effects of production hazards such as weeds, diseases, and insects. The goal in this system is to II have Actual yield equal attainable yield plus affordable yield in a sustainable production system. As pointed out above, probably the most important decision is variety selection. A good start to successful production is selecting varieties best adapted to specific areas. I believe that goes further and includes selecting the best genetics for specific fields based on yield potential and stresses associated with sites. Regardless of crop, when a producer asks for variety recommendations, I return with the question "what are the top three performances you want or expect from your varieties?" Priorities differ widely with the considerations commonly focused on yield, disease susceptibility, quality, standiblity, cost of seed, maturity, and Other stress tolerances, Selection of specific varieties should be a result of evaluating expected performance and demonstrated performances through a credible testing program. Selecting varieties that perform in the top group (top 1/3) of several locations over years has proven the most reliable compared to the top producer at a given location. It gives producers the best genetic by environment information which illustrates strength across multiple growing conditions. To minimize production risk, I often refer to the advantages of genetic diversity. For each crop grown, two to four varieties should be incorporated to protect against specific stresses and spread out work load of critical timed operations. In theory, a good past producing variety, a strong current one, and the experimenting with a variety displaying promise is a good way to mix up genetics and advance with new lines. Utilize the MN Varietal Trials Results publication produced by the U of MN Agricultural Experiment Stations and available at Extension Offices. Doug Helen is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Crops, serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. Court report II (Week of Jan. 7, 2003) ORTONVILLE POLICE DEPT. Robert Lee Swint, Jr., Ortonville, Poss. Cont. Sub Crim/4th, Fined $750, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10, Jail/Prison: 90 days. Jacquline Kay Odegaard, Sioux Falls, SD, Cunsumption/Non-Driver, Failure to Appear, DL Suspended. Jesse James Folk, Ortonville, Minor consump/Non-Driver, Fined $100, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. Gregory Julian Vangsness, Ortonville, Underage/Passeng, Fined $100, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. MN HIGHWAY PATROL Stella Rae Driscoll, Browns Valley, Speeding 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15 ..... Jeffery T. Sveen, Aberdeen, SD, Speeding 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Tonia Ann Gist Poirier, Rogers, Speeding 69155, Fined $45, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Maynard LeRoy Rasmussen, Watertown, SD, Speed 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Linda Marie Spanier, Bloomington, Speeding 71/55, Fined $55, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Tyler Joe Albertson, Ortonviile, Speed 65/55, Fined $35, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Valerie Ann Schumacher, Maple Grove, Speed 78/55, Fined $65, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. BIG STONE CO. SHERIFF Richard Michael Ritter, East Gull Lake, Speed 65155, Fined $40, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. Steven Richard Altrich, Graceville, Speed 65/55, Fined $40, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $10. Donald Lee Veldhouse, Yankton, SD, Speed 69/55, Fined $45, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Clinton Clay Harshman, Maplewood, Speed 71/55 (3rd/Yr), Fined $55, Surcharge $35, Court Costs $15. Shawn Matthew Kane, Hastings, Drive After Suspension, Failure to Appear. Library meet The Pioneerland Library System Board will meet this Thursday, Jan. 16, 2003, 7:30 p.m., in the multipurpose room of the Willmar Public Library, 410 Fifth Street SW, Willmar. i ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Sr. Bertha Karels Ervin Mikkelson Matt Pond James Johnson Herbert Streich Floyd Guse Wilber Athey Darlene Wilde Dwayne Koehntopp Ann Boals C. Benkofske Paul Lindahl Joyce Wilkening James WeUnitz Ruth Osen Doris Johnson Gene Olson Arloene Hamilton. Paul R. Moen Henry Lubbesmeyer Ardis Brehmer Dick's Cycle Shop ] ] ]]]] ]H Letters E//ssa by the late Rev. George P. W D.D. (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. Ihno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the island of Sumatra, Rev. Werner passed away late in the year 2000. ***** "THE GREAT DEPRESSION" (continued from last week) Coupled with the depression years were the dust bowl years. We watched helplessly as the dust blew across the fields, roads and towns blowing what little top soil there was on the land far to the east. It was so dry that it didn't pay to plant the seed and watch it blow away. Farmers lost their farms. They tried to pour their milk in ditches to