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January 21, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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ta Road will be improved I land purchase pending lase of the Ottertail Land at of Big Stone Lake by the City has not yet been as the City Council voted at dar meeting last Monday to a meeting with Ottertail to trotting the City's obligations any potential pollutants. Mike Dorry made Lion on the basis of a memo- from Dave McLaughlin, City suggesting that the city re.an agreement with Otter- any costs to $20,000. estimate of costs for men- site through at least 2009 Pollution Control 'specifications.) imposed by either or MPCA, a large area of the [1 hold restrictions as to use, Ig to McLaughlin. Also the purchase the land will to protect cover from disturbance, groundwater at least until wells after abandonment City will be responsible for ting until at least 2009. suggests that if accepts the land, it should agreement that limits its costs "hated $20,000 and specifi- Ottertail to indemnify it Y future, unforeseen costs. Road resurfacing recommen- the Street Committee was by the Council. Several live along Rita Road uniformly express- n with the condition road. Budgeting concerns, dll determine in part the City to begin the resur- ation of curb and gutter. Cost estimates from Jim Shultz of Larson, Paterson and Associates for a 38 foot road were approximately $211,800.00. If the city were to do the work, cost estimates for the same size road were in the range of $144,000. (A savings estimated to be nearly $68,000) However according to Tim Scherer, Public Woks Foreman, to begin the initial grading and prepara- tion, at the current budget levels for 2003, there would be a $40,000 to $50,000 shortfall. Dinnel voiced concerns, despite favoring the project, that Governor Pawlenty's state budget might hold serious impact on city projects such as this one. "It's clear that it would be difficult to start the project this year as the budget has been set, and we really don't know how State funding to cities will impact Ortonville." Council member Lisa Berkner pointed out that normally the develop- er is responsible for installing curb and gutter, and meeting city standards for street construction. "Paying for this road is a bad precedent." In a let- ter to the Council, Roman Taffe, for- mer City Clerk/Administrator states that under the existing ordinance, clearly the cost of infrastructure for new developments and subdivisions are completely chargeable to the developer and those costs are then passed on to the land/home purchasers as part of their purchase price." The majority opinion on the Coun- cil, accepted the recommendation of the Street Committee to go ahead with improvements to Rita Road, but at 32 foot width. Council member Arndt recom- mended that if the city is willing to do the project, a proposed date for initiat- ing construction should be set, "These people deserve some commitment as to when the project will be initiated," said Arndt. In determining the city and resi- dent obligations to pay for the project, Council member, Dan Oakes explained that the 70/30 cost split, recommended by the Street Commit- tee, should be calculated as a benefits charge. The City, due to the lower costs of doing the work internally will receive full benefit of any cost sav- ings. As explained by Council Mem- ber Dan Oakes, the actual City/resi- dent split will be more nearly 57/43 depending on the true cost of com- pleting the Rita Road improvements by the City rather than by independent contractor. "The benefits charge for- mula rewards the city for cost saving measures and are often based on run- ning charge per foot costs from previ- ous projects." The motion carried with a vote of 5 in favor, 1 abstain, and 1 against. Various committee appointments were approved including the Fire Department and the reappointment of Jerry Dawald to the Civil Service Commission. The Hospital Building Committee received approval per their recom- mendation to spend an additional $4,635 on a design oversight regard- ing discharge from the sump pump from the northeast side of the new outpatient services building which potentially may cause an ice hazard into the street. The money will be used to divert the water directly into the storm sewer, and asphalt patch the road. Country Farm. Credit Services award $8,000 =n scholarships Itry Farm Credit Services Wilkin. Eight scholarships will be www.agcountry.com. 16 $500 scholarships to seniors from Minnesota who plan to enroll !cants must be from a farming or plan to pursue a or some other aspect Ire. Eight