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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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January 26, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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January 26, 1922
 

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THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT J ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 1922 NUMBER 38 S. COUNSEL MAKES RULING IN FAVOR OF LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION # Organization Only of Its Kind In the Gets Backing Sec. Wallace, Also. newly organized Big Stone Co-Operative Livestock Asso- L has thru the assistance of Sen- llogg, ecured a ruling of the Counsel of the War Finance holding that co-operative with substantial capital to receive funds on the as banks or trust compan- letter dated January 20, Hen- Secretary of Agriculture "l have your letter of Janu- and have noted the accompany- COpy of the telegram which has to the President. I think you assured the War Finance cor- will assist in every way con- with the legal authority under is created arld is operating. I course, be glad to do every- I can to help." Gets New Ruling. the matter up further Counsel Gerard C. Henderson that thus far advances have Rde to co-operative associa- upon negotiable warehouse so the ruling referred to in paragraph directly a'dects organization which is the first organized in the United Some time past the general pub- official circles at Wash- that the money sent by the War Finance Cor- went straight into the pock- the farmers for whose benefit )rioted. While as a mat- these funds went to coun- and by return mail to the ondents of the country pay off their loans and from thruout the country the back to Chicago and New pay back money borrowed by banks. of the operations of the up to the present time the that has been paid-is per- relieved while the country only temporarily relieved as pay the money back to the Corporation whether the or not. To the farmer, it that it means only an ex- of time but no new funds to farming or for pay- or interest. All In Same Iat. COuntry bank, it is held, is in boat as the farmer and so owner of property of any The money manipulators, it is have contracted the currertcy nation and thereby decreased all property real and per- gold and cold cash that tender. associations of far- SUch as the Big Stone County Association, will enable the banker and all business men, to work together for the good without placing all the of furnishing new funds for and necessary agricultural upon the banks alone. interested in this matter attend the meeting of the Big Co-operative Livestock to be held at the Court- Ortonville, on Saturday, Jan- The meeting has been called :00 o'clock a. ,m. Bowlers Win 7th At Fargo Tourney place at the North- Bowling Association tourna- held at Fargo, N. D., this the honor theloeal team brot them on Wednesday night on that day with a of "teams from this section of No rating can be given however, with reference to of the tournament not close until Saturday the victory over a larg of teams on Wednesday is an althe they did not bowl there were, however, teams less fortunate. the team is as follows: .................. 150 176 160---486 -..h ........... 166 156 202--524 ................ 153 148 167--468 ................ 165 178 174.17 .................. 177 179 158--514 ............ 811 837 861- won sixth place in the a score of 183, 199, 212,-- Fred Halls accom- team, bowling in both sin- Lakeside Club Elects. successful meeting of the was held at the August Friday evening, at which a large attendance. Else- held with the fol- Mel Hegge, president; vice-president; Gilbert , secretary; and Theo Nel- A program was given WaS rv Valuables Recovered from Ruins of Schoen Building Recovery of the safe from the ruins of the M. Schoen & Son building, which was destroped by fire on Thur}- day of last week was made on Tues- day and the contents were found to be in as good condition as if no fire had occurred. The safe was buried in the mass of debris and considerable work was caused in getting it out. Adjustment by the insurance com- panies having policies covering the loss was made yesterday, the adjust- er declaring it a total loss to both stock and building. Insurance carried by Mr. Schoen on the building amount- ed to $11,400 and that carried by The M. M. Johnson Furniture Company on stock and fixtures totalled $13,000. In- ventory at the close of th year show- ed the stock and fixtures valued at $25,000, which, with the valuation of $30,000 on the building makes a total loss of $55,009. Offices of the Johnson Furniture Company have been opened in the old post office building known as the A. L. Moore Land office and up to the present time no definite arrangements