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Ortonville, Minnesota
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January 19, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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JANUARY 19, 1922 PAGE P$ The FARMERS PAGE I DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. I Is Keynote ureau s Pro ram ta Federation Demands More Consumers' Dollar--Backs Credit Plan. )st problem affecting y is marketing and of farm products," says agricultural program adopt- the third annual convention of Farm Bureau fedora- Paul. program, which lays out lines to be followed this year by is a .series of state- Which definitely pledge the or- to support these principles Projects: adjustment of farm business to demands, with a reduction of between farm prices paid retrenchment by armers in of machinery, building ma- so forth, until a reasonable ustment is established. campaign for passage Christianson rural credits to the state constitution next general election, backed full strength of the farm bu- of the federal reserve sys- representatives of basic pro- industries, jacluding agricul- of credit laws to give far- and 36 months credit. of the agricultural of the War Finance cur- until a permanent agency is to take its place. pport for the U. S. Grain Inc., the National Livestock association, the Minnesota Creameries association, the Central Co-operativa association, and similar of cost of production in- of a collective buying for 1923, when co-operative agencies have fully estab- that will permit crea- a state farmers' finance ur- grades that will reflect a price true milling value, not tech- of that phase of the Each- act which guarantees a re- railroads' valuation. labor and railroad corpor- both share in price re- a means to restore rea- rates, the program on congress, all railroad and the railway labor relief. also calls for: and favorable action on the wathrway project. mileage of serviceable than construction of a and tonnage timita- I" i in educational policy to i\\;  reatest possible aid to rural of inheritance taxes, to repeal of the excess and opposition to any gen- for all or for none, on a basis of equal- industries. of county farm bureaus units as potent factors farm prosperity. requiring county com- snake appropriations for in every county where has 200 or more a truth in fabric law. in coarse forest help northern Minnesota of the provisions of the Farm Bureau fed- as elected represen- farm bureaus ex- )royal of the agd- congress. DECIDES TELL THE TRUTH time ago a Hoosier of being called a he would tell the next issue of the following Benin, the laziest mer- raade a trip to Belle- is do- His store is dir- can he do much ? last Sunday on Sermon was punk. died at his home here doctor out as To gave it o much of his own him. Sylvia Roads and Saturday at the bride is a very ordin- know any more iackrabbit, and mFe than s not a beauty by any ,means, and has a gait like a duck. The groom is an up-to- date loafer. He has been living off the folks at home all his life and is a good-for-nothing. It will be a hard life. The governor of the state, a very ordinary man, and was elected by mistake, was here yesterday. He has very few friends here now. DIED.--Aged 56 years, six months and 13 days. Deceased was a mild mannered pirate, with a thirst for moonshine. He came here in the night with another man's wife and joined the church at the first opportunity. He owed us several dollars for the paper, a large meat bill and you could hear him pray seven blocks. He died sing- ing "Jesus paid it alL" and we guess he is right--he never paid anything himself. He was buried in an asbes- tos casket, and his friends threw palm leaves in his grave as he may need them.--Exchange. DAIRY COW SHOULD HAVE BEST CARE NOW Regular housing and barn feeding of the dairy cow should not be delayed too long in the fail," says T. W. Gul- lickson of the dairy division, Univer- sity Farm, "for unless she receives plenty of food and is kept in comfor- table quarters a islump in her produc- tion is sure to occur with the change in season. A drop in production is al- ways a serious matter, for it is well known to all experienced dairymen that when a loss of milk yield occurs it is almost impossible to bring pro- duction up to a high level again later, even if the cow is given the best feed and care. "The stable in which the cow is to be kept should be cleaned and well bedded, broken windows and doors re- placed or repaired, and the ventila- tion system put into working condi- tion so that the change from outdoor and pasture life to that of the stable may be made as moderate as possible. The cow must be comfortable if she is to be profitable. "The feed cow, always an impor- tant factor, is extremely so at this season. A splendid basis for her ra- tion is found in the feeds that are usu- ally grown on every farm. Clover or alfalfa hay with corn silage furnish a very satisfactory roughage combina- tion for the ration. It is economical to supply the hay in as large amounts as the cow will consume. Twenty to 35 pounds of silage, depending on the size of the animal, should be given from the fimt day of barn feeding for it will aid greatly in ,making easy the transition from pasture to dry feed- mR. "In addition to the roughage the cow producing milk should receive some grain or concentrate feed. Corn and oats furnish an excellent basis for such grain ration. It will usually however, be found profitable to pur- chase other feeds to add to these. A combination of 300 pounds gromld corn, 200 pounds ground oats, 2b0 pounds bran and 100 pounds linsee oilmeai will give good results. One pound of this mixture to every three pounds of milk produced is about the proper ratio for a Jersey or Guernsey cow, while the lower testing Holstein should receive only one pound for ew cry four pounds of milk she gives. The quantity should vary from this rule with different individuals, some cows consuming a larger proportion of roughage than others and there- fore requiring a trifle less concen- trates." Not Quite "Busted" Yet. The United States has only 6 per cent of the population of the world and only 7 per cent of the land, and yet we produce: 20 per cent of world's gold. 25 per cent of world's wheat. 40 per cent of world's iron. 40 per cent of world's lead, 40 per cent of world's silver. 50 per cent of world s zinc. 52 per cent of world's coal. 60 per cent of world's cotton. 