scholarships will to Minnesota residents lnties of Becker, Big Stone, Grant, Hubbard, Ottertail, Pope, Traverse, Wadena or If YOU awarded to North Dakota residents from the counties of Barnes, Cass, Dickey, LaMoure, Ransom, Richland, Sargent, Stutsman or Traill. Selection is based on academic record, personal attributes, vocational promise, leadership and financial need. The deadline for applications is April 1, 2003. Students may obtain scholarship application forms from their high school counselor, by calling any AgCountry Farm Credit Services office, or from our web site - Get Your Share of the Government's $350 Billion Our Government Gives Away Each Yearl Get FREE MONEY to start a business go to school, train Jor a new job, buy real estate, trawl the worldat government expense become a singer, dancer or adid or do ust about anything you can imagine! You'll learn how to become an insider.., work smart, not hard get what you can for nothing and get it all right NOW! CALL NOW with credit card orders: 1-800-351-4949 To order FREE MONEY TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE For only $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling. Savel Order the entire Audio Package (6 cassettes plus the 1200 pg.book) for only $59.95 plus $6,95 S & H. Order On Line at : www.lesko.cornlnewsl;] Send: checks or money orders in the amount of $35 90 or $66.90 for the auoi6 package to; Matthew Lesko, Dept NEWS13, 12081 Nebel Street, Rockville, MD 20852 RTONVILLE, HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-bPM MN PHONE (320) 839-2653 See us at the GRANT COUNTY FARM & HOME SHOW 22 & 23. Serving Taco Salads, Prime Rib Roast Beef or Pork Sandwiches and Brats! LOCALLY GROWN BEEF - Per Lb. -$2.79 QUARTERS OR SIDES ............... S 1.49 VURKEv ......... $2.99 Locally Grown Pork - Per Lb. R=(  HALF A HOG .................... LET US CATER YOUR EVENT/ • Annlversarin • Weddings • Special Gatherings Jan. 21,2003 AgCountry Farm Credit Services is a farmer-owned financial services company providing credit and inte- grated financial management services to more than 7,000 customers in southeastern North Dakota and west central Minnesota. The company, headquartered at 1749 38th Street SW in Fargo, has assets of $1 billion with more than 220 employees and 14 branch office locations. Housing (Continued from page 1) best served where there is a local hos- pital. "Maintaining the status quo in terms of a small town hospital can be as detrimental as building too many units," said Ruff. As the competition lbr health service dollars intensifies, citizens may be tempted to move away from the area in search of the full service health continuum that is designed to serve residents as they age and demand greater levels of care. Even a private developer or non- profit would most likely need the assistance of city or hospital in the form of the city providing land; and from existing health agencies in terms of guaranteeing health service costs. "Without the cooperation and inte- gration of the rest of the health care community, assisted living doesn't work," according to Mike Barr, origi- nally from Ortonville, builder of assisted living facilities in fourteen states and developer of the Ortonville Townhomes. Ruff, from Ehlers & Associates said, "Financing a project like this is the simple part. It's determining the design that's far more crucial." According to informed sources, Ortonville residents who support the concept of building assisted living in the city, should look carefully at the design to insure that all components can be profitable, to limit the risks, and guarantee the quality of care intended, keeping in mind that the current budget deficits at both state and national levels will most certainly have an impact on money available for Medicare and Medicaid packages. The primary revenue stream for both Northridge and the Ortonville hospital, as most facilities throughout the state serving a primarily elderly population is predominately funded through Medicare and Medicaid. Even with residents paying for their own care and the bulk of services in an assisted living facility, the impact of the budget deficit on the other areas of OAHS may impact the quality of care that can be provided through home health care, and other services while maintaining profit enough to pay for the facility. EDA member, Blair Johnson said, "I have no reason to believe that there is any problem with the project. Research indicates that Ortonville can support even more units, and the OAHS has a great track record in operating Northridge." Are all the proposed components absolutely necessary'? For instance, memory care