for opening of a new stbre have been made. Following up the outlook for the possibility of erecting a new building, an interview was had with Mr. M. Schoen and while he is the heavier loser it is his plans to rebuild. As to the type of building to be erected much depends, of course, upon the rental and the figures given by the contractors. New Millinery Store for City; To Open Soon Ortonville is to have another mil- linery store, the location of which will be in the building occupied by The Ortonville Electric Shop. The new store will be conducted by the Misses Juliat Llma and Mary Christensen of Lamberton, Minn., who arrived here yesterday and are making the neces- sary arrangements. Opening dates will be announced later. The Christensen sisters have had considerable experience in the Millin- ery and Dressmaking business, hav- ing conducted a store at Lamberton for the past three years. A new stock is expected to mTive in a short time. The Ortonville Electric Shop will re- main in the same building, using the north one-half. Popular Company Of Entertainers Coming Clint and Bessie Robbins Open Six Day Engagement Monday At Orpheum Clint ancJ Bessie Robbins, North Da- kota's favorites, will open their en- gagement at the Orpheum theatre on Monday evening, January 30, in Fran- cis Nordstrom's great comedy "The Ruined Lady." Miss Grace George, one of Ameri- ca's best comediennes, produced this play last season in New York and Chicago and spent the entire year in these two cities. Bessie Robbins has the part created by Miss George and she is at her best in this comedy. Clint Robbins plays the "old bachelor" who has been engaged for eight years but never has even made an attempt to set the marriage date. Two children of "Ann" Mortimer's" sister are left in her care when the sister is killed in a railroad accident and "Bill" and she, t, a ,, father a:nd mother them. Bill takes everything for granted that they will be married when the children grow up, but evidently does not see them do so, for it takes a friend of Anne's to awaken her to the fact that she must do something desperate to make "Bill" see the situation and "wake Bill up." She does this and gets herself into a terrible predicament and ruins her reputation. The laughs come thick and fast and it is one of the cleanest and best comedies ever written. As always, Clint and Bessie mount their plays in lavish manner and the costuming is a feature. Unusual vaudeville numbers will be presented by Charles Hammond, the world's greatest novelty artist, Pauline Thom- as, operatic soprano, and others. A splendid orchestra is another big asset to really give you something worth while. The plays to be presented are "The Ruined Lady," "Nothing But the Truth," "Polyanna," "A Runawavy Match," "Friendly Enemies," "Wed- ding Bells," and "The Lady Detec- tive." Each play has had a six months to one yems run in Chicago and New York and never received afivrse criti- cism. Miss Mary Shumaker entertained a number o friends Wednesday Itfter- noon in honor of Mrs. Herbert Ostlind of Everett, Wash., and Miss Elms of Seattle, Wash. Miss Elms lenves this afternoon for Seattle. City's "Prettiest Girls" To Appear In Tribune Young ladies of this city who have been in the habit of admiring or criticizing the photographs appearing every Sunday in the Minneapolis Tri- bune in the rotogravure section under the title, "Fair Women of the North- west," now have the opportunity to show the rst of the readers of that paper that Ortonville is the home of "pretty girls." In reply to a letter written by Wal- ter Dinnel, of the Reed Studio here. Miss Ethel B. Calhoun, in charge o the department and who selects the photographs published in the Tribune, states: "We would be pleased to have you furnish us with photos of the prettiest girls in your town. We would like about 15 photographs of the prettiest girls in Ortonville, pre- ferably unmarried." Every young lady in the city de- sirous of competing for the honor will be photographed without charge and will also be given one photograph free, regardless of whether the subject is selected to appear m the paper. While no particular time was named by the paper as to when the pictures will ap- pear, it is expected that it will be towards spring. However, Mr. Din- nel, is instructed to send the photos in as soon as possible. Three Legged Rooster and Sporty Monkey At Palm's If Bill Palm could gather all of the different animals, birds and reptiles that he has displayed at various times, into one group, he would have a little menagerie all to himself. The latest advertising feature in that line which will soon be seen in the jewelry shop window is a three legged rooster. This bird looks exact- ly like the regulation early rising specimen of barnyard fame with the added appendage in the shape of a third foot. The bird