60 per cent bf world's copper. 60 per cent of world's aluminum. 66 per cent of world's oil, 75 per cent of world's corn. 85 per cent of world's autos. We also refine 80 per cent of the copper and operate 40 per cent of the world's railroads. Before the war, we owed nations 5 billion dollars. We have not only paid this debt, but foreign nations now owe us 10 billion dollars. We now hold the largest gold reserves of any nation in the worid.--Capper's Week- ly. ii I i J THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ing strong to 25c higher than early, l --Place your order now for the Ford Bulk of the good butcher hogs $7.00 Car at prices lower than they have to $7.50, top $7.50, heavy packer:-fbeen in the history of the Ford Motor Feeder Demand 00om,o,. oo page 3. native and fed western lambs $10.50 to $11.50, better grade ewes $5.50 to Get your neighbor to subscribe $6.00. for the independent too. Good St0cker and Stockers and Feeders Sell on Strong To Slightly Higher Basis, Fat Cattle Market Drags. ,Ionday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Market closing steady on killing classes, strong to slightly higher on stoekers and feeders. Calves 500. Market steady. Best lights mostly $7.50. Hogs 11,300. Market opened 25c to 50c lower, closing strong to 25c higher than early. Good butch- ers $7.00 to $7.25, top $7.50, bulk good pigs $8.35. Sheep 3,300. Market slow to weak. So. St. Paul, Jan. 16, 1922:A rel- atively broad demand for stockers and feeders caused these classes to set on a strong to slightly higher market. and aided in holding fat cattle price on a fully steady basis altho packer buyers were trying to force fresh de- clines in line with Chicago where the weeks market on beef steers and but- cher she stock opened ,mostly 25c low- er. Genera! quality of the receipts was extremely plain, and altho short fed beef steers of a medium grade are quotable from $6.50 to $7.50, only a few odd head brought these prices o- day, bulk of the beef steers here sell- ing from $5.25 to $6.25. Butcher she stock sold largely from $3.25 to $5.00. with some of the best young cows and heifers selling on a strong to slightly higher market from $5.25 up to around $6.50. A few old canners sold as low as $2.00 with bulk of canners and cut- ters selling from $2.25 to $3.25. A few thin lightweight bolognas sold down to $3.25, with bulk of medium and heavyweights going at $3.50 to $4.00. Best light veal calves sold largely at $7.50, some up to $8.00, seconds $5.00 to $5.50. A part load of feeders sold up to $6.40 with some on the fat cattle or- der going from $5.75 to $6.25, and bulk of stockers and feeders selling I from $5.00 to $5.75, only limited num- bers of the plainer kinds selling down to $4.50 or somewhat less. "---- 7 """---- - tHugs opene d 25e t 0 5? lower, clos- We will pay the following ][] prices for ilmkt ] Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton [][ Copper and heavy Brau,4 to 8c [ per pound, ill Old Rags, cent per pound. [l[ Old Rubbers and Tire /s cent  to I cent per pound. I Pipe Fittings, Brass .C, ood I[] Belting and Hose carried In ][ stock. Acetylene Welding. Ill The Ortonville Foundry I W, F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 ]l] l H ' rHEN it comes to deliver. ing the goods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and widthlumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier blmher Co. Ortonville Minn. New Harness Shop i I I I I I have opened up a harness shop in building known as the Big Stone Land and Loan Com- pany, three doors south from the postoffice, and am ready to repair and oil harnesses and also re- pair auto tops and curtains. Bring in your har- nesses and have them repaired and oiled before spring season's work. i F. E. Davidson Ortonville, Minn. I I I i II ] I ..... I Spumodm croup relieved or warded off by rubbing on a vapori.ing salve. III  | I j The old method of treating spasmodic croup with nauseat- ing drugs is out of date. So is the vapor-lamp scheme that re- quired the bedroom windows to be kept closed. Now mother rubs the little one's chest and throat with Vicks, arranges the bedding so that the arising vapors will be inhaled all night long, opens the windows to let in the blessed fresh air, and re- tiresconfident of a good sleep. Just rub it on and breathe in the vapors Vicks has come to be the al- most universal treatment for children's cold troubles, be- cause it does away with dosing. Vicks contains the old, time- tested remediesCamphor, Men- thol, Eucalyptus, etc.--combined by special process, so that while they penetrate and stimulate the skin, the ingredients are also released as vapors by the body heat and are breathed right into the lungs. See the work Being Finished in our Ruby Red Granite senti lot Our Designs 0EOHVlLt[ MOMUM[00T WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. Anker-Holth Cream Se arators The Filtered-Oil Oiling System Everyone familiar with oil or machinery knows that if you let dirty oil set for a while the heavy used oil and sediment will settle to the bottom and the good light oil will stay on top. This same principle is used in filtering the oil in the Anker- Holth Cream Separator. The oil reservoir is made with a pit in the bottom which catches all the sediment, water, milk, or any foreign substance that may get into the oiling chamber in any way. Then a little pan shaped like a trough is placed in the oiling chamber to keep the light oil on top and this heavy oil from remixing. This feature alone adds ,many years of life to the Anker- Holtb and many users tell us is worth the price of the separator. It keeps the heav used oil from gumming up the gears and means easier runmng. There are many reasons why you should use the Anker- Holth Cream Separators and .we will be glad to go over them with yotL J. D. ROSS & COMPANY Professional and Business Directory I , C.E. SIGLOH O l:or Expert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC t REPAIRING Phone 284.L Ortonviile, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. 4 II ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. I GUS. E. ANDERSON. Prop. JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Wok. Ortonville, Minn. R.F. D PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 35 Ortonville, Minn. Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderat Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uJhill from Gunderscm's rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc) F. L BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesota Belva Kaercher TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY Ortonville, Minn. FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W: DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C PH. C. Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn, Col. Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER $0 years' exrienee No praetie- ins on your pxopargy. Call or write me early and get l o mn early dat Ovtonville, YOUR AUCTIONEER COL. J. W. BELZER Real Estate, Merdtadise, Pure Bred Stock and Farm Sales A Speialty For dates write me at Ortenvflle. Graduate of Jones Auction School , , ,, , J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHON'ES--Residence- 194 Furattm Stere - 18 All Work Guaranteed OrtonHile, Mizmeaota. WILL FINCH ]Sxporienced Paintmr Phone 25-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY PHE WELL DIGGER ' Fifteen Years' Expim Ortmtville, JANUARY 19, 1922 PAGE P$ The FARMERS PAGE I DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. I Is Keynote ureau s Pro ram ta Federation Demands More Consumers' Dollar--Backs Credit Plan. )st problem affecting y is marketing and of farm products," says agricultural program adopt- the third annual convention of Farm Bureau fedora- Paul. program, which lays out lines to be followed this year by is a .series of state- Which definitely pledge the or- to support these principles Projects: adjustment of farm business to demands, with a reduction of between farm prices paid retrenchment by armers in of machinery, building ma- so forth, until a reasonable ustment is established. campaign for passage Christianson rural credits to the state constitution next general election, backed full strength of the farm bu- of the federal reserve sys- representatives of basic pro- industries, jacluding agricul- of credit laws to give far- and 36 months credit. of the agricultural of the War Finance cur- until a permanent agency is to take its place. pport for the U. S. Grain Inc., the National Livestock association, the Minnesota Creameries association, the Central Co-operativa association, and similar of cost of production in- of a collective buying for 1923, when co-operative agencies have fully estab- that will permit crea- a state farmers' finance ur- grades that will reflect a price true milling value, not tech- of that phase of the Each- act which guarantees a re- railroads' valuation. labor and railroad corpor- both share in price re- a means to restore rea- rates, the program on congress, all railroad and the railway labor relief. also calls for: and favorable action on the wathrway project. mileage of serviceable than construction of a and tonnage timita- I" i in educational policy to i\\;  reatest possible aid to rural of inheritance taxes, to repeal of the excess and opposition to any gen- for all or for none, on a basis of equal- industries. of county farm bureaus units as potent factors farm prosperity. requiring county com- snake appropriations for in every county where has 200 or more a truth in fabric law. in coarse forest help northern Minnesota of the provisions of the Farm Bureau fed- as elected represen- farm bureaus ex- )royal of the agd- congress. DECIDES TELL THE TRUTH time ago a Hoosier of being called a he would tell the next issue of the following Benin, the laziest mer- raade a trip to Belle- is do- His store is dir- can he do much ? last Sunday on Sermon was punk. died at his home here doctor out as To gave it o much of his own him. Sylvia Roads and Saturday at the bride is a very ordin- know any more iackrabbit, and mFe than s not a beauty by any ,means, and has a gait like a duck. The groom is an up-to- date loafer. He has been living off the folks at home all his life and is a good-for-nothing. It will be a hard life. The governor of the state, a very ordinary man, and was elected by mistake, was here yesterday. He has very few friends here now. DIED.--Aged 56 years, six months and 13 days. Deceased was a mild mannered pirate, with a thirst for moonshine. He came here in the night with another man's wife and joined the church at the first opportunity. He owed us several dollars for the paper, a large meat bill and you could hear him pray seven blocks. He died sing- ing "Jesus paid it alL" and we guess he is right--he never paid anything himself. He was buried in an asbes- tos casket, and his friends threw palm leaves in his grave as he may need them.--Exchange. DAIRY COW SHOULD HAVE BEST CARE NOW Regular housing and barn feeding of the dairy cow should not be delayed too long in the fail," says T. W. Gul- lickson of the dairy division, Univer- sity Farm, "for unless she receives plenty of food and is kept in comfor- table quarters a islump in her produc- tion is sure to occur with the change in season. A drop in production is al- ways a serious matter, for it is well known to all experienced dairymen that when a loss of milk yield occurs it is almost impossible to bring pro- duction up to a high level again later, even if the cow is given the best feed and care. "The stable in which the cow is to be kept should be cleaned and well bedded, broken windows and doors re- placed or repaired, and the ventila- tion system put into working condi- tion so that the change from outdoor and pasture life to that of the stable may be made as moderate as possible. The cow must be comfortable if she is to be profitable. "The feed cow, always an impor- tant factor, is extremely so at this season. A splendid basis for her ra- tion is found in the feeds that are usu- ally grown on every farm. Clover or alfalfa hay with corn silage furnish a very satisfactory roughage combina- tion for the ration. It is economical to supply the hay in as large amounts as the cow will consume. Twenty to 35 pounds of silage, depending on the size of the animal, should be given from the fimt day of barn feeding for it will aid greatly in ,making easy the transition from pasture to dry feed- mR. "In addition to the roughage the cow producing milk should receive some grain or concentrate feed. Corn and oats furnish an excellent basis for such grain ration. It will usually however, be found profitable to pur- chase other feeds to add to these. A combination of 300 pounds gromld corn, 200 pounds ground oats, 2b0 pounds bran and 100 pounds linsee oilmeai will give good results. One pound of this mixture to every three pounds of milk produced is about the proper ratio for a Jersey or Guernsey cow, while the lower testing Holstein should receive only one pound for ew cry four pounds of milk she gives. The quantity should vary from this rule with different individuals, some cows consuming a larger proportion of roughage than others and there- fore requiring a trifle less concen- trates." Not Quite "Busted" Yet. The United States has only 6 per cent of the population of the world and only 7 per cent of the land, and yet we produce: 20 per cent of world's gold. 25 per cent of world's wheat. 