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January 21, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Ortonville with a heart" l Non00,rDu00,ive00ew00oEoer,n..,v. Oo0000uEnit, N DENT @ : ; , '77  i:ill i/ii d)WATERS GRILL AND BAR is holding its Grand Opening this weekend. Mary and Dale Homan invite ) Stop in and join in the good food, fun and entertainment. rs Grill & Bar to hold rand Opening this weekend Grill and Bar in will be hosting a "Grand celebration this Friday today, Jan 24-26. There will prizes, food specials, and nnent. and Mary l:tomai invite stop in a,nd check out done with the estab- "ve renovated the Opened it up more and re window overlooking with authentic sport- old fashion tools are a against warm colored walls, Cozy, casual, atmosphere in with family and friends. from his family and built a large trickling the bar with stones area, headwaters of the in which the bar is IT Students Lnted now lie Ambulance is seeking to train for Medical Technician. ;et up as soon as these are a caring person with a ire to help others, call "-Ontact Angle Kriesel, at 320-839-3102. (Adv.) named. Headwaters is located in the for- mer Baxters Beef n' Brew location on Ortonville's Main Street. Prior to Baxters it was The Cove, which Dale wned for 16 vcars. After taking a few years off to pur- sue interests in sales and carpentry, he decided to get back into the business, this time with an emphasis on the food. Their menu includes a variety of sandwiches, burgers, steak cubes, soups and salads. Headwaters is the home of the infamous 1 lb. "Kahuna" Burger. Children are most definitely wel- come at Headwaters, where they have a special kids' menu. Plans are under way for some fun kid activities and specials in the near future. They also plan to have a regular discount night for senior citizens on Tuesdays. The Homans have a lot of ideas for different food specials and entertain- ment which they hope to implement soon. They've already started with their monthly "Murder Mystery" din- ner parties for groups of eight inquisi- tive adults. The next one is scheduled for Feb. 22. Other fun things they want to pur- sue include Mexican nights, daily happy hour specials, DJ music, karaoke, comedy acts, dinner theaters, hypnotists and magic acts. Headwaters Grill & Bar has a Sunday liquor license. They hope to start offering brunches on Sundays with both breakfast and lunch items. They offer regular take out food orders and sell off sale liquor. Dale works at Headwaters full time and Mary is there when she's not at her full time job as Coordinator of the Lac qui Parle Yellow Bank Watershed District Clean Water Partnership program. In addition, they have 12 employees who serve as cooks, bar tenders and servers. The Homans invite you to stop into Headwaters Grill and Bar this week- end and enjoy the food, fun and enter- tainment during their Grand Opening celebration. See ad elsewhere this issue for details. Schmieg, Henrich on ATC Dean's list Doug Tatge, Dean of Academic Affairs, of the Alexandria Technical College, announced on Jan. i 3, 2003, those students who have achieved at least a 3.5 Grade Point Average for fall semester. The following students were named to the Dean's List from this area: Joseph Henrich, Ortonville in the Concrete Mason program, and Blake Schmieg, Big Stone City in Machine Tool Technology. Ublic hearing on proposed confinement draws crowd 150 attended the of the Big Stone Coun- nission last Wednes- 00te! ,2oo3. te , ! be the , of renewal We 1 not be . SO $30,00 Dakota; il= t]l ,r day in Clinton regarding the proposal by Lismore Hutterite Brethren for a conditional use permit to establish a farrow to finish hog confinement feedlot, to be located at NE 1/4 Sec- tion 32 and NE 1/4, Section 33, Town- ship 13, Range 47. That location is approximately 2 miles from Big Stone Lake in Prior Township. The Lismore colony is made up of. 13 families or about 60 people. The Hutterites own 5500 acres of land in Big Stone County between two colonies, one at Lismore and the other east of Graceville. Jeff Sveen, Aberdeen SD and attorney for the Hutterite Colony, prefaced remarks in support of the proposed project by indicating that the project would be built as environmen- tally sound as possible. He said that the Hutterites were good stewards of the land, they lived on the land, and were determined to build the facility to protect the ground water, meet all state and county requirements, and use the latest in technology to safe- guard their livelihood. Clarence Hofer, spokesperson for the Hutterite Colony told the audience that the colony felt it was important to diversify to survive in agriculture at this time, and that the proposed con- finement barn was adjacent to where they lived, and that they were "not exempt from any problems. "We do not intend to ask for any decision tonight. We are here to meet with the community to