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Ortonville, Minnesota
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January 19, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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January 19, 1922
 

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) j THE Ot00TONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1922 NUMBER 37 Completely Destroys Johnson's Furniture Store A ASK TO AID W. FARMERS md Word Tele- Urges War Finance to Loan Di- "dire calamity has befal- agricultural interest of the a delegate convention of Minnesota Bankers and Far- Saturday sent a 1,000-word of appeal to President Hat- the necessity for assistance to the farmer. of the message to the resulted from the organiza- the Big Stone County Live- which seeks to have Finance Corporation make to its organization. The expresses the belief that of- and Eastern busi- are unaware of this Charges were made that banks have been given as- up to this time. The tele- the follows: that official circles at and the business men of cities are not fully aware e dire calamity that has befallen interests of the ha- especially the grain growing of the Northwest and of the need for immediate and direct the government thru the corporation." Kaercher's Plan. believe that the government Big Feature At Grand Theatre January 25, 26 Cecil B. DeMille, perhaps the fore- most motion picture producer in the country, if not the world, will display his genius at Its best in his latest [Paramount picture, "The Affairs of :Anatol," at the Grand Theatre Janu- ary 25 and 26. From every standpoint --investiture, its all-star cast, sumptu- i ousness of settings, brilliance of direc- torial execution, richness of costumes, quality of story and general artistry, this picture marks a distinct epoch in screen production of the decade. The story, written by Jennie Mac- pherson, and suggested by the famous play by Arthur Schnitzler, deals with an impressionable young man of wealth who finds time to interest him- self in the affairs of others and who learns by practical experience that it pays best to attend to one's own af- fairs and let others do the same. The cast is superb and includes such stars as Wallace Reid, Gloria Swan- son, Elliot Deter, Bebe Daniels, Monte Blue, Wanda Hawley, Theodore Roberts, Agnes Ayres and Theodore Kosloff. Their portrayals are artistic i and add vastly to the value of the pro- duction. The photoplay by Alvin i Wyckoff and Karl Struss is beautiful Take it all in all this is perhaps the !best picture thus far made by Cecil B. DeMille and that is saying a great deal. Forced To Use Teams. Operations by the crew making ice have been interrupted due to a touch of disagreeable weather. Due to the cold spell  was found impossible to keep the channel open, which was cut for the purpose of floating ice to the loading platform. As the result teams were brought into use. direct relief to the far- . L of the nation and in a practical I lit   ] pie manner npp01ntments approve of the plan of financ-[ rl ers, proposed hy A B Kaer-I I.. P.......1 I.. 1 fl99 ! Ortonville, Minn., embodied I IJy UOUlKA1 I'UI 17(( .-operative association of pro-I thru which government money I -- . ,-7 T e loaned. : Agrees to nare xpense ot believe farmers and business Purchasing Pulmotor for of each county, who personally Fire Department. the character and standing of are better able to pass security offered by the farmer or other committees cities, who have no know- of these things, and, therefore, such co-operative agricultural should be permitted to directly with the War Finance and that the approval gUaranty of securities offered by County units should be accepted War Finance corporation." Ortonvill, Minnesota. Two building permits were issued by, the city council at its regular meet- ing held on Monday night, one to Carl- son & Hasslen for the remodeling and repairing of the building that was damaged by fire, occupied by the Coderre Barber shop and one to P. B. Vikre for the remodeling of his pho- tographic studio. Work on the Carlson & Hasslen building will commence at once but no definite plans have been made by POULTRY SHOW DATES SE T 0N FEBRUARY 1-2-3 Canfield, Poultry Specialist From U. Farm To Be Judge. Premium Lists To Be Mailed Soon. February 1, 2 and 3 are the dates set for the fourth annual Big Stone County Poultry Show which will be held at the Alvah Matthews Building in this city and at which, indications lead the directors of the association to believe there will be even more en- tries than there were last year. Thos. Canfield, poultry specialist of the University Farm has been secured to act as judge and in addition will give educational talks in connection with the culling, housing, feeding and breeding for better poultry produc- tion. These talks will be held each day during the show, according to present arrangements. Prizes totalling in the neighborhood of $400 amde from the specml prizes are being offered and a display is looked for that will be second to none in western Minnesota. The premium lists are being printed at this time and will be distributed by the officers of the association by Wed- nesday of next week. Everyone inter- ested in the raising of poult1 should write to Mr. C. G. Holmquist, Orton- rifle, Minn., for one of these lists in case they do not receive one. In the meanti,me it will be a good idea to tame your prize chickens and get them in readiness for show purposes, for there is sure to be several hundred people in attendance. Each year the show gets bigger and better. This show should interest every farmer in the county to the extent of making an entry for indications are now that a number of entries are to be made from a considerable distance. Big Stone Round Table To Give Operetta Jan. 20 An operetta, "The Wind Rose," to be given under the auspices of the Round Table Club of Big Stone City, S. D., will be given in the City Hall at that place on Friday, January 20, 1921, at 8:15 p. m. Seats are on sale at Clute's Drug Store, admission 30c and 40c. The program is as follows: Cast of Characters. Rose McCloud, a popular young so- January. 14, 1922. Warren G. Harding, D. C., believe that official circles at and the business men of cities are not fully aware of dire calamity that has befallen agricultural interests of the na- and especially the grain growing of the northwest and of the need for immediate and direct the Government thru the War Corporation. This corpora- helped directly only the large in the cities and has thus far no relief to the farmers what- and but little to the country banks i that of only a temporary and lira-, nature, and under the present sys- Cannot and will not benefit direct- e great body of fanmers who are] in need of assistance, not only I tension of time but also in reduc-! of the rate of interest on both i and ort time loans and more! with which to make the best use of their cheap grain. of brood sows, milk cows, cattle and heifers are going on page 5) SWENSON WINNER IN FOR BATTERY NAME decided upon as the suitable name for the new bat- manufactured by Halls & ot this city, and the of the contest was Mr. S. living on route two out The selection of this name of 216 suggestions that were sent unanimous by the three judges, were Wayne Kelly, C. A. Zwiener lerbert Bolsta. a result of the contest Mr. Swen- Will receive one of the "Spit-Fire" free. DEBATERS wIN OVER BROWNS VALLEY J. M. Snesrud, superintendent of high school, returned from Tuesday night, where he as one of the judges in the con- between the debating teams of city and the Browns Valley high held in connection with the High School Debating Contest. won the debate by a decision of the Judges. The judges were Supt. Vail of Gran- and Supt. Terming of Madi- ciety Belle ........................ Vera Gold Mr. Vikre. Mary Forsythe, her secretary and Additional appointments made by friend ....... Margaret Cross the city council are as folIows: Her- Mrs. Fussy, her housekeeper .......... bert Bolsta, ' city attorney; Walter I Minnie Black Mittelsteadt, marshal; Fred Kreisel, Lad'""Gre'(;"-an'"eccentric la,, Superintendent of Water and Light ...-J:-, '  .-v ." wtiglt ........................ un lralnar(l Plant; Dan Carlson, assistant. Mrs.] Reporters John A. Johnson was appointed as a Miss Writemup ................ Vera Zeigler member of the Board of Health fol- lowing the refusal of Mrs. H. W. Sar- via to qualify owing to other matters that demand her attention. The matter of purchasing a pul- motor was brought before the meeting with the result that one-third of the expense will be appropriated bY the city, one-third by the fire department and one-third by Drs. Bolsta and Karn. This will be the property of the fire department. An agreement was made between the city and Kruger Brothers of Aberdeen and Fred Peterson of this city whereby the latter are to erect suitablefences to serve as a guard within tle radius where they are mak- ing ice. This protection is essential as there are a number of people who use the road on the ice in coming' to this city and any neglect towards the uroper protection might lead to a damage suit against the city in case of an accident. Under the present agreemefit, the responsibility rests wholly upon the firm conducting the business. Fences have already been placed and the proper care taken to safeguard the public. Award of the city printing went to the Journal, which paper agreed to print all legal notices, proceedings, etc., entirely free of charge provided that paper was aVarded the job print- ing which the cit might require dur- ing the year. The bid submitted by the Star specified printing of proceed. ings without charge but with a charge for legal notices on a basis of 30 per cent less than the rate allowed by law. The Independent's bid was highest, with a price approximately equivalent to that on which the county printing was secured. Letter From 'q2y." Cyrus Ericks0n, formerly associate editor of the Independent, and who is now a student at Harvard University, writes that conditions in the east art not mch better than they are in the middle west but that a spirit of opti mism seems to prevail where peas] mism formerly ruled supreme and tha better times are on the way. "Cy" tF !taking up the study of law. Miss Putomdown .......... Marion Black Dora, Flora, Molly, Polly, Debutantes: Dorris Black, Myrtle Buri, Clare. Vanderwelde, Dorothy Black. Miss Talkalot, a suffragette .......... ................................... Flora Lauster Mrs. Doingood, a charity worker .... .......................................... Sarah Clark Madame Sewseams, a dressmaker .... ........................................ Ruth Camero Madame Feathertep, a milliner ........ .............................................. Ida Trapp Madame Smellsweet, a perfumer .... ........................................ Orinda Obitz Bobble, the Buttons, Violette Redetzke Maids--Rose Nelson, Minnie Wil- liams, Gladys Vanderwelde, Kath- erine Rhoder, Leta Reed, Ida Trapp, Orinda Obitz, Ellen Trapp. Pianist--Ida Gold. Scenes ACT IA formal drawing room in Rose McCloud's city home. ACT IIA garden on Rose McCloud's country estate. TIME--The present. One month elapses between the acts. Woodmen Visit Clinton Lodge. Nineteen members of the local M. W. A. Lodge drove to Clinton on Tues- day night to visit lodge at that place. Those who made up the party were: Fred Seaton, Gee. Miller, Ken Welch. A. C. Anderson, G. W. Vander- Venter, P. E. VanHorn, J. D. Ross. Elmer Anderson, U. J. Stotesbury kmer Everson, Harold Shuit, A. H Sturges, Ed. Shult, Irwin Salverson. Freland Pratt, M. Scheible, Henry Eaton, H. W. Palm, and E. W. Holm- quist. ,,. Church Adds 30 Members. Thirty new members were added to the Methodist church during thr ast two weeks and a chorus choir of hirty voices organized as the resul f the combined work of Rev. Hag Tans and Rev. Day. An offering was received on Sunda, otalling $100.15 and a check for $10' resented to Rev. Day for his service "n conducting a series of meetinl 'ero which came to a close on tha day. Legion Wins A Pair; Loses To Benson During the last week the local quint participated in thl-ee games winning two and dropping one to the strong Benson team. The game at Benson was free from thrills and was only an example of how a much heavier team could wear its opponents down. The first half was quite even and in the last half Benson gradually forged ahead. The final score was 23 to 12. The Line-up: Ortonville Benson Gowan .................... f .......... B. Peterson Stegner ................ f .............. C. Nelson Bertelson .............. c ................ Barbour Petrick ................ g .......... C. Peterson Geier .................... g .............. Anderson Scoring: Field C-oalsB. Peterson 6, Nelson 4, Barbour 1, Gowan 2, Steg- her 1, Bertelson 1. Free throws---B. Peterson 1 out of 5, Bertelson 4 out of 6. Beardsley Game A Thriller. The contest with Beardsley here Monday night was the kind fans like to talk about. After taking a lead of 6 points in the first half the Legiion seemed help- less against the long shots of O. Lumphey and V. Allen who soon ran the score up to 14 to 8 in favor of Beardsley However in the final min- utes of play Stegner and Petrick ev- ened the score and the game ran into an extra period. Those five minutes were disastrous for the visitors. Or- tonville dropped four baskets as fast as they could be counted, Gowan be- ing the big point man. The final score was 22 to 14. The Line-up: Ortonville Beardsley Gowan .................... f ........ J. I,umphrey Stegner . ................. f ........ O. Lumphrey Bertelson ................ c ........ : ....... Meyers Petrick .................. g .............. V. Allen Geier ...................... g ............. C. Allen Ortonville Beardsley Scoring: Field goals--Gowan 5, Stegner 2, Bertetson 2. Petrick 2, O. Lumphrey 4. V. Allen 2, C. Allen 1. Free throws---J. Lumphrey none out of 2. Slow Game With Graceville. Wednesday "evening the |ocals de- feated the Graceville K. C's in a slow game, 21 to 12. The Line-up: Ortonville Graceville Gowan f Cota Beckman .............. c .............. J. Homer Petrick .................. g ............ R. Horner Geier .................... g ............ tI. Larkin Scoring: Field GoalsGowan 2, SLegner 2, Bertelson 2, Petrick, Beck- man 2, W. Larkin 3, J. Horner 2. Lee 1. Subs--Stegner for Loy, Bertelson for Beckman, H. Larkin for R. Hor- ner. LEGION AND AUXILIARY ELEC'r OFFICERS FOR 1922 Oficers electcd at the annual meet- ing of the Legion and Auxiliary, held at the courthouse here on Thursday evening are Legion, F. W. Engdahl; commander: Elmer Hausauer. vice com,mander; WiHard Tweet, adjutant; Earl Miller, treasurer. The executive committee consisting of four mem- bers, Herbert Bolsta, H. Lentz, C. A. Zwiener and Henry Bailey. Auxiliary officers are: Miss Ruth Wilkins, president. Mrs. Vern il- vington, vice-president; Miss Cora Atha, secretary; Miss Dena Hudson, treasurer. The executive committee is composed of Mrs. John Gowan, Mrs. Corn Scofield and Mrs. J. A. Ja- cobsen. The following persons were admit- ted to membership in the organiza- tion: Mrs. Clara Hahn, Mrs. Charles Spink, Mrs. F. M. Geier, Mrs. C. A. Beard, Miss Mattie Jacobsen, Mrs. Roy Geier, Mrs. Paul Bockoven and the Misses Grace and Belva Kaer- cher. Following the Legion meeting the Auxiliary entertained the members of both organizations. A lnnch was served after which Commander Eng- dahl called the meeting to order and responses were made by Rev. Paul Bockoven, a reading by Rev. E. Day, and by Herbert Bolsta. ORTONVILLE-OTRE Y PHONE COMPANY ELECTS OFFICERS At a meeting of the Ortonville-Ot- rey Telephone Company, held Jan. 18. at the schoolhouse in District No. 60 the following officers were elected' teve Chickey, president, W,m, Pode- evils, vice-president; Chas. Hillstrom, Henry Theil,. Albert Anderson, Hans n knderson, ad-Elmer Thompson, di- "cetera; Albert Lindquist, secretary easurer.; and Carl Hillstrom and A ' nderson, linemen. Kolah Club. The next meeting of the Kolah Clu} rill be held on Thursday, January 2 t the home of Mrs. Peter Lannor with Mrs. Lannon and Mrs. Sutton a, :stesses. Subject, "Fumigation and )isinfecting," by Mrs. John Startle "rod Mrs. F. A. Zehringer. ESTIMATED LOSS $55,000 ON STOCK AND BUILDING; INSURANCE $21,400 Fire Fanned By High Wind Soon Be- yond Control; Other Buildings In Line of Fire Protected Building Erected By N. Schoen Son In 1902 Was Most Substantial and Commodious In City Fire that for a time threatened property valued up- wards to $150,000.00, believed to have originated from a defective chimney, totally destroyed the three-story brick building occupied by the M. M. Johnson Furniture Com- pany here this afternoon, at a loss of $55,000.00. The builc- ing and stock was considered the best in the western part of Minnesota. Axel Olson, an employee of the JOhnson Furniture Company, discovered the fire in the southwest corner of the basement and gave the alarm at 3:15, which, in less than five minutes, resulted in the appearance of the fire department upon the scene, but the flames, fanned by a strong west wind, had filled the building with a dense @cloud of smoke which made entrance New Places OpeneB00S00es:SChantes t MtlHnery Stores, A Grocery Store and Harness Shop To Open Soon. Confidence in the future prospects for Ortenville and the surrounding territory was mainfested by three citizens of, this city when the follow- ing transactions took-plaee,:last Mon- day, gad Monday could hardly be termed "a blue one." " Orton Brothers became the proprie- tors of the grocery store conducted by Otto Meyers; Pete Hausauer be- came the owner of E. L. Lundstrom': interest in the Lundstrom & Geisel Meat Market, and F. E. Davison moved his equipment into the build-! ing formerly occupied by the Big Stone Land and Loan Company and open up a harness repair, shop. [ will The building occupied by Otto Mey- ers store is being repainted and re- utterly impossible, and access to the fire itself out of the question. As a result, four streams of water were trained upon the building in the hopes of saving the structure but within 45 minutes from. the time the fire origi- nated the building was a mass of debris. After having discovered that the flames were unquenchable, Wayne Kelly, chief of the department, direc- ted his men to protect the adjoining buildings with the result that prop- erty, estimated at fully $100,000.00 was saved. Volunteers aided the de- partment men materially in saving the property threatened. Flames that spanned the street in front of the building burst forth when the front of the structure gave way, and huge clouds of dense smoke arose that forced the throng of witnesses that had gathered back a distance of many rods, and the excessive heat broke plate glass windows in the buildings occupied by the Ortonville Journal, Fred Brown, the Brennecke and Fenner Produce Co., the Kollitz Mercantile Company, and the Alvah Matthews Implement Co. paired and will be opened on Febru- i cry 4th by the Often Brothers under Fighting the blaze from the top of the name Cash and Carry Grocery, the Alvah Matthews Implement build- It is the plan of tbe Orton Brothers' ing the fire, men, altho imperiling their to do only a cash business as it i: lives because of the weakened eondi- their belief that it will be possible to tion of the north wall which was ex- sell groceries at a savings to the cus- petted to glve-way at any moment, tomer under this method, succeeded in saving that building and Edgar and Albert Orton who are the work of every man on the depart- the new owners have had a number of ment who fought against heavy odds years' experience in the mercantile is deserving of the highest praise in business, having been employed at the checking the further spread which Kollitz Mercantile Company's store, would have meant, perhaps, the loss of They are also the proprietor: of the a large part of the residential section Eahtonka Dancing Pavilion on the adjoining Lincoln Avenue on the Lake front. The meat market in which Mr. Hau- sauer is now interested will be con- ducted under the name of Geisel and Hausauer. Both are meat cutters with years' of experience, Mr. Hausauer having been in the employ of Mr. Gee. Shumaker for ,many years at the Pio- neer Market and also was employed at that market until his purchase in the new market. F. E. Davison needs no introduction, having been engaged in the harness business in this city until a few months ago. At the present time no definite plans have been made by either Mr E. L. Lundstrom or Mr. Otto Meyers as to their future business engage- ments. Camp Fire Girls Meet, The Camp Fire Girls, forty in num- ber, met at the Library Tuesday eve- ning, in charge of their guardian, Miss Helen Miehell. The purpose el the meeting was to divide the giri into two groups and to elect a treas- urer to serve both camps. Irene