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January 19, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment onversatkms WITH THE and00 By Jim Van Der Pot   One of the ways of coping with the low crop and livestock prices is an old one that deserves another look. This is the practice of putting livestock on the crop residue after harvest. It is difficult to conceive anything that is going to bail out a business based upon hogs which sold for 12 cents a pound this fall, or for that mat- ter corn, which if it hadn't been for government support, might very well have hit one dollar a bushel on the way down. But though hogs will not always sell for 12 cents, or corn for less than two dollars, we can be pretty sure that the road ahead for virtually all crops and livestock is going to be rockier than what we have already been over. And nothing takes the bumps out bet- ter than squeezing out a little more value from the crop and cutting feed expense for the animal if it can be done right on the farm. That is money that no one gets their hands on before we do, which is almost unheard of in modem farming! Of course, this farming requires a desire or at least a willingness to farm year around. Any who have worked off the farm in the off season, or who are wealthy enough not to have to work a full year are not going to be interested. And like running the government, this gets done by those who show up. As an example, even though Alan Nation says that we In Minnesota only average 40 days of snow cover in the fields each winter, there is no way any domestic animal could have been maintained any part of the winter on corn stalks in a year like 1996-1997. Even my sows couldn't get through the snow and ice to the corn they knew very well was there. Only a buffalo would have had a chance. So the fencing and the planning went to waste that year. Still, most years are not like that and there will be some benefit to those persistent enough to try. Last fall, we had 16 acres of corn stalks that had fence part way around, so we decided to try a double approach. First, we left four pairs of rows stand, calculating that amount to be about half of what would be need- ed to maintain 50 sows for the month from mid October though mid November. We figured the hogs would pick up what the combine dropped in addition to the rows left. We moved the sows in, advancing ?' CLUES ACROSS I. Fossil material 8. Lawmaker 9. Flintstone character 10. Underwater vessels, for short I I. Slapping 14. Pioneer vehicle 16. Toothless 18. Make into a print 22. Jewelry spot 23.  Park, CO 24. Columbus' destination CLUES DOWN I. Monetary units of Bolivia 2. Reasonable 3. Monetary unit of Peru 4. Worn to Mecca 5. Dejected 6. Artist's medium 7. Trail on the ground 12. She was sweet as apple cider 13. Surfeit 14. Indulge in gluttony 15. Edible kernel 17. Supernatural 19. Musical speeds 20. Makes fast 2 I. Used to control an animal SOLUTIONS ACROSS I. Petrified wood 8. Senator 9. Wilma 10. Subs I I. Smacking 14. Overland stage 16. Edentate 18. Etch 22. Earlobe 23. Eames 24. The East Indies SOLUTIONS DOWN I. Pesos 2. Tenable 3. lnti 4. lhram 5. Downcast 6. Oil 7. Draggle 12. Ida 13. Plethora 14. Overeat 15. Nutmeat 17. Eerie 19. Tempi 20. Hasps 2 I. Rein CI990004 Page 4 1 the fence every week, thus walking them across the entire acreage in a Thanks a million month s time. They did well, getting a little fat actually. So did we. Monkeying around with a little fence  m is an easy way to feed sows, compared Dear Readers: The headlines have with his dad, no more computer game [ for instance to walking through the ceased and life has resumed for the competitions with the man he loved, crowd of them carrying a pail of corn. Brown family of Los Angeles. and no more birthdays or holidays Anybody who has tried that knows it However, they are and will remain shared with the man who was his I requires strong bones. And the sows short one very important member- hero. For Dylan Brown there will be figure the program out immediately, generally going out to eat just before dawn and staying there until they are full or tired of it. When the wire gets moved, they line up along the old line and wait. Costs are hard to calculate, with the price of corn being what it was. What is a $1.50 bushel of corn worth if you haven't harvested or dried it? $1.25? $1.15? Or how about a bushel on the ground? $.10? Let's just say the sows fed cheap, which is good since they were cheap as well. About a week before Thanksgiving, we took the sows off and turned the ewes out, figuring the corn would be scarce enough so that foundering would be no problem. The 150 ewes foraged in that field until close to Christmas, eating mostly the husks and leaves as well as a few stalks. They were supplemented alfal- fa hay after the first week. We fed six big bales of hay for the entire month they were out there until