hear your concerns, and are willing to make modifications to the design." The design meets all state require- ments according to Hofer. In the barn there will be no deep pits and they will be cleaned out frequently. The shallow pits will help to cut down on odor as there will be no time to devel- op the bacteria growth that causes the odor. The manure is piped to a con- crete structure and will be half in and half out of the ground, and in addition dirt will be piled up around the struc- ture so the structure will be about 3/4 buried. The manure holding structure will be designed to hold a one year supply of manure. "We want to allow for enough space so that we never over fill. We'll have room beyond the requirement," said Hofer. The structure will be covered with a non-permeable cover, with a bio-fil- ter system designed to reduce the smell even more. The manure will be pumped under- ground to an injector in the fields through a flow meter and goes direct- ly into the ground at a depth of 8 to 10 inches. According to Hofer, over fer- tilizing can be a concern, but the state regulates the amount of manure that can be spread depending on soil tests and the nutrient value of the manure. "With the knifing process, the manure is spread underground and is never exposed to the air which will (Continued on page 9) City pursues senior housing Channel 3 airs video this week Praire Grass Communities/Farr Development representative Darrel Farr was in Ortonville last week in an attempt to help proponents of elderly housing move forward. Last week, Farr inspected five potential sites, guided by Mayor Dave Dinnel. Dinnel reported to the EDA that the softball park site adjacent to Northridge appeared to be the best site meeting the criteria of the Prairie Grass proposal. The current proposal made by Prairie Grass Communities is to build a 34 unit building that would cost in the range of $2.7 to $2.8 million. The building would include 14 indepen- dent living units, 14 assisted living units and 6 memory care units. It is proposed that management of the facility would be provided by Prairie Grass for up to two years, at which time the facility would be managed by Ortonville Area Health Services. Projected monthly fees for the independent living component are $650 for a one bedroom, $850 for a two bedroom; assisted living studios would cost $1,700, and $1,900 for a one bedroom unit; the memory care unit component costs were estimated to be $2,550. Local task force mem- bers indicated that this was below the average costs of like-care facilities throughout the state. For those interested, Prairie Grass has provided a video that will be aired on Channel 3 running Sunday, Jan 19 and Wednesday, Jan 22 at 10:30 a.m., 3:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. and will air the balance of the week at 10:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. The video, according to Mayor Dinnel, will show viewers what units built by Prairie Grass in other com- munities look like and includes inter- views with residents. If the Prairie Grass proposal is accepted by the EDA and the City Council, general obligation bonds will be issued for $3 million. According to Mark Ruff of Ehlers & Associates, the City's bonding company, "General obligation bonds are the vehicles most often used by cities where the city is involved in such projects. They are regulated by the state, limited to $3 million and provide the construction project with the lowest possible inter- est rates." Public entities can usually provide for funding at a more compet- itive rate than private moneys. "In my experience," added Ruff," the key areas to watch for in posting a general obligation bond for elderly housing is to avoid building more units than can be rented, and face the facts that rents may have to be raised from time to time. There's always up's and down's in occupancy rates in this type of housing. The EDA has retained Maxfield Research Incorporated to update the market study done four years ago with more current 2000 census data. Healthcare grant fimds will be used to pay for the update and study conclu- sions should help in determining the feasibility of the project. "In addition, there's often the per- ception that because a city is involved, other revenues should sup- port the project. In short, maintaining rents below market level because the city is involved," explained Ruff. That perception can prevent the housing from making a profit, and force the city to obligate taxpayers. Cities, of course, may opt to oblig- ate taxpayers if the goal is to provide housing tbr the elderly at below or at preferred market rates, which is rarely done in the U.S., but has been the case in some European countries. As the Prairie Grass proposal is structured, the city holds the full brunt of the risk involved, tlowever, con- struction of any facility that provides health assistance usually