was brought here from Minneapolis, where it had been shown. Mr. Palm sold the African leopard that he had on display this winter at a nice profit, and purchased a pair of monkeys, which can be seen any day in the music room of his jewelry store. They are regular cut-ups and furnish entertainment for both youngsters and grownups, and of course are a valuable advertising feature for the owner. "Bill" is having a hard time bring- ing the gentleman monkey up in the straight and narrow path that he would like to have him follow. He (the monkey) has an inclination to be a little sporty, and if given half a chance would smoke cigarettes, proven when he grabbed a cigarette out of a young man's hand near the cage. Jumping up out of reach, he put the c4garet in his mouth, like a regular fellow .and proceeded to enjoy the weed. The smoke however curled up into his eyes and nose and after a lot of blinking he removed the cigarette, and becoming confused put it back into his mouth, lighted end first, like many a young fellow has done before him. Bill is having a hard time keep- ing him straight, and young fellows of bad habits are urged to keep away from the cage. Dr. and Mrs. Neill Cliff returned to their home at Milbank, S. D., Sunday, the former having been a patient at the hospital here for several weeks with pneumonia. Farm Institute Series Will Open Jan. 31 at Prior Questions uppermost in the minds of the farmers of the county today, relative to the livestock and grain farming will be discussed in a series of meetings held thruout the county ureter the auspices of the Farm Bu- reau, by some of the leading extension department men of the Agricultural College of St. Paul, the first of which will be held at the Prior Town Hall on Tuesday, January 31, The sched- ule as announced includes a meeting at Odessa, on February 11, one at C lin t o n February 25; Beardsley, February 27 and one at Correll on March 21. The meetings, it is stated, will be practical---dealing with farm prob- lems of today, and the men who will conduct them come with the reputa- tion of being real "dirt farmers" and not mere theorists. How can the farmer best utilize the crop he produces ? How shall he mar- ket it ? Will livestock return mor on the investment than traight grain farming? What is the value of an acre of alfalfa or clover utilized in different ways? These are some of the topics for consideration together with questions pertaining to the cost of producing an acre of corn, an acre of wheat and a pound of pork. Livestock Association To Meet Here Saturday A meeting of the Big Stone County Co-operative Livestock Association has been called by the officers, to be held at the courthouse in this city at 10:00 o'clock a. m., on Saturday, Jan'- uary 28, for the purpose of reporting the progress made and also to con- sider matters of importance with ref- erence to securing financial aid thrn the War Finance Corporation. Application for loans will be con- sidered at this ,meeting it is announ- ced, and an appeal is made to every farmer in the county who is desirous of securing funds on agricultural pa- per for farming purposes to be pres- ent. Appears in Cncert. The Minneapolis Tribune last Fri- day gave an account of a benefit con- rt held in Leabanon Lutheran church that city Friday, in which Miss Joyce Welch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ken Welch of this city took part as a member of the Hennepin Ladies' Trio as pianist and reader. Miss Welch is a student at McPhail School of Music and Dramatic Art. Dr. Rifenbark Adds Equipment. Announcement is made by Dr. R. D. Rifenbark that he has just received a complete up-to-date optical equip- ment and that he is now prepared to fit glasses. With the addition of this equipment Dr. R_ifenbark now has an office that is lacking in no particular. Charles Matthews retui-ned Tuesday from a trip over the counties of Tra- verse, Swift, Yellow Medicine, Kandi- oyhi and Lac qui Parle where he has been superintending the shipment of corn for the Near East Relief suffer- ers. He states that two farmers near Maynard offered to give a carload of corn providing the citizens of Mayn- ard donate a car and the surrounding country a third car, and that they are undertaking to raise the corn to meet the offer. NET EARNINGS BY DEPARTMENTS IS SHOWN IN FINANCIAL REPORT Largest Business In History Of State Transacted I n Year Just Past, Auditor's Report Shows. Minnesota did the largest business in its history during the year just closed. For the twelve calendar months ending December 31, 1921, according to figures compiled by the State Audi- tor, transactions involving a total of $102,387,474.20 were entered in the books of the department. O this amount $150,997,726.94 repre- sented receipts while the expenditures totalled $51,389,747.26. The legal book-keeping period