40 per cent of world's iron. 40 per cent of world's lead, 40 per cent of world's silver. 50 per cent of world s zinc. 52 per cent of world's coal. 60 per cent of world's cotton. 60 per cent bf world's copper. 60 per cent of world's aluminum. 66 per cent of world's oil, 75 per cent of world's corn. 85 per cent of world's autos. We also refine 80 per cent of the copper and operate 40 per cent of the world's railroads. Before the war, we owed nations 5 billion dollars. We have not only paid this debt, but foreign nations now owe us 10 billion dollars. We now hold the largest gold reserves of any nation in the worid.--Capper's Week- ly. ii I i J THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ing strong to 25c higher than early, l --Place your order now for the Ford Bulk of the good butcher hogs $7.00 Car at prices lower than they have to $7.50, top $7.50, heavy packer:-fbeen in the history of the Ford Motor Feeder Demand 00om,o,. oo page 3. native and fed western lambs $10.50 to $11.50, better grade ewes $5.50 to Get your neighbor to subscribe $6.00. for the independent too. Good St0cker and Stockers and Feeders Sell on Strong To Slightly Higher Basis, Fat Cattle Market Drags. ,Ionday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Market closing steady on killing classes, strong to slightly higher on stoekers and feeders. Calves 500. Market steady. Best lights mostly $7.50. Hogs 11,300. Market opened 25c to 50c lower, closing strong to 25c higher than early. Good butch- ers $7.00 to $7.25, top $7.50, bulk good pigs $8.35. Sheep 3,300. Market slow to weak. So. St. Paul, Jan. 16, 1922:A rel- atively broad demand for stockers and feeders caused these classes to set on a strong to slightly higher market. and aided in holding fat cattle price on a fully steady basis altho packer buyers were trying to force fresh de- clines in line with Chicago where the weeks market on beef steers and but- cher she stock opened ,mostly 25c low- er. Genera! quality of the receipts was extremely plain, and altho short fed beef steers of a medium grade are quotable from $6.50 to $7.50, only a few odd head brought these prices o- day, bulk of the beef steers here sell- ing from $5.25 to $6.25. Butcher she stock sold largely from $3.25 to $5.00. with some of the best young cows and heifers selling on a strong to slightly higher market from $5.25 up to around $6.50. A few old canners sold as low as $2.00 with bulk of canners and cut- ters selling from $2.25 to $3.25. A few thin lightweight bolognas sold down to $3.25, with bulk of medium and heavyweights going at $3.50 to $4.00. Best light veal calves sold largely at $7.50, some up to $8.00, seconds $5.00 to $5.50. A part load of feeders sold up to $6.40 with some on the fat cattle or- der going from $5.75 to $6.25, and bulk of stockers and feeders selling I from $5.00 to $5.75, only limited num- bers of the plainer kinds selling down to $4.50 or somewhat less. "---- 7 """---- - tHugs opene d 25e t 0 5? lower, clos- We will pay the following ][] prices for ilmkt ] Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton [][ Copper and heavy Brau,4 to 8c [ per pound, ill Old Rags, cent per pound. [l[ Old Rubbers and Tire /s cent  to I cent per pound. I Pipe Fittings, Brass .C, ood I[] Belting and Hose carried In ][ stock. Acetylene Welding. Ill The Ortonville Foundry I W, F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 ]l] l H ' rHEN it comes to deliver. ing the goods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and widthlumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier blmher Co. Ortonville Minn. New Harness Shop i I I I I I have opened up a harness shop in building known as the Big Stone Land and Loan Com- pany, three doors south from the postoffice, and am ready to repair and oil harnesses and also re- pair auto tops and curtains. Bring in your har- nesses and have them repaired and oiled before spring season's work. i F. E. Davidson Ortonville, Minn. I I I i II ] I ..... I Spumodm croup relieved or warded off by rubbing on a vapori.ing salve. III  | I j The old method of treating spasmodic croup with nauseat- ing drugs is out of date. So is the vapor-lamp scheme that re- quired the bedroom windows to be kept closed. Now mother rubs the little one's chest and throat with Vicks, arranges the bedding so that the arising vapors will be inhaled all night long, opens the windows to let in the blessed fresh air, and re- tiresconfident of a good sleep. Just rub it on and breathe in the vapors Vicks has come to be the al- most universal treatment for children's cold troubles, be- cause it does away with dosing. Vicks contains the old, time- tested remediesCamphor, Men- thol, Eucalyptus, etc.--combined by special process, so that while they penetrate and stimulate the skin, the ingredients are also released as vapors by the body heat and are breathed right into the lungs. See the work Being Finished in our Ruby Red Granite senti lot Our Designs 0EOHVlLt[ MOMUM[00T WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. Anker-Holth Cream Se arators The Filtered-Oil Oiling System Everyone familiar with oil or machinery knows that if you let dirty oil set for a while the heavy used oil and sediment will settle to the bottom and the good light oil will stay on top. This same principle is used in filtering the oil in the Anker- Holth Cream Separator. The oil reservoir is made with a pit in the bottom which catches all the sediment, water, milk, or any foreign substance that may get into the oiling chamber in any way. Then a little pan shaped like a trough is placed in the oiling chamber to keep the light oil on top and this heavy oil from remixing. This feature alone adds ,many years of life to the Anker- Holtb and many users tell us is worth the price of the separator. It keeps the heav used oil from gumming up the gears and means easier runmng. There are many reasons why you should use the Anker- Holth Cream Separators and .we will be glad to go over them with yotL J. D. ROSS & COMPANY Professional and Business Directory I , C.E. SIGLOH O l:or Expert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC t REPAIRING Phone 284.L Ortonviile, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. 