War- ford was elected treasurer. Mar. Shumaker and Ruth Gowan are the assistant Guardians who will haw ,barge bf Group ..A," and Belva Kaer- cher and Muriel Schoen, assistant ardJans, will have charge of Grow "B." Meetings will be held end week. Wellendorf Tops Market With Lambr Col. W.rn. Wellendorf returned Wed esday from St. Paul where he sold : arload of lambs Tuesday. His ship ent brought the top price on th  ay of $11.25 per cwt. Mr. Wellev orf states that the price of ho !umped from 75c to $1.00 on the d 'e was there, choice hogs bringin.' $8.80. south. The building, constructed of pressed brick and trimmed with granite, was erected in 1902 by M. Schoen & Son, and was the pride of the city. It con- rained three stories with full base- ment, and was occupied until 1919 by M. Schoen & Son, who conducted a furniture business that had gained them a reputation of having the third largest store of its kind in the state. In 1919 the business was sold to M. M. Johnson, who came from Plenti- wood, Montana, and who was the own- er of the stock valued at $25)00 which was destroyed, Loss of the building falls upon Martin Sohoen, the amount of which is placed at $80,000.00. Both Mr. Johnson and Mr. Schoen had recently redmmd the amount of thsurance carried and the fire caught ern but partially insured, the stock being covered with $10,000 and the building with $11,400.00. Mr. Johnson, in an interview, an- nounced that he would leave for Min- neapolis tonight, to purchase a com- plete line of supplies for his under- taking business mad will return on Saturday. At the present time Mrs. M. M. Johnson is at Chicago on her return from Grand Rapids, Michigan, wher both herself and Mr. Johnson had been to purchase a new stock of furniture, a part of which arrived to- day and was consumed by the fire. For the present time elves will be maintained in the building occupied by Mr. Martin Sehoen. Plans for the erection of a new building will begin immediately and the work commenced as soon as weather conditions permit, according o an announcement given out by Mr. choen. While it has not been state@ as to the exact type of buildng to be ,rected it is believed that it will con, orm in style tot he one destroyed. ii t ) j THE Ot00TONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1922 NUMBER 37 Completely Destroys Johnson's Furniture Store A ASK TO AID W. FARMERS md Word Tele- Urges War Finance to Loan Di- "dire calamity has befal- agricultural interest of the a delegate convention of Minnesota Bankers and Far- Saturday sent a 1,000-word of appeal to President Hat- the necessity for assistance to the farmer. of the message to the resulted from the organiza- the Big Stone County Live- which seeks to have Finance Corporation make to its organization. The expresses the belief that of- and Eastern busi- are unaware of this Charges were made that banks have been given as- up to this time. The tele- the follows: that official circles at and the business men of cities are not fully aware e dire calamity that has befallen interests of the ha- especially the grain growing of the Northwest and of the need for immediate and direct the government thru the corporation." Kaercher's Plan. believe that the government Big Feature At Grand Theatre January 25, 26 Cecil B. DeMille, perhaps the fore- most motion picture producer in the country, if not the world, will display his genius at Its best in his latest [Paramount picture, "The Affairs of :Anatol," at the Grand Theatre Janu- ary 25 and 26. From every standpoint --investiture, its all-star cast, sumptu- i ousness of settings, brilliance of direc- torial execution, richness of costumes, quality of story and general artistry, this picture marks a distinct epoch in screen production of the decade. The story, written by Jennie Mac- pherson, and suggested by the famous play by Arthur Schnitzler, deals with an impressionable young man of wealth who finds time to interest him- self in the affairs of others and who learns by practical experience that it pays best to attend to one's own af- fairs and let others do the same. The cast is superb and includes such stars as Wallace Reid, Gloria Swan- son, Elliot Deter, Bebe Daniels, Monte Blue, Wanda Hawley, Theodore Roberts, Agnes Ayres and Theodore Kosloff. Their portrayals are artistic i and add vastly to the value of the pro- duction. The photoplay by Alvin i Wyckoff and Karl Struss is beautiful Take it all in all this is perhaps the !best picture thus far made by Cecil B. DeMille and that is saying a great deal. Forced To Use Teams. Operations by the crew making ice have been interrupted due to a touch of disagreeable weather. Due to the cold spell  was found impossible to keep the channel open, which was cut for the purpose of floating ice to the loading platform. As the result teams were brought into use. direct relief to the far- . L of the nation and in a practical I lit   ] pie manner npp01ntments approve of the plan of financ-[ rl ers, proposed hy A B Kaer-I I.. P.......1 I.. 1 fl99 ! Ortonville, Minn., embodied I IJy UOUlKA1 I'UI 17(( .-operative association of pro-I thru which government money I -- . ,-7 T e loaned. : Agrees to nare xpense ot believe farmers and business Purchasing Pulmotor for of each county, who personally Fire Department. the character and standing of are better able to pass security offered by the farmer or other committees cities, who have no know- of these things, and, therefore, such co-operative agricultural should be permitted to directly with the War Finance and that the approval gUaranty of securities offered by County units should be accepted War Finance corporation." Ortonvill, Minnesota. Two building permits were issued by, the city council at its regular meet- ing held on Monday night, one to Carl- son & Hasslen for the remodeling and repairing of the building that was damaged by fire, occupied by the Coderre Barber shop and one to P. B. Vikre for the remodeling of his pho- tographic studio. Work on the Carlson & Hasslen building will commence at once but no definite plans have been made by POULTRY SHOW DATES SE T 0N FEBRUARY 1-2-3 Canfield, Poultry Specialist From U. Farm To Be Judge. Premium Lists To Be Mailed Soon. February 1, 2 and 3 are the dates set for the fourth annual Big Stone County Poultry Show which will be held at the Alvah Matthews Building in this city and at which, indications lead the directors of the association to believe there will be even more en- tries than there were last year. Thos. Canfield, poultry specialist of the University Farm has been secured to act as judge and in addition will give educational talks in connection with the culling, housing, feeding and breeding for better poultry produc- tion. These talks will be held each day during the show, according to present arrangements. Prizes totalling in the neighborhood of $400 amde from the specml prizes are being offered and a display is looked for that will be second to none in western Minnesota. The premium lists are being printed at this time and will be distributed by the officers of the association by Wed- nesday of next week. Everyone inter- ested in the raising of poult1 should write to Mr. C. G. Holmquist, Orton- rifle, Minn., for one of these lists in case they do not receive one. In the meanti,me it will be a good idea to tame your prize chickens and get them in readiness for show purposes, for there is sure to be several hundred people in attendance. Each year the show gets bigger and better. This show should interest every farmer in the county to the extent of making an entry for indications are now that a number of entries are to be made from a considerable distance. Big Stone Round Table To Give Operetta Jan. 20 An operetta, "The Wind Rose," to be given under the auspices of the Round Table Club of Big Stone City, S. D., will be given in the City Hall at that place on Friday, January 20, 1921, at 8:15 p. m. Seats are on sale at Clute's Drug Store, admission 30c and 40c. The program is as follows: Cast of Characters. Rose McCloud, a popular young so- January. 14, 1922. Warren G. Harding, D. C., believe that official circles at and the business men of cities are not fully aware of dire calamity that has befallen agricultural interests of the na- and especially the grain growing of the northwest and of the need for immediate and direct the Government thru the War Corporation. This corpora- helped directly only the large in the cities and has thus far no relief to the farmers what- and but little to the country banks i that of only a temporary and lira-, nature, and under the present sys- Cannot and will not benefit direct- e great body of fanmers who are] in need of assistance, not only I tension of time but also in reduc-! of the rate of interest on both i and ort time loans and more! with which to make the best use of their cheap grain. of brood sows, milk cows, cattle and heifers are going on page 5) SWENSON WINNER IN FOR BATTERY NAME decided upon as the suitable name for the new bat- manufactured by Halls & ot this city, and the of the contest was Mr. S. living on route two out The selection of this name of 216 suggestions that were sent unanimous by the three judges, were Wayne Kelly, C. A. Zwiener lerbert Bolsta. a result of the contest Mr. Swen- Will receive one of the "Spit-Fire" free. DEBATERS wIN OVER BROWNS VALLEY J. M. Snesrud, superintendent of high school, returned from Tuesday night, where he as one of the judges in the con- between the debating teams of city and the Browns Valley high held in connection with the High School Debating Contest. won the debate by a decision of the Judges. The judges were Supt. Vail of Gran- and Supt. Terming of Madi- ciety Belle ........................ Vera Gold Mr. Vikre. Mary Forsythe, her secretary and Additional appointments made by friend ....... Margaret Cross the city council are as folIows: Her- Mrs. Fussy, her housekeeper .......... bert Bolsta, ' city attorney; Walter I Minnie Black Mittelsteadt, marshal; Fred Kreisel, Lad'""Gre'(;"-an'"eccentric la,, Superintendent of Water and Light ...-J:-, '  .-v ." wtiglt ........................ un lralnar(l Plant; Dan Carlson, assistant. Mrs.] Reporters John A. Johnson was appointed as a Miss Writemup ................ Vera Zeigler member of the Board of Health fol- lowing the refusal of Mrs. H. W. Sar- via to qualify owing to other matters that demand her attention. The matter of purchasing a pul- motor was brought before the meeting with the result that one-third of the expense will be appropriated bY the city, one-third by the fire department and one-third by Drs. Bolsta and Karn. This will be the property of the fire department. An agreement was made between the city and Kruger Brothers of Aberdeen and Fred Peterson of this city whereby the latter are to erect suitablefences to serve as a guard within tle radius where they are mak- ing ice. This protection is essential as there are a number of people who use the road on the ice in coming' to this city and any neglect towards the uroper protection might lead to a damage suit against the city in case of an accident. Under the present agreemefit, the responsibility rests wholly upon the firm conducting the business. Fences have already been placed and the proper care taken to safeguard the public. Award of the city printing went to the Journal, which paper agreed to print all legal notices, proceedings, etc., entirely free of charge provided that paper was aVarded the job print- ing which the cit might require dur- ing the year. The bid submitted by the Star specified printing of proceed. ings without charge but with a charge for legal notices on a basis of 30 per cent less than the rate allowed by law. The Independent's bid was highest, with a price approximately equivalent to that on which the county printing was secured. Letter From 'q2y." Cyrus Ericks0n, formerly associate editor of the Independent, and who is now a student at Harvard University, writes that conditions in the east art not mch better than they are in the middle west but that a spirit of opti mism seems to prevail where peas] mism formerly ruled supreme and tha better times are on the way. "Cy" tF !taking up the study of law. Miss Putomdown .......... Marion Black Dora, Flora, Molly, Polly, Debutantes: Dorris Black, Myrtle Buri, Clare. Vanderwelde, Dorothy Black. Miss Talkalot, a suffragette .......... ................................... Flora Lauster Mrs. Doingood, a charity worker .... .......................................... Sarah Clark Madame Sewseams, a dressmaker .... ........................................ Ruth Camero Madame Feathertep, a milliner ........ .............................................. Ida Trapp Madame Smellsweet, a perfumer .... ........................................ Orinda Obitz Bobble, the Buttons, Violette Redetzke Maids--Rose Nelson, Minnie Wil- liams, Gladys Vanderwelde, Kath- erine Rhoder, Leta Reed, Ida Trapp, Orinda Obitz, Ellen Trapp. Pianist--Ida Gold. Scenes ACT IA formal drawing room in Rose McCloud's city home. ACT IIA garden on Rose McCloud's country estate. TIME--The present. One month elapses between the acts. Woodmen Visit Clinton Lodge. Nineteen members of the local M. W. A. Lodge drove to Clinton on Tues- day night to visit lodge at that place. Those who made up the party were: Fred Seaton, Gee. Miller, Ken Welch. A. C. Anderson, G. W. Vander- Venter, P. E. VanHorn, J. D. Ross. Elmer Anderson, U. J. Stotesbury kmer Everson, Harold Shuit, A. H Sturges, Ed. Shult, Irwin Salverson. Freland Pratt, M. Scheible, Henry Eaton, H. W. Palm, and E. W. Holm- quist. ,,. Church Adds 30 Members. Thirty new members were added to the Methodist church during thr ast two weeks and a chorus choir of hirty voices organized as the resul f the combined work of Rev. Hag Tans and Rev. Day. An offering was received on Sunda, otalling $100.15 and a check for $10' resented to Rev. Day for his service "n conducting a series of meetinl 'ero which came to a close on tha day. Legion Wins A Pair; Loses To Benson During the last week the local quint participated in thl-ee games winning two and dropping one to the strong Benson team. The game at Benson was free from thrills and was only an example of how a much heavier team could wear its opponents down. The first half was quite even and in the last half Benson gradually forged ahead. The final score was 23 to 12. The Line-up: Ortonville Benson Gowan .................... f .......... B. Peterson Stegner ................ f .............. C. Nelson Bertelson .............. c ................ Barbour Petrick ................ g .......... C. Peterson Geier .................... g .............. Anderson Scoring: Field C-oalsB. Peterson 6, Nelson 4, Barbour 1, Gowan 2, Steg- her 1, Bertelson 1. Free throws---B. Peterson 1 out of 5, Bertelson 4 out of 6. Beardsley Game A Thriller. The contest with Beardsley here Monday night was the kind fans like to talk about. After taking a lead of 6 points in the first half the Legiion seemed help- less against the long shots of O. Lumphey and V. Allen who soon ran the score up to 14 to 8 in favor of Beardsley However in the final min- utes of play Stegner and Petrick ev- ened the score and the game ran into an extra period. Those five minutes were disastrous for the visitors. Or- tonville dropped four baskets as fast as they could be counted, Gowan be- ing the big point man. The final score was 22 to 14. The Line-up: Ortonville Beardsley Gowan .................... f ........ J. I,umphrey Stegner . ................. f ........ O. Lumphrey Bertelson ................ c ........ : ....... Meyers Petrick .................. g .............. V. Allen Geier ...................... g ............. C. Allen Ortonville Beardsley Scoring: Field goals--Gowan 5, Stegner 2, Bertetson 2. Petrick 2, O. Lumphrey 4. V. Allen 2, C. Allen 1. Free throws---J. Lumphrey none out of 2. Slow Game With Graceville. Wednesday "evening the |ocals de- feated the Graceville K. C's in a slow game, 21 to 12. The Line-up: Ortonville Graceville Gowan f Cota Beckman .............. c .............. J. Homer Petrick .................. g ............ R. Horner Geier .................... g ............ tI. Larkin Scoring: Field GoalsGowan 2, SLegner 2, Bertelson 2, Petrick, Beck- man 2, W. Larkin 3, J. Horner 2. Lee 1. Subs--Stegner for Loy, Bertelson for Beckman, H. Larkin for R. Hor- ner. LEGION AND AUXILIARY ELEC'r OFFICERS FOR 1922 Oficers electcd at the annual meet- ing of the Legion and Auxiliary, held at the courthouse here on Thursday evening are Legion, F. W. Engdahl; commander: Elmer Hausauer. vice com,mander; WiHard Tweet, adjutant; Earl Miller, treasurer. The executive committee consisting of four mem- bers, Herbert Bolsta, H. Lentz, C. A. Zwiener and Henry Bailey. Auxiliary officers are: Miss Ruth Wilkins, president. Mrs. Vern il- vington, vice-president; Miss Cora Atha, secretary; Miss Dena Hudson, treasurer. The executive committee is composed of Mrs. John Gowan, Mrs. Corn Scofield and Mrs. J. A. Ja- cobsen. The following persons were admit- ted to membership in the organiza- tion: Mrs. Clara Hahn, Mrs. Charles Spink, Mrs. F. M. Geier, Mrs. C. A. Beard, Miss Mattie Jacobsen, Mrs. Roy Geier, Mrs. Paul Bockoven and the Misses Grace and Belva Kaer- cher. Following the Legion meeting the Auxiliary entertained the members of both organizations. A lnnch was served after which Commander Eng- dahl called the meeting to order and responses were made by Rev. Paul Bockoven, a reading by Rev. E. Day, and by Herbert Bolsta. ORTONVILLE-OTRE Y PHONE COMPANY ELECTS OFFICERS At a meeting of the Ortonville-Ot- rey Telephone Company, held Jan. 18. at the schoolhouse in District No. 60 the following officers were elected' teve Chickey, president, W,m, Pode- evils, vice-president; Chas. Hillstrom, Henry Theil,. Albert Anderson, Hans n knderson, ad-Elmer Thompson, di- "cetera; Albert Lindquist, secretary easurer.; and Carl Hillstrom and A ' nderson, linemen. Kolah Club. The next meeting of the Kolah Clu} rill be held on Thursday, January 2 t the home of Mrs. Peter Lannor with Mrs. Lannon and Mrs. Sutton a, :stesses. Subject, "Fumigation and )isinfecting," by Mrs. John Startle "rod Mrs. F. A. Zehringer. ESTIMATED LOSS $55,000 ON STOCK AND BUILDING; INSURANCE $21,400 Fire Fanned By High Wind Soon Be- yond Control; Other Buildings In Line of Fire Protected Building Erected By N. Schoen Son In 1902 Was Most Substantial and Commodious In City Fire that for a time threatened property valued up- wards to $150,000.00, believed to have originated from a defective chimney, totally destroyed the three-story brick building occupied by the M. M. Johnson Furniture Com- pany here this afternoon, at a loss of $55,000.00. The builc- ing and stock was considered the best in the western part of Minnesota. Axel Olson, an employee of the JOhnson Furniture Company, discovered the fire in the southwest corner of the basement and gave the alarm at 3:15, which, in less than five minutes, resulted in the appearance of the fire department upon the scene, but the flames, fanned by a strong west wind, had filled the building with a dense @cloud of smoke which made entrance New Places OpeneB00S00es:SChantes t MtlHnery Stores, A Grocery Store and Harness Shop To Open Soon. Confidence in the future prospects for Ortenville and the surrounding territory was mainfested by three citizens of, this city when the follow- ing transactions took-plaee,:last Mon- day, gad Monday could hardly be termed "a blue one." " Orton Brothers became the proprie- tors of the grocery store conducted by Otto Meyers; Pete Hausauer be- came the owner of E. L. Lundstrom': interest in the Lundstrom & Geisel Meat Market, and F. E. Davison moved his equipment into the build-! ing formerly occupied by the Big Stone Land and Loan Company and open up a harness repair, shop. [ will The building occupied by Otto Mey- ers store is being repainted and re- utterly impossible, and access to the fire itself out of the question. As a result, four streams of water were trained upon the building in the hopes of saving the structure but within 45 minutes from. the time the fire origi- nated the building was a mass of debris. After having discovered that the flames were unquenchable, Wayne Kelly, chief of the department, direc- ted his men to protect the adjoining buildings with the result that prop- erty, estimated at fully $100,000.00 was saved. Volunteers aided the de- partment men materially in saving the property threatened. Flames that spanned the street in front of the building burst forth when the front of the structure gave way, and huge clouds of dense smoke arose that forced the throng of witnesses that had gathered back a distance of many rods, and the excessive heat broke plate glass windows in the buildings occupied by the Ortonville Journal, Fred Brown, the Brennecke and Fenner Produce Co., the Kollitz Mercantile Company, and the Alvah Matthews Implement Co. paired and will be