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January 19, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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Public notices PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Big Stone County Planning Commission will hold regular meetings in the Clinton Memorial Building at 7:00 pm. the second Tuesday of each month. Dated: January 12, 1999 By order of the Big Stone County Planning Commission Ronda Maas, Deputy Environmental Officer 20 SE Second Street Ortonville, MN 56278 (Jan. t 9, 1999) PROCEEDINGS OF THE 0RTONVILLE CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL SESSION MONDAY, DECEMBER 28,1998 CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 5:00 P.M. CALL TO ORDER AND ROLL CALL: Mayor Ellingson called the regular meeting of the Ortonville City Council to order at 5:02 P.M. with the following present: Council Members Present: Mel Reinke, Mike Dorry, Dan Oakes, Mary Gustafson, Bill Hynnek, George Elliott City Staff Present: Roman Taffe, Gary Dlnnel Media Present: Ryan Stattelman, Stacy Dammer AGENDA AMENDMENTS: A motion was offered by Reinke, seconded by Gustafson and the motion passed unanimously to approve the following alenda amendments: New Business: b. Flood bills COUNCIL MINUTES Hynnek moved and Gustafson seconded and the motion passed unanimously to approve the Dec. 21, 1998 minutes of the Ortonville City Council aspresented. UNFINISHED BUSINESS The Council discussed hiring an architect/space planner to review and make recommendations regarding city office space. After discussion, Ellingson moved and Oakes seconded the motion and it passed unanimously to table the discussion of hiring an architect/space planner and to table discussion on city office space. NEW BUSINESS The Council reviewed applications from Dan and Michelle Wilson for a permit to hold dancing/roller skating and for a non-intoxicating malt beverage on- sale license for the Sioux Historic Pavilion. Reinke moved and Elliott seconded and the motion passed unanimously to approve a permit to hold dancing/roller skating at the Sioux Historic Pavilion. Dorry moved and Oakes seconded and the motion passed unanimously to approve the request for a retailer's on-sale non-intoxicating malt liquor license. Next the Council reviewed several bills related to the 1997 flood business buyout program. Reinke moved and Elhngson seconded that bills to Nova Consulting and MPCA in an aggregate amount of $14,156 which is to be paid by the UMVRDC from grant dollars for said project. Ellingson moved and Hynnek seconded and the motion passed unanimously to hold the January Utility Committee on Jan. 19th at 5:00 pro. Hynnek tnoved and Reinke seconded and the motion passed unanimously to second City Council meeting of January on the 19th at 7:00 pm due to the Martin Luther King holiday on the 18th. ADJOURNMENT: There being no further business before the Council, Dorry moved, Elliott seconded and the motion passed unanimously to adjourn the Dec. 28th meeting of the City Council of the City of Ortonville at 5:50 p.m. Roman C. Taffe, City Clerk-Administrator David Ellingson, Mayor Obituaries Woodrow Steffen Woo&row "Woody" Albert Steffen, 80, of Bemidji, died Tuesday, Jan.12, 1999 at North Country Regional Hospital in Bemidji. Funeral Services were held Saturday Jan. 16th at Solway Lutheran Church in Solway with the Rev. Ken Halstead officiating. Interment was at the Minnesota State Veteran's Cemetery in Little Falls. He was born April 17, 1918 in Alamo, North Dakota, the son of Herman and Ducetta (Murray) Steffen. He attended and graduated from Bellingham Public School in Bellingham. After graduation in 1936, be worked at the Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Lake City, MN. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps on Dec. 19, 1939. He served with the 19th Bombardment Group which was attacked by Japanese forces on Dec. 8, 1941. He surrendered to Japanese forces on May 10, 1942. He was a prisoner of war until his liberation at Yokaichi, Japan in Sept. 1945. He attained the rank of Technical Sargeant and was awarded a Bronze Star for his World War II service. Following his return from overseas duty, he married Marcella Juliot on Feb. 22, 1946. After his discharge from military service the same year, I he returnedto the Bellingham area where he owned and operated a heavy equipment construction business. In 1965, he accepted employment with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service as a field technician. He worked out of the Madison, Waseca and Bagley offices. He retired from government service in 1972. He was active throughout his MISSION POSSIBLE AGENT REPORT .... Anyone who