Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
January 21, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 14     (14 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 14     (14 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
January 21, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




,A.00ma news digest I I MADISON-Thomas Smittle, 53, of Madison pled guilty to terroristic threats in District Court. The court accepted the plea and imposed a sentence as a gross misdemeanor. There was a stay of imposition for two years probation under the following conditions: serve 30 days in jail, pay fine, fees and surcharges of $670, sign and obey probation agreement, obey all laws and participate in a chemical use assessment and follow recommendations abstaining from the possession and use of alcohol and drugs, submit random testing at his cost, submit a written apology to the victim through 6W Corrections and no contact with the victim, his family or property. He is also to complete a psychological evaluation and follow recommendations. The sentence resulted from an incident Aug. 11 when the LqP County Sheriff Office received a call about Smittle having a gun and threatened to use it on Vince Toutges of Marietta. ROSHOLT, SD-Windows rattled miles away when an explosion at the Tri-State Ethanol plant blew the tops off of three tanks and blew out a portion of the north wall. It was reportedly heard as far away as New Effington. Fortunately, no one was seriously injured. The explosion occurred on New Year's Eve as two welders from North Central ConStruction (NCC) were welding pipes as part of the plant's transition from propane to natural gas. The welding set off an explosion in one tank shortly before 3 p.m and seconds later, explosions were set off in two other tanks. Although there were no apparent injuries, approximately six people were transported to the Wheaton Community Hospital for observation. A welder also drove himself to the hospital. All operations at the plant have been shut down for an indeterminate time. MARIETTA-A group of concerned citizens from Marietta met with the Lac qui Parle County Board of Commissioners at their first meeting for 2003, held on Tuesday, Jan. 7. The members of the group included Marlene Iverson and her son Charles, Rosie Taylor and Glenda How611. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance in the proposed formation of a night watch program in Marietta. Iverson said the group feels there has been a rise in vandalism in Marietta and the intent of the night watch program would be to make the members of the community feel more secure. She noted there is a large elderly population in Marietta. The proposal would be to have evening watch people in place on Friday and Saturday evenings for a two-hour period. No action was taken on the night watch proposal by the commissioners. Big Stone City I Gall Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 Sis Torgerson spent the week-end of Jan. 10th in LittleCanada-St. Paul. Sis visited her daughter Janet Kaufenberg and they went to Janet's daughter's wedding at a Catholic Church in St. Paul. Kevin and Dawn Raymond and Kenny and Katie also attended. Arvin and Jennifer Mueller, Evelyn, Robert, Betty, and Megan Zahnow enjoyed Sunday dinner, Jan. 19th at the Robert Carlson's to help Bob Carlson and Betty Zahnow observe their January birthdays. Adeline Overberg spent Christmas with her daughter Sharon Johnson and husband Larry and daughter Angle Ford in Kennewick, WA. Adeline got acquainted with her new great- grandson Hunter Ford born April 13, 2002. He was nine months old. His great-grandparents from Tennessee were also there. Adeline returned home on the 9th of January after spending three weeks in Kennewick. Delores Bengtson on Saturday, Jan. 1 lth to help her celebrate her birthday had her daughters as guests Cindy Bublitz and Zachary, daughter Sharon Weiber and Sharon's granddaughter Stephanie Optiz, and Delores' daughter Bonnie Swezey and Bonnie's daughter Amanda, and Delores' granddaughter Christie Ward and children. They had dinner together at Delores' home in Big Stone. Delores' birthday was Jan. 8th. Joe and Cindy Angerhofer of Brookings were Wednesday, Jan. 15th overnight guests at the Arlin and Verna Angerhofer's home. Thursday afternoon, Jan. 16th they all attended the funeral of Harold Angerhofer at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in rural Milbank. Ruth Torgerson is the great- grandmother of a baby boy born to Terry and Becky Jenniges of Wabasso, (down by Redwood Falls) on Wednesday, Jan. 15th. It weighed about 7 I/2 pounds. The baby joins a sister Makayla Jo at home. On Thursday afternoon, Jan. 16th Mrs. Elaine Stolpman of near Rosen and her sister Joanne Berndt of Big Stone visited Sally Roggenbuck of Northridge. Also on Thursday afternoon Kathy Oakes of Ononville visited Sally Roggenbuck. On Thursday evening, Jan. 16th the Holy Family Catholic Aid held their meeting at the Conference Room in Northridge. On Thursday morning, Jan. 16th Sally Roggenbuck attended the Bowl of Love held at St. John's Catholic Church. They recycled used greeting cards, attended Mass at I 1:00, and had a potluck dinner after Mass in the church basement. On Friday, Jan. 10th a monthly birthday party was held at Northridge. The Melody Kings entertained. Find a honey of a deal in the 00mnm See Us At The Farm & Home Show Wednesday, Jan. 22 & Thursday, Jan. 23 MIDCONTINENT CABINETE Solid Value, Lasting Beauty TM 00NdOon00wnt" C A  I N" E T R Y It's time to brighten up your kitchen with brand new cabinets and surfaces! Planning a New Home or Addition? " See Gavin For Plans & Estimates Do you recall opting for the hammered bronze faucets instead of Andersen windows? It's easy to be tempted by extra agance. A much wiser dect,on ould be to install Andersen windows. High-Performance rM Lov,-E2 glass insulates better than standard dual-pane glass, keeping armth reside and cold outside, /:,,.,,_. That means lower energy bdls. and /A)n wh ..... Idn'l love that? Opt for real /f luxury - energy-effilem Andersen ; indt}ws. Worryproof. TimeprooL Andersen Windows.@ See )or imletmndemly o,,d ad ope a cd Ar de n dcal fo ear bruited  an.m,y lhll *'Anderetv' na UI AW logo Are regll- tered radmks of lder,, n ColpOr.,uon 2nf,) ,\\;H nghl retvcd ADHIlO4A Inc. ,4878 Enjoying retirement Submitted by B.S. County Local Advisory Council on Children's and Adult Mental Health. Paraphrased from Allina Hospitals and clinics Behavioral Health Facts "Young at Heart-Enjoying Your Golden Years." Retirement can be really something to look forward to. The average length of time for retirement is 14 to 16 years. Some people live 20 years or longer. Research says the secret of a long life is exercise, a good diet, not worry but a positive outlook, spiritually active, socially active, intellectually active, manage stress, know how to work, no drugs, moderate in drinking, don't think old and have order in their lives. Eat right without to much salt, sugar, and fat. Eat fruit, vegetables, complex carbohydrates, fiber, and low fat dairy products. An easy and safe form of exercise is walking. When the weather is not good walk inside. Your social life should be good. In retirement you have the time to cultivate friendships. In retirement you will have time to develop talents and skills you never had time for. You can try painting or writing in a journal. Forget about failure. Select things that bring happiness just trying. Another area you have experience and skills to offer is in volunteering. One can volunteer at church, school, hospital, etc. Occasionally some people have a hard time with retirement. Professional help may be needed if you are depressed, trouble adjusting to the loss of a loved one, no friends, or can't find things to do. Professional help may be just what may be needed to put the spark in retirement. If you have any questions call Family Social Services at 839-2555. Annual Bowl for Hospice set Feb. 22nd The 20th Annual Bowl for Hospice will be held Saturday, Feb. 22, 2003, in six locations: Benson Bowl in Benson from 9 AM until noon, Dawson Bowling in Dawson from 9 AM until noon, New London Bowl in New London from 8 AM until 3 PM, the Kandi Bowl in Willmar, from noon until 5 PM. Koronis Lanes in Paynesville and the Mel'ody Lanes in Montevideo from noon until 3 PM. In 2002, over $32,000.00 was raised in one day to benefit the hospice program. ...... All'funds raied are Used fo" ditec,t patient care to supplement care and services not covered by third party payers, such as insurance. Pledges raised will remain in the local Rice Hospice service areas of Appleton, Benson, Dawson, Granite Falls, Montevideo, Ortonville/ Graceville, Paynesville and Willmar. League bowlers, businesses, youth groups and everyone is encouraged to bowl or just collect pledges and turn them in the day of the Bowl for Hospice. Interested bowlers and nonbowlers may pick up pledge forms from your local Rice Hospice Office, K95/KDJS radio station in Willmar (You may also send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to K95/KDJS, P.O. BOX 380, Willmar, MN 56201 and they will send you a Pledge Form). The Benson Bowl, Dawson Bowl, New London Bowl, Koronis Lanes in Paynesville, Mel'ody Lanes in Montevideo, Kandi Bowl in Willmar, Bremer Bank-Downtown Willmar, US Bank-Willmar and the United Prairie Bank in Spicer will also have Pledge Forms. Call 320-231-1600, or 320-231- 4695 for more information : r TUPPERWARE Bridal Shower & Registry 1 In Home Parties (Other locations available) Hostess Gift Specials | Fundraisers - (s0o/,, donated) 1 Career Opportunity Lifetime Guarantee | %: Monthly Specials ii!ii!ii Call 800-939-5105 or 328-839-3454 "j Ask for Lany .... Basement Problems Solved 1. Leaky Basements Made Dry (No digging up yard) 2. Buckling Walls Straightened 3. Crumbling Walls Restored Over 35 Years of Service Proven Systems www.dryupbasement.com ! -800-348-6247 CL#20037736 Proposed changes in school imm= adds chicken pox, pneumococcal Minnesota children attending school or child care would need to show proof they are vaccinated against chickenpox, and children under two in child care would need to show proof they are immunized against pneumococcal disease, under changes to immunization require- ments being proposed by the Minnesota Department of Health. Parents who choose not to have their child immunized need to show proof they have chosen to decline the new immunizations. The department published a notice of hearing to adopt the rules in the Dec. 30 State Register. The depart- ment will hold a hearing before an administrative, law judge at 9 a.m on Friday, Feb. 28, in the Mississippi Room, at the Snelling Office Park building, 1645 Energy Park Drive, St. Paul. Following the hearing, the judge will set a period for taking written comments, ranging from about two weeks to a month. The judge will then recommend whether the department should adopt the rules. If approved, the changes would not take effect until the 2004- 2005 school year. Before beginning this formal process, MDH held two public meet- ings in July and September and a statewide videoconference in August to discuss the proposed changes with ,Minnesota residents. Based on the meetings, comments received, and a review of current scientific research, MDH developed the new immuniza- tion requirements. Under a process set up by the Minnesota Legislature in 2001, the Commissioner of Health may change the immunization requirements by adopting new state rules rather than amending the state school immuniza- tion law. "This process was designed to allow enough flexibility to ensure that school immunization require- ments be kept up to date with current scientific research medical practice standards, and vaccine developments, while ensuring that the public has opportunity to provide input," said Kristen Ehresmann, who heads the Immunization Tuberculosis and International Health Section at MDH. "In this way, we can all do a better job of protecting our children against vac- cine-preventable diseases." Besides making some adjustments to the current immunization schedule, the proposed changes also include a couple of new vaccinations. Under the proposed rules, proof of chickenpox vaccinations would be required for children in child care, kindergarten and seventh grade. Children under two years old in child care also would need to show proof they are immu- nized against pneumococcal disease. Both of these new immunization requirements are supported and rec- ommended by major national medical groups, including the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP), and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AFP). Thirty-eight states already have school laws requiring chickenpox vaccine. The proposed changes do not change the medical exemption or the option for parents to decline any or all vaccines for conscientious reasons. In fact, the proposed rules include a pro- vision that requires all child care facil- ities and elementary/secondary schools to use the official MDH record form or a similar document approved by MDH. This is in response to concerns from parents and others that the information schools and child care facilities send out does not always follow the law and does not always include information about the legal exemptions. Schools and child care facilities already check for vaccination cover- age. These two new vaccines would be added to the existing list. MDH is working with large school districts to identify ways to include these new requirements without significantly increasing the time schools spend on checking and helping students stay up to date with immunization require- ments. "Parents, MDH and local pub- lic health agencies, health care providers and schools are all critical partners in helping children stay up to date with their immunizations, Ehresmann said. We all need to work together to make these new require- ments effective." In the five years before use of the varicella vaccine began, approximate- ly four million cases of chickenpox occurred every year in the U.S., resulting in an average of 11,000 hos- pitalizations annually and 1130 deaths. More than 80 percent of the cases and 40 percent of the deaths were in chil- dren. One of the most im of varicella vaccination is to prevent severe varicella its complications, such as encephalitis and a streptococcal infection. complications are not vet we do see them every small number of people complications become si and even die. We should not such complications in this Ehresmann said. The pneumococcal tects against a type cause blood infections and meningitis, as well as Recently, the increase in resistant strains of pneumonia has made ease more difficult, thus severe illness. The helped reduce rates of tant infections. "Many serious diseases ca vented, or their severity reduced by Ehresmann said. This only most of the people in vaccinated. Immunization ments result in high levels nization coverage, schools ease, and healthy ,, nities for all Minnesotans. tion, effective grams produce substantial the state by reducing the children who need state tance and special programs ness, deafness, mental and congenital heart defects. Thanks to the success of tion programs, hood diseases, such as mumps, are no longer United States. Other preve eases, such as diphtheria, virtually eliminated throu tion. More information about posed immunization rules, ing, and statement ableness is available by 676-5414, 1-877-676-541,1, 215-8980 (TTY). may also visit the MDH s/immrule.htm - or contact e-mail Check out our web site at ww' Come In and See Us At Our Booth At The 2003 Grant County Farm & Home Show Wednesday, Jan. 22 & Thursday, Jan. lq Let Our Representatives Show You How You ', 0t Can Save On Your l.,r|dl... % lit Energy Bills with i ..... to win a . Dual P'uel & new electric Demand Controllers ,.. J __ We can also help you make your home more " =- comfortable and more luxurious with simple,  t --- .... :==--v= == .... i Cared n -v: affordable comfort technologies like rod,ant o itii:;/li!ili I floor heat to warm a chilly bathroom or an .e electric fireplace to cozy up your den. II Ill I I ill I IIII II Power Company Page 2b ai INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jag, ,A.00ma news digest I I MADISON-Thomas Smittle, 53, of Madison pled guilty to terroristic threats in District Court. The court accepted the plea and imposed a sentence as a gross misdemeanor. There was a stay of imposition for two years probation under the following conditions: serve 30 days in jail, pay fine, fees and surcharges of $670, sign and obey probation agreement, obey all laws and participate in a chemical use assessment and follow recommendations abstaining from the possession and use of alcohol and drugs, submit random testing at his cost, submit a written apology to the victim through 6W Corrections and no contact with the victim, his family or property. He is also to complete a psychological evaluation and follow recommendations. The sentence resulted from an incident Aug. 11 when the LqP County Sheriff Office received a call about Smittle having a gun and threatened to use it on Vince Toutges of Marietta. ROSHOLT, SD-Windows rattled miles away when an explosion at the Tri-State Ethanol plant blew the tops off of three tanks and blew out a portion of the north wall. It was reportedly heard as far away as New Effington. Fortunately, no one was seriously injured. The explosion occurred on New Year's Eve as two welders from North Central ConStruction (NCC) were welding pipes as part of the plant's transition from propane to natural gas. The welding set off an explosion in one tank shortly before 3 p.m and seconds later, explosions were set off in two other tanks. Although there were no apparent injuries, approximately six people were transported to the Wheaton Community Hospital for observation. A welder also drove himself to the hospital. All operations at the plant have been shut down for an indeterminate time. MARIETTA-A group of concerned citizens from Marietta met with the Lac qui Parle County Board of Commissioners at their first meeting for 2003, held on Tuesday, Jan. 7. The members of the group included Marlene Iverson and her son Charles, Rosie Taylor and Glenda How611. The purpose of the meeting was to obtain guidance in the proposed formation of a night watch program in Marietta. Iverson said the group feels there has been a rise in vandalism in Marietta and the intent of the night watch program would be to make the members of the community feel more secure. She noted there is a large elderly population in Marietta. The proposal would be to have evening watch people in place on Friday and Saturday evenings for a two-hour period. No action was taken on the night watch proposal by the commissioners. Big Stone City I Gall Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 Sis Torgerson spent the week-end of Jan. 10th in LittleCanada-St. Paul. Sis visited her daughter Janet Kaufenberg and they went to Janet's daughter's wedding at a Catholic Church in St. Paul. Kevin and Dawn Raymond and Kenny and Katie also attended. Arvin and Jennifer Mueller, Evelyn, Robert, Betty, and Megan Zahnow enjoyed Sunday dinner, Jan. 19th at the Robert Carlson's to help Bob Carlson and Betty Zahnow observe their January birthdays. Adeline Overberg spent Christmas with her daughter Sharon Johnson and husband Larry and daughter Angle Ford in Kennewick, WA. Adeline got acquainted with her new great- grandson Hunter Ford born April 13, 2002. He was nine months old. His great-grandparents from Tennessee were also there. Adeline returned home on the 9th of January after spending three weeks in Kennewick. Delores Bengtson on Saturday, Jan. 1 lth to help her celebrate her birthday had her daughters as guests Cindy Bublitz and Zachary, daughter Sharon Weiber and Sharon's granddaughter Stephanie Optiz, and Delores' daughter Bonnie Swezey and Bonnie's daughter Amanda, and Delores' granddaughter Christie Ward and children. They had dinner together at Delores' home in Big Stone. Delores' birthday was Jan. 8th. Joe and Cindy Angerhofer of Brookings were Wednesday, Jan. 15th overnight guests at the Arlin and Verna Angerhofer's home. Thursday afternoon, Jan. 16th they all attended the funeral of Harold Angerhofer at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in rural Milbank. Ruth Torgerson is the great- grandmother of a baby boy born to Terry and Becky Jenniges of Wabasso, (down by Redwood Falls) on Wednesday, Jan. 15th. It weighed about 7 I/2 pounds. The baby joins a sister Makayla Jo at home. On Thursday afternoon, Jan. 16th Mrs. Elaine Stolpman of near Rosen and her sister Joanne Berndt of Big Stone visited Sally Roggenbuck of Northridge. Also on Thursday afternoon Kathy Oakes of Ononville visited Sally Roggenbuck. On Thursday evening, Jan. 16th the Holy Family Catholic Aid held their meeting at the Conference Room in Northridge. On Thursday morning, Jan. 16th Sally Roggenbuck attended the Bowl of Love held at St. John's Catholic Church. They recycled used greeting cards, attended Mass at I 1:00, and had a potluck dinner after Mass in the church basement. On Friday, Jan. 10th a monthly birthday party was held at Northridge. The Melody Kings entertained. Find a honey of a deal in the 00mnm See Us At The Farm & Home Show Wednesday, Jan. 22 & Thursday, Jan. 23 MIDCONTINENT CABINETE Solid Value, Lasting Beauty TM 00NdOon00wnt" C A  I N" E T R Y It's time to brighten up your kitchen with brand new cabinets and surfaces! Planning a New Home or Addition? " See Gavin For Plans & Estimates Do you recall opting for the hammered bronze faucets instead of Andersen windows? It's easy to be tempted by extra agance. A much wiser dect,on ould be to install Andersen windows. High-Performance rM Lov,-E2 glass insulates better than standard dual-pane glass, keeping armth reside and cold outside, /:,,.,,_. That means lower energy bdls. and /A)n wh ..... Idn'l love that? Opt for real /f luxury - energy-effilem Andersen ; indt}ws. Worryproof. TimeprooL Andersen Windows.@ See )or imletmndemly o,,d ad ope a cd Ar de n dcal fo ear bruited  an.m,y lhll *'Anderetv' na UI AW logo Are regll- tered radmks of lder,, n ColpOr.,uon 2nf,) ,\\;H nghl retvcd ADHIlO4A Inc. ,4878 Enjoying retirement Submitted by B.S. County Local Advisory Council on Children's and Adult Mental Health. Paraphrased from Allina Hospitals and clinics Behavioral Health Facts "Young at Heart-Enjoying Your Golden Years." Retirement can be really something to look forward to. The average length of time for retirement is 14 to 16 years. Some people live 20 years or longer. Research says the secret of a long life is exercise, a good diet, not worry but a positive outlook, spiritually active, socially active, intellectually active, manage stress, know how to work, no drugs, moderate in drinking, don't think old and have order in their lives. Eat right without to much salt, sugar, and fat. Eat fruit, vegetables, complex carbohydrates, fiber, and low fat dairy products. An easy and safe form of exercise is walking. When the weather is not good walk inside. Your social life should be good. In retirement you have the time to cultivate friendships. In retirement you will have time to develop talents and skills you never had time for. You can try painting or writing in a journal. Forget about failure. Select things that bring happiness just trying. Another area you have experience and skills to offer is in volunteering. One can volunteer at church, school, hospital, etc. Occasionally some people have a hard time with retirement. Professional help may be needed if you are depressed, trouble adjusting to the loss of a loved one, no friends, or can't find things to do. Professional help may be just what may be needed to put the spark in retirement. If you have any questions call Family Social Services at 839-2555. Annual Bowl for Hospice set Feb. 22nd The 20th Annual Bowl for Hospice will be held Saturday, Feb. 22, 2003, in six locations: Benson Bowl in Benson from 9 AM until noon, Dawson Bowling in Dawson from 9 AM until noon, New London Bowl in New London from 8 AM until 3 PM, the Kandi Bowl in Willmar, from noon until 5 PM. Koronis Lanes in Paynesville and the Mel'ody Lanes in Montevideo from noon until 3 PM. In 2002, over $32,000.00 was raised in one day to benefit the hospice program. ...... All'funds raied are Used fo" ditec,t patient care to supplement care and services not covered by third party payers, such as insurance. Pledges raised will remain in the local Rice Hospice service areas of Appleton, Benson, Dawson, Granite Falls, Montevideo, Ortonville/ Graceville, Paynesville and Willmar. League bowlers, businesses, youth groups and everyone is encouraged to bowl or just collect pledges and turn them in the day of the Bowl for Hospice. Interested bowlers and nonbowlers may pick up pledge forms from your local Rice Hospice Office, K95/KDJS radio station in Willmar (You may also send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to K95/KDJS, P.O. BOX 380, Willmar, MN 56201 and they will send you a Pledge Form). The Benson Bowl, Dawson Bowl, New London Bowl, Koronis Lanes in Paynesville, Mel'ody Lanes in Montevideo, Kandi Bowl in Willmar, Bremer Bank-Downtown Willmar, US Bank-Willmar and the United Prairie Bank in Spicer will also have Pledge Forms. Call 320-231-1600, or 320-231- 4695 for more information : r TUPPERWARE Bridal Shower & Registry 1 In Home Parties (Other locations available) Hostess Gift Specials | Fundraisers - (s0o/,, donated) 1 Career Opportunity Lifetime Guarantee | %: Monthly Specials ii!ii!ii Call 800-939-5105 or 328-839-3454 "j Ask for Lany .... Basement Problems Solved 1. Leaky Basements Made Dry (No digging up yard) 2. Buckling Walls Straightened 3. Crumbling Walls Restored Over 35 Years of Service Proven Systems www.dryupbasement.com ! -800-348-6247 CL#20037736 Proposed changes in school imm= adds chicken pox, pneumococcal Minnesota children attending school or child care would need to show proof they are vaccinated against chickenpox, and children under two in child care would need to show proof they are immunized against pneumococcal disease, under changes to immunization require- ments being proposed by the Minnesota Department of Health. Parents who choose not to have their child immunized need to show proof they have chosen to decline the new immunizations. The department published a notice of hearing to adopt the rules in the Dec. 30 State Register. The depart- ment will hold a hearing before an administrative, law judge at 9 a.m on Friday, Feb. 28, in the Mississippi Room, at the Snelling Office Park building, 1645 Energy Park Drive, St. Paul. Following the hearing, the judge will set a period for taking written comments, ranging from about two weeks to a month. The judge will then recommend whether the department should adopt the rules. If approved, the changes would not take effect until the 2004- 2005 school year. Before beginning this formal process, MDH held two public meet- ings in July and September and a statewide videoconference in August to discuss the proposed changes with ,Minnesota residents. Based on the meetings, comments received, and a review of current scientific research, MDH developed the new immuniza- tion requirements. Under a process set up by the Minnesota Legislature in 2001, the Commissioner of Health may change the immunization requirements by adopting new state rules rather than amending the state school immuniza- tion law. "This process was designed to allow enough flexibility to ensure that school immunization require- ments be kept up to date with current scientific