for the state is from July to July, hence the excess of expenditures. From taxes of various kinds the state treasury was enriched to the extent of $22,744,590.39. Department- al fees and other earnings contributed the balance, $28253.236.55. The largest source of revenue was from state taxes amounting to $11,- 271,650.08 and the econd largest, the railroad gross earnings tax. From this source more than $8,000,000 was realized. Another large revenue pro- ducer was the sale of motor licenses which is the principal basis of the good roads program inaugurated to pull Minnesota out of the mud. More than $5,000,000 was received from the sale of auto tags. While direct taxation is the chief source of revenue of every common- wealth there are other lines of reve- nue and these are found, in depart- @ mental fees and earnings of various kinds. Minnesota fared well in this respect last year and to the credit of those in charge it must be said that the receipts in the majority of cases were in excess of the expenditures: The State Insurance department gave its check for over $125,000. The Dairy & Food department was credited with earnings of over $175,000, and the State Game and Fish Commission with a sum slightly under $400,000. Large earning factors were those of hotel inspection with receipts of over $41,- 000, Oil Inspection with receipts of more than $173,000, and the Secre- tary of State with fees from the fil- ing of articles of incorporation total- ling $107,705. Royalties from iron ore mined on state land exceeded $1,- ooo,ooo. Interest on state loans added materially, likewise the interest due on the sale of state lands. The two were responsible for a contribution of more than $3,000,000. Altho receipts are a necessity and their increase with the years cause for rejoicing and an indication of the state's prosperity, it is the expendi- tures that interest the average tax payer. Some large items in disburse- ments were listed last year but they were mostly in aid of some state ac- tivity such as agriculture, good roads and education. Over $10,000,000 was expended for the latter. Next came special aid to veterans of the world war and in return the construction of good roads. Minnesota's financial story however, is best told in the fol- lowing tables covering the principal items of receipts and expenditures for the year just closed. (.tinued at pate 8) PROPERTY VALUED AT $32,000 DESTROYED IN CORRELL FIRE = Must Apply for Auto License l#y February 15 In a new ruling issued by Mike Holm, Secretary of State, penalty for delayed registration will be waived for the first fifteen days in February. in other words, motor vehicle owners will be allowed until February 15 in which to make application for regis- tration without penalty for delayed registration. Figures .made public from the state secretary's office reveal the informa- tion that there is in this state one automobile for every seven of the pop- ulation. Two thirds of the entire pop- ulation could, therefore, be loaded into motor vehicles of the state and there would still be space enough to accom- modate all the people residing in the State of Nevada as invited guests for the same ride. Returns for the year 1921 shows that the neighboring counties have paid in more than Big Stone county, which indicates that they possess more autoes or else more luxurious ones and less Fords. Traverse paid $21,382.05; Swift, $39,050.39; Lac qui Parle,, $42,- 590.36 and Big Stone $25,295.05. Tra- verse county being the only one pay- ing less than this county. Ortonville Boy to Tour With Hamline Glee Club William McLane, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. McLane of this city, will tour northern Minnesota and North Dakota during the month of February, as a member of the Ham- line Glee Club, according to an arti- cle appearing in the Hamline Oracle. Mr. McLane, who is a sophomore at Hamline, was among those who toured the western coast last season, filling the position of first tenor with that organization. They appeared at all of the larger western cities, such as Seattle, Salt Lake City, San Francisco Butte and Omaha. The present schedule will take the Club to Willmar, Alexaniria, Grand Forks, N. D., Brainerd, Little Falls, and a number of other towns in the northern part of this state. Preus Asks Loan For State Farmers Adoption of "Ortonville Plan" Will Be Urged by Governor In Washington. Governor J. A. O. Preus will leave for Washington Tuesday, and while there will urge adoption of the socall- ed "Ortonville plan" of financing farm loans. He will interview the directors of the War Finance corporation and ask them to authorize loans to county co-operative organizations, such as the newly formed Big Stone County Co- operative Loan association. S. D. Duea, state superintendent of banks, has conferred with the Minne- apolis