must co- ordinate service with the local hospi- tal or health service agencies, in this case Ortonville Area ltealth Services. Ruff believes that communities that plan these sorts of projects are (Continued on page 3) BIG STONE CITY'S JUNIOR GIRL SCOUTS have begun their annual cookie sales for 2003. There are eight varieties. The girls will be taking orders for the cookies through Feb. 2. If you wish to place an order and were not contacted, please call one of the following girls: Annie Voecks 862-8149, Ashley Athey 862-8211, Melissa Grabow 862- 8273 or Hillori Gronholz 862-8644. (Adv.) Public help is sought for " dialysis equipment here To further add to the excellence of Ortonville's area health services, an effort is underway today to seek public donations to add dialysis equip- ment for area patients in need of such services. Those patients in mention are those suffering from end stage renal dis- ease (ESID) and needing kidney dialysis, who have been and are still, needing to travel over 100 miles round trip, three days a week for their treatment. To obtain the needed equipment, the Big Stone Health Care Foundation has voted to match up to a total not to exceed $100,000, contributed by the public, toward the purchase of the needed dialysis equipment, The fu, ndraising e ff, o-t  has been dubbed the Ortonville Kidney Dialysis Project... 'PROJECT. All donations are tax deductible in full. Should the City Council not authorize the Project by May of this year, all contribu. tions, with interest, will be returned to the respective donors. For complete details, see ad by the Health Care Foundation elsewhere iis issue. , J ( Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com } THE SEVENTH GRADE GIRLS BASKETBALL TROJANS are left to right, front row: Katy Adelman, Jenny Jacobsen, Christine Taffe, Linsdey Plathe, Caiti Barr, Paige Hansen. Back row: Morgan Simonitch, Tiffany Giese, Tabitha Henrich, Samantha Meyer, Elizabeth Meyer and Colleen McLaughlin. 7th grade girls basketball team hold 11-1 Ortonville's seventh grade girls basketball team is winding down its regular season. Playing tough defense and playing a fast break style of offense has helped the Lady Trojans record for season 7th graders to an 11-1 record. The girls have defeated teams from Morris, Wheaton, Browns Vdley, CGB, Milbank and Dawson. with the only loss coming at the hands of Hancock's 8th grade. The team travels to Dawson on Monday, Jan. 20. and plays Big Stone City on Thursday, Jan. 23 at 4:00 p.m. Ortonville with a heart" l Non00,rDu00,ive00ew00oEoer,n..,v. Oo0000uEnit, N DENT @ : ; , '77  i:ill i/ii d)WATERS GRILL AND BAR is holding its Grand Opening this weekend. Mary and Dale Homan invite ) Stop in and join in the good food, fun and entertainment. rs Grill & Bar to hold rand Opening this weekend Grill and Bar in will be hosting a "Grand celebration this Friday today, Jan 24-26. There will prizes, food specials, and nnent. and Mary l:tomai invite stop in a,nd check out done with the estab- "ve renovated the Opened it up more and re window overlooking with authentic sport- old fashion tools are a against warm colored walls, Cozy, casual, atmosphere in with family and friends. from his family and built a large trickling the bar with stones area, headwaters of the in which the bar is IT Students Lnted now lie Ambulance is seeking to train for Medical Technician. ;et up as soon as these are a caring person with a ire to help others, call "-Ontact Angle Kriesel, at 320-839-3102. (Adv.) named. Headwaters is located in the for- mer Baxters Beef n' Brew location on Ortonville's Main Street. Prior to Baxters it was The Cove, which Dale wned for 16 vcars. After taking a few years off to pur- sue interests in sales and carpentry, he decided to get back into the business, this time with an emphasis on the food. Their menu includes a variety of sandwiches, burgers, steak cubes, soups and salads. Headwaters is the home of the infamous 1 lb. "Kahuna" Burger. Children are most definitely wel- come at Headwaters, where they have a special kids' menu. Plans are under way for some fun kid activities and specials in the near future. They also plan to have a regular discount night for senior citizens on Tuesdays. The Homans have a lot of ideas for different food specials and entertain- ment which they hope to implement soon. They've already started with their monthly "Murder Mystery" din- ner parties for groups of eight inquisi- tive adults. The next one is scheduled for Feb. 22. Other fun things they want to pur- sue include Mexican nights, daily happy hour specials, DJ music, karaoke, comedy acts, dinner theaters, hypnotists and magic acts. Headwaters Grill & Bar has a Sunday liquor license. They hope to start offering brunches on Sundays with both breakfast and lunch items. They offer regular take out food orders and sell off sale liquor. Dale works at Headwaters full time and