drive up the price. Grain sold for 10 a bushel; chickens were a dime apiece. People were des- perate. That is, all but my uncle R.A. When farmers could not pay their mortgage, he would carry them tbr awhile, but after a time he tbreclosed and before long the bank owned the farm. 1 believe that most of the farms in North Dakota were at one time owned by the banks in the state. So my genial and likeable uncle R.A. rose above the vicelike grip of the great depression, but he was the only one of our family to do so. Our three years in the Odessa/ Yellowbank appointment passed quickly enough and my father was appointed to the Worthington charge. This was a much larger town in southwestern Minnesota, the county seat of Nobles County situated in a rich farming area just 10 miles north of the Iowa state line. The brick church at 4th Ave. and 14th St. was quite new and the farmers and mer- chants more prosperous than those around Odessa. Though 1 did not want to leave Odessa this appoint- ment proved to be a godsend to me. I entered the graduating class in Worthington and graduated in 1935, almost mid center in the great depres- sion which did not actually end until the beginning of WWlI, despite all of FDR's efforts to jump start the econ- omy with his many social programs. Because no money was available to send me to college, I went to work after graduation driving a tractor for John T. Doeden's threshing rig. I was happy to be making $1 each day as we went from farm to farm on our threshing circuit and I went off to college armed with $40 as a down payment ..... ...... If we had remained in Odessa, l am sure that the gates to a college life would firmly have been closed to me. Westmar College in LeMars, Iowa was within hitchhiking distance (about 80 miles) so I could hitchhike home each weekend and work as the janitor of my father's church, making $10 each month, enough to keep pay- ing on my college bills. The great depression never worded me because jobs always seemed to come my way, and though they never brought in much money, they kept me solvent and resourceful. I lived what one might describe by any terms a frugal life, though I usually saved in small ways, that I might invest in larger enterprises like an education. I was given a student appointment in my third year of college and this made it possible for me to buy a car and trav- el in style each weekend between Minnesota and Iowa to my church in Slayton, another county seat north of Worthington. In order to accelerate my college program, 1 took usually 21 credit hours each semester, getting two majors (English and Music) and completed my college requirements in three years. And so I left Minnesota and Iowa never to return, except for annual family visits, and drove my little 1929 Chevrolet coupe to Naperville, 111. where my father had gone for his higher learning 46 years before 1 matriculated in the Evangelical Theological Seminary. Dad graduated in 1898 from what was then the Union Biblical Institute where all classes were taught in German by Heer Docktor Professors of what was truly "the old school." In 1938 the effects of the great depression lingered in the Chicago area, but I got a job that summer painting houses for 40 an hour, liv- ing (free of charge) in the married students dorm and working nights for my meals in the only restaurant in town. (Now Naperville is one of the most upscale western suburbs in the Chicago area - quite a contrast from the little town 1 knew in Seminary.) But again, I only knew the depression aJ a stimulant to more aggressive I action in working my way through college, seminaries and the University of Chicago. I In 1939 1 took the Greyhound bus to New York City and entered the New York Theological Seminary where I taught at the venerable Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, played the piano at an all girls hotel in Greenwich Village, directed a choir in a German Baptist Church in Brooklyn, tutored in German, operat- ed the seminary switchboard and worked a few hours each week as the seminary elevator operator. I left New York in 1940 to com- plete my seminary work at Naperville and to accept a student iappointment in Peoria, IlL during last year in seminary. The Lord : ly works in wondrous ways because after earning my seminary degree, I was able to earn two degrees in I diverse fields at the great University of Chicago, acquiring five academic degrees along my way (and one hon- orary) from mid-point in the Great Depression and well into the 1940s. [ Adversity either can weaken or it can strengthen, depending on what we do with our resources, however slender they may be. We all have gifts and talents which can be invest- ed in developing and increasing those : resources in order that we may share i them with others. I Ill Cloverbuds sessions for Jan. Afterschool Cloverbud sessions for Big Stone County are just around the corner! The dates are January 21 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. at the Clinton Elementary School; and, on January 23rd from 3:15-4:30 p.m. in