agricultural loan committee. "I understand that the Minneapolis com- mittee is favorable to the plan, and that there is nothing in the law that prevents it being carried out," Gov- ernor Preus said today. While in Washington Governor Preus also will take up several de- partment matCters affecting the state of Minnesota. He expects to return next week. Four-Day Show, Decision Of Poultry Association Extension of the Big Stone County Poultry Association's Fourth Annual Show from a three day to a four day exhibition resulted at a meeting of the directors held here yesterday. The opening date of the show is Wednes- day, February 1. All preparations are being made to handle what is expected will be the largest number of prize chickens ever exhibited at a show in this part of the state. Premium lists have been mail- ed to poultry fanciers setting out the rules governing the show and the prizes to be offered. So Local breed- ers of fine feathers have nothing left to do now but bring their birds in and "take the money." "Let's make this a cracking, cack- ling good show. Don't rest satisfied until your birds have been judged and the blue ribbon tacked to your crate. Someone is going to carry away hon- ors--why not let it be you ? Revenue CollectOr Will Aid In Making Returns Deputy Collector, John C. Douglas of the United States Internal Revenue Bureau will be in Ortonville on Febru- ary 20, 21, and 22 to assist tax payers in filing their 1921 income tax return. it was announced today by Miss Mary Mogren, postmistress. Anyone interested in securing as- sistance in making out their returns are requested to call on Mr. Douglas on the above datea. South Portion of Village Is Threatened in Spectacular Blaze That Could Be Seen For Miles. Property valued at approximately $32,000.00 was destroyed at Correll last Saturday night in the most spec- tacular fire witnessed in this section of the state in many years, when the two story frame building occupied by Bottge and Wigdahl and the lumber yards of the Botsford Company went up m smoke, while velunteer fire fighters who formed a "bucket bri- gade" fought vainly in sub-zero weather in an effort to quench the flames. Losses reported are as follows: Botsford Lumber Company, burned to the ground. 150,000 feet of lumber and sheds valued in the neighborhood of $15,000. Insured in the Lumber- men's Protective Association in pro- portion to stock carried. Bottge and Wigdahl stock valued at $13,000; in- surance $8,000. Building owned by Lynn Woods, valued at $3,500, insured for $1,000. Damage to other property was comparatively small. "Bucket Brigade" Formed. Starting in the Bottge and Wigdaht department store, shortly after 8:00 o'clock and believed to have been caus- ed by a heating stoe, the fire spread with great rapidity thru the section devoted to ladies ready-to-wear gar- ments and other inflamable merchan- dise until the building was enveloped in flames within a few minutes. Within a short time after the fire originated every available citizen of the village was on the scene with pail in hand and in a few minutes enough men were on deck to form a line from a well nearby, which was the only source of water supply, and fighting of the fire by the old time method be- gan. Handicapped by a lack of modem methods to combat the flames the fire soon spread to the Botsford yards in spite of the intrepid efforts of the volunteer fighters. With a strong wind fanning the flames the men re- alized that assistance was necessary to prevent further spread and calls were sent to both the Appleton and Ortonville departments for aid. Appleton Men Help. Twelve men from the Appleton de- ,partment responded to the call, but because of a blizzard that was raging, efforts to get the chemical truck thru the drifts near there failed and they were obliged to abandon it. They then joined in the work of the other fight- ers, using what was at hand. Special Train Asked. While the Appleton men were on he scene members of the local de- partment had the chemica[ apparatus in readiness, with a replenished tank,c but the report came that to attempt to get to Correll with the low clear- ance which the truck has, would be futile. Rather than to attempt the trip appeals were then ,made by the citizens of Correll to the Milwaukee Road, asking that an engine and fiat car be sent from Milbank to trans- port the local outfit. By a slight change in the direction of the Wind, however, further assistance was deemed  unnecessary and the report came that the fire was under control in time to save a trip of the special being made up at Milbank. Fears that prompted the call for aid were held for the safety of the Farmers' Elevator which was in the path of the fire. This was well stored with grain and the sheds adjoining it with coal and wood, Three Buildings Saved. By the use of buckets