Mary is there when she's not at her full time job as Coordinator of the Lac qui Parle Yellow Bank Watershed District Clean Water Partnership program. In addition, they have 12 employees who serve as cooks, bar tenders and servers. The Homans invite you to stop into Headwaters Grill and Bar this week- end and enjoy the food, fun and enter- tainment during their Grand Opening celebration. See ad elsewhere this issue for details. Schmieg, Henrich on ATC Dean's list Doug Tatge, Dean of Academic Affairs, of the Alexandria Technical College, announced on Jan. i 3, 2003, those students who have achieved at least a 3.5 Grade Point Average for fall semester. The following students were named to the Dean's List from this area: Joseph Henrich, Ortonville in the Concrete Mason program, and Blake Schmieg, Big Stone City in Machine Tool Technology. Ublic hearing on proposed confinement draws crowd 150 attended the of the Big Stone Coun- nission last Wednes- 00te! ,2oo3. te , ! be the , of renewal We 1 not be . SO $30,00 Dakota; il= t]l ,r day in Clinton regarding the proposal by Lismore Hutterite Brethren for a conditional use permit to establish a farrow to finish hog confinement feedlot, to be located at NE 1/4 Sec- tion 32 and NE 1/4, Section 33, Town- ship 13, Range 47. That location is approximately 2 miles from Big Stone Lake in Prior Township. The Lismore colony is made up of. 13 families or about 60 people. The Hutterites own 5500 acres of land in Big Stone County between two colonies, one at Lismore and the other east of Graceville. Jeff Sveen, Aberdeen SD and attorney for the Hutterite Colony, prefaced remarks in support of the proposed project by indicating that the project would be built as environmen- tally sound as possible. He said that the Hutterites were good stewards of the land, they lived on the land, and were determined to build the facility to protect the ground water, meet all state and county requirements, and use the latest in technology to safe- guard their livelihood. Clarence Hofer, spokesperson for the Hutterite Colony told the audience that the colony felt it was important to diversify to survive in agriculture at this time, and that the proposed con- finement barn was adjacent to where they lived, and that they were "not exempt from any problems. "We do not intend to ask for any decision tonight. We are here to meet with the community to hear your concerns, and are willing to make modifications to the design." The design meets all state require- ments according to Hofer. In the barn there will be no deep pits and they will be cleaned out frequently. The shallow pits will help to cut down on odor as there will be no time to devel- op the bacteria growth that causes the odor. The manure is piped to a con- crete structure and will be half in and half out of the ground, and in addition dirt will be piled up around the struc- ture so the structure will be about 3/4 buried. The manure holding structure will be designed to hold a one year supply of manure. "We want to allow for enough space so that we never over fill. We'll have room beyond the requirement," said Hofer. The structure will be covered with a non-permeable cover, with a bio-fil- ter system designed to reduce the smell even more. The manure will be pumped under- ground to an injector in the fields through a flow meter and goes direct- ly into the ground at a depth of 8 to 10 inches. According to Hofer, over fer- tilizing can be a concern, but the state regulates the amount of manure that can be spread depending on soil tests and the nutrient value of the manure. "With the knifing process, the manure is spread underground and is never exposed to the air which will (Continued on page 9) City pursues senior housing Channel 3 airs video this week Praire Grass Communities/Farr Development representative Darrel Farr was in Ortonville last week in an attempt to help proponents of elderly housing move forward. Last week, Farr inspected five potential sites, guided by Mayor Dave Dinnel. Dinnel reported to the EDA that the softball park site adjacent to Northridge appeared to be the best site meeting the criteria of the Prairie Grass proposal. The current proposal made by Prairie Grass Communities is to build a 34 unit building that would cost in the range of $2.7 to $2.8 million. The building would include 14 indepen- dent living units, 14 assisted living units and 6 memory care units. It is proposed that management of the facility would be provided by Prairie Grass for up to two years, at which time the facility would be managed by Ortonville Area Health Services. Projected monthly fees for the independent living component are $650 for a one bedroom, $850 for a two bedroom; assisted living studios would cost $1,700, and $1,900 for a one bedroom unit; the memory care unit component costs were estimated to be $2,550. Local task force mem- bers indicated that this was below