units demand higher staffing levels than independent or assisted living. Memory care resi- dents need more supervision, 24 hours a day, and some take prescription drugs that must be dispensed by qual- ified personnel. Does it make sense to incorporate these services along with assisted and independent living'? Prairie Grass representatives say yes. Brant Christiansen, Prairie Grass representative suggested at the open house that combining the services under one roof would allow an indi- vidual who qualified for independent housing to provide the care necessary for their spouse suffering from loss of memory within the same building. Others have suggested that the nurs- ing home, though more expensive is more suitably staffed. It makes sense that health care can be provided more cost effectively in one building than at multiple loca- tions. Can OAHS compete with other health care facilities for adequate staff at wage levels they currently pay'? How is the competition for staff going to impact the profitability of yet another facility they manage as neigh- boring cities expand health services? Clearly, as evidenced by the first open house hosted by Prairie Grass this past December, there is a great deal of interest in building an assisted living residence in the area. Several surrounding cities already have units in place, or are planning facilities. Ken Archer, OAHS Administrator, has stated on a number of occasions the importance of providing a contin- uum of health care services for people as they age and their health needs change. Blair Johnson of the EDA Board recalls the expense and effort that went into researching assisted living options years ago. Ortonville's Task Force members have researched options, traveled to other sites, consulted with OAHS administrative staff. Ultimately, the quality of life issues for residents who have lived in and contributed to this community may be most important of all. Insur- ing that Ortonville's residents can remain in the community, maintain their friendships, keep the feeling of Dreaming 00INDEPENDENT OPEN HOUSE IN HONOR OF Vernon "Bud" and Jean Dirck's 50th wedding anniversary, on Sunday, Jan. 26th at the Marietta Legion, Marietta, from 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Program at 3 p.m. Your presence will be considered your gift. Please feel free to bring any memories to share. Questions? Call: Cindy (320)668-2326 or Deb (320)668-2130. security and well-being that comes from having caring neighbors 'next door', may have more to do with good health and long life than all the doc- tors, drugs and dollars. Prior to acceptance of the Prairie Grass Communities proposal, two public hearings will be held. One by the City Council and one by the EDA. Anyone interested in the senior hous- ing proposal may attend these meet- trigs. As of the hdependent press deadline the dates have not yet been set. Also, additional discussions will be held with David McLaughlin, City Attorney, to work out concerns he held with the Prairie Grass Communi- ties' contracts, according to Lahore Sellin, City Council member and member of the Council's ad hoc com- mitttee formed to discuss McLaugh- lin's objections. t" ......................... - ..................................................................... Senate District 20 Senator Gary Kubly serves the counties of Yellow Medicine, Renvllle, Big Stone, Lincoln, Lac qul Parle, Swift and Chippewa Please contact Senator Gary Kubly with issues and concerns. Room 306 Capitol, St. Paul, MN 55155 (651) 296-5094 sen. gary. kubly@senate, mn Wells Fargo Portfolio Management Account: Annuities, Almost CD;" IRAs, 401 k Rollovers, Mutual Funds and Brokerage Services. Big dreams. Small dreams. Wells Fargo can help you realize them. We have a full range of financial products and services to meet your needs, and we can guide your decisions to help you reach your short-term and long-term goals with products such as the Wells Fargo Portfolio Management Account and the Almost CD. And from Wells Fargo Investments, Annuities, IRAs, 401 k Rollovers, Mutual Funds, Brokerage Services and more. Wells Fargo has been helping people get to their next stage for over 150 years. Talk to a representative today at .your local Wells Fargo, visit us online at wellsfargo.com or call • 1-800-TO-WELLS. © 2003 Wells Fargo Banks. All rights reserved. Members FDtC. INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE PRODUCTS: • Are NOT insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency • Are NOT deposits of or guaranteed by the Bank or any Bank affiliate I "May 10se value Investment products and brokerage services are available