breeding started, which is about two lbs/hd/day, or about a half ration. If you figure alfalfa hay at $50 a ton, which may be high this year, the value of the foraging for the ewes was $150 or about $9/acre. The sows took half their daily ration from field loss for their month, which would be about three lbs/hd/day of corn. With corn at $1.50, the corn which was lost to convention- al harvest substituted for about $120 worth of sow feed or about $7.50/acre. The total impact of foraging for that field was $16.50 an acre. That won't make a year like this profitable. But there are plenty years when that could be equal to the total profit per acre from the cropping operation. It is like farming twice as much land. Area students on MSU Dean's List Several area students have been named the the Dean's List at Moorhead State University of Moorhead for fall semester. Among those on the list are Stacy Dorry and Brian S.of Ortonville and Michael Felton of Odessa. Also, Suzanne Haman of Beardsley has been named to the Dean's List. ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Mrs. Arnold Knutson Carol Koch Arloene Hamilton Alvina Inderieden Selmer Simonson Ernest Gerjets Iverson Insurance David Klepel Eleanor M. Johnson Lowell Hormann Burton Nypen Lorwin Zahrbock Bellingham Public School. Floyd (;use Walter Brandt Rodger Bmndt Ernest Brandt Blent Brandt Mr./Mrs. Sites Ulrich Jack Loula Dorothy Rygajlo Raymond Lunde John Nelson Floris Thieike Dennis Van Lith Vera Hyatt Mrs. G.O. Sandro Mrs. Leo Taffe Mrs. Stuart Paterson Marion Sehwandt Lyle Wittnebel Carl Loraff Kevin Rademacher Donald Oswood Lee Hamner Ruth Torgerson Bertha Frevert Charles frevert Roger Lundberg Peggy Hedman Clara Zeek Sylvia Plnkert Randy Roder Mrs. Leonard Karels Donald Swanson Ruth Osen Dorothy Shaleen Mrs. B.C. Fowler Clarence Magnuson Lilllan Danielson Anna Martlg Mrs. Richard Nichols Anne Paterson Frances Beecham Gary Beachem Tom Rice Gerhardt Wittnebel Joseph Spore Richard Hansen Arden Kraft Brian Brown, son, father and at one time an outstanding police officer. Brian Brown was shot in the head and died early Monday morning on November 30, 1998. At 27 years old, he was on the LAPD only 3 years when his life was claimed by a 23 year old Inglewood gang member. Brian Brown would probably still be alive today, if the man who shot him had served his full sentence of 11 years, instead of being paroled after serving roughly half his sentence for a prior conviction of attempted murder. Prior to November 30 the Brown household consisted of Brian's parents, Dennis and April, and Dylan Brown-Brian's only child. Brian was a single parent and for reasons not publicized, chose to raise his son within the extended family. Good choice because at least now 7 year old Dylan has his grandparents to raise him. The difficulty in writing this column is whether to put focus on the anger I feel toward an ex-felon whose life amounted to nothing, or the sadness I feel for the Brown family and their loss. Both emotions are so intertwined it's difficult to separate them. Fact remains two men are dead: 27 year old Brian Brown, LAPD field training officer, ex-marine and recipient of the Purple Heart for services rendered in Somalia, and 23 year old Oscar Zatarain, for who there are no positive bullet points except to say he is dead. Death is about the survivors, so I'll make my focus 7 year old Dylan Brown. His life has been forever shaped by an ex-felon who has no redeeming value in our society. Young Dylan will live the rest of his life without being able to answer, "Why did my daddy have to die?" A senseless crime will plague him a lifetime-a crime that has no justice, no merit, no fairness. All he knows is that there will be no more fishing trips day after day of learning to adjust without the most important person in the world to him. As a nation we must ask ourselves, how can we help? Indirectly, we can help by asking for stricter laws that will keep felons behind bars. We can demand harsher, less lenient sentencing for first time offenders. We can guarantee a life of damnation for those who kill the very ones who put their lives on the line to protect us. By doing this we will send the message that gang warfare will not be tolerated and we will not be held hostage by gang members. Even with all this, young Dylan's loss will not be lessened. It is a private grief that none of us can really understand. It is the type of grief that a little 7 year old boy probably doesn't understand very well himself, and will undoubtedly leave him with tortured nightmares for Lord knows how long. But as the dust settles for the BrOwn family and they piece their fragmented lives back together, as a nation we can directly show them we care and try to shoulder some of their burden. A donation, a card, a simple letter of sympathy would help. If you would like to participate, please send your contribution