research medical practice standards, and vaccine developments, while ensuring that the public has opportunity to provide input," said Kristen Ehresmann, who heads the Immunization Tuberculosis and International Health Section at MDH. "In this way, we can all do a better job of protecting our children against vac- cine-preventable diseases." Besides making some adjustments to the current immunization schedule, the proposed changes also include a couple of new vaccinations. Under the proposed rules, proof of chickenpox vaccinations would be required for children in child care, kindergarten and seventh grade. Children under two years old in child care also would need to show proof they are immu- nized against pneumococcal disease. Both of these new immunization requirements are supported and rec- ommended by major national medical groups, including the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), the American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP), and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AFP). Thirty-eight states already have school laws requiring chickenpox vaccine. The proposed changes do not change the medical exemption or the option for parents to decline any or all vaccines for conscientious reasons. In fact, the proposed rules include a pro- vision that requires all child care facil- ities and elementary/secondary schools to use the official MDH record form or a similar document approved by MDH. This is in response to concerns from parents and others that the information schools and child care facilities send out does not always follow the law and does not always include information about the legal exemptions. Schools and child care facilities already check for vaccination cover- age. These two new vaccines would be added to the existing list. MDH is working with large school districts to identify ways to include these new requirements without significantly increasing the time schools spend on checking and helping students stay up to date with immunization require- ments. "Parents, MDH and local pub- lic health agencies, health care providers and schools are all critical partners in helping children stay up to date with their immunizations, Ehresmann said. We all need to work together to make these new require- ments effective." In the five years before use of the varicella vaccine began, approximate- ly four million cases of chickenpox occurred every year in the U.S., resulting in an average of 11,000 hos- pitalizations annually and 1130 deaths. More than 80 percent of the cases and 40 percent of the deaths were in chil- dren. One of the most im of varicella vaccination is to prevent severe varicella its complications, such as encephalitis and a streptococcal infection. complications are not vet we do see them every small number of people complications become si and even die. We should not such complications in this Ehresmann said. The pneumococcal tects against a type cause blood infections and meningitis, as well as Recently, the increase in resistant strains of pneumonia has made ease more difficult, thus severe illness. The helped reduce rates of tant infections. "Many serious diseases ca vented, or their severity reduced by Ehresmann said. This only most of the people in vaccinated. Immunization ments result in high levels nization coverage, schools ease, and healthy ,, nities for all Minnesotans. tion, effective grams produce substantial the state by reducing the children who need state tance and special programs ness, deafness, mental and congenital heart defects. Thanks to the success of tion programs, hood diseases, such as mumps, are no longer United States. Other preve eases, such as diphtheria, virtually eliminated throu tion. More information about posed immunization rules, ing, and statement ableness is available by 676-5414, 1-877-676-541,1, 215-8980 (TTY). may also visit the MDH s/immrule.htm - or contact e-mail Check out our web site at ww' Come In and See Us At Our Booth At The 2003 Grant County Farm & Home Show Wednesday, Jan. 22 & Thursday, Jan. lq Let Our Representatives Show You How You ', 0t Can Save On Your l.,r|dl... % lit Energy Bills with i ..... to win a . Dual P'uel & new electric Demand Controllers ,.. J __ We can also help you make your home more " =- comfortable and more luxurious with simple,  t --- .... :==--v= == .... i Cared n -v: affordable comfort technologies like rod,ant o itii:;/li!ili I floor heat to warm a chilly bathroom or an .e electric fireplace to cozy up your den. II Ill I I ill I IIII II Power Company Page 2b ai INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jag,