three build- ings at the rear of the Bottge and Wig- dahl store were saved. They were those occupied by 1t. E. Cobb Pro- duce Company, Ed. Kingsreiter, and the Northwestern Telephone Co. Ev. erything was moved from these build- ings to the street, including the tele- phone equipment. The fire, which was the second large one in this county within a period of a little over forty-eight hours, cattle be seen easily from Odessa and the Yel- lowbank territory, a distance o .15 miles. Fire Department Called Out On Coldest Night Fire at the Art Pufald garage orL Sunday night, caused by an overheat- ed furnace, brought out the fire de- partment on the coldest night this year and burned a tire and front wheel from a Ford car, doing damage to the car and floor of the garage valued at 60.00. The fire was reported by John Miehell, Jr., at about ten o'clock, who noticed it as he was passing the gar- age on his way home from down town. Prompt responseby the department resulted in quenching the flames by the use of chemicals. The floor about the furnace, which is a one flue heat- er, is thought to have become satur atod With gasoline drtplg from I leaky carborator of a Ford ear which was standing a short distam from thin register. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT J ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 1922 NUMBER 38 S. COUNSEL MAKES RULING IN FAVOR OF LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION # Organization Only of Its Kind In the Gets Backing Sec. Wallace, Also. newly organized Big Stone Co-Operative Livestock Asso- L has thru the assistance of Sen- llogg, ecured a ruling of the Counsel of the War Finance holding that co-operative with substantial capital to receive funds on the as banks or trust compan- letter dated January 20, Hen- Secretary of Agriculture "l have your letter of Janu- and have noted the accompany- COpy of the telegram which has to the President. I think you assured the War Finance cor- will assist in every way con- with the legal authority under is created arld is operating. I course, be glad to do every- I can to help." Gets New Ruling. the matter up further Counsel Gerard C. Henderson that thus far advances have Rde to co-operative associa- upon negotiable warehouse so the ruling referred to in paragraph directly a'dects organization which is the first organized in the United Some time past the general pub- official circles at Wash- that the money sent by the War Finance Cor- went straight into the pock- the farmers for whose benefit )rioted. While as a mat- these funds went to coun- and by return mail to the ondents of the country pay off their loans and from thruout the country the back to Chicago and New pay back money borrowed by banks. of the operations of the up to the present time the that has been paid-is per- relieved while the country only temporarily relieved as pay the money back to the Corporation whether the or not. To the farmer, it that it means only an ex- of time but no new funds to farming or for pay- or interest. All In Same Iat. COuntry bank, it is held, is in boat as the farmer and so owner of property of any The money manipulators, it is have contracted the currertcy nation and thereby decreased all property real and per- gold and cold cash that tender. associations of far- SUch as the Big Stone County Association, will enable the banker and all business men, to work together for the good without placing all the of furnishing new funds for and necessary agricultural upon the banks alone. interested in this matter attend the meeting of the Big Co-operative Livestock to be held at the Court- Ortonville, on Saturday, Jan- The meeting has been called :00 o'clock a. ,m. Bowlers Win 7th At Fargo Tourney place at the North- Bowling Association tourna- held at Fargo, N. D., this the honor theloeal team brot them on Wednesday night on that day with a of "teams from this section of No rating can be given however, with reference to of the tournament not close until Saturday the victory over a larg of teams on Wednesday is an althe they did not bowl there were, however, teams less fortunate. the team is as follows: .................. 150 176 160---486 -..h ........... 166 156 202--524 ................ 153 148 167--468 ................ 165 178 174.17 .................. 177 179 158--514 ............ 