or card to: The Brian Brown Trust, Pacific Community Police Station, 12312 Culver Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90066. Above all, I ask that you remember young Dylan Brown in your .prayers, who asked on that tragic mormng of No vember 30, "Why did my daddy have to die?" Editor's note: check your local radio station for Percy Ross' call of the day and visit his web site at www. thanksamillion, com. Write Percy Ross, c/o the Ortonville Independent, PO Box 39000-B, Minneapolis, MN 55,[39. Include your phone number All letters are read. Only a few are answered in this column; others may be acknowledged privately. By Penny Sitter We received subscriptions to several magazines for Christmas. One of them contains recipes. I haven't cooked or baked any of them yet. I sit in my chair with an afghan over my knees and drool over the delicious- looking casseroles, cookies, pies, and goodies. I make plans. I could serve this to the gels at Bible Study, but I'd have to get up really early on the morning that I entertain them. I could probably serve this at my church circle but maybe it's better to go for an old tried and true recipe. I'm not sure that it will turn out like the picture. I admit that I've had some failures through the years. For awhile I was famous for my plum-pit pie. My sister gave me a quart of small plums she had canned and told me how she made pie from them. I didn't think to check if they were pitted. They weren't. Luckily it was just Howard for dinner that day so we enjoyed the pie although we had to keep spitting out the pits. Then, wouldn't you know, here came Howard's brothers who were planning to work together that afternoon. They walked in and exclaimed, "Hey, we got pie!" Then they grabbed plates and forks and started in. They really laughed about the plum pits and made a big deal out of it. And they managed to make reference to that for years afterwards. Even if I had chocolate pie, they would ask about pits before they started eating. Even if I never try the new recipes, I really enjoy the magazine. It's the way we used to enjoy the Sears catalog when we were kids. We wished and planned but in reality we knew we wouldn't get those clothes or toys. However, day-dreaming was such a pleasant pass-time. We spent many happy hours just talking about what we would like and enjoying the pictures. [ PRINTING Is Our Business I THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT On Hwy. 12 between Ortonville, MN and Big Stone City,SD (3201839-2911 98 Pontiac Grand Am GT CD, sunroof, AC, PL, PW, 1,300 miles , i 98 Chevy Blazer SlO LS 4x4 17,000 miles .............................................................................. $1 8egoo 95 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD 53.000 miles, CD, sunroof, leather ............................................ $1 68 800 94 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD red, wih leather interior, AM/FM cass., 92,000 miles, local trade .,$1 4, eGO 93 Buick LeSabre Custom IS ,000 mi, exc t0nd ................................................................... 7,6OO 92 Pontiac Grand Prix SE PW, PL, AM/FM cass.,exc, c0nd ..................................................... $4,500 89 Chevy Corsica PW, PL 00INDEPENDENT The Ortonville Independent (u.s.p.s. 4n-480) oeeeo JEANETTE KAERCHER Publisher JAMES O. IAERCHER Managing Editor SUZETTIE KAERCHER-B Editor & Advertising Sales SARA J. KAERCHER Ad and Printing Consultant ROBERT FULLER Plant Manager ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition TAMMIE GLEBE Compositor/Receptionist RYAN STATTELMAN Reporter/Ad Consultant MIKE BARNHARDT Photographer BILL DWYER & BOB SH Pressmen KRIBTA NOVAK Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater ooeoo Tues., Jan. 19, 1999 Vol. 80; Continuing the ORTONVILLE JOURNAL ST/ Publled E vl Tuesday at 29 2rid St. N.W. Oflonvlle, kin 56276 Ptx.,ab PolRge Paid at 0flotwll, SUBSCRIPTION $25.00per year In Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant and Rober In South Dakota. $29.00 for all counties in Minnesota and Dakota. All others, $33.00 per yea Postmaster: Send address chan The Ortonvllle Independent, Box Ortonvllle, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCH -ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE BASED ( A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE DATE- Big Stone, Lac qul Pade, Traverse, Counties in Minnesota and Grant Roberts In South Dakota February .............. 2|.00 August ............... March .................. 22,89 September ......... April .................... 20.81 October ........ May ..................... 18.73 November ............ June .................... 18.86 Oecambar ............ July ...................... 14,67 January .............. ALL OTteRS IN MINN. AND SO. DAK. .February ............. 2g.00 August ................ M,,rch .................. 