through Wells Fargo Investments, LLC (member NYSE/SIPC), a non-bank affiliate dWells Fargo & Company. Page 3 ta Road will be improved I land purchase pending lase of the Ottertail Land at of Big Stone Lake by the City has not yet been as the City Council voted at dar meeting last Monday to a meeting with Ottertail to trotting the City's obligations any potential pollutants. Mike Dorry made Lion on the basis of a memo- from Dave McLaughlin, City suggesting that the city re.an agreement with Otter- any costs to $20,000. estimate of costs for men- site through at least 2009 Pollution Control 'specifications.) imposed by either or MPCA, a large area of the [1 hold restrictions as to use, Ig to McLaughlin. Also the purchase the land will to protect cover from disturbance, groundwater at least until wells after abandonment City will be responsible for ting until at least 2009. suggests that if accepts the land, it should agreement that limits its costs "hated $20,000 and specifi- Ottertail to indemnify it Y future, unforeseen costs. Road resurfacing recommen- the Street Committee was by the Council. Several live along Rita Road uniformly express- n with the condition road. Budgeting concerns, dll determine in part the City to begin the resur- ation of curb and gutter. Cost estimates from Jim Shultz of Larson, Paterson and Associates for a 38 foot road were approximately $211,800.00. If the city were to do the work, cost estimates for the same size road were in the range of $144,000. (A savings estimated to be nearly $68,000) However according to Tim Scherer, Public Woks Foreman, to begin the initial grading and prepara- tion, at the current budget levels for 2003, there would be a $40,000 to $50,000 shortfall. Dinnel voiced concerns, despite favoring the project, that Governor Pawlenty's state budget might hold serious impact on city projects such as this one. "It's clear that it would be difficult to start the project this year as the budget has been set, and we really don't know how State funding to cities will impact Ortonville." Council member Lisa Berkner pointed out that normally the develop- er is responsible for installing curb and gutter, and meeting city standards for street construction. "Paying for this road is a bad precedent." In a let- ter to the Council, Roman Taffe, for- mer City Clerk/Administrator states that under the existing ordinance, clearly the cost of infrastructure for new developments and subdivisions are completely chargeable to the developer and those costs are then passed on to the land/home purchasers as part of their purchase price." The majority opinion on the Coun- cil, accepted the recommendation of the Street Committee to go ahead with improvements to Rita Road, but at 32 foot width. Council member Arndt recom- mended that if the city is willing to do the project, a proposed date for initiat- ing construction should be set, "These people deserve some commitment as to when the project will be initiated," said Arndt. In determining the city and resi- dent obligations to pay for the project, Council member, Dan Oakes explained that the 70/30 cost split, recommended by the Street Commit- tee, should be calculated as a benefits charge. The City, due to the lower costs of doing the work internally will receive full benefit of any cost sav- ings. As explained by Council Mem- ber Dan Oakes, the actual City/resi- dent split will be more nearly 57/43 depending on the true cost of com- pleting the Rita Road improvements by the City rather than by independent contractor. "The benefits charge for- mula rewards the city for cost saving measures and are often based on run- ning charge per foot costs from previ- ous projects." The motion carried with a vote of 5 in favor, 1 abstain, and 1 against. Various committee appointments were approved including the Fire Department and the reappointment of Jerry Dawald to the Civil Service Commission. The Hospital Building Committee received approval per their recom- mendation to spend an additional $4,635 on a design oversight regard- ing discharge from the sump pump from the northeast side of the new outpatient services building which potentially may cause an ice hazard into the street. The money will be used to divert the water directly into the storm sewer, and asphalt patch the road. Country Farm. Credit Services award $8,000 =n scholarships Itry Farm Credit Services Wilkin. Eight scholarships will be www.agcountry.com. 16 $500 scholarships to seniors from Minnesota who plan to enroll !cants must be from a farming or plan to pursue a or some other aspect Ire. Eight scholarships will to Minnesota residents lnties of Becker, Big