4 II ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. I GUS. E. ANDERSON. Prop. JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Wok. Ortonville, Minn. R.F. D PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 35 Ortonville, Minn. Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderat Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uJhill from Gunderscm's rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc) F. L BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesota Belva Kaercher TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY Ortonville, Minn. FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W: DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C PH. C. Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn, Col. Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER $0 years' exrienee No praetie- ins on your pxopargy. Call or write me early and get l o mn early dat Ovtonville, YOUR AUCTIONEER COL. J. W. BELZER Real Estate, Merdtadise, Pure Bred Stock and Farm Sales A Speialty For dates write me at Ortenvflle. Graduate of Jones Auction School , , ,, , J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHON'ES--Residence- 194 Furattm Stere - 18 All Work Guaranteed OrtonHile, Mizmeaota. WILL FINCH ]Sxporienced Paintmr Phone 25-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY PHE WELL DIGGER ' Fifteen Years' Expim Ortmtville, THE ORTONYILLE INDEPENDENT PAGI9 Professional and I Business Directory h C. E. SIGLOH [0r hpert REPAIRING P 28&L oneavJll Mtma. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Ca. Suits Made to Order. Ortvlne. Minn. ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaiq'ed nest}y d prop ly. Our Work Guaranteed. GU E. ANDERSON. pp. JOHN SFANYERS LiSt Heulin of lt Kinds Expres* and B*gge Teleione 287 Grtonville, Mnn PAUL DIRNBAUER Brisk Iyer and Plasterer Ste MM sod All K/lids of Cemt wk. Or tH]l Mtnn, R.F. PETERSON & SON wta mz Ste Lake I SS Ortoneg}t M Kodak o=oP,O PRILNT1NG ]qLARGING Pmpt Quallk Moderlt THE REED STUDIO OoavlUe Mi. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK i OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICLN iOae blOCk u bin fro Gtmdertoa'| V*po-kut csbine Treetmeta , (For rhetm, neurit, its) F. L. BROWN THE JEWELER Belva Kaercher TIACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONy Ortonvill, Mln FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any Idad of ght and hvy drafg Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 A. B. KAERCHER Attv, re 7 ttt Lgw Odd Fel)o Buik Ortonvfllt, DR. F. W: DUNN. CHIRG'RACTOR IXD, WBIT D.CpH, C. Sphgra 12-13-1-116 mak BIdK. Col Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONE]gR ) etre' ete YOUR AU CTIOrEER COL. J. W. BELZER Rml statt M Pine  1 Farm Sles A 81totality For date write te ot Jones Auotion Stheol J. A. JOHNSON PIAO TUNI AND REAIP.J[N PHONES--Bed, . 194 All Wk Gmmtl Sotmvi/ MIzot WILL FINCH ixgkmd Pslntt. All weft fumtee Pr0ram Demands of f products," ys c, tural pgeam adopt- the third anoual nvenOon of federa S patti. lays out UneJ to be followed ths e by a eres of slate- which definitely pledge the or- ajstment of fa busine to t demands, with a reduction of prices id )y aers in y, blding ma- drid  forth, until a nabls for psae 1 credits to the state eonsituon aext geral eleetlon, bked ' fll trength of the faro bu- ,24 d 86 mont crsdit. of the agrlcalmsa[ ,y is pla. epprt for the U. S. Graln I, In, te Neo Liveetock sndaton, the Mineta Creeries osculation, Co-operation and elmJlar price re- tie lt railroad the railway be is a very ordin- Good St0cker and Feeder Demand To Slightly Higher Basis, Fat Cattle Market I)rag. huty by xy ,an, and has a gait The grsom is an upAo.' He I bn living off I a good-for-nothing, It will be a hard llfe. The goveor of the state, a very ordinary man and wa elated by inistke, was he esteiay. He Ires DlED,--Aged 56 years, six mnths manned plrate, wJLh a thirst fol moonshine. He ee ho in the night with another m's wife and joined Lhe chuh at the first opporturdty. He od us veral doHa for the paper, a large met bill and you euld hear him nray seven b orir He died ing- ing "Jou paid it all," and we gue he is rlghtIhe never paid anything himself. He was huied in an asbe Los c]et, and his friends thrnw palm leaves in hi$ gvs a he may need Lhem.--]'xehan ge, DAIRY COW SHOULD HAVE BEST CARE NOW Regular housing and ba feeding of the dairy e should not be delayed o long n the fL" ys T, w. Gul- lickson of the dairy division, Univer- sity Fa. "for unless she cis plenty of fd ad is kept in enter- table quarter alelump in her predic- tion is su to our with the ohauge in season. A dp in production is al- ways a rio matter, for it is well known to all experienced dairymen that h a loss of milk yield o it ig almost impossible to bring pro- duction up to a Idgh leve$ again later, even if the eow is given the best feed and sate. "The stable in which te w is to he kept should be cleaned and well bedded, broken wtnd and doo piaeed or palred, d the ntila- lion syetem put into rking eandi- tloa so that he ehang fm outdoor and pasture life to that of the stable may be made  modte  poihle. The cow must he comfortable if she Is We will ty the fMItatg to be pflttble, ilee s f }ltt "The feed cow, always  impo Olt Irmb f*$.00 to I;10.00 pt td taut ftor, is sxtrely so at this Copper  htvy Bralm.4 tek: son. A splendid basis for her ra- tion is found in the feeds that are" uu per atmd. ally gro on every far Clover or Old RS  et per poi. Mfalfa hay with  silage furnish Old Rubbet wad  * t a very satisfactory ughage eombina- to 1 eeat per lion for the ration. It is nomlea] Pipe Fittingt B to supply the hay in  large amotmts ]Itiag d H eatrli la as the sow will cone. Twenty to stk. Atyle WeMhtg. 