attends school activities sees these agents. This group of ages come in a variety of ages and descriptions, but their faces are familiar. These agents go out in rain, sleet, cold, wind and dark of night to show our local kids that what they do really matters. You see them at concerts, sporting events, fundraisers, as well as school open house! Some of these agents began their mission by watching their own children, however, some of these agents have never had their own children, they have adopted all of the local kids. These agents build community strength each time they stop and tell a young person how they enjoyed their performance. I know of mission possible agents who chose a 'designated player". They supported that player in a number of ways by wearing that player's photo on a lapel button and attending all of that player's games. I'm sure that player also received notes of congratulations on their contributions to the game. What a way to build community! What a way to say, "Your hard work and dedication is important." What a wonderful way to raise the standards of sportsmanship and honor self-control. In a world where there is too much despair about what is going wrong, these agents have boldly stepped forward to support what is going right. They elect to support our young people in their activities and to honor them for their hard work, dedication, and skills. Our community is a better place because of them. Assets built into a local child in this case: Assets # 3,4,5,7,8, 13, 14. 17,18, 19, 38, 39, 40. Agent 33me involved: Entertainment of their choice. Potential results of this agents investment: Unlimited! Rle your Mission Possible Agent Report with: Vision Marketing RR 1 Box 218 Ortonville, HN 56278 NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC CENTER Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 yeare Illl L ill-'1 II I/j I l [llll hk-'ll II-,VI Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. l/ Terry L Seenmn, M.D. (sos) ee2-z63o or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Polnte Business Perk Watertown, SD lifetime with volunteer fire department duty. He served 8 years as commander of the Bemidji Civil Air Patrol Unit. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, Disabled American Veterans, the 19th Bomb Group Association, American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor and American Ex- Prisoners of War. Woody is survived by his wife, Marcella Steffen of Bemidji, two daughters Christine (Barry) Guptill of Paynesville, Charlene (Mark) Cohrs of Park Rapids, a son Joel (Sandy) Steffen of Bemidji, nine grandchildren, 1 great grandchild. 2 brothers Clarence (Jean) Steffen of Reseda, Calf. Oliver (Billie) Steffen of Clark, SD, a sister Norma Jensen of Minnetonka, numerous nieces and nephews. Woody was preceded in death by his parents, & 2 sisters - Muriel Jensen, and Christie Steffen. Active pallbearers will be Matthew and Nathan Cohrs, Chad Williams, Paul Beck, Daryl Hall and John Seitz. Honorary pallbearers were Dana Guptill, Nikki Beck, Rebecca and Naiya Cohrs, Amity Seitz, Rachel and Shawn Steffen. Old Mill Twirlers The Old Mill Twirlers danced to the calling of Logan Jackson last Wednesday. There were three squares in attendance with guests from Watertown and Sisseton. Dennis Van Asch from Milbank will call on Wednesday, Jan. 20, Chili Night. On the lunch committee are Leland and Dorothy Schwandt and Paula Tennis and Harold Thaden. Upcoming dances: Jan. 27th, Cal Brown calling. The Old Mill Twirlers dance on Wednesday evening at 8 p.m. in the High School lunchroom. Use the Northeast door, guests are always welcome. USDA offers protection for noninsurable crops Minnesota producers growing non- insurable crops are eligible for protec- tion under the United States Department of Agriculture's Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance program, according to Linda Hennen, acting state executive director of the Farm Service Agency. Farmers who grow corps that are not insurable with federal crop insur- ance policies can receive USDA dis- aster payments if adverse weather causes production losses over a wide area. Any crop commercially grown for food or fiber is eligible, except trees grown for wood, paper or pulp. Eligible crops include: fruits and veg- etableb..quacultur', floriculture, ornamental nursery, Christmas trees, turf grass sod, and seed crops. To be eligible for Noninsured Crop Assistance Program benefits, a crop must be within an approved area in which the expected area yield for the crop is reduced by more than 35 per- cent because of natural disaster. Approved disaster areas may be defined as a county, an area of at least 320,000 contiguous acres or acreage