Stone, Grant, Hubbard, Ottertail, Pope, Traverse, Wadena or If YOU awarded to North Dakota residents from the counties of Barnes, Cass, Dickey, LaMoure, Ransom, Richland, Sargent, Stutsman or Traill. Selection is based on academic record, personal attributes, vocational promise, leadership and financial need. The deadline for applications is April 1, 2003. Students may obtain scholarship application forms from their high school counselor, by calling any AgCountry Farm Credit Services office, or from our web site - Get Your Share of the Government's $350 Billion Our Government Gives Away Each Yearl Get FREE MONEY to start a business go to school, train Jor a new job, buy real estate, trawl the worldat government expense become a singer, dancer or adid or do ust about anything you can imagine! You'll learn how to become an insider.., work smart, not hard get what you can for nothing and get it all right NOW! CALL NOW with credit card orders: 1-800-351-4949 To order FREE MONEY TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE For only $29.95 plus $5.95 shipping and handling. Savel Order the entire Audio Package (6 cassettes plus the 1200 pg.book) for only $59.95 plus $6,95 S & H. Order On Line at : www.lesko.cornlnewsl;] Send: checks or money orders in the amount of $35 90 or $66.90 for the auoi6 package to; Matthew Lesko, Dept NEWS13, 12081 Nebel Street, Rockville, MD 20852 RTONVILLE, HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-bPM MN PHONE (320) 839-2653 See us at the GRANT COUNTY FARM & HOME SHOW 22 & 23. Serving Taco Salads, Prime Rib Roast Beef or Pork Sandwiches and Brats! LOCALLY GROWN BEEF - Per Lb. -$2.79 QUARTERS OR SIDES ............... S 1.49 VURKEv ......... $2.99 Locally Grown Pork - Per Lb. R=(  HALF A HOG .................... LET US CATER YOUR EVENT/ • Annlversarin • Weddings • Special Gatherings Jan. 21,2003 AgCountry Farm Credit Services is a farmer-owned financial services company providing credit and inte- grated financial management services to more than 7,000 customers in southeastern North Dakota and west central Minnesota. The company, headquartered at 1749 38th Street SW in Fargo, has assets of $1 billion with more than 220 employees and 14 branch office locations. Housing (Continued from page 1) best served where there is a local hos- pital. "Maintaining the status quo in terms of a small town hospital can be as detrimental as building too many units," said Ruff. As the competition lbr health service dollars intensifies, citizens may be tempted to move away from the area in search of the full service health continuum that is designed to serve residents as they age and demand greater levels of care. Even a private developer or non- profit would most likely need the assistance of city or hospital in the form of the city providing land; and from existing health agencies in terms of guaranteeing health service costs. "Without the cooperation and inte- gration of the rest of the health care community, assisted living doesn't work," according to Mike Barr, origi- nally from Ortonville, builder of assisted living facilities in fourteen states and developer of the Ortonville Townhomes. Ruff, from Ehlers & Associates said, "Financing a project like this is the simple part. It's determining the design that's far more crucial." According to informed sources, Ortonville residents who support the concept of building assisted living in the city, should look carefully at the design to insure that all components can be profitable, to limit the risks, and guarantee the quality of care intended, keeping in mind that the current budget deficits at both state and national levels will most certainly have an impact on money available for Medicare and Medicaid packages. The primary revenue stream for both Northridge and the Ortonville hospital, as most facilities throughout the state serving a primarily elderly population is predominately funded through Medicare and Medicaid. Even with residents paying for their own care and the bulk of services in an assisted living facility, the impact of the budget deficit on the other areas of OAHS may impact the quality of care that can be provided through home health care, and other services while maintaining profit enough to pay for the facility. EDA member, Blair Johnson said, "I have no reason to believe that there is any problem with the project. Research indicates that Ortonville can support even more units, and the OAHS has a great track record in operating Northridge." Are all the proposed components absolutely necessary'? For instance, memory care units demand higher staffing levels than independent or assisted living. Memory