28.81 September ......... ' April .................... 24.19 May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.38 July ...................... 18.98 January ............... ALL ARSA t February .............. 88.00 Auguet ................ March .................. 30.28 September .......... April .................... 27.80 October ............. ' Msy ..................... 84,78 November, June ................... 28.00 July ..................... 18.26 '" "PUBLISHER LIABILITY The Publisher shall not be slight changes or typographical that do not lessen the value advertisement. The Publisher's for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to publication advertisement in any subse or the refund of any monies advertisement. DEADLINES Chumh notes - Saturday mall Display ads - Fdday mail Correspondence - Monday mall Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Fdday afternoon Classified ads - Fdday noon (Any ed brought In later will be 1 classify.) OFRCE HOURS Lm. p.m.; 8 a.m.-12 noon; 1-5 A Thursday 30 A Friday: 8 a.m.-12 noon A Holidays Letters to the editor community Issues are Letter wdters should be aware that Independent reserves the and/or condense letters paper also reserves the publish letters that are which Letters printed or typed name, address and telephone Addresses and telephone . not be published. Letter writers are asked to themselves to one letter Please keep letter bdef, over 350 words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Inde determining what is news Is based i If an Individual zatlon charges for admission event, for an Item or.for a service be considered advertising. In words ' , "If you charg e, we charge.' Aavertismgls the life-blood newspaper. Without It a news would cease to exist. The paper receives for subscrl single paper sales Is use( Ink and paper used In product. It no longer does paper cost Increases. It still cove cost of Ink and a small portion ov paJr used. vertlstng to a newspaper crops and livestock to farmers; m products to the grocer; dresses, and underwear to 1 Without any of those Items, particular business would not business. ADB: We reserve the right any advertising without obll justify our decision. POLICIES A News: Our as fully e staffs Opinions will oplnlonpege, A Editorials:  2e, whether or m other sources Is editor are her own those of other 8taft expressed In Items from lion8 own but are general Interest. Cell 320-832-616:1 :120-839-:1761 to place classified advertlsln Ortonvllle Independent. Tuesday, Jan. 19, Editorial comment onversatkms WITH THE and00 By Jim Van Der Pot   One of the ways of coping with the low crop and livestock prices is an old one that deserves another look. This is the practice of putting livestock on the crop residue after harvest. It is difficult to conceive anything that is going to bail out a business based upon hogs which sold for 12 cents a pound this fall, or for that mat- ter corn, which if it hadn't been for government support, might very well have hit one dollar a bushel on the way down. But though hogs will not always sell for 12 cents, or corn for less than two dollars, we can be pretty sure that the road ahead for virtually all crops and livestock is going to be rockier than what we have already been over. And nothing takes the bumps out bet- ter than squeezing out a little more value from the crop and cutting feed expense for the animal if it can be done right on the farm. That is money that no one gets their hands on before we do, which is almost unheard of in modem farming! Of course, this farming requires a desire or at least a willingness to farm year around. Any who have worked off the farm in the off season, or who are wealthy enough not to have to work a full year are not going to be interested. And like running the government, this gets done by those who show up. As an example, even though Alan Nation says that we In Minnesota only average 40 days of snow cover in the fields each winter, there is no way any domestic animal could have been maintained any part of the winter on corn stalks in a year like 1996-1997. Even my sows couldn't get through the snow and ice to the corn they knew very well was there. Only a buffalo would have had a chance. So the fencing and the planning went to waste that year. Still, most years are not like that and there will be some benefit to those persistent enough to try. Last fall, we had 16 acres of corn stalks that had fence part way around, so we decided to try a double approach. First, we left four pairs of rows stand, calculating that amount to be about half of what would be need- ed to maintain 50 sows for the month from mid October though mid November. We figured the hogs would pick up what the combine dropped in addition to the rows left. We moved the sows in, advancing ?' CLUES ACROSS I. Fossil material 8. Lawmaker 9. Flintstone character 10. Underwater vessels, for short I I. Slapping 14. Pioneer vehicle 16. Toothless 18. Make into a print 22. Jewelry spot 23.  Park, CO 24. Columbus' destination CLUES DOWN I. Monetary units of Bolivia 2. Reasonable 3. Monetary unit of Peru 4. Worn to Mecca 5. Dejected 6. Artist's medium 7. Trail on the ground 12. She was sweet as apple cider 13. Surfeit 14. Indulge in gluttony 15. Edible kernel 17. Supernatural 19. Musical speeds 20. Makes fast 2 I. Used to control an animal SOLUTIONS ACROSS I. Petrified wood 8. Senator 9. Wilma 10. Subs I I. Smacking 14. Overland stage 16. Edentate 18. Etch 22. Earlobe 23. Eames 24. The East Indies SOLUTIONS DOWN I. Pesos 2. Tenable 3. lnti 4. lhram 5. Downcast 6. Oil 7. Draggle 12. Ida 13. Plethora 14. Overeat 15. Nutmeat 17. Eerie 19. Tempi 20. Hasps 2 I. Rein CI990004 Page 4 1 the fence every week, thus walking them across the entire acreage in a Thanks a million month s time. They did well, getting a little fat actually. So did we. Monkeying around with a little fence  m is an easy way to feed sows, compared Dear Readers: The headlines have with his dad, no more computer game [ for instance to walking through the ceased and life has resumed for the competitions with the man he loved, crowd of them carrying a pail of corn. Brown family of Los Angeles. and no more birthdays or holidays Anybody who has tried that knows it However, they are and will remain shared with the man who was his I requires strong bones. And the sows short one very important member- hero. For Dylan Brown there will be figure the program out immediately, generally going out to eat just before dawn and staying there until they are full or tired of it. When the wire gets moved, they line up along the old line and wait. Costs are hard to calculate, with the price of corn being what it was. What is a $1.50 bushel of corn worth if you haven't harvested or dried it? $1.25? $1.15? Or how about a bushel on the ground? $.10? Let's just say the sows fed cheap, which is good since they were cheap as well. About a week before Thanksgiving, we took the sows off and turned the ewes out, figuring the corn would be scarce enough so that foundering would be no problem. The 150 ewes foraged in that field until close to Christmas, eating mostly the husks and leaves as well as a few stalks. They were supplemented alfal- fa hay after the first week. We fed six big bales of hay for the entire month they were out there until breeding started, which is about two lbs/hd/day, or about a half ration. If you figure alfalfa hay at $50 a ton, which may be high this year, the value of the foraging for the ewes was $150 or about $9/acre. The sows took half their daily ration from field loss for their month, which would be about three lbs/hd/day of corn. With corn at $1.50, the corn which was lost to convention- al harvest substituted for about $120 worth of sow feed or about $7.50/acre. The total impact of foraging for that field was $16.50 an acre. That won't make a year like this profitable. But there are plenty years when that could be equal to the total profit per acre from the cropping operation. It is like farming twice as much land. Area students on MSU Dean's List Several area students have been named the the Dean's List at Moorhead State University of Moorhead for fall semester. Among those on the list are Stacy Dorry and Brian S.of Ortonville and Michael Felton of Odessa. Also, Suzanne Haman of Beardsley has been named to the Dean's List. ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Mrs. Arnold Knutson Carol Koch Arloene Hamilton Alvina Inderieden Selmer Simonson Ernest Gerjets Iverson Insurance David Klepel Eleanor M. Johnson Lowell Hormann Burton Nypen Lorwin Zahrbock Bellingham Public School. Floyd (;use Walter Brandt Rodger Bmndt Ernest Brandt Blent Brandt Mr./Mrs. Sites Ulrich Jack Loula Dorothy Rygajlo Raymond Lunde John Nelson Floris Thieike Dennis Van Lith Vera Hyatt Mrs. G.O. Sandro Mrs. Leo Taffe Mrs. Stuart Paterson Marion Sehwandt Lyle Wittnebel Carl Loraff Kevin Rademacher Donald Oswood Lee Hamner Ruth Torgerson Bertha Frevert Charles frevert Roger Lundberg Peggy Hedman Clara Zeek Sylvia Plnkert Randy Roder Mrs. Leonard Karels Donald Swanson Ruth Osen Dorothy Shaleen Mrs. B.C. Fowler Clarence Magnuson Lilllan Danielson Anna Martlg Mrs. Richard Nichols Anne Paterson Frances Beecham Gary Beachem Tom Rice Gerhardt Wittnebel Joseph Spore Richard Hansen Arden Kraft Brian Brown, son, father and at one time an outstanding police officer. Brian Brown was shot in the head and died early Monday morning on November 30, 1998. At 27 years old, he was on the LAPD only 3 years when his life was claimed by a 23 year old Inglewood gang member. Brian Brown would probably still be alive today, if the man who shot him had served his full sentence of 11 years, instead of being paroled after serving roughly half his sentence for a prior conviction of attempted murder. Prior