the average costs of like-care facilities throughout the state. For those interested, Prairie Grass has provided a video that will be aired on Channel 3 running Sunday, Jan 19 and Wednesday, Jan 22 at 10:30 a.m., 3:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. and will air the balance of the week at 10:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. The video, according to Mayor Dinnel, will show viewers what units built by Prairie Grass in other com- munities look like and includes inter- views with residents. If the Prairie Grass proposal is accepted by the EDA and the City Council, general obligation bonds will be issued for $3 million. According to Mark Ruff of Ehlers & Associates, the City's bonding company, "General obligation bonds are the vehicles most often used by cities where the city is involved in such projects. They are regulated by the state, limited to $3 million and provide the construction project with the lowest possible inter- est rates." Public entities can usually provide for funding at a more compet- itive rate than private moneys. "In my experience," added Ruff," the key areas to watch for in posting a general obligation bond for elderly housing is to avoid building more units than can be rented, and face the facts that rents may have to be raised from time to time. There's always up's and down's in occupancy rates in this type of housing. The EDA has retained Maxfield Research Incorporated to update the market study done four years ago with more current 2000 census data. Healthcare grant fimds will be used to pay for the update and study conclu- sions should help in determining the feasibility of the project. "In addition, there's often the per- ception that because a city is involved, other revenues should sup- port the project. In short, maintaining rents below market level because the city is involved," explained Ruff. That perception can prevent the housing from making a profit, and force the city to obligate taxpayers. Cities, of course, may opt to oblig- ate taxpayers if the goal is to provide housing tbr the elderly at below or at preferred market rates, which is rarely done in the U.S., but has been the case in some European countries. As the Prairie Grass proposal is structured, the city holds the full brunt of the risk involved, tlowever, con- struction of any facility that provides health assistance usually must co- ordinate service with the local hospi- tal or health service agencies, in this case Ortonville Area ltealth Services. Ruff believes that communities that plan these sorts of projects are (Continued on page 3) BIG STONE CITY'S JUNIOR GIRL SCOUTS have begun their annual cookie sales for 2003. There are eight varieties. The girls will be taking orders for the cookies through Feb. 2. If you wish to place an order and were not contacted, please call one of the following girls: Annie Voecks 862-8149, Ashley Athey 862-8211, Melissa Grabow 862- 8273 or Hillori Gronholz 862-8644. (Adv.) Public help is sought for " dialysis equipment here To further add to the excellence of Ortonville's area health services, an effort is underway today to seek public donations to add dialysis equip- ment for area patients in need of such services. Those patients in mention are those suffering from end stage renal dis- ease (ESID) and needing kidney dialysis, who have been and are still, needing to travel over 100 miles round trip, three days a week for their treatment. To obtain the needed equipment, the Big Stone Health Care Foundation has voted to match up to a total not to exceed $100,000, contributed by the public, toward the purchase of the needed dialysis equipment, The fu, ndraising e ff, o-t  has been dubbed the Ortonville Kidney Dialysis Project... 'PROJECT. All donations are tax deductible in full. Should the City Council not authorize the Project by May of this year, all contribu. tions, with interest, will be returned to the respective donors. For complete details, see ad by the Health Care Foundation elsewhere iis issue. , J ( Check out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com } THE SEVENTH GRADE GIRLS BASKETBALL TROJANS are left to right, front row: Katy Adelman, Jenny Jacobsen, Christine Taffe, Linsdey Plathe, Caiti Barr, Paige Hansen. Back row: Morgan Simonitch, Tiffany Giese, Tabitha Henrich, Samantha Meyer, Elizabeth Meyer and Colleen McLaughlin. 7th grade girls basketball team hold 11-1 Ortonville's seventh grade girls basketball team is winding down its regular season. Playing tough defense and playing a fast break style of offense has helped the Lady Trojans record for season 7th graders to an 11-1 record. The girls have defeated teams from Morris, Wheaton, Browns Vdley, CGB, Milbank and Dawson. with the only loss coming at the hands of Hancock's 8th grade. The team travels to Dawson on Monday, Jan. 20. and plays Big Stone City on Thursday, Jan. 23 at 4:00 p.m.