5 pounds of silage' depending on the he Ortonville Foundry W. IL MULbICA, Prep. te $ it will Md greatly in .rooking ey the past to dry fd- in n- addition to the ughage cow pdeing ilk should Monday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Market eloing steal n killing easses, slng te slightly igher on stocksrs and feeders. Calves 00. Market steady. Best lights notly $7.5O. Hogs 1100. Market >period 5c to 50e lower, cloing strong Lo 2e higher than eariy. Good butch rs $7.O0 to $726, top $7.5O, bulk good igs $.35. Shp 300. Market slow weak. n. St. Paul, Jan. 16, 1922:--A l- tily had demand for stoskers and feeders caed the classes to se on a strong to slightly higher rket and aided a holding fat eatt]e prees n a fully steady basis aItho packer uysrs we tryn to foe fsh de- :nes in line with Chicago where the weeks market on beef stee and but- sher she stock opened .mostly 25c Iow or. Genera quality of the ipts was extremely plain, md altho short fed beef steers of a medium grade are quotable from $5.5O to $7.50, only a few odd head brought these prs In- day, buk af the beef steers here ell- lag fm $5.2h to $6.25. Butcher she steak sod largely fm $3.25 to $5.O0, with some of the best young ws and heife selling on a strong to slightly hgher mrket fm $5.25 up to aund $.50. A few od nners sod  low $2.OO wlth bulk of eanners and cat- ters se]linff fm $2.25 t $.2. A few thin lightweight bolognas soM dswn to $3.25, with bulk of medium and heavyweights going at $8.50 to $4.OO. Rest light veal elves sold largely at $7.0, some up to $8.OO, nds $5.OO to $5.0. A part load of fders Id up to $6.4O with some on the fat ttle o tier golng fm $5.75 to $5.6, and bulk of stoske and feede selllng from $5O0 to $5.75, only llmltl num- bers of the planer lnds lling do, to $4.e0 or mewhat ess. Hogs opened 25 to 0e lor, dos- IP IT', YOU NEED -.V).LFURNIeH iT TH PROPE PED for sh grdu rton, it t us[ however, be found pfithle t pu of oo pound* g,d eo, 2O0 ponds ground oaf& LYfl pounds bran and 1oo pounds ]insee oilmeal will give good results. One pound of ths mixture to ery th pper tlo for a Jey or Guey cow, wile the ower testing Holstein should ie onIy one pound for ev. cry four pounds of mlk she gives. [ i W The qntity should vary from tMs le with diffent indivJdls, me HN it eom to deliver eomlng a larger pportlon inj the goods on time of rougha th others and there- were  tt' all. For fo ,qutring a tt4fle lees een. hlg jIm  small lobe---lain. bar wed to the ppe Not Qeite "Bustvd  yet. It5 d wMlwmber for The united Stat has only 6 pc1 every raelkal purpe pr- siealb and only 7 per cent el the led, and et we produ: ........... ,d' ...... Geier Lmnr Co. 26 per cmt of d's wheat. 40 per nt of world's in. O1"tonvi . 40 per ot ot rld's lead, 40 per cent of world's silver. 5O per t of world's zln 52 per cent of world's l. 0 per cent of world's tm 6O per t bf worM's copper. 6O per eet of wort,Ps almaln 66 per cent of world's 41. 75 per nt of world/s rn. 8 per t of world*s au rld's rsHmads, Befo the war, we owed nations 5 We have not only paid tJ' debt. ut eim natics now 1o billion dollar. We n ing strong to 25c higher than rly, uik of the goed buteher hogs e7.OOiCar at prices lower than they have to $7.5O, top $7O, heay packerjbeen  the hstory of the Ford Mor $.h0 to $5., good pigs $5.35. Good Company. See ad on page 3. ative and fed western lambs $10,50 -- ' to $iI,0, better grade ewes $5,5O to --Get your neighbor t subscribe $6 09 for the independent t, New Harness Shop I have opened up a harness shop in building known as the Big Stone Land and Loan Com- pany, three doors south from the postoffice, and am ready to repair and oil harnesses and also re. pair auto tops and curtains. Bring in your har- nesses and have them repaired and oiled before spring season's work. F. E. Davidson Or tonville, Minn. A new waY to treat croup ] ] Spasmodic croup relieved or warded off by rubbing on a vaporizing salve. The old method of treating Vichs has come to be the al- pasmodin croup with nan.seat- most unlvePzal treatment for mg drugs m out of date. So is children's cvld troubles, b- the yaps-lamp schne that re- cause it does away with dosing. quinl the bedroom window to Vicks contains the old, time- be kept c!sed. Now mother tetedremediew-Camphor, Men. tir--confident of a gOOd sleep, the lungs, tube the htt]e one's cbest and thol, Eucalypms, etc.ornbined throat with Vicks, arranges the by spociM process, so that while bedding so that the arising they penetrate and stlmuinte the vapors 11 be inhaled all night skin, the ingredients am also long, opens the windows to let eleased as vapors by the body m the blessed Sresh air, and re- heat and are breathed right into ,o., ob,,o..o00 V00c-s breathe in the vapors A P o  u m See the work Being Finished in our Ruby Red Granite ORTOffl[[[ HO00UH[00T WORKS JOHNSON & LLNDHOM, Prolm. Anker-Holth Cream Separators The Filtered-Oil Oiling System Everne $smfllar vdth oil or macldnery Iows that if you let dirty eft  for a wle the heavy ed oil and sediment will ettle te the bottom and the good light oil will stay on top. This ewlte principle is used in filtering the oil in the Anlm Holth Cream So,triter. The oil olr is made with  pit in the bottom which tehes MI the sediment, water, milk, or any fordgn bstaace that may get into the offing ehbe in y way. Then s littla pan mtped like a tugh is placed in the offing ehmmber to keep the light oil on top md this heavy oil from reming. This ft alone add y, year of life to the Ak Holth and my uee tell us is worth the pee of the lrato. It keea te hvF used oil from gumming up the gears and re*arts eer runmng. There ate many reasons why you shoald  the Anker- Holth Cream epters and a wiBbe glad to go nr them J. D. ROSS & COMPANY JANUARY 19, 1922 PAGE P$ The FARMERS PAGE I DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. I Is Keynote ureau s Pro ram ta Federation Demands More Consumers' Dollar--Backs Credit Plan. )st problem affecting y is marketing and of farm products," says agricultural program adopt- the third annual convention of Farm Bureau fedora- Paul. program, which lays out lines to be followed this year by is a .series of state- Which definitely pledge the or- to support these principles Projects: adjustment of farm business to demands, with a reduction of between farm prices paid retrenchment by armers in of machinery, building ma- so forth, until a reasonable ustment is established. campaign for passage Christianson rural credits to the state constitution next general election, backed full strength of the farm bu- of the federal reserve sys- representatives of basic pro- industries, jacluding agricul- of credit laws to give far- and 36 months credit. of the agricultural of the War Finance cur- until a permanent agency is to take its place. pport for the U. S. Grain Inc., the National Livestock association, the