opened on Febru- i cry 4th by the Often Brothers under Fighting the blaze from the top of the name Cash and Carry Grocery, the Alvah Matthews Implement build- It is the plan of tbe Orton Brothers' ing the fire, men, altho imperiling their to do only a cash business as it i: lives because of the weakened eondi- their belief that it will be possible to tion of the north wall which was ex- sell groceries at a savings to the cus- petted to glve-way at any moment, tomer under this method, succeeded in saving that building and Edgar and Albert Orton who are the work of every man on the depart- the new owners have had a number of ment who fought against heavy odds years' experience in the mercantile is deserving of the highest praise in business, having been employed at the checking the further spread which Kollitz Mercantile Company's store, would have meant, perhaps, the loss of They are also the proprietor: of the a large part of the residential section Eahtonka Dancing Pavilion on the adjoining Lincoln Avenue on the Lake front. The meat market in which Mr. Hau- sauer is now interested will be con- ducted under the name of Geisel and Hausauer. Both are meat cutters with years' of experience, Mr. Hausauer having been in the employ of Mr. Gee. Shumaker for ,many years at the Pio- neer Market and also was employed at that market until his purchase in the new market. F. E. Davison needs no introduction, having been engaged in the harness business in this city until a few months ago. At the present time no definite plans have been made by either Mr E. L. Lundstrom or Mr. Otto Meyers as to their future business engage- ments. Camp Fire Girls Meet, The Camp Fire Girls, forty in num- ber, met at the Library Tuesday eve- ning, in charge of their guardian, Miss Helen Miehell. The purpose el the meeting was to divide the giri into two groups and to elect a treas- urer to serve both camps. Irene War- ford was elected treasurer. Mar. Shumaker and Ruth Gowan are the assistant Guardians who will haw ,barge bf Group ..A," and Belva Kaer- cher and Muriel Schoen, assistant ardJans, will have charge of Grow "B." Meetings will be held end week. Wellendorf Tops Market With Lambr Col. W.rn. Wellendorf returned Wed esday from St. Paul where he sold : arload of lambs Tuesday. His ship ent brought the top price on th  ay of $11.25 per cwt. Mr. Wellev orf states that the price of ho !umped from 75c to $1.00 on the d 'e was there, choice hogs bringin.' $8.80. south. The building, constructed of pressed brick and trimmed with granite, was erected in 1902 by M. Schoen & Son, and was the pride of the city. It con- rained three stories with full base- ment, and was occupied until 1919 by M. Schoen & Son, who conducted a furniture business that had gained them a reputation of having the third largest store of its kind in the state. In 1919 the business was sold to M. M. Johnson, who came from Plenti- wood, Montana, and who was the own- er of the stock valued at $25)00 which was destroyed, Loss of the building falls upon Martin Sohoen, the amount of which is placed at $80,000.00. Both Mr. Johnson and Mr. Schoen had recently redmmd the amount of thsurance carried and the fire caught ern but partially insured, the stock being covered with $10,000 and the building with $11,400.00. Mr. Johnson, in an interview, an- nounced that he would leave for Min- neapolis tonight, to purchase a com- plete line of supplies for his under- taking business mad will return on Saturday. At the present time Mrs. M. M. Johnson is at Chicago on her return from Grand Rapids, Michigan, wher both herself and Mr. Johnson had been to purchase a new stock of furniture, a part of which arrived to- day and was consumed by the fire. For the present time elves will be maintained in the building occupied by Mr. Martin Sehoen. Plans for the erection of a new building will begin immediately and the work commenced as soon as weather conditions permit, according o an announcement given out by Mr. choen. While it has not been state@ as to the exact type of buildng to be ,rected it is believed that it will con, orm in style tot he one destroyed. ii t THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN. THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1922 NUMR 37 Completely Destroys Johnson's Furniture Store ASK TO AID W. FARMERS Word Tele- Finance to Loan Di- mgienltund Saturday sent a 1,000 word Ly for sIsnee to the faer. of the mesge t sulted from the ganlza- Big Stone County Liv , whLch ske to have Fnan Corpotion make to its organization. The L express* the belief that of- Etorn b- unawa of this Charg that given as- up to tbAs time. The tel the psident follows: and not fully aware 1 escdally the grai growing of the Northwest and e,be eve that the govement I extend direct relief to the fa the ton and in a praetlcal appve of the plan of flnanc- by A. B. gr- Ortonlle, Minn., seau of pro- thin hich govement money D helie fae and basin.s eh th, who peonM]y standing of a better able to p&q J Security offend by the faer thee things, ad, therefor, perilled to fietEy and that the appmvaI aranty Ortonville, Minnesota. V 14, 1922. believe that omcial and the biness men of y awa of that northwtp and of the t ae for !by COllection. Ths and h thus far the faers what- y banks a temporary and IIm- atu, and un4er the pnt s- ! great bod i need of assistance, not only L of time bet area'in r* rate of inferrer  both and ort tl loans p grai h milk cows, uoirqt (Cmtind  paze 5) 8W3gN$ON WINNER IN FOR BARRY NAME lltable o fqr mafaetred by Halts o tMs itF, and eonttt wt Hying on route two The aelection of tide name r Wayne Ka rbert Bolsts. a result o WIN OVEIt BROWNS VALLEY M. Snrud, superintendent of hi#, hool, retutm, d from v night, whom he Ju0e in the n- hetwm the dabatng t arm the Bs Valley dd in eonntion with the Sehoot Debating Conte*L won the dat by a Big Feature At Grand Cil B. DeMille, perhaps the fo most motion pictu producer in eotr if n t tht Ms g-enius at 'ts picture, Anato]," at the Grand oriat exetlon, quality of story Lhis picture marks g disnet epoch Jn The story, written b: pberson, and suggested by the famoue play by ', deals impressionabie self in the learns by practical experience that it Robet, Agnes and add vastly uction. The photoplay by Aldn Wyekoff d Karl Stress is beautiful Tak it all n all this is perhaps the best pietu th far made by Cecil yag a great Foed To U Teams Operations by the ew making i of disageable weather. cold spell 1 was found imposble to keep the channel open, for the purpose of floating lee to te toadlng platform. were brought into use New Appointments By Council For 1922 Agrees to Share Expense of Pure-hosing Potor for Fire I._tment. Two building petite lar meet- ing held on Monday night, one to Carl g and pairng of the building that was by oupled by te Vik for the odeling of his pho tographle studlo Work on the Carln & btldlnff no definite pls Additional POULTRY SHOW DATES SET ON FEBRUARY 1-2-3 Canfield, Poultry Specialist From O. Farm To Be Judge. Premium Lists To Be Mailed Soon. February I, 2 and 3 annual Big Stone County Poultry Show which will be held at the AIvah Matthew* Building city and at which, indications the city Fussy, her hou*ekeeper ........ bert Bolsta, city atey; Mittelsteadk marshall Fred Kisel,[Lady Gy, an entnc play- upentdent of Water and Pant; Dan Carlson, aseistat, $ohn A. Johnson was appointed as a member of the Board of Health fol- lowing the mfal of M. H. W, Sa s to qualify owLng te other matte The realtor of puhing a pnl- t0r  brought befo the mtLng o the All be appropriatt by the ety, onethlrd by the fi department d one-thir by Dr BoLeta d Kern. This wilt be the property of the fire department. An agreement was made betwn the city and Krr Bratbe of Aberdn and Pred lterson of tbe City whereby the latter a to erect itablafens to ee  a guard witmn the radius where they a mak- ing te. This protection is esmial u th are a nber of people who g to this dt and y negit tewars the proteetl might lead to a dag stilt against the city in cane of 'an atdaat. Under the rssnt meat, the rcsnsibfllt wholly pon the fi mtuetlng the Fea have alr been platd end the proper ears taken to afterward the pub[i Award of the dry prhatiag went to the Seamal, which paper arted to print all legld noths, prtradngs, etc., enttly f of charge pvd that paper wtm aOarded the Job nt- ing wBeh the eit might reqair du lug the yr. The bid submitted by the Star stifa pint of prr*eetd- inga dthlt eharg bat with a chat g far legal notices on a btl of 0 lx nt le then the rate alld by law The Indepndt'e Md w hlgheth with a pries apphaatel eqllet to that on which the e0unty printing w avared, Letter From 'y," G3.ras Erteks0n, formelly Msot editor of the Indtpeadent, and who it n a stadent at Harcard Urvl wrls that coalitions in the east a th they are tn thl pirtt of apti whta  mitre formerly ral prme and t' betr tima am on the my, "6hr" Ir  the gadl Thee. Canfield, poultl T specialist of the University Fa has bn secured to act  judge and in addition wilt gt dutionat talks in onneetion vth the culling, housing, feeding and bdlng for better oultr produc- on. These talks will be held each day during the hew, according to psent Prizes totalling in the neighborhood of $40O ide from te pec[al pris are being offered and a display is looked for that will be an, In weste Minnesota The premium 1Lets are being pnted nesday of neat week Everyone inter. IT should G. Holmqmst, Ortn. rills, Minn, for one of these  they do not ceive one. it will be a good idea tc te you prize ch ckena and get them in adine for chow purIses, fez here s su to be several Each year th chow gets bgger and better ThiE ntest every faer i the count entry for indlctlons a nber of entree a to b Big Stone Round Table . To Give Operetta Jan. 20 1 An opetta, "The Win d RO," t be gin under the auspices o the g Stone City S. D., will he given in the City Hall at that place on Friday, Janry 20, 1921, at 8:15 p. m. at Clare's Dg Store, and 40e. The program is as follows: Cast of Characters. Rose McCloud, a pepu]ar young so- ciety Belle ............ Ve Col Mary Forsyhe, her secretary and friend ................ Margat Cros Miss Writemup Vera Xeigle Dora, FIo a, Molly, Po y, Debutantes: Dois 8lack, Myrtle 1uri, Clar VanderweMe, Dorothy Baek Mis Talkot, a suffragette Mra. Dongoed, a chaty worker bladame Sewsms, a dssmaker Madame Feathertep, a mUllner ...... ....................... Ida Trapp Madame Smellswt, a perfumer. Bobble, the Buttons, Maid--Rose Neln, Minnie liar, Gladys Vandeelde, Kath- erlr Rhoder, Leta Reed, ld Tlpp, Orind Ohitz Ellen Tpp Ftanist-lda Gold. sea ACT I--A fomal dwthg room it Roe MCloud's ety home. ACT II--A garden on Rose MeGioud't untry estatt TIME--The paent elapses betwn the acts. Wohen Vit Clinton Lodse. Nineteen mbem of the Iol M w. A. Ledge dve to C]hten on 'rues, day night to slt ]edge at the, t place Tho who made up the party  Fld Seaton, O Miller, Kn Welch A. C. VelVet, P E. VmxHom, J. D. Rou l EIm Anden, U. 3. Store*bury: Amer En, HId Shult, A. H Sturges, Ed hult Fr[4lnd Ptt, M. Schdble, Henry aton, H. W. Pah, quist. Chur Add* SO Membert. Thirty n reembets h the Methodist ehurch during the ast two weeks and a ehor choir of hlrty valee orgmted as f the combined work of Roy. Hag ans and Roy. Day. Au offering was rtcelved on Sands, otalling $I00A5 and a cheek for $10' ented to Pv, Day for h/t servtve n ondtwng a aeries of  here which came to a loe on the day. I Legion Wins A Pair; *lOrpl|ltqlr Loses To Benson Pl|']alP LOSS $55,000 ON STOCK  .......................... AND BUILDING; INSURANCE $21,400 participated in thre games winnin dropping one .................. Fire Fanned By High Wind Soon Be- its opponents do. The forged ahead. The Line up: Ortonvle i eat Beardsley Game A Thriller. The contest with Beardsley Monday night was the kind fans like I , talk about. [ After taking a lead of 6 points in[ less against the long shots Lumphey an, v. Alien vho s( the score up to 14 to 8 in favor of Beardsley. However in the final min- utes of play Stegner nd patrick ev. ened the co and the gn ran into an exfra perlL tile ,sito. Or- drooped four baskets q ft as they could be counted, ing the big point man, The Ltnup: Stegner ............... f O. Lumphy Petriek. ....... g .. .... Redsley Scoring: Field gIs--Gowan 5, Sterner 2, Bertelson 2, Petriek 2, O. Lumphrey 4, V+ Allen 2, C. AlLen 1. Lumphrey none out Slpw, Game With Geevtlle. Wedneoday evenlng  |OLS d Ley The Line-up: Scoring: Field Goals Gowan 2, Stegner , Borzoi*on 2, Patrick, Beck- man 2, W, Larkn 3, J. Homer 2, L 1. Subs--Stegner for Lay, Berteleon for Beckman, H. AUXILIARY ELECt ing of the Le#en and Aullary, hem tho cnurthoue he on Thursday evenLng are Idon, F. W. Engdahh rommander; Emer Hausauer, Wee- mmander; winsrd Tweet, adjutant; Earl Miller, tasurer. csnsisting of bars, Herbert Boleta, H. Lentz, C A. ailey. Afliary om a: Mise Ruth Wilkins, pident. Mrs. Ve il- vington, viepd*nt; Mi Cera Ath etary; Miss De Rod*on, The exeeuve eommiee ie mposed of Mrs. John Gowan, M. Cora Seofield d Mrs. J. A. Ja- The following ted to mbersMp in the orgai- Splnk, M F. L Geler, M C. A. Beard. Ms Mama Jbson, Mr& Roy Geler, Mrs. Paul the Mists Grae d char. F01owng the Lelan meeng the Auxilhry ent*rtmned the memberl of 'beth oranizations, A Inneh w verd after which Coder Eg- ahl called the talcing to order and e de by Bkven, a reading by Ray. E Day, n hy Iterbert Bolsta COMPANY LECTfl OFFICERS At a rntlng of the OrtonltO Telephor Company, held the following sm we elected: teve Chiekey. ps{dent, VL ils, -psident; Ch. enry Theil,. Albert Andern, Hans hdern, andRimer Thompson, all- Albert Lndqist, tary ' nden, Iaemen. Kolah ChK qe t tlng of the Kolh On t the home ef Mrs. peter 't. Subject, "Fndgaon Zehngr. yond Control; Other Buildings In Line of Fire Protected Building Erected By N. Schoen  Son In 1902 Was Most Substantial and Commodious In City Fire that for a time threatened property valued up- wards to $150,000.00, believed to have originated from a defective chimney, totally destroyed the tbree-story brick building occupied by the M. M. Johnson Furniture Com- pany hee this afternoon, at a loss of $55#00.00. The buill- ing and stock was considered the best in the western part of Minnesota. Axel Olson, an employee of the J6hnson Furniture Company, discovered the fire in the southwest corner of the baeemet and gave the alarm at 3:15 which, in less than five minutes, resulted in the appearance of the fire department upon the scene, but the flames, fanned by a strong west wind, had filled the building with a dense cloud of smoke which made entrance New Business Places fi:teereilfoPusiobe'thanqdueatSoS tLth: a....,en, AI Chanes Isult' fur sta' "n of iwater e we traine d upon the bmtdl g n th haps --   of saving the stctare but within 45 Millinery Stores, A Grocery Store and Harness Shop To Open Soon. " Confidence in the futu pspeets for OrtonvHle and the surromding territory was mainfested by throe citizens of, this city when the follow- ing transactiv tooklt Jom ay, ahd Monday could hardly be reded % blue one." - Orton Brothers became the praprle- ndted by Otto Meyer*; Pete Hausaaer be- came the owner of E. L. Lndstrnm's Lnndstrom & Gisel Meat Market, and F. E, Davison moved his equipment into the buihl- /sg foer]y oepied by the Big Stone Land and Loan Company and wfl[ open up a haness repainshop. The building opied by Otto May. is being painted and re paired and will be opened on Febl. ary 4th by the Orton Brg, thevs der -y Gcery" minutes from the time the fire orig tad the blding was a mass of debris. After hav dlvered that the dames were unquenchable, Wayr Kol, chief of t department, re- ted M me,, to protect the adjoining bnildlnge with the result that pmp- ety, estimated at lly $10000.0 was eared. Volteer aided the da- lmrtment n matorllly in ving he property thatene& Yes that smne the street in front of the building but forth when the front of the etctm gave way, and huge elenda of defoe emoke aae that foxed the throng of tne that had thered back a distance of many l.os, and the exees ve ht broke plate gis windowe ia the braidings cccnpled by the Ortonville Joual, Fred Brow, the Brannsce and Fenner Produce Co., the KolILtz Meantle Company, d the Alvh Matthews Impleluent Co Fghting the blaze frsm the top of the Alvah Matthewe ImpIement buff& It is th# plan of the Orlon Brothers ing the fien, aitho imperiling their to do only a sh bsns as it is lives because of the weakens6 spade- their belief that it will be pessLb]e to lion of the north wall which was ex- lt groceries at a sange to the e-' peeled to give-way at any moment. ment who fought against heavy odds is desexing of the highest pra/se in the fllrther spad which Mentile Company's store would have meant, perltpe, the Idiot rhay a ai the pptors of the'a large part of the idtial stion Eahtenka Dancing Pavilion on the a,LJoining Lincoln Avenue oa the south. now [ntested Will be con- ne of Oeisel and yea' of experien, Mr. having bn in the ploy of Mr. Gap. w employed pareha having bn this city 1tutti monthz At th rmnt time no plaM have n made by either Mr E. k LI to thor fat bainess mQnt. Camp Fire GIrk Mt. The Camp llre Gifts, for ia nora- bar, met at the Library Tttesday eve- rang, In ehar ef their gardi, Mtzs Helen Mlehell. The eurpo o the mting wu to divide the girl into two aps and to elect a tt*as ur t serve both camps. I War k ford I aidted treasur. Mar Shmker d Ruth Gxxllana who will have "hg 6f Gp A," and Bdva Kaer urel Sehoen, as ardlan, will ha eharg of Crou, Mting will be held Wellondoef Tog Market CoL W. Weltendrf returned We ,esda rload of lambz Taeaday. His shp ",ent btmht the top prl on th- lay of $11.25 p*r ew Mr. Waller 1oft stat that the pr of ho ipd from 75e to $1.00 on the d 80.w the, ehole hog bringin! The building, conatcted of pressed with granite, was 1902 by M Schn & son. and was the pride of the dry. It con- fall base- ment, and was upled tfl 1919 by & Sen, who conducted a busi that had gre4 them putation of ha'dug the third largest tore of It Mud In the state* toL M, Jahnn, who e from Pttl- wd, Mtana, and Who w the $2500 which was destroyed, Lse of the btdldlag" falls upon Martin Seh, the ameant of which is placed at l0,ee.00. Beth Mr. Johnson and Mr. 8daoen had reetly rda*ed the Mt of Immrme ear:bed and the fe eaetht them bet parthdly ial, the stock covered with StOee and the Imildng with lA0e.00. Mr. Johnson, in n interlow, an. nound that he wed |ve for - neapolil tonight, te rwehase a mm pete Bne of amlles for Ms mlder- taking bdness  wln rum on Saturday. At the priest time M. M. Jhama ia at 1ago e her from Grand F.alg4ds. Mhlgan. d Mr. Jotaum hod been to Imrdmm a new tock of faItere, a prt of whleh m.ved to- day d was "cennmed by the fd For th* prent tlme efaees wi be mlntaiaed in the belldlng oeeepi b Mr. Martin eho. Pls for the eeetlea of a new bitding will bstln amadlatei aml the rk emmead u  ,th conditions petmlt, rdlng gl out b Mr. Whe it has adz been tate& u tv the exat rpe e baPsthE te b ,eted it le believed that it wm eea- yle to the mm drela& ) j THE Ot00TONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 1922 NUMBER 37 Completely Destroys Johnson's Furniture Store A ASK TO AID W. FARMERS md Word Tele- Urges War Finance to Loan Di- "dire calamity has befal- agricultural interest of the a delegate convention of Minnesota Bankers and Far- Saturday sent a 1,000-word of appeal to President Hat- the necessity for assistance to the farmer. of the message to the resulted from the organiza- the Big Stone County Live- which seeks to have Finance Corporation make to its organization. The expresses the belief that of- and Eastern busi- are unaware of this Charges were made that banks have been given as- up to this time. The tele- the follows: that official circles at and the business men of cities are not fully aware e dire calamity that has befallen interests of the ha- especially the grain growing of the Northwest and of the need for immediate and direct the government thru the corporation." Kaercher's Plan. believe that the government Big Feature At Grand Theatre January 25, 26 Cecil B. DeMille, perhaps the fore- most motion picture producer in the country, if not the world, will display his genius at Its best in his latest [Paramount picture, "The Affairs of :Anatol," at the Grand Theatre Janu- ary 25 and 26. From every standpoint --investiture, its all-star cast, sumptu- i ousness of settings, brilliance of direc- torial execution, richness of costumes, quality of story and general artistry, this picture marks a distinct epoch in screen production of the decade. The story, written by Jennie Mac- pherson, and suggested by the famous play by Arthur Schnitzler, deals with an impressionable young man of wealth who finds time to interest him- self in the affairs of others and who learns by practical experience that it pays best to attend to one's own af- fairs and let others do the same. The cast is superb and includes such stars as Wallace Reid, Gloria Swan- son, Elliot Deter, Bebe Daniels, Monte Blue, Wanda Hawley, Theodore Roberts, Agnes Ayres and Theodore Kosloff. Their portrayals are artistic i and add vastly to the value of the pro- duction. The photoplay by Alvin i Wyckoff and Karl Struss is beautiful Take it all in all this is perhaps the !best picture thus far made by Cecil B. DeMille and that is saying a great deal. Forced To Use Teams. Operations by the crew making ice have been interrupted due to a touch of disagreeable weather. Due to the cold spell  was found impossible to keep the channel open, which was cut for the purpose of floating ice to the loading platform. As the result teams were brought into use. direct relief to the far- . L of the nation and in a practical I lit   ] pie manner npp01ntments approve of the plan of financ-[ rl ers, proposed hy A B Kaer-I I.. P.......1 I.. 1 fl99 ! Ortonville, Minn., embodied I IJy UOUlKA1 I'UI 17(( .