on which the annual value of all crops grown is at least $80 million. Once the area loss requirement is met for a crop, Noninsured Assistance Program payments are made to an eli- gible producer when individual crop losses are in excess of 50 percent of duction records. If records are not available, a producer will receive an approved yield based on a percentage of the county expected yield. "Unlike other disaster assistance programs," Hennen said, "a producer must file an acreage and production report with the local Farm Service Agency office prior to the crop report- ing date. If acres and yields are not reported timely, a producer may be ineligible for Noninsured Assistance Program payment." Losses must be reported with 15 days of the crop loss. Payments to any one person under the Program cannot ii! Area news digest GARY, SD-Gary native Jerry Norton won the Wrangler BullfiG World Championship recently during the 10-day National Rodeo, held in I.as Vegas. Norton won the first round of bull-tic on Monday, placed second on Tuesday, won on Wednesday, placed second Thursday. He finished the 1998 season with $55, in earnings, putting him in the top spot in the bullfighters' race. said he felt every type of emotion after winning the championship. was a full gamut of emotions," he said. "Happy, sad, very God for it being His will, very thankful to my family and wife for behind me and sad that my dad couldn't be present. He passed about three years ago. At the same time, I knelt down and God in the middle of the arena and thanked Dad a little bit, too." road to a championship dream, which included three previous the NFR, started at the age of 17. MONTEVIDEO-Bored with the usual tunes and talk on your dial? You might consider a future stop at 98.3 FM, better KRAM - Keel Radio and Music - to a pair of teenagers from Montevideo area. Two Montevideo Senior High School Jacob Niemand and Josiah Christoffer - are breaking ground on amateur, non-commercial radio station. What began in mid-1997 CB radio trial on a lazy summer afternoon in Christoffer's barn progressed to a fairly sophisticated studio in the basement Niemand's home. "We were sitting in Joe's barn with nothing and we started talking about how cool it would be to be radio jockeys," says Jake. "So we found CB radio and that was our piece of equipment." MILBANK, SD-Highway 12 traffic in east Milbank was detoured several minutes when a car fire broke out at the Cenex Store Saturday afternoon, Jan. 9th. About 5:30 p.m. a car next to the gas pumps burst into flame. Grant County Deputy Brad Swenson was first at the scene and used his patrol Jeep to the vehicle away from the pumps into the street. Police and officers routed traffic away from the station as a precaution firemen extinguished the flames. Assistant Fire Chief Bill the fire was hot enough to burn the interior of the car and the front tires. He said the cause was not known, but it may been an electrical problem with the vehicle, which was a 1986 The driver was identified as Linda Schmitt. No one was injured. DAWSON-Battling frigid temperatures Wednesday, Jan. 6, Dawson Fire Department could not save a two-vehicle garage at Vernit Swanson home located at 863 Ash Street in Dawson. Fire Chief Jeff Olson reported that they received the call about a.m. and when they arrived, the garage was totally engulfed in Some of the neighbors of the Swansons lost power as the heat burned lines to their homes. Two vehicles were also de the fire. "We were there for about an hour and a half. The winds strong enough to make it miserable," he said about the extreme c weather conditions while fighting the fire. Olson reported that possible cause of the fire was a tank heater which was on one of vehicles to heat the engine during the early morning hours. exceed $100,000 for any given crop year and a person exceeding the $2 million gross revenue limitation is ineligible for benefits. Producers with crops that cannot be insured by Federal Crop Insurance should contact their local Farm Service Agency personnel for more details on this program. February The February CommU Calendar will appear in Independent's Jan. 26th edition. If you would like your meeting to appear on the please have copy in by Thursday. 