care resi- dents need more supervision, 24 hours a day, and some take prescription drugs that must be dispensed by qual- ified personnel. Does it make sense to incorporate these services along with assisted and independent living'? Prairie Grass representatives say yes. Brant Christiansen, Prairie Grass representative suggested at the open house that combining the services under one roof would allow an indi- vidual who qualified for independent housing to provide the care necessary for their spouse suffering from loss of memory within the same building. Others have suggested that the nurs- ing home, though more expensive is more suitably staffed. It makes sense that health care can be provided more cost effectively in one building than at multiple loca- tions. Can OAHS compete with other health care facilities for adequate staff at wage levels they currently pay'? How is the competition for staff going to impact the profitability of yet another facility they manage as neigh- boring cities expand health services? Clearly, as evidenced by the first open house hosted by Prairie Grass this past December, there is a great deal of interest in building an assisted living residence in the area. Several surrounding cities already have units in place, or are planning facilities. Ken Archer, OAHS Administrator, has stated on a number of occasions the importance of providing a contin- uum of health care services for people as they age and their health needs change. Blair Johnson of the EDA Board recalls the expense and effort that went into researching assisted living options years ago. Ortonville's Task Force members have researched options, traveled to other sites, consulted with OAHS administrative staff. Ultimately, the quality of life issues for residents who have lived in and contributed to this community may be most important of all. Insur- ing that Ortonville's residents can remain in the community, maintain their friendships, keep the feeling of Dreaming 00INDEPENDENT OPEN HOUSE IN HONOR OF Vernon "Bud" and Jean Dirck's 50th wedding anniversary, on Sunday, Jan. 26th at the Marietta Legion, Marietta, from 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Program at 3 p.m. Your presence will be considered your gift. Please feel free to bring any memories to share. Questions? Call: Cindy (320)668-2326 or Deb (320)668-2130. security and well-being that comes from having caring neighbors 'next door', may have more to do with good health and long life than all the doc- tors, drugs and dollars. Prior to acceptance of the Prairie Grass Communities proposal, two public hearings will be held. One by the City Council and one by the EDA. Anyone interested in the senior hous- ing proposal may attend these meet- trigs. As of the hdependent press deadline the dates have not yet been set. Also, additional discussions will be held with David McLaughlin, City Attorney, to work out concerns he held with the Prairie Grass Communi- ties' contracts, according to Lahore Sellin, City Council member and member of the Council's ad hoc com- mitttee formed to discuss McLaugh- lin's objections. t" ......................... - ..................................................................... Senate District 20 Senator Gary Kubly serves the counties of Yellow Medicine, Renvllle, Big Stone, Lincoln, Lac qul Parle, Swift and Chippewa Please contact Senator Gary Kubly with issues and concerns. Room 306 Capitol, St. Paul, MN 55155 (651) 296-5094 sen. gary. kubly@senate, mn Wells Fargo Portfolio Management Account: Annuities, Almost CD;" IRAs, 401 k Rollovers, Mutual Funds and Brokerage Services. Big dreams. Small dreams. Wells Fargo can help you realize them. We have a full range of financial products and services to meet your needs, and we can guide your decisions to help you reach your short-term and long-term goals with products such as the Wells Fargo Portfolio Management Account and the Almost CD. And from Wells Fargo Investments, Annuities, IRAs, 401 k Rollovers, Mutual Funds, Brokerage Services and more. Wells Fargo has been helping people get to their next stage for over 150 years. Talk to a representative today at .your local Wells Fargo, visit us online at wellsfargo.com or call • 1-800-TO-WELLS. © 2003 Wells Fargo Banks. All rights reserved. Members FDtC. INVESTMENT AND INSURANCE PRODUCTS: • Are NOT insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency • Are NOT deposits of or guaranteed by the Bank or any Bank affiliate I "May 10se value Investment products and brokerage services are available through Wells Fargo Investments, LLC (member NYSE/SIPC), a non-bank affiliate dWells Fargo & Company. Page 3