-operative association of pro-I thru which government money I -- . ,-7 T e loaned. : Agrees to nare xpense ot believe farmers and business Purchasing Pulmotor for of each county, who personally Fire Department. the character and standing of are better able to pass security offered by the farmer or other committees cities, who have no know- of these things, and, therefore, such co-operative agricultural should be permitted to directly with the War Finance and that the approval gUaranty of securities offered by County units should be accepted War Finance corporation." Ortonvill, Minnesota. Two building permits were issued by, the city council at its regular meet- ing held on Monday night, one to Carl- son & Hasslen for the remodeling and repairing of the building that was damaged by fire, occupied by the Coderre Barber shop and one to P. B. Vikre for the remodeling of his pho- tographic studio. Work on the Carlson & Hasslen building will commence at once but no definite plans have been made by POULTRY SHOW DATES SE T 0N FEBRUARY 1-2-3 Canfield, Poultry Specialist From U. Farm To Be Judge. Premium Lists To Be Mailed Soon. February 1, 2 and 3 are the dates set for the fourth annual Big Stone County Poultry Show which will be held at the Alvah Matthews Building in this city and at which, indications lead the directors of the association to believe there will be even more en- tries than there were last year. Thos. Canfield, poultry specialist of the University Farm has been secured to act as judge and in addition will give educational talks in connection with the culling, housing, feeding and breeding for better poultry produc- tion. These talks will be held each day during the show, according to present arrangements. Prizes totalling in the neighborhood of $400 amde from the specml prizes are being offered and a display is looked for that will be second to none in western Minnesota. The premium lists are being printed at this time and will be distributed by the officers of the association by Wed- nesday of next week. Everyone inter- ested in the raising of poult1 should write to Mr. C. G. Holmquist, Orton- rifle, Minn., for one of these lists in case they do not receive one. In the meanti,me it will be a good idea to tame your prize chickens and get them in readiness for show purposes, for there is sure to be several hundred people in attendance. Each year the show gets bigger and better. This show should interest every farmer in the county to the extent of making an entry for indications are now that a number of entries are to be made from a considerable distance. Big Stone Round Table To Give Operetta Jan. 20 An operetta, "The Wind Rose," to be given under the auspices of the Round Table Club of Big Stone City, S. D., will be given in the City Hall at that place on Friday, January 20, 1921, at 8:15 p. m. Seats are on sale at Clute's Drug Store, admission 30c and 40c. The program is as follows: Cast of Characters. Rose McCloud, a popular young so- January. 14, 1922. Warren G. Harding, D. C., believe that official circles at and the business men of cities are not fully aware of dire calamity that has befallen agricultural interests of the na- and especially the grain growing of the northwest and of the need for immediate and direct the Government thru the War Corporation. This corpora- helped directly only the large in the cities and has thus far no relief to the farmers what- and but little to the country banks i that of only a temporary and lira-, nature, and under the present sys- Cannot and will not benefit direct- e great body of fanmers who are] in need of assistance, not only I tension of time but also in reduc-! of the rate of interest on both i and ort time loans and more! with which to make the best use of their cheap grain. of brood sows, milk cows, cattle and heifers are going on page 5) SWENSON WINNER IN FOR BATTERY NAME decided upon as the suitable name for the new bat- manufactured by Halls & ot this city, and the of the contest was Mr. S. living on route two out The selection of this name of 216 suggestions that were sent unanimous by the three judges, were Wayne Kelly, C. A. Zwiener lerbert Bolsta. a result of the contest Mr. Swen- Will receive one of the "Spit-Fire" free. DEBATERS wIN OVER BROWNS VALLEY J. M. Snesrud, superintendent of high school, returned from Tuesday night, where he as one of the judges in the con- between the debating teams of city and the Browns Valley high held in connection with the High School Debating Contest. won the debate by a decision of the Judges. The judges were Supt. Vail of Gran- and Supt. Terming of Madi- ciety Belle ........................ Vera Gold Mr. Vikre. Mary Forsythe, her secretary and Additional appointments made by friend ....... Margaret Cross the city council are as folIows: Her- Mrs. Fussy, her housekeeper .......... bert Bolsta, ' city attorney; Walter I Minnie Black Mittelsteadt, marshal; Fred Kreisel, Lad'""Gre'(;"-an'"eccentric la,, Superintendent of Water and Light ...-J:-, '  .-v ." wtiglt ........................ un lralnar(l Plant; Dan Carlson, assistant. Mrs.] Reporters John A. Johnson was appointed as a Miss Writemup ................ Vera Zeigler member of the Board of Health fol- lowing the refusal of Mrs. H. W. Sar- via to qualify owing to other matters that demand her attention. The matter of purchasing a pul- motor was brought before the meeting with the result that one-third of the expense will be appropriated bY the city, one-third by the fire department and one-third by Drs. Bolsta and Karn. This will be the property of the fire department. An agreement was made between the city and Kruger Brothers of Aberdeen and Fred Peterson of this city whereby the latter are to erect suitablefences to serve as a guard within tle radius where they are mak- ing ice. This protection is essential as there are a number of people who use the road on the ice in coming' to this city and any neglect towards the uroper protection might lead to a damage suit against the city in case of an accident. Under the present agreemefit, the responsibility rests wholly upon the firm conducting the business. Fences have already been placed and the proper care taken to safeguard the public. Award of the city printing went to the Journal, which paper agreed to print all legal notices, proceedings, etc., entirely free of charge provided that paper was aVarded the job print- ing which the cit might require dur- ing the year. The bid submitted by the Star specified printing of proceed. ings without charge but with a charge for legal notices on a basis of 30 per cent less than the rate allowed by law. The Independent's bid was highest, with a price approximately equivalent to that on which the county printing was secured. Letter From 'q2y." Cyrus Ericks0n, formerly associate editor of the Independent, and who is now a student at Harvard University, writes that conditions in the east art not mch better than they are in the middle west but that a spirit of opti mism seems to prevail where peas] mism formerly ruled supreme and tha better times are on the way. "Cy" tF !taking up the study of law. Miss Putomdown .......... Marion Black Dora, Flora, Molly, Polly, Debutantes: Dorris Black, Myrtle Buri, Clare. Vanderwelde, Dorothy Black. Miss Talkalot, a suffragette .......... ................................... Flora Lauster Mrs. Doingood, a charity worker .... .......................................... Sarah Clark Madame Sewseams, a dressmaker .... ........................................ Ruth Camero Madame Feathertep, a milliner ........ .............................................. Ida Trapp Madame Smellsweet, a perfumer .... ........................................ Orinda Obitz Bobble, the Buttons, Violette Redetzke Maids--Rose Nelson, Minnie Wil- liams, Gladys Vanderwelde, Kath- erine Rhoder, Leta Reed, Ida Trapp, Orinda Obitz, Ellen Trapp. Pianist--Ida Gold. Scenes ACT IA formal drawing room in Rose McCloud's city home. ACT IIA garden on Rose McCloud's country estate. TIME--The present. One month elapses between the acts. Woodmen Visit Clinton Lodge. Nineteen members of the local M. W. A. Lodge drove to Clinton on Tues- day night to visit lodge at that place. Those who made up the party were: Fred Seaton, Gee. Miller, Ken Welch. A. C. Anderson, G. W. Vander- Venter, P. E. VanHorn, J. D. Ross. Elmer Anderson, U. J. Stotesbury kmer Everson, Harold Shuit, A. H Sturges, Ed. Shult, Irwin Salverson. Freland Pratt, M. Scheible, Henry Eaton, H. W. Palm, and E. W. Holm- quist. ,,. Church Adds 30 Members. Thirty new members were added to the Methodist church during thr ast two weeks and a chorus choir of hirty voices organized as the resul f the combined work of Rev. Hag Tans and Rev. Day. An offering was received on Sunda, otalling $100.15 and a check for $10' resented to Rev. Day for his service "n conducting a series of meetinl 'ero which came to a close on tha day. Legion Wins A Pair; Loses To Benson During the last week the local quint participated in thl-ee games winning two and dropping one to the strong Benson team. The game at Benson was free from thrills and was only an example of how a much heavier team could wear its opponents down. The first half was quite even and in the last half Benson gradually forged ahead. The final score was 23 to 12. The Line-up: Ortonville Benson Gowan .................... f .......... B. Peterson Stegner ................ f .............. C. Nelson Bertelson .............. c ................ Barbour Petrick ................ g .......... C. Peterson Geier .................... g .............. Anderson Scoring: Field C-oalsB. Peterson 6, Nelson 4, Barbour 1, Gowan 2, Steg- her 1, Bertelson 1. Free throws---B. Peterson 1 out of 5, Bertelson 4 out of 6. Beardsley Game A Thriller. The contest with Beardsley here Monday night was the kind fans like to talk about. After taking a lead of 6 points in the first half the Legiion seemed help- less against the long shots of O. Lumphey and V. Allen who soon ran the score up to 14 to 8 in favor of Beardsley However in the final min- utes of play Stegner and Petrick ev- ened the score and the game ran into an extra period. Those five minutes were disastrous for the visitors. Or- tonville dropped four baskets as fast as they could be counted, Gowan be- ing the big point man. The final score was 22 to 14. The Line-up: Ortonville Beardsley Gowan .................... f ........ J. I,umphrey Stegner . ................. f ........ O. Lumphrey Bertelson ................ c ........ : ....... Meyers Petrick .................. g .............. V. Allen Geier ...................... g ............. C. Allen Ortonville Beardsley Scoring: Field goals--Gowan 5, Stegner 2, Bertetson 2. Petrick 2, O. Lumphrey 4. V. Allen 2, C. Allen 1. Free throws---J. Lumphrey none out of 2. Slow Game With Graceville. Wednesday "evening the |ocals de- feated the Graceville K. C's in a slow game, 21 to 12. The Line-up: Ortonville Graceville Gowan f Cota Beckman .............. c .............. J. Homer Petrick .................. g ............ R. Horner Geier .................... g ............ tI. Larkin Scoring: Field GoalsGowan 2, SLegner 2, Bertelson 2, Petrick, Beck- man 2, W. Larkin 3, J. Horner 2. Lee 1. Subs--Stegner for Loy, Bertelson for Beckman, H. Larkin for R. Hor- ner. LEGION AND AUXILIARY ELEC'r OFFICERS FOR 1922 Oficers electcd at the annual meet- ing of the Legion and Auxiliary, held at the courthouse here on Thursday evening are Legion, F. W. Engdahl; commander: Elmer Hausauer. vice com,mander; WiHard Tweet, adjutant; Earl Miller, treasurer. The executive committee consisting of four mem- bers, Herbert Bolsta, H. Lentz, C. A. Zwiener and Henry Bailey. Auxiliary officers are: Miss Ruth Wilkins, president. Mrs. Vern il- vington, vice-president; Miss Cora Atha, secretary; Miss Dena Hudson, treasurer. The executive committee is composed of Mrs. John Gowan, Mrs. Corn Scofield and Mrs. J. A. Ja- cobsen. The following persons were admit- ted to membership in the organiza- tion: Mrs. Clara Hahn, Mrs. Charles Spink, Mrs. F. M. Geier, Mrs. C. A. Beard, Miss Mattie Jacobsen, Mrs. Roy Geier, Mrs. Paul Bockoven and the Misses Grace and Belva Kaer- cher. Following the Legion meeting the Auxiliary entertained the members of both organizations. A lnnch was served after which Commander Eng- dahl called the meeting to order and responses were made by Rev. Paul Bockoven, a reading by Rev. E. Day, and by Herbert Bolsta. ORTONVILLE-OTRE Y PHONE COMPANY ELECTS OFFICERS At a meeting of the Ortonville-Ot- rey Telephone Company, held Jan. 18. at the schoolhouse in District No. 60 the following officers were elected' teve Chickey, president, W,m, Pode- evils, vice-president; Chas. Hillstrom, Henry Theil,. Albert Anderson, Hans n knderson, ad-Elmer Thompson, di- "cetera; Albert Lindquist, secretary easurer.; and Carl Hillstrom and A ' nderson, linemen. Kolah Club. The next meeting of the Kolah Clu} rill be held on Thursday, January 2 t the home of Mrs. Peter Lannor with Mrs. Lannon and Mrs. Sutton a, :stesses. Subject, "Fumigation and )isinfecting," by Mrs. John Startle "rod Mrs. F. A. Zehringer. ESTIMATED LOSS $55,000 ON STOCK AND BUILDING; INSURANCE $21,400 Fire Fanned By High Wind Soon Be- yond Control; Other Buildings In Line of Fire Protected Building Erected By N. Schoen Son In 1902 Was Most Substantial and Commodious In City Fire that for a time threatened property valued up- wards to $150,000.00, believed to have originated from a defective chimney, totally destroyed the three-story brick building occupied by the M. M. Johnson Furniture Com- pany here this afternoon, at a loss of $55,000.00. The builc- ing and stock was considered the best in the western part of Minnesota. Axel Olson, an employee of the JOhnson Furniture Company, discovered the fire in the southwest corner of the basement and gave the alarm at 3:15, which, in less than five minutes, resulted in the appearance of the fire department upon the scene, but the flames, fanned by a strong west wind, had filled the building with a dense @cloud of smoke which made entrance New Places OpeneB00S00es:SChantes t MtlHnery Stores, A Grocery Store and Harness Shop To Open Soon. Confidence in the future prospects for Ortenville and the surrounding territory was mainfested by three citizens of, this city when the follow- ing transactions took-plaee,:last Mon- day, gad Monday could hardly be termed "a blue one." " Orton Brothers became the proprie- tors of the grocery store conducted by Otto Meyers; Pete Hausauer be- came the owner of E. L. Lundstrom': interest in the Lundstrom & Geisel Meat Market, and F. E. Davison moved his equipment into the build-! ing formerly occupied by the Big Stone Land and Loan Company and open up a harness repair, shop. [ will The building occupied by Otto Mey- ers store is being repainted and re- utterly impossible, and access to the fire itself out of the question. As a result, four streams of water were trained upon the building in the hopes of saving the structure but within 45 minutes from. the time the fire origi- nated the building was a mass of debris. After having discovered that the flames were unquenchable, Wayne Kelly, chief of the department, direc- ted his men to protect the adjoining buildings with the result that prop- erty, estimated at fully $100,000.00 was saved. Volunteers aided the de- partment men materially in saving the property threatened. Flames that spanned the street in front of the building burst forth when the front of the structure gave way, and huge clouds of dense smoke arose that forced the throng of witnesses that had gathered back a distance of many rods, and the excessive heat broke plate glass windows in the buildings occupied by the Ortonville Journal, Fred Brown, the Brennecke and Fenner Produce Co., the Kollitz Mercantile Company, and the Alvah Matthews Implement Co. paired and will be opened on Febru- i cry 4th by the Often Brothers under Fighting the blaze from the top of the name Cash and Carry Grocery, the Alvah Matthews Implement build- It is the plan of tbe Orton Brothers' ing the fire, men, altho imperiling their to do only a cash business as it i: lives because of the weakened eondi- their belief that it will be possible to tion of the north wall which was ex- sell groceries at a savings to the cus- petted to glve-way at any moment, tomer under this method, succeeded in saving that building and Edgar and Albert Orton who are the work of every man on the depart- the new owners have had a number of ment who fought against heavy odds years' experience in the mercantile is deserving of the highest praise in business, having been employed at the checking the further spread which Kollitz Mercantile Company's store, would have meant, perhaps, the loss of They are also the proprietor: of the a large part of the residential section Eahtonka Dancing Pavilion on the adjoining Lincoln Avenue on the Lake front. The meat market in which Mr. Hau- sauer is now interested will be con- ducted under the name of Geisel and Hausauer. Both are meat cutters with years' of experience, Mr. Hausauer having been in the employ of Mr. Gee. Shumaker for ,many years at the Pio- neer Market and also was employed at that market until his purchase in the new market. F. E. Davison needs no introduction, having been engaged in the harness business in this city until a few months ago. At the present time no definite plans have been made by either Mr E. L. Lundstrom or Mr. Otto Meyers as to their future business engage- ments. Camp Fire Girls Meet, The Camp Fire Girls, forty in num- ber, met at the Library Tuesday eve- ning, in charge of their guardian, Miss Helen Miehell. The purpose el the meeting was to divide the giri into two groups and to elect a treas- urer to serve both camps. Irene War- ford was elected treasurer. Mar. Shumaker and Ruth Gowan are the assistant Guardians who will haw ,barge bf Group ..A," and Belva Kaer- cher and Muriel Schoen, assistant ardJans, will have charge of Grow "B." Meetings will be held end week. Wellendorf Tops Market With Lambr Col. W.rn. Wellendorf returned Wed esday from St. Paul where he sold : arload of lambs Tuesday. His ship ent brought the top price on th  ay of $11.25 per cwt. Mr. Wellev orf states that the price of ho !umped from 75c to $1.00 on the d 'e was there, choice hogs bringin.' $8.80. south. The building, constructed of pressed brick and trimmed with granite, was erected in 1902 by M. Schoen & Son, and was the pride of the city. It con- rained three stories with full base- ment, and was occupied until 1919 by M. Schoen & Son, who conducted a furniture business that had gained them a reputation of having the third largest store of its kind in the state. In 1919 the business was sold to M. M. Johnson, who came from Plenti- wood, Montana, and who was the own- er of the stock valued at $25)00 which was destroyed, Loss of the building falls upon Martin Sohoen, the amount of which is placed at $80,000.00. Both Mr. Johnson and Mr. Schoen had recently redmmd the amount of thsurance carried and the fire caught ern but partially insured, the stock being covered with $10,000 and the building with $11,400.00. Mr. Johnson, in an interview, an- nounced that he would leave for Min- neapolis tonight, to purchase a com- plete line of supplies for his under- taking business mad will return on Saturday. At the present time Mrs. M. M. Johnson is at Chicago on her return from Grand Rapids, Michigan, wher both herself and Mr. Johnson had been to purchase a new stock of furniture, a part of which arrived to- day and was consumed by the fire. For the present time elves will be maintained in the building occupied by Mr. Martin Sehoen. Plans for the erection of a new building will begin immediately and the work commenced as soon as weather conditions permit, according o an announcement given out by Mr. choen. While it has not been state@ as to the exact type of buildng to be ,rected it is believed that it will con, orm in style tot he one destroyed. ii t