21st. """ INDEP ,, Phone 320-839-6163 Ortonville, MN 56278 the approved yield. Approved yields are based on a producer's actual pro- Free photo NOW IS THE TIME contest for NOTICE TO SU BSCRIBERS! ! area residents The International Library of Photography is pleased to announce that over $56,000 in prizes will be awarded this year in the International Open Amateur Photography Contest. Photographers from the Ortonville area, particularly beginners, are welcome to try to win their share of over 1,300 prizes. The deadline for the contest is Feb.28, 1999. The contest is open to everyone and entry is FREE. "Any photographer, whether previously published or not, can be a winner," stated Jeffrey Bryan, Contest Director. "Photographers from the Ortonville area have successfully competed in past competitions." Every photograph entered also has a chance to be published in a deluxe, full-color, museum-quality album. To enter, send ONE photograph in ONLY ONE of the following categories: People, Travel, Pets, Children, Sports, Nature, Action, Humor, Portraiture, or Other. The photo must be a color or black-and- white print (unmounted), 8" x 10" or smaller. All entries must include the photographer's name and address on the back, as well as the category and the title of the photo. Photos cannot be returned. Photographs should be sent to: The International Library of Photography, Suite 350-9002, 10045 Red Run Blvd., Owings Mills, MD 21117. Entries must be postmarked by Feb. 28, 1999. The International Library of Photography is an organization dedicated to bringing the work of amateur photographers to the public's attention. TO RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION! expiring with the Jan. 26, 1999 issue. This is only one week away, so you'll want to renew your subscription today! As you know, most Independent subscription renewals are due Feb. 1st of each year. Thus, your present subscription will be DON'T MISS AN ISSUEll printed in the paper during the next few weeks. We want you to continue as a subscriber! This notice is to remind you of the deadline so you won't miss an issue. No postcard notices will be sent, but additmnal reminders will be JUST FILL OUT THE COUPON BELOWt the paper coming to you for another year. Just fill out the coupon below and! return it with proper pay- ment to: Don't delay renewing your subscription. Do it today. It will give our subscription department time to properly renew your paper and keep Subscription Department, Ortonville Independent, Box 336, 0rtonville, MN 56278 -Thank You AREA SUBSCRIBERS ........ (SubserlbQr$ living in RtQ St.o, Leo qui $2500 Parle, Traverse, Swift countlos in Min- nesota & Grant and Roberts in South Dakota. Minnesota and ,2900 South Dakota Subscribers P/ease Renew My Subscription For Another Year Name I I Address I I I I =3300 -..----,--,. , All Other Areas L_. =.., o..,=,, ., .=,, .... Page 4b 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan. 19, Public notices PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Big Stone County Planning Commission will hold regular meetings in the Clinton Memorial Building at 7:00 pm. the second Tuesday of each month. Dated: January 12, 1999 By order of the Big Stone County Planning Commission Ronda Maas, Deputy Environmental Officer 20 SE Second Street Ortonville, MN 56278 (Jan. t 9, 1999) PROCEEDINGS OF THE 0RTONVILLE CITY COUNCIL SPECIAL SESSION MONDAY, DECEMBER 28,1998 CITY COUNCIL CHAMBERS 5:00 P.M. CALL TO ORDER AND ROLL CALL: Mayor Ellingson called the regular meeting of the Ortonville City Council to order at 5:02 P.M. with the following present: Council Members Present: Mel Reinke, Mike Dorry, Dan Oakes, Mary Gustafson, Bill Hynnek, George Elliott City Staff Present: Roman Taffe, Gary Dlnnel Media Present: Ryan Stattelman, Stacy Dammer AGENDA AMENDMENTS: A motion was offered by Reinke, seconded by Gustafson and the motion passed unanimously to approve the following alenda amendments: New Business: b. Flood bills COUNCIL MINUTES Hynnek moved and Gustafson seconded and the motion passed unanimously to approve the Dec. 21, 1998 minutes of the Ortonville City Council aspresented. UNFINISHED BUSINESS The Council discussed hiring an architect/space planner to review and make recommendations regarding city office space. After discussion, Ellingson moved and Oakes seconded the motion and it passed unanimously to table the discussion of hiring an architect/space planner and to table discussion on city office space. NEW BUSINESS The Council reviewed applications from Dan and Michelle Wilson for a permit to hold dancing/roller skating and for a non-intoxicating malt beverage on- sale license for the Sioux Historic Pavilion. Reinke moved and Elliott seconded and the motion passed unanimously to approve a permit to hold dancing/roller skating at the Sioux Historic Pavilion. Dorry moved and Oakes seconded and the motion passed unanimously to approve the request for a retailer's on-sale non-intoxicating malt liquor license. Next the Council reviewed several bills related to the 1997 flood business buyout program. Reinke moved and Elhngson seconded that bills to Nova Consulting and MPCA in an aggregate