the Early Childhood Classroom at the Ortonville Elementary School. This month's session will have a Big Stone County 4-Her as guest speaker. Sarah Diekmann will share some of her experiences from her trip to Japan as a foreign exchange student this past summer. A nutritional snack and discussion on nutrition will be led by Heidi Torgerson, Families That Work Nutrition Education Assistant. Afterschool Cioverbuds is for youth in grades K - 3. The purpose of the Cloverbud Program is to support positive development of children as they explore their world, discover the possibilities, build self-esteem, and practice the basic social skills which will be the basis for a future when they will become competent, caring, contributing citizens. To support this, the Cloverbud Program demonstrates the following characteristics: Reflects a child-centered approach; Is non- competitive; Encourages family and community involvement; Values diversity and is developmentally, culturally, and linguistically appropriate; and Is accessible to all children. To sign your child up for the session at your school, please call your school's Community Ed Director. For more information, please contact Suzanne M. Souza, Big Stone County's 4-H Program Coordinator at UMVRDC Jan. Meet The Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission will hold its regular monthly meeting on Monday, Jan. 20, 2003 at the Appleton Civic Center. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. the Extension Office at 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518. , 1 .Buy life lnsuFance and save on your home and car. hen you buy your life insurance from us through Auto-Owners Insurance, you'll receive special dis- counts on your home, mobile home or car We'll save you money. As an independent Auto-Owners agent, we take great interest in you - as well as your home and car. We are specialists in insuring people - and the things they own. ,.4'uto-Owners/nnwanee Life Home Car Business  IIII II I Tom Kindt Agency 113 NW First Street Ortonvllle, MN Located in the CenBonk buHdtng Phone 320-839-6145 IIIII The Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) ooooe JAMES D. KA Publisher/Managing " SUZETTE KAERCHER-BI. Editor and Advertising Sal ARLENE WIESE l Office Manager | KATHI;LANTIS i Computer and Composition St EMILEE OKESON [ Compositor/eReceptioni  ARDIE ECKARDT l Reporter/Photographer I BILL DWYER l Pressman I BOB SHEROD 1 Presesman ! TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBUC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Jan. 14, 2003 Vol. 84; Continuing Published Every Tuesday at 29 2nd fl Ortonville, MN 56278 Pedodica{s Postage Paid st Orlon'all|e, | $30.00 per year in Bi Pade, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and Roberts in South Dakota. $34.00 for counties in Minnesota and All others, $38.00 per year, Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Independent, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBS( RATE SCHEDULE ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE Big Stone, Lac qul Swift Countlee In Grant and Roberts In South February ........... 30,00 August .i.. Mamh ................ 27,50 Apdl .................. 25.00 October .... May ................... 22.50 November June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 January ...... February ........... :M.00 August Mamh ................ 31.24 april .:.....: .......... 28.40 Oelober ...... May ................... 25.56 November., June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA OUTSIDE AND SO. DAK. February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34,87 April .................. 31.70 October .... May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 December, July ................... 22.19 January.... "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FOR I i Tl,,isher shall no1' chlnes or typographical not lessen the value of an The Publisher's liabilib omissions in tisement is strictly the advertisement in any issue or the refund of the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be tO classify.) 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The money receives for subsiriptions )aper sales is used to pay for paper used in producing th no longer does so increases. It still covers the and a small portion of the Advertising to a crops and livestock to 3roducts to the grocer; and underwear to the and plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those particular business would not I ness. ADS: We reserve the advertising without our decision. POLICIES: A News: Our goal : fully and accurately, as staff's opinions will appear opinion page. A Editorials: Opinions gage, whether locally written or om other sources ts intended late thinking and discussion readers.Opinions expressed tor are her own and not of other staff members. expressed in items from tions may own views, but are eral interest. , , Phone 320-839-6163 ot 1 839-3761 to place aifled advertlaln Ortonvllle Inde mail@ Page 4 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan.