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January 21, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Editorial comment i i i ,, ,, ,, I I II I II I I I GUEST EDITORIAL... Many don't have health care coverage Submitted by Kathy Oakes, Big Stone County Outreach Worker People who don't have health care coverage may find that medical bills and the cost of prescriptions can break their budget. There is help available to these families and individuals. According to 2000 census figures, Big Stone County has the potential of 1043 youth and 427 adults who might be E.ligible for Minnesota's health care programs, w aicl" include Medical Assistance, General Assistance Medical Care, MinnesotaCare and the Prescription Drug Program. Outreach workers are currently making every effort to find and enroll Minnesota residents who may be eligible for these programs. If enrolled, the state may pay all or part of these eligible residents' medical bills. Income guidelines for these services vary. MinnesotaCare services vary depending on age, income, and whether or not you are pregnant. A range of medical services are covered by MinnesotaCare, including alcohol and drug treatment, dental care, hospitalization and immunizations. Medical Assistance income and asset guidelines vary depending on the number of people in the family and whether the applicant is disabled or pregnant. For example, a family consisting of one adult and one,four-year*old child may have a current monthly income of up to $1,287 to qualify for Medical Assistance. A family of four with children ages 2-5 may earn up to $1,957 a month and still qualify. To qualify for Medical Assistance, most people are limited to cash, savings, and non-homestead property worth less than $3,000 for individuals or $6,000 for married couples or a family of two, plus $200 for each additional dependent. However, there is no asset limit for children or pregnant women. If your income is more than program limits, Medical Assistance may still pay part of your medical bills. Eligibility is determined by county financial workers after the completed application is turned in at social services offices. General Assistance Medical Care helps people who are not eligible for other state or federal assistance programs pay for medical care. A single Minnesota resident may earn up to $502 a month to qualify for GAMC. A family of four may have monthly income up to $1,030. There is also a state-sponsored prescription drug rOgram for people over 65 who have income at or low 120 percent of the federal poverty guideline and limited assets. Uninsured Minnesota residents can apply for any of these programs with a single application. To request an application, or to receive assistance filling out an application, call 1-877-294-3997 (Toll Free). PRINTING ts; ,3ur Business THE ORTON00 ILLE INDEPENDENT Clues ACROSS 1. Sour 5. Breezed through 9. Stories or tales 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 23. I 2 .'7 I Is 3 3. Japanese ancestry 4. Oceanic abysses 5. God of light 6. Women's under- Container for shipping garment Soldier, prefix 7. _ Erikson, psycho- Dole out legist Further 8. Went out with Neglect 9. One who talks too Small and round much Had a good night 10. Ancient Greek City A plant fiber used for 11. Thick piece of making rope something . 24. Small cubes with 1 to 12. Small West Indian 6 spots on the faces bird 25. A point conceded 13. An enclosure for swine 27. Establish by law or with authority 21. Torquato __, Italian poet 1544-95 32. Shoots the breeze 22. Gadic mayonnaise 36. A blue dye 26. Bullfighting ) is 19 42 48 7 8 19 54 55 54 17 70 32. Dressed 33. Fissures 34. Later 35.  off; hit the ball hard 37. Company that rings receipts 38. Metal shackles 41. More further 42. She aided Jason in taking the Golden Fleece from her father 47. Wears away 49. First in time 51. Hat with no brim or bill 52. Bhakti sect 54. Hairstyles 55. Propose 56. Suggestive of the supernatural 39. River in Florence maneuver 40. Football placement 28. Fallow deer 43. Herbaceous plant 29. Biblical name of 44. About aviation ancient Syria 45. Designed chairs 30. William __ 46. Anger playwright 48. A sign of assent, sal- 31. No No No utation, or command 50. Resist authority (slang) 53. Rented 58. Common pairing in ads 62. Defied 63. Move upward 64. Recurring only at long intervals 65. Enzyme 66. Twilights 67. About ear 68. Criterions 69. Social skill 70. Try to locate Clues DOWN I. Tennis statistics 2. Rings up 57. Slang for poor merchandise 58. Affliction 59. Amounts of time ; U.S. 60. Celebration, abbr. 61.1, abbr. 62. Insecticide ., ,i,m,lol, l,n,l,l,l,f,l , ,io m,l,l^ i, m), ,l.lol i ,l.mol.00.l.[ol . ,l'.llo). I.I.IoI, ,l,mm T-v s , , . ,),m-al, l,m , of,l, l ,o *,,I,,I, - ol'#,lol ' .I,I,I mmmmE+0000 I 'I'I ' 'l"t ram' 'I"I' ['1' ='1 'l['m '11 School lunch I Tuesday, Jan. 21 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Cinnamon Wheat Toast, Orange Juice, Milk Lunch: Fajitas, Lettuce, Cheese, Tater Tots, 4-12 Apple or Blueberry Pie, K-3 Diced Peach Sauce, Fortune Cookie, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Wednesday, Jan. 22 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Breakfast Pastry, Peach Sauce, Milk Lunch: 4-12 Bacon Cheeseburger, K-3 Cheeseburger, Pickles, French Fries, Juice Choices, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Thursday, Jan. 23 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Trix Yogurt, Cinnamon Wheat Toast. Mixed Fruit Sauce, Milk Lunch: Italian Dunking Sauce. Garlic Breadsticks, Mixed Vegetables, Applesauce, Rice Krispy Bar, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Friday, Jan. 24 No School Monday, Jan. 27 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Donut Holes, Apple Wedges, Milk Lunch: 4-12 Chickenwich, Curly Fries, Choc. Malt C., K-3 Li'l Slugger Chicken Leg, Smiley Fry, Dinner Roll, Diced Peach Sauce. OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Tuesday, Jan. 28 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Eng. Muffin, P. Butter/Jelly, Apple Sauce, Milk Lunch: Fiesta Pizza, Salsa, Black Olives, Garden Salad, Diced Pear Sauce, Ice. Cream Bar, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese IIIIII I II II II ONCE AGAIN ... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: G.O. Sandro Jim & Cindy Nelson Onalee Bruns Silas Ulrich Herb Enns Jamie Mittelstaedt Dennis Rademacher Marlys McAllister Erika Kaiser Gordon Gioege Richard Guse John Wanke Eida Von Eschen Howard Von Esehen Joel Von Eschen Harry Loesehke Isabel Tobin Aaron H. Smith Leonard Stanley Richard & Gloria Sandberg Ruth Torgerson Brian Hamann Tom Hynnek Richard Schneck Bill Busk Jim Kelly Clayton Jacobsen Allan Westermeyer Jr. Carlene Wittnebel Vernon Botker Harlan Hansen Jeffrey Hansen Letters to E//ssa by the late Reo. George P. Wern D.D. (Edi. nc, te: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who mo,,ed his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from ]gH to 194. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Mirmesota town as written to his granddaughter Ehssa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 m Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One oi his classmates m Odessa was Rev. I)r. Ihno lanssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are rom when the author was a volunteer m mission on the island (>f Sumatra. Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000. ***** "THE PARSONAGE HEATING SYSTEM" In these modern times of turning up the thermostat in the winter to make the house wanner, or turning down the air conditioning in the sum- mer to make the house cooler, it is difficult to imagine the complicated system of heating employed by us "pioneers" in Minnesota in the early days of this century. Our Odessa parsonage, which was adjacent to the church, was as mod- ern as most homes in rural areas of the midwest. Of course we had no running water, unless you consider my running out to the pump behind the house, pail in my hand, "running water." Of course we had no refrigerator, unless you consider that "dumb wait- er" we let down from the kitchen into a hole in the basement, a kind of refrigeration. (One day the handle slipped out of my hand and that box fell into its depression in the base- ment floor with a resounding crash that shook up the dishes like a major earthquake.) It seemed I did many dumb things like that in my youth and still do today. Central heating, what was thai? In a sense one might say that we did have central heating. The furnace in the basement had one outlet, a large opening to the floor above which was positioned midway between the liv- ing room and the dining room and near the stairs that led to the second floor. (Very little heat escaped to the second floor.) In those technology deprived early times we learned "to make do" with what we had. So Dad and I would crank up the old Model T Ford and drive to the Sitter farm about five miles north of town. As I recall we had no trailer so we used that old car as a truck or for whatever. Every farmer planted a grove near his farm house, to break the blast of winter winds, to use for firewood, to beautify the barren landscape of the high plains. In the Sitter grove was much dead wood which this generous member of our Evangelical Church offered Dad as a contribution to the church. Naturally I was enlisted as partner in this wood harvesting scheme so each summer and fall we "laid to" with axe and saw. It was no fun. It was work cutting those dead tree limbs into sections we could lay in the back scat of the car. (No trunks in the back of the car in those days.) No power tools could lighten the tedium of sawing and cutting enough fire- wood for a voracious furnace that had to spew forth warm air from September through April and even into May. And it was not just one trip we made.each season to the Sitter farm. Load after seemingly endless load we piled into that little car and chugged back to that woodpile beside our garage/barn. But after we had cut the wood, loaded it into the car and piled it in the back yard, our work was only half done. Now we had to cut it into lengths that would fit into the fur- nace, a formidable task considering how much that old insatiable monster could consume in the course of those long frigid Minnesota winters. So from time to time throughout the winter, Dad and I would repair to the much used chopping block and there, with axe blade or cross cut saw, lay waste that diminishing pile of wood. The smaller pieces we cut with sharp blows of the axe, wood flying into the air as the blade cut deep and sure. The larger pieces demanded that heavy cross cut saw with the wood secured in a cradle for the saw- ing. With one loot on the piece of wood, held about waist high, the right arm drew that saw blade back and forth, back and forth, until finally, one section fell to the ground. Then the wood was moved into position for the next round of sawing, sweating (if it was in the fall) and freezing hands if it was in the winter. There was no surcease, no vacation, no respite from this ongoing ritual of fall, winter and early spring. We were survivors. ..... (eoniinutd next vek)- - The Ortonvil Independer (U.S.P.S. 412-46 JAMES D. KAERC PublisherManaging SUZE'I'TE KAERCHER Editor and Advertising I ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTI Computer and Composition EMILEE OKESOI Compositor/Recepti ARDIE ECKARD' Reporter/Photo BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM Camera NANCY Collater PHIL BLAKE Leayeout Tues., Jan. 21, 2003 Vol. Continuing the ORTONVILLE Published Every Tuesday at 29 ' Ortonville, MN Periodicals Postage SUBSC$ $30.00per year in Big Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. $34.00 ;ounties in Minnesota and All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, Minnesota RATE ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS A FEBRUARY IST Blg Stone, Lac qul Swlft Countles In Grant and Roberts In February ........... 30,00 March ................ 27,50 Apdl .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHEFI$ February ........... 34.00 AuguSt March ................ 31.24 Apnl .................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AND SO. DAK. February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 2%36 ,.. July ................... 22.19 ;i .."IUBLI.I4ER'S LIABILI"Pf F The Publisher shall not be li ,. changes or typographical not lessen the value of an a The Publishe=:'s liability for ot a omissions in connection wit v tisement is strictly limited to [ g the advertisement in any A issue or the refund of any m( ;n the advertisement. DEADLINES ni Church notes- Saturday m o Display ads - Fridaymail Jg. Correspondence - Monday :ti v Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday K - News - Friday affemoon PY, Classified ads - Friday nool a3d, (Any ad brought in later will Illar to classify.) = OFFICE HOUR9 A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM , " Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOn ;r A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON g A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM Holidays may affect office_ s LETTERS POLl(; 'q Letters to the editor disc 0 munity issues are encoure writers should be aware f Independent reserves the and/or condense letters fo paper also reserves the rigl lish letters that are unsuitabl( it might be held legally liable, a Letters should contain :1, printed or typed name, a. address and telephone Addresses and telephone R I( not be published, ta Letter writers are asked selves o one letter per rnd 'ill keep letter brief, perferably (t words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independ ck determining what is advertisl n is news is based on one si If an individual business zation charges for admission wi for an item or for a service, it id sidered advertising. In oe [n you charge, we charge." Advertising is the lile-blOO paper. Without it a new@ cease to exist. The men( a receives for subscriptions paper sales is used to pay f paper used in producing no longer does so because ' a Increases. It still covers th n t h h and a small portion of the P Advertising to a newsP +++ crops and livestock to farm products to the grocer" dr and underwear to the soft-li and plows and tractors to fit dealer. Without any of thoS particular business would n hess. ADS: We reserve the right tO advertising without obligat our decision. . il " POLICIES:  A News: Our goal is to report[ fully .and accurately as P CLIFFORD AND DORIS HOLTZ of Brainerd recently celebrated staff's opinions will appeer 1 opinion page. di their 50th wedding anniversary privately with their family. They  Editorials: Opinions pull were married Nov. 29, 1952, in Brainerd, page, whether locally writt_e0,ai from other sources s inteni> late thinking and discussiOPa' . ' readers. Opin'ons,, exprosse0 Comfortable Reading tor are her own and not neo of other staff membOr "Newspapers come into your home, almost like part of your family. You expressed in items from tions may be contradictory ! greet them in your bathrobe, carry them into your bresid'ast room, lounge  own views, but are offered oral interest. with them in the den. They may be the only companions you actually take' Phone 329-839-6165, with you into the bathroom." sifted advertising - ASNE Bulletin, a publication produced by managing editors;,, Ortonvllle839-3761 to IndependPlace disl:l meil@o Tuesday, Jan, Page 4 INDEPENDENT Editorial comment i i i ,, ,, ,, I I II I II I I I GUEST EDITORIAL... Many don't have health care coverage Submitted by Kathy Oakes, Big Stone County Outreach Worker People who don't have health care coverage may find that medical bills and the cost of prescriptions can break their budget. There is help available to these families and individuals. According to 2000 census figures, Big Stone County has the potential of 1043 youth and 427 adults who might be E.ligible for Minnesota's health care programs, w aicl" include Medical Assistance, General Assistance Medical Care, MinnesotaCare and the Prescription Drug Program. Outreach workers are currently making every effort to find and enroll Minnesota residents who may be eligible for these programs. If enrolled, the state may pay all or part of these eligible residents' medical bills. Income guidelines for these services vary. MinnesotaCare services vary depending on age, income, and whether or not you are pregnant. A range of medical services are covered by MinnesotaCare, including alcohol and drug treatment, dental care, hospitalization and immunizations. Medical Assistance income and asset guidelines vary depending on the number of people in the family and whether the applicant is disabled or pregnant. For example, a family consisting of one adult and one,four-year*old child may have a current monthly income of up to $1,287 to qualify for Medical Assistance. A family of four with children ages 2-5 may earn up to $1,957 a month and still qualify. To qualify for Medical Assistance, most people are limited to cash, savings, and non-homestead property worth less than $3,000 for individuals or $6,000 for married couples or a family of two, plus $200 for each additional dependent. However, there is no asset limit for children or pregnant women. If your income is more than program limits, Medical Assistance may still pay part of your medical bills. Eligibility is determined by county financial workers after the completed application is turned in at social services offices. General Assistance Medical Care helps people who are not eligible for other state or federal assistance programs pay for medical care. A single Minnesota resident may earn up to $502 a month to qualify for GAMC. A family of four may have monthly income up to $1,030. There is also a state-sponsored prescription drug rOgram for people over 65 who have income at or low 120 percent of the federal poverty guideline and limited assets. Uninsured Minnesota residents can apply for any of these programs with a single application. To request an application, or to receive assistance filling out an application, call 1-877-294-3997 (Toll Free). PRINTING ts; ,3ur Business THE ORTON00 ILLE INDEPENDENT Clues ACROSS 1. Sour 5. Breezed through 9. Stories or tales 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 23. I 2 .'7 I Is 3 3. Japanese ancestry 4. Oceanic abysses 5. God of light 6. Women's under- Container for shipping garment Soldier, prefix 7. _ Erikson, psycho- Dole out legist Further 8. Went out with Neglect 9. One who talks too Small and round much Had a good night 10. Ancient Greek City A plant fiber used for 11. Thick piece of making rope something . 24. Small cubes with 1 to 12. Small West Indian 6 spots on the faces bird 25. A point conceded 13. An enclosure for swine 27. Establish by law or with authority 21. Torquato __, Italian poet 1544-95 32. Shoots the breeze 22. Gadic mayonnaise 36. A blue dye 26. Bullfighting ) is 19 42 48 7 8 19 54 55 54 17 70 32. Dressed 33. Fissures 34. Later 35.  off; hit the ball hard 37. Company that rings receipts 38. Metal shackles 41. More further 42. She aided Jason in taking the Golden Fleece from her father 47. Wears away 49. First in time 51. Hat with no brim or bill 52. Bhakti sect 54. Hairstyles 55. Propose 56. Suggestive of the supernatural 39. River in Florence maneuver 40. Football placement 28. Fallow deer 43. Herbaceous plant 29. Biblical name of 44. About aviation ancient Syria 45. Designed chairs 30. William __ 46. Anger playwright 48. A sign of assent, sal- 31. No No No utation, or command 50. Resist authority (slang) 53. Rented 58. Common pairing in ads 62. Defied 63. Move upward 64. Recurring only at long intervals 65. Enzyme 66. Twilights 67. About ear 68. Criterions 69. Social skill 70. Try to locate Clues DOWN I. Tennis statistics 2. Rings up 57. Slang for poor merchandise 58. Affliction 59. Amounts of time ; U.S. 60. Celebration, abbr. 61.1, abbr. 62. Insecticide ., ,i,m,lol, l,n,l,l,l,f,l , ,io m,l,l^ i, m), ,l.lol i ,l.mol.00.l.[ol . ,l'.llo). I.I.IoI, ,l,mm T-v s , , . ,),m-al, l,m , of,l, l ,o *,,I,,I, - ol'#,lol ' .I,I,I mmmmE+0000 I 'I'I ' 'l"t ram' 'I"I' ['1' ='1 'l['m '11 School lunch I Tuesday, Jan. 21 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Cinnamon Wheat Toast, Orange Juice, Milk Lunch: Fajitas, Lettuce, Cheese, Tater Tots, 4-12 Apple or Blueberry Pie, K-3 Diced Peach Sauce, Fortune Cookie, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Wednesday, Jan. 22 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Breakfast Pastry, Peach Sauce, Milk Lunch: 4-12 Bacon Cheeseburger, K-3 Cheeseburger, Pickles, French Fries, Juice Choices, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Thursday, Jan. 23 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Trix Yogurt, Cinnamon Wheat Toast. Mixed Fruit Sauce, Milk Lunch: Italian Dunking Sauce. Garlic Breadsticks, Mixed Vegetables, Applesauce, Rice Krispy Bar, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Friday, Jan. 24 No School Monday, Jan. 27 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Donut Holes, Apple Wedges, Milk Lunch: 4-12 Chickenwich, Curly Fries, Choc. Malt C., K-3 Li'l Slugger Chicken Leg, Smiley Fry, Dinner Roll, Diced Peach Sauce. OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese Tuesday, Jan. 28 Breakfast: Cereal Choices OR Eng. Muffin, P. Butter/Jelly, Apple Sauce, Milk Lunch: Fiesta Pizza, Salsa, Black Olives, Garden Salad, Diced Pear Sauce, Ice. Cream Bar, OPTIONAL CHOICE 4-12: Baked Potato/Meat/Cheese IIIIII I II II II ONCE AGAIN ... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: G.O. Sandro Jim & Cindy Nelson Onalee Bruns Silas Ulrich Herb Enns Jamie Mittelstaedt Dennis Rademacher Marlys McAllister Erika Kaiser Gordon Gioege Richard Guse John Wanke Eida Von Eschen Howard Von Esehen Joel Von Eschen Harry Loesehke Isabel Tobin Aaron H. Smith Leonard Stanley Richard & Gloria Sandberg Ruth Torgerson Brian Hamann Tom Hynnek Richard Schneck Bill Busk Jim Kelly Clayton Jacobsen Allan Westermeyer Jr. Carlene Wittnebel Vernon Botker Harlan Hansen Jeffrey Hansen Letters to E//ssa by the late Reo. George P. Wern D.D. (Edi. nc, te: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who mo,,ed his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from ]gH to 194. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Mirmesota town as written to his granddaughter Ehssa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 m Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One oi his classmates m Odessa was Rev. I)r. Ihno lanssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are rom when the author was a volunteer m mission on the island (>f Sumatra. Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000. ***** "THE PARSONAGE HEATING SYSTEM" In these modern times of turning up the thermostat in the winter to make the house wanner, or turning down the air conditioning in the sum- mer to make the house cooler, it is difficult to imagine the complicated system of heating employed by us "pioneers" in Minnesota in the early days of this century. Our Odessa parsonage, which was adjacent to the church, was as mod- ern as most homes in rural areas of the midwest. Of course we had no running water, unless you consider my running out to the pump behind the house, pail in my hand, "running water." Of course we had no refrigerator, unless you consider that "dumb wait- er" we let down from the kitchen into a hole in the basement, a kind of refrigeration. (One day the handle slipped out of my hand and that box fell into its depression in the base- ment floor with a resounding crash that shook up the dishes like a major earthquake.) It seemed I did many dumb things like that in my youth and still do today. Central heating, what was thai? In a sense one might say that we did have central heating. The furnace in the basement had one outlet, a large opening to the floor above which was positioned midway between the liv- ing room and the dining room and near the stairs that led to the second floor. (Very little heat escaped to the second floor.) In those technology deprived early times we learned "to make do" with what we had. So Dad and I would crank up the old Model T Ford and drive to the Sitter farm about five miles north of town. As I recall we had no trailer so we used that old car as a truck or for whatever. Every farmer planted a grove near his farm house, to break the blast of winter winds, to use for firewood, to beautify the barren landscape of the high plains. In the Sitter grove was much dead wood which this generous member of our Evangelical Church offered Dad as a contribution to the church. Naturally I was enlisted as partner in this wood harvesting scheme so each summer and fall we "laid to" with axe and saw. It was no fun. It was work cutting those dead tree limbs into sections we could lay in the back scat of the car. (No trunks in the back of the car in those days.) No power tools could lighten the tedium of sawing and cutting enough fire- wood for a voracious furnace that had to spew forth warm air from September through April and even into May. And it was not just one trip we made.each season to the Sitter farm. Load after seemingly endless load we piled into that little car and chugged back to that woodpile beside our garage/barn. But after we had cut the wood, loaded it into the car and piled it in the back yard, our work was only half done. Now we had to cut it into lengths that would fit into the fur- nace, a formidable task considering how much that old insatiable monster could consume in the course of those long frigid Minnesota winters. So from time to time throughout the winter, Dad and I would repair to the much used chopping block and there, with axe blade or cross cut saw, lay waste that diminishing pile of wood. The smaller pieces we cut with sharp blows of the axe, wood flying into the air as the blade cut deep and sure. The larger pieces demanded that heavy cross cut saw with the wood secured in a cradle for the saw- ing. With one loot on the piece of wood, held about waist high, the right arm drew that saw blade back and forth, back and forth, until finally, one section fell to the ground. Then the wood was moved into position for the next round of sawing, sweating (if it was in the fall) and freezing hands if it was in the winter. There was no surcease, no vacation, no respite from this ongoing ritual of fall, winter and early spring. We were survivors. ..... (eoniinutd next vek)- - The Ortonvil Independer (U.S.P.S. 412-46 JAMES D. KAERC PublisherManaging SUZE'I'TE KAERCHER Editor and Advertising I ARLENE WIESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTI Computer and Composition EMILEE OKESOI Compositor/Recepti ARDIE ECKARD' Reporter/Photo BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM Camera NANCY Collater PHIL BLAKE Leayeout Tues., Jan. 21, 2003 Vol. Continuing the ORTONVILLE Published Every Tuesday at 29 ' Ortonville, MN Periodicals Postage SUBSC$ $30.00per year in Big Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. $34.00 ;ounties in Minnesota and All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, Minnesota RATE ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS A FEBRUARY IST Blg Stone, Lac qul Swlft Countles In Grant and Roberts In February ........... 30,00 March ................ 27,50 Apdl .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHEFI$ February ........... 34.00 AuguSt March ................ 31.24 Apnl .................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AND SO. DAK. February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 2%36 ,.. July ................... 22.19 ;i .."IUBLI.I4ER'S LIABILI"Pf F The Publisher shall not be li ,. changes or typographical not lessen the value of an a The Publishe=:'s liability for ot a omissions in connection wit v tisement is strictly limited to [ g the advertisement in any A issue or the refund of any m( ;n the advertisement. DEADLINES ni Church notes- Saturday m o Display ads - Fridaymail Jg. Correspondence - Monday :ti v Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday K - News - Friday affemoon PY, Classified ads - Friday nool a3d, (Any ad brought in later will Illar to classify.) = OFFICE HOUR9 A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM , " Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOn ;r A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON g A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM Holidays may affect office_ s LETTERS POLl(; 'q Letters to the editor disc 0 munity issues are encoure writers should be aware f Independent reserves the and/or condense letters fo paper also reserves the rigl lish letters that are unsuitabl( it might be held legally liable, a Letters should contain :1, printed or typed name, a. address and telephone Addresses and telephone R I( not be published, ta Letter writers are asked selves o one letter per rnd 'ill keep letter brief, perferably (t words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independ ck determining what is advertisl n is news is based on one si If an individual business zation charges for admission wi for an item or for a service, it id sidered advertising. In oe [n you charge, we charge." Advertising is the lile-blOO paper. Without it a new@ cease to exist. The men( a receives for subscriptions paper sales is used to pay f paper used in producing no longer does so because ' a Increases. It still covers th n t h h and a small portion of the P Advertising to a newsP +++ crops and livestock to farm products to the grocer" dr and underwear to the soft-li and plows and tractors to fit dealer. Without any of thoS particular business would n hess. ADS: We reserve the right tO advertising without obligat our decision. . il " POLICIES:  A News: Our goal is to report[ fully .and accurately as P CLIFFORD AND DORIS HOLTZ of Brainerd recently celebrated staff's opinions will appeer 1 opinion page. di their 50th wedding anniversary privately with their family. They  Editorials: Opinions pull were married Nov. 29, 1952, in Brainerd, page, whether locally writt_e0,ai from other sources s inteni> late thinking and discussiOPa' . ' readers. Opin'ons,, exprosse0 Comfortable Reading tor are her own and not neo of other staff membOr "Newspapers come into your home, almost like part of your family. You expressed in items from tions may be contradictory ! greet them in your bathrobe, carry them into your bresid'ast room, lounge  own views, but are offered oral interest. with them in the den. They may be the only companions you actually take' Phone 329-839-6165, with you into the bathroom." sifted advertising - ASNE Bulletin, a publication produced by managing editors;,, Ortonvllle839-3761 to IndependPlace disl:l meil@o Tuesday, Jan, Page 4 INDEPENDENT