amount of $14,156 which is to be paid by the UMVRDC from grant dollars for said project. Ellingson moved and Hynnek seconded and the motion passed unanimously to hold the January Utility Committee on Jan. 19th at 5:00 pro. Hynnek tnoved and Reinke seconded and the motion passed unanimously to second City Council meeting of January on the 19th at 7:00 pm due to the Martin Luther King holiday on the 18th. ADJOURNMENT: There being no further business before the Council, Dorry moved, Elliott seconded and the motion passed unanimously to adjourn the Dec. 28th meeting of the City Council of the City of Ortonville at 5:50 p.m. Roman C. Taffe, City Clerk-Administrator David Ellingson, Mayor Obituaries Woodrow Steffen Woo&row "Woody" Albert Steffen, 80, of Bemidji, died Tuesday, Jan.12, 1999 at North Country Regional Hospital in Bemidji. Funeral Services were held Saturday Jan. 16th at Solway Lutheran Church in Solway with the Rev. Ken Halstead officiating. Interment was at the Minnesota State Veteran's Cemetery in Little Falls. He was born April 17, 1918 in Alamo, North Dakota, the son of Herman and Ducetta (Murray) Steffen. He attended and graduated from Bellingham Public School in Bellingham. After graduation in 1936, be worked at the Civilian Conservation Corps camp in Lake City, MN. He enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps on Dec. 19, 1939. He served with the 19th Bombardment Group which was attacked by Japanese forces on Dec. 8, 1941. He surrendered to Japanese forces on May 10, 1942. He was a prisoner of war until his liberation at Yokaichi, Japan in Sept. 1945. He attained the rank of Technical Sargeant and was awarded a Bronze Star for his World War II service. Following his return from overseas duty, he married Marcella Juliot on Feb. 22, 1946. After his discharge from military service the same year, I he returnedto the Bellingham area where he owned and operated a heavy equipment construction business. In 1965, he accepted employment with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service as a field technician. He worked out of the Madison, Waseca and Bagley offices. He retired from government service in 1972. He was active throughout his MISSION POSSIBLE AGENT REPORT .... Anyone who attends school activities sees these agents. This group of ages come in a variety of ages and descriptions, but their faces are familiar. These agents go out in rain, sleet, cold, wind and dark of night to show our local kids that what they do really matters. You see them at concerts, sporting events, fundraisers, as well as school open house! Some of these agents began their mission by watching their own children, however, some of these agents have never had their own children, they have adopted all of the local kids. These agents build community strength each time they stop and tell a young person how they enjoyed their performance. I know of mission possible agents who chose a 'designated player". They supported that player in a number of ways by wearing that player's photo on a lapel button and attending all of that player's games. I'm sure that player also received notes of congratulations on their contributions to the game. What a way to build community! What a way to say, "Your hard work and dedication is important." What a wonderful way to raise the standards of sportsmanship and honor self-control. In a world where there is too much despair about what is going wrong, these agents have boldly stepped forward to support what is going right. They elect to support our young people in their activities and to honor them for their hard work, dedication, and skills. Our community is a better place because of them. Assets built into a local child in this case: Assets # 3,4,5,7,8, 13, 14. 17,18, 19, 38, 39, 40. Agent 33me involved: Entertainment of their choice. Potential results of this agents investment: Unlimited! Rle your Mission Possible Agent Report with: Vision Marketing RR 1 Box 218 Ortonville, HN 56278 NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC CENTER Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 yeare Illl L ill-'1 II I/j I l [llll hk-'ll II-,VI Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. l/ Terry L Seenmn, M.D. (sos) ee2-z63o or 1-800-658-4763 Mallard Polnte Business Perk Watertown, SD lifetime with volunteer fire department duty. He served 8 years as commander of the Bemidji Civil Air Patrol Unit. He was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, Disabled American Veterans, the 19th Bomb Group Association, American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor and American Ex- Prisoners of War. Woody is survived by his wife, Marcella Steffen of Bemidji, two daughters Christine (Barry) Guptill of Paynesville, Charlene (Mark) Cohrs of Park Rapids, a son Joel (Sandy) Steffen of Bemidji, nine grandchildren, 1 great grandchild. 2 brothers Clarence (Jean) Steffen of Reseda, Calf. Oliver (Billie) Steffen of Clark, SD, a sister Norma Jensen of Minnetonka, numerous nieces and nephews. Woody was preceded in death by his parents, & 2 sisters - Muriel Jensen, and Christie Steffen. Active pallbearers will be Matthew and Nathan Cohrs, Chad Williams, Paul Beck, Daryl Hall and John Seitz. Honorary pallbearers were Dana Guptill, Nikki Beck, Rebecca and Naiya Cohrs, Amity Seitz, Rachel and Shawn Steffen. Old Mill Twirlers The Old Mill Twirlers danced to the calling of Logan Jackson last Wednesday. There were three squares in attendance with guests from Watertown and Sisseton. Dennis Van Asch from Milbank will call on Wednesday, Jan. 20, Chili Night. On the lunch committee are Leland and Dorothy Schwandt and Paula Tennis and Harold Thaden. Upcoming dances: Jan. 27th, Cal Brown calling. The Old Mill Twirlers dance on Wednesday evening at 8 p.m. in the High School lunchroom. Use the Northeast door, guests are always welcome. USDA offers protection for noninsurable crops Minnesota producers growing non- insurable crops are eligible for protec- tion under the United States Department of Agriculture's Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance program, according to Linda Hennen, acting state executive director of the Farm Service Agency. Farmers who grow corps that are not insurable with federal crop insur- ance policies can receive USDA dis- aster payments if adverse weather causes production losses over a wide area. Any crop commercially grown for food or fiber is eligible, except trees grown for wood, paper or pulp. Eligible crops include: fruits and veg- etableb..quacultur', floriculture, ornamental nursery, Christmas trees, turf grass sod, and seed crops. To be eligible for Noninsured Crop Assistance Program benefits, a crop must be within an approved area in which the expected area yield for the crop is reduced by more than 35 per- cent because of natural disaster. Approved disaster areas may be defined as a county, an area of at least 320,000 contiguous acres or acreage on which the annual value of all crops grown is at least $80 million. Once the area loss requirement is met for a crop, Noninsured Assistance Program payments are made to an eli- gible producer when individual crop losses are in excess of 50 percent of duction records. If records are not available, a producer will receive an approved yield based on a percentage of the county expected yield. "Unlike other disaster assistance programs," Hennen said, "a producer must file an acreage and production report with the local Farm Service Agency office prior to the crop report- ing date. If acres and yields are not reported timely, a producer may be ineligible for Noninsured Assistance Program payment." Losses must be reported with 15 days of the crop loss. Payments to any one person under the Program cannot ii! Area news digest GARY, SD-Gary native Jerry Norton won the Wrangler BullfiG World Championship recently during the 10-day National Rodeo, held in I.as Vegas. Norton won the first round of bull-tic on Monday, placed second on Tuesday, won on Wednesday, placed second Thursday. He finished the 1998 season with $55, in earnings, putting him in the top spot in the bullfighters' race. said he felt every type of emotion after winning the championship. was a full gamut of emotions," he said. "Happy, sad, very God for it being His will, very thankful to my family and wife for behind me and sad that my dad couldn't be present. He passed about three years ago. At the same time, I knelt down and God in the middle of the arena and thanked Dad a little bit, too." road to a championship dream, which included three previous the NFR, started at the age of 17. MONTEVIDEO-Bored with the usual tunes and talk on your dial? You might consider a future stop at 98.3 FM, better KRAM - Keel Radio and Music - to a pair of teenagers from Montevideo area. Two Montevideo Senior High School Jacob Niemand and Josiah Christoffer - are breaking ground on amateur, non-commercial radio station. What began in mid-1997 CB radio trial on a lazy summer afternoon in Christoffer's barn progressed to a fairly sophisticated studio in the basement Niemand's home. "We were sitting in Joe's barn with nothing and we started talking about how cool it would be to be radio jockeys," says Jake. "So we found CB radio and that was our piece of equipment." MILBANK, SD-Highway 12 traffic in east Milbank was detoured several minutes when a car fire broke out at the Cenex Store Saturday afternoon, Jan. 9th. About 5:30 p.m. a car next to the gas pumps burst into flame. Grant County Deputy Brad Swenson was first at the scene and used his patrol Jeep to the vehicle away from the pumps into the street. Police and officers routed traffic away from the station as a precaution firemen extinguished the flames. Assistant Fire Chief Bill the fire was hot enough to burn the interior of the car and the front tires. He said the cause was not known, but it may been an electrical problem with the vehicle, which was a 1986 The driver was identified as Linda Schmitt. No one was injured. DAWSON-Battling frigid temperatures Wednesday, Jan. 6, Dawson Fire Department could not save a two-vehicle garage at Vernit Swanson home located at 863 Ash Street in Dawson. Fire Chief Jeff Olson reported that they received the call about a.m. and when they arrived, the garage was totally engulfed in Some of the neighbors of the Swansons lost power as the heat burned lines to their homes. Two vehicles were also de the fire. "We were there for about an hour and a half. The winds strong enough to make it miserable," he said about the extreme c weather conditions while fighting the fire. Olson reported that possible cause of the fire was a tank heater which was on one of vehicles to heat the engine during the early morning hours. exceed $100,000 for any given crop year and a person exceeding the $2 million gross revenue limitation is ineligible for benefits. Producers with crops that cannot be insured by Federal Crop Insurance should contact their local Farm Service Agency personnel for more details on this program. February The February CommU Calendar will appear in Independent's Jan. 26th edition. If you would like your meeting to appear on the please have copy in by Thursday. 21st. """ INDEP ,, Phone 320-839-6163 Ortonville, MN 56278 the approved yield. Approved yields are based on a producer's actual pro- Free photo NOW IS THE TIME contest for NOTICE TO SU BSCRIBERS! ! area residents The International Library of Photography is pleased to announce that over $56,000 in prizes will be awarded this year in the International Open Amateur Photography Contest. Photographers from the Ortonville area, particularly beginners, are welcome to try to win their share of over 1,300 prizes. The deadline for the contest is Feb.28, 1999. The contest is open to everyone and entry is FREE. "Any photographer, whether previously published or not, can be a winner," stated Jeffrey Bryan, Contest Director. "Photographers from the Ortonville area have successfully competed in past competitions." Every photograph entered also has a chance to be published in a deluxe, full-color, museum-quality album. To enter, send ONE photograph in ONLY ONE of the following categories: People, Travel, Pets, Children, Sports, Nature, Action, Humor, Portraiture, or Other. The photo must be a color or black-and- white print (unmounted), 8" x 10" or smaller. All entries must include the photographer's name and address on the back, as well as the category and the title of the photo. Photos cannot be returned. Photographs should be sent to: The International Library of Photography, Suite 350-9002, 10045 Red Run Blvd., Owings Mills, MD 21117. Entries must be postmarked by Feb. 28, 1999. The International Library of Photography is an organization dedicated to bringing the work of amateur photographers to the public's attention. TO RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION! expiring with the Jan. 26, 1999 issue. This is only one week away, so you'll want to renew your subscription today! As you know, most Independent subscription renewals are due Feb. 1st of each year. Thus, your present subscription will be DON'T MISS AN ISSUEll printed in the paper during the next few weeks. We want you to continue as a subscriber! This notice is to remind you of the deadline so you won't miss an issue. No postcard notices will be sent, but additmnal reminders will be JUST FILL OUT THE COUPON BELOWt the paper coming to you for another year. Just fill out the coupon below and! return it with proper pay- ment to: Don't delay renewing your subscription. Do it today. It will give our subscription department time to properly renew your paper and keep Subscription Department, Ortonville Independent, Box 336, 0rtonville, MN 56278 -Thank You AREA SUBSCRIBERS ........ (SubserlbQr$ living in RtQ St.o, Leo qui $2500 Parle, Traverse, Swift countlos in Min- nesota & Grant and Roberts in South Dakota. Minnesota and ,2900 South Dakota Subscribers P/ease Renew My Subscription For Another Year Name I I Address I I I I =3300 -..----,--,. , All Other Areas L_. =.., o..,=,, ., .=,, .... Page 4b 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan. 19,