Minnesota Creameries association, the Central Co-operativa association, and similar of cost of production in- of a collective buying for 1923, when co-operative agencies have fully estab- that will permit crea- a state farmers' finance ur- grades that will reflect a price true milling value, not tech- of that phase of the Each- act which guarantees a re- railroads' valuation. labor and railroad corpor- both share in price re- a means to restore rea- rates, the program on congress, all railroad and the railway labor relief. also calls for: and favorable action on the wathrway project. mileage of serviceable than construction of a and tonnage timita- I" i in educational policy to i\\;  reatest possible aid to rural of inheritance taxes, to repeal of the excess and opposition to any gen- for all or for none, on a basis of equal- industries. of county farm bureaus units as potent factors farm prosperity. requiring county com- snake appropriations for in every county where has 200 or more a truth in fabric law. in coarse forest help northern Minnesota of the provisions of the Farm Bureau fed- as elected represen- farm bureaus ex- )royal of the agd- congress. DECIDES TELL THE TRUTH time ago a Hoosier of being called a he would tell the next issue of the following Benin, the laziest mer- raade a trip to Belle- is do- His store is dir- can he do much ? last Sunday on Sermon was punk. died at his home here doctor out as To gave it o much of his own him. Sylvia Roads and Saturday at the bride is a very ordin- know any more iackrabbit, and mFe than s not a beauty by any ,means, and has a gait like a duck. The groom is an up-to- date loafer. He has been living off the folks at home all his life and is a good-for-nothing. It will be a hard life. The governor of the state, a very ordinary man, and was elected by mistake, was here yesterday. He has very few friends here now. DIED.--Aged 56 years, six months and 13 days. Deceased was a mild mannered pirate, with a thirst for moonshine. He came here in the night with another man's wife and joined the church at the first opportunity. He owed us several dollars for the paper, a large meat bill and you could hear him pray seven blocks. He died sing- ing "Jesus paid it alL" and we guess he is right--he never paid anything himself. He was buried in an asbes- tos casket, and his friends threw palm leaves in his grave as he may need them.--Exchange. DAIRY COW SHOULD HAVE BEST CARE NOW Regular housing and barn feeding of the dairy cow should not be delayed too long in the fail," says T. W. Gul- lickson of the dairy division, Univer- sity Farm, "for unless she receives plenty of food and is kept in comfor- table quarters a islump in her produc- tion is sure to occur with the change in season. A drop in production is al- ways a serious matter, for it is well known to all experienced dairymen that when a loss of milk yield occurs it is almost impossible to bring pro- duction up to a high level again later, even if the cow is given the best feed and care. "The stable in which the cow is to be kept should be cleaned and well bedded, broken windows and doors re- placed or repaired, and the ventila- tion system put into working condi- tion so that the change from outdoor and pasture life to that of the stable may be made as moderate as possible. The cow must be comfortable if she is to be profitable. "The feed cow, always an impor- tant factor, is extremely so at this season. A splendid basis for her ra- tion is found in the feeds that are usu- ally grown on every farm. Clover or alfalfa hay with corn silage furnish a very satisfactory roughage combina- tion for the ration. It is economical to supply the hay in as large amounts as the cow will consume. Twenty to 35 pounds of silage, depending on the size of the animal, should be given from the fimt day of barn feeding for it will aid greatly in ,making easy the transition from pasture to dry feed- mR. "In addition to the roughage the cow producing milk should receive some grain or concentrate feed. Corn and oats furnish an excellent basis for such grain ration. It will usually however, be found profitable to pur- chase other feeds to add to these. A combination of 300 pounds gromld corn, 200 pounds ground oats, 2b0 pounds bran and 100 pounds linsee oilmeai will give good results. One pound of this mixture to every three pounds of milk produced is about the proper ratio for a Jersey or Guernsey cow, while the lower testing Holstein should receive only one pound for ew cry four pounds of milk she gives. The quantity should vary from this rule with different individuals, some cows consuming a larger proportion of roughage than others and there- fore requiring a trifle less concen- trates." Not Quite "Busted" Yet. The United States has only 6 per cent of the population of the world and only 7 per cent of the land, and yet we produce: 20 per cent of world's gold. 25 per cent of world's wheat. 40 per cent of world's iron. 40 per cent of world's lead, 40 per cent of world's silver. 50 per cent of world s zinc. 52 per cent of world's coal. 60 per cent of world's cotton. 60 per cent bf world's copper. 60 per cent of world's aluminum. 66 per cent of world's oil, 75 per cent of world's corn. 85 per cent of world's autos. We also refine 80 per cent of the copper and operate 40 per cent of the world's railroads. Before the war, we owed nations 5 billion dollars. We have not only paid this debt, but foreign nations now owe us 10 billion dollars. We now hold the largest gold reserves of any nation in the worid.