to November 30 the Brown household consisted of Brian's parents, Dennis and April, and Dylan Brown-Brian's only child. Brian was a single parent and for reasons not publicized, chose to raise his son within the extended family. Good choice because at least now 7 year old Dylan has his grandparents to raise him. The difficulty in writing this column is whether to put focus on the anger I feel toward an ex-felon whose life amounted to nothing, or the sadness I feel for the Brown family and their loss. Both emotions are so intertwined it's difficult to separate them. Fact remains two men are dead: 27 year old Brian Brown, LAPD field training officer, ex-marine and recipient of the Purple Heart for services rendered in Somalia, and 23 year old Oscar Zatarain, for who there are no positive bullet points except to say he is dead. Death is about the survivors, so I'll make my focus 7 year old Dylan Brown. His life has been forever shaped by an ex-felon who has no redeeming value in our society. Young Dylan will live the rest of his life without being able to answer, "Why did my daddy have to die?" A senseless crime will plague him a lifetime-a crime that has no justice, no merit, no fairness. All he knows is that there will be no more fishing trips day after day of learning to adjust without the most important person in the world to him. As a nation we must ask ourselves, how can we help? Indirectly, we can help by asking for stricter laws that will keep felons behind bars. We can demand harsher, less lenient sentencing for first time offenders. We can guarantee a life of damnation for those who kill the very ones who put their lives on the line to protect us. By doing this we will send the message that gang warfare will not be tolerated and we will not be held hostage by gang members. Even with all this, young Dylan's loss will not be lessened. It is a private grief that none of us can really understand. It is the type of grief that a little 7 year old boy probably doesn't understand very well himself, and will undoubtedly leave him with tortured nightmares for Lord knows how long. But as the dust settles for the BrOwn family and they piece their fragmented lives back together, as a nation we can directly show them we care and try to shoulder some of their burden. A donation, a card, a simple letter of sympathy would help. If you would like to participate, please send your contribution or card to: The Brian Brown Trust, Pacific Community Police Station, 12312 Culver Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90066. Above all, I ask that you remember young Dylan Brown in your .prayers, who asked on that tragic mormng of No vember 30, "Why did my daddy have to die?" Editor's note: check your local radio station for Percy Ross' call of the day and visit his web site at www. thanksamillion, com. Write Percy Ross, c/o the Ortonville Independent, PO Box 39000-B, Minneapolis, MN 55,[39. Include your phone number All letters are read. Only a few are answered in this column; others may be acknowledged privately. By Penny Sitter We received subscriptions to several magazines for Christmas. One of them contains recipes. I haven't cooked or baked any of them yet. I sit in my chair with an afghan over my knees and drool over the delicious- looking casseroles, cookies, pies, and goodies. I make plans. I could serve this to the gels at Bible Study, but I'd have to get up really early on the morning that I entertain them. I could probably serve this at my church circle but maybe it's better to go for an old tried and true recipe. I'm not sure that it will turn out like the picture. I admit that I've had some failures through the years. For awhile I was famous for my plum-pit pie. My sister gave me a quart of small plums she had canned and told me how she made pie from them. I didn't think to check if they were pitted. They weren't. Luckily it was just Howard for dinner that day so we enjoyed the pie although we had to keep spitting out the pits. Then, wouldn't you know, here came Howard's brothers who were planning to work together that afternoon. They walked in and exclaimed, "Hey, we got pie!" Then they grabbed plates and forks and started in. They really laughed about the plum pits and made a big deal out of it. And they managed to make reference to that for years afterwards. Even if I had chocolate pie, they would ask about pits before they started eating. Even if I never try the new recipes, I really enjoy the magazine. It's the way we used to enjoy the Sears catalog when we were kids. We wished and planned but in reality we knew we wouldn't get those clothes or toys. However, day-dreaming was such a pleasant pass-time. We spent many happy hours just talking about what we would like and enjoying the pictures. [ PRINTING Is Our Business I THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT On Hwy. 12 between Ortonville, MN and Big Stone City,SD (3201839-2911 98 Pontiac Grand Am GT CD, sunroof, AC, PL, PW, 1,300 miles , i 98 Chevy Blazer SlO LS 4x4 17,000 miles .............................................................................. $1 8egoo 95 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD 53.000 miles, CD, sunroof, leather ............................................ $1 68 800 94 Jeep Grand Cherokee LTD red, wih leather interior, AM/FM cass., 92,000 miles, local trade .,$1 4, eGO 93 Buick LeSabre Custom IS ,000 mi, exc t0nd ................................................................... 7,6OO 92 Pontiac Grand Prix SE PW, PL, AM/FM cass.,exc, c0nd ..................................................... $4,500 89 Chevy Corsica PW, PL 00INDEPENDENT The Ortonville Independent (u.s.p.s. 4n-480) oeeeo JEANETTE KAERCHER Publisher JAMES O. IAERCHER Managing Editor SUZETTIE KAERCHER-B Editor & Advertising Sales SARA J. KAERCHER Ad and Printing Consultant ROBERT FULLER Plant Manager ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition TAMMIE GLEBE Compositor/Receptionist RYAN STATTELMAN Reporter/Ad Consultant MIKE BARNHARDT Photographer BILL DWYER & BOB SH Pressmen KRIBTA NOVAK Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater ooeoo Tues., Jan. 19, 1999 Vol. 80; Continuing the ORTONVILLE JOURNAL ST/ Publled E vl Tuesday at 29 2rid St. N.W. Oflonvlle, kin 56276 Ptx.,ab PolRge Paid at 0flotwll, SUBSCRIPTION $25.00per year In Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant and Rober In South Dakota. $29.00 for all counties in Minnesota and Dakota. All others, $33.00 per yea Postmaster: Send address chan The Ortonvllle Independent, Box Ortonvllle, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCH -ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE BASED ( A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE DATE- Big Stone, Lac qul Pade, Traverse, Counties in Minnesota and Grant Roberts In South Dakota February .............. 2|.00 August ............... March .................. 22,89 September ......... April .................... 20.81 October ........ May ..................... 18.73 November ............ June .................... 18.86 Oecambar ............ July ...................... 14,67 January .............. ALL OTteRS IN MINN. AND SO. DAK. .February ............. 2g.00 August ................ M,,rch .................. 28.81 September ......... ' April .................... 24.19 May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.38 July ...................... 18.98 January ............... ALL ARSA t February .............. 88.00 Auguet ................ March .................. 30.28 September .......... April .................... 27.80 October ............. ' Msy ..................... 84,78 November, June ................... 28.00 July ..................... 18.26 '" "PUBLISHER LIABILITY The Publisher shall not be slight changes or typographical that do not lessen the value advertisement. The Publisher's for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to publication advertisement in any subse or the refund of any monies advertisement. DEADLINES Chumh notes - Saturday mall Display ads - Fdday mail Correspondence - Monday mall Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Fdday afternoon Classified ads - Fdday noon (Any ed brought In later will be 1 classify.) OFRCE HOURS Lm. p.m.; 8 a.m.-12 noon; 1-5 A Thursday 30 A Friday: 8 a.m.-12 noon A Holidays Letters to the editor community Issues are Letter wdters should be aware that Independent reserves the and/or condense letters paper also reserves the publish letters that are which Letters printed or typed name, address and telephone Addresses and telephone . not be published. Letter writers are asked to themselves to one letter Please keep letter bdef, over 350 words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Inde determining what is news Is based i If an Individual zatlon charges for admission event, for an Item or.for a service be considered advertising. In words ' , "If you charg e, we charge.' Aavertismgls the life-blood newspaper. Without It a news would cease to exist. The paper receives for subscrl single paper sales Is use( Ink and paper used In product. It no longer does paper cost Increases. It still cove cost of Ink and a small portion ov paJr used. vertlstng to a newspaper crops and livestock to farmers; m products to the grocer; dresses, and underwear to 1 Without any of those Items, particular business would not business. ADB: We reserve the right any advertising without obll justify our decision. POLICIES A News: Our as fully e staffs Opinions will oplnlonpege, A Editorials:  2e, whether or m other sources Is editor are her own those of other 8taft expressed In Items from lion8 own but are general Interest. Cell 320-832-616:1 :120-839-:1761 to place classified advertlsln Ortonvllle Independent. Tuesday, Jan. 19,