--Capper's Week- ly. ii I i J THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ing strong to 25c higher than early, l --Place your order now for the Ford Bulk of the good butcher hogs $7.00 Car at prices lower than they have to $7.50, top $7.50, heavy packer:-fbeen in the history of the Ford Motor Feeder Demand 00om,o,. oo page 3. native and fed western lambs $10.50 to $11.50, better grade ewes $5.50 to Get your neighbor to subscribe $6.00. for the independent too. Good St0cker and Stockers and Feeders Sell on Strong To Slightly Higher Basis, Fat Cattle Market Drags. ,Ionday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Market closing steady on killing classes, strong to slightly higher on stoekers and feeders. Calves 500. Market steady. Best lights mostly $7.50. Hogs 11,300. Market opened 25c to 50c lower, closing strong to 25c higher than early. Good butch- ers $7.00 to $7.25, top $7.50, bulk good pigs $8.35. Sheep 3,300. Market slow to weak. So. St. Paul, Jan. 16, 1922:A rel- atively broad demand for stockers and feeders caused these classes to set on a strong to slightly higher market. and aided in holding fat cattle price on a fully steady basis altho packer buyers were trying to force fresh de- clines in line with Chicago where the weeks market on beef steers and but- cher she stock opened ,mostly 25c low- er. Genera! quality of the receipts was extremely plain, and altho short fed beef steers of a medium grade are quotable from $6.50 to $7.50, only a few odd head brought these prices o- day, bulk of the beef steers here sell- ing from $5.25 to $6.25. Butcher she stock sold largely from $3.25 to $5.00. with some of the best young cows and heifers selling on a strong to slightly higher market from $5.25 up to around $6.50. A few old canners sold as low as $2.00 with bulk of canners and cut- ters selling from $2.25 to $3.25. A few thin lightweight bolognas sold down to $3.25, with bulk of medium and heavyweights going at $3.50 to $4.00. Best light veal calves sold largely at $7.50, some up to $8.00, seconds $5.00 to $5.50. A part load of feeders sold up to $6.40 with some on the fat cattle or- der going from $5.75 to $6.25, and bulk of stockers and feeders selling I from $5.00 to $5.75, only limited num- bers of the plainer kinds selling down to $4.50 or somewhat less. "---- 7 """---- - tHugs opene d 25e t 0 5? lower, clos- We will pay the following ][] prices for ilmkt ] Old Iron, $6.00 to $10.00 per ton [][ Copper and heavy Brau,4 to 8c [ per pound, ill Old Rags, cent per pound. [l[ Old Rubbers and Tire /s cent  to I cent per pound. I Pipe Fittings, Brass .C, ood I[] Belting and Hose carried In ][ stock. Acetylene Welding. Ill The Ortonville Foundry I W, F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 ]l] l H ' rHEN it comes to deliver. ing the goods on time we're there, that's all. For big jobs or small jobs--lum- ber sawed to the proper length and widthlumber for every practical purpose prac- tically priced. Geier blmher Co. Ortonville Minn. New Harness Shop i I I I I I have opened up a harness shop in building known as the Big Stone Land and Loan Com- pany, three doors south from the postoffice, and am ready to repair and oil harnesses and also re- pair auto tops and curtains. Bring in your har- nesses and have them repaired and oiled before spring season's work. i F. E. Davidson Ortonville, Minn. I I I i II ] I ..... I Spumodm croup relieved or warded off by rubbing on a vapori.ing salve. III  | I j The old method of treating spasmodic croup with nauseat- ing drugs is out of date. So is the vapor-lamp scheme that re- quired the bedroom windows to be kept closed. Now mother rubs the little one's chest and throat with Vicks, arranges the bedding so that the arising vapors will be inhaled all night long, opens the windows to let in the blessed fresh air, and re- tiresconfident of a good sleep. Just rub it on and breathe in the vapors Vicks has come to be the al- most universal treatment for children's cold troubles, be- cause it does away with dosing. Vicks contains the old, time- tested remediesCamphor, Men- thol, Eucalyptus, etc.--combined by special process, so that while they penetrate and stimulate the skin, the ingredients are also released as vapors by the body heat and are breathed right into the lungs. See the work Being Finished in our Ruby Red Granite senti lot Our Designs 0EOHVlLt[ MOMUM[00T WORKS JOHNSON & LINDHOM, Props. Anker-Holth Cream Se arators The Filtered-Oil Oiling System Everyone familiar with oil or machinery knows that if you let dirty oil set for a while the heavy used oil and sediment will settle to the bottom and the good light oil will stay on top. This same principle is used in filtering the oil in the Anker- Holth Cream Separator. The oil reservoir is made with a pit in the bottom which catches all the sediment, water, milk, or any foreign substance that may get into the oiling chamber in any way. Then a little pan shaped like a trough is placed in the oiling chamber to keep the light oil on top and this heavy oil from remixing. This feature alone adds ,many years of life to the Anker- Holtb and many users tell us is worth the price of the separator. It keeps the heav used oil from gumming up the gears and means easier runmng. There are many reasons why you should use the Anker- Holth Cream Separators and .we will be glad to go over them with yotL J. D. ROSS & COMPANY Professional and Business Directory I , C.E. SIGLOH O l:or Expert WIRINGSERVIcEELECTRIC t REPAIRING Phone 284.L Ortonviile, Minn. JOE BAYER & SON Of the Ortonville Tailoring Co. All kinds of cleaning and pressing neatly done. Suits Made to Order. Ortonville, Minn. 4 II ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP Shoes repaired neatly and prompt- ly. Our Work Guaranteed. I GUS. E. ANDERSON. Prop. JOHN SPANYERS Light Hauling of all Kinds Express and Baggage Telephone 287 Ortonville, Minn. PAUL DIRNBAUER Brick Layer and Plasterer Stone Mason and All Kinds of Cement Wok. Ortonville, Minn. R.F. D PETERSON & SON Dray Line Big Stone Lake Ice Phone 35 Ortonville, Minn. Kodak DEVELOPING PRINTING ENLARGING Prompt, Quality Service, Moderat Prices. THE REED STUDIO Ortonville Minn. DR. R. D. RIFENBARK OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN One block uJhill from Gunderscm's rug Store Vapor-Sulphur Cabinet Treatments (For rheumatism, neuritis, etc) F. L BROWN THE JEWELER Ortonville, Minnesota Belva Kaercher TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY Ortonville, Minn. FOR TRUCK SERVICE and any kind of light and heavy draying Hausauer Bros. PHONE 268 All Orders Given Prompt Attention A. B. KAERCHER Attorney at Law Odd Fellows Building Ortonville, Minn. DR. F. W: DUNN. CHIROPRACTOR D. D. WHITE, D. C PH. C. Spinographer 12-13-14-15-16 Shumaker Bldg. Ortonville, Minn, Col. Win. Wellendorf AUCTIONEER $0 years' exrienee No praetie- ins on your pxopargy. Call or write me early and get l o mn early dat Ovtonville, YOUR AUCTIONEER COL. J. W. BELZER Real Estate, Merdtadise, Pure Bred Stock and Farm Sales A Speialty For dates write me at Ortenvflle. Graduate of Jones Auction School , , ,, , J. A. JOHNSON PIANO TUNING AND REPAIRING PHON'ES--Residence- 194 Furattm Stere - 18 All Work Guaranteed OrtonHile, Mizmeaota. WILL FINCH ]Sxporienced Paintmr Phone 25-L All Work Guaranteed ELMER SALSBURY PHE WELL DIGGER ' Fifteen Years' Expim Ortmtville,