811 837 861- won sixth place in the a score of 183, 199, 212,-- Fred Halls accom- team, bowling in both sin- Lakeside Club Elects. successful meeting of the was held at the August Friday evening, at which a large attendance. Else- held with the fol- Mel Hegge, president; vice-president; Gilbert , secretary; and Theo Nel- A program was given WaS rv Valuables Recovered from Ruins of Schoen Building Recovery of the safe from the ruins of the M. Schoen & Son building, which was destroped by fire on Thur}- day of last week was made on Tues- day and the contents were found to be in as good condition as if no fire had occurred. The safe was buried in the mass of debris and considerable work was caused in getting it out. Adjustment by the insurance com- panies having policies covering the loss was made yesterday, the adjust- er declaring it a total loss to both stock and building. Insurance carried by Mr. Schoen on the building amount- ed to $11,400 and that carried by The M. M. Johnson Furniture Company on stock and fixtures totalled $13,000. In- ventory at the close of th year show- ed the stock and fixtures valued at $25,000, which, with the valuation of $30,000 on the building makes a total loss of $55,009. Offices of the Johnson Furniture Company have been opened in the old post office building known as the A. L. Moore Land office and up to the present time no definite arrangements for opening of a new stbre have been made. Following up the outlook for the possibility of erecting a new building, an interview was had with Mr. M. Schoen and while he is the heavier loser it is his plans to rebuild. As to the type of building to be erected much depends, of course, upon the rental and the figures given by the contractors. New Millinery Store for City; To Open Soon Ortonville is to have another mil- linery store, the location of which will be in the building occupied by The Ortonville Electric Shop. The new store will be conducted by the Misses Juliat Llma and Mary Christensen of Lamberton, Minn., who arrived here yesterday and are making the neces- sary arrangements. Opening dates will be announced later. The Christensen sisters have had considerable experience in the Millin- ery and Dressmaking business, hav- ing conducted a store at Lamberton for the past three years. A new stock is expected to mTive in a short time. The Ortonville Electric Shop will re- main in the same building, using the north one-half. Popular Company Of Entertainers Coming Clint and Bessie Robbins Open Six Day Engagement Monday At Orpheum Clint ancJ Bessie Robbins, North Da- kota's favorites, will open their en- gagement at the Orpheum theatre on Monday evening, January 30, in Fran- cis Nordstrom's great comedy "The Ruined Lady." Miss Grace George, one of Ameri- ca's best comediennes, produced this play last season in New York and Chicago and spent the entire year in these two cities. Bessie Robbins has the part created by Miss George and she is at her best in this comedy. Clint Robbins plays the "old bachelor" who has been engaged for eight years but never has even made an attempt to set the marriage date. Two children of "Ann" Mortimer's" sister are left in her care when the sister is killed in a railroad accident and "Bill" and she, t, a ,, father a:nd mother them. Bill takes everything for granted that they will be married when the children grow up, but evidently does not see them do so, for it takes a friend of Anne's to awaken her to the fact that she must do something desperate to make "Bill" see the situation and "wake Bill up." She does this and gets herself into a terrible predicament and ruins her reputation. The laughs come thick and fast and it is one of the cleanest and best comedies ever written. As always, Clint and Bessie mount their plays in lavish manner and the costuming is a feature. Unusual vaudeville numbers will be presented by Charles Hammond, the world's greatest novelty artist, Pauline Thom- as, operatic soprano, and others. A splendid orchestra is another big asset to really give you something worth while. The plays to be presented are "The Ruined Lady," "Nothing But the Truth," "Polyanna," "A Runawavy Match," "Friendly Enemies," "Wed- ding Bells," and "The Lady Detec- tive." Each play has had a six months to one yems run in Chicago and New York and never received afivrse criti- cism. Miss Mary Shumaker entertained a number o friends Wednesday Itfter- noon in honor of Mrs. Herbert Ostlind of Everett, Wash., and Miss Elms of Seattle, Wash. Miss Elms lenves this afternoon for Seattle. City's "Prettiest Girls" To Appear In Tribune Young ladies of this city who have been in the habit of admiring or criticizing the photographs appearing every Sunday in the Minneapolis Tri- bune in the rotogravure section under the title, "Fair Women of the North- west," now have the opportunity to show the rst of the readers of that paper that Ortonville is the home of "pretty girls." In reply to a letter written by Wal- ter Dinnel, of the Reed Studio here. Miss Ethel B. Calhoun, in charge o the department and who selects the photographs published in the Tribune, states: "We would be pleased to have you furnish us with photos of the prettiest girls in your town. We would like about 15 photographs of the prettiest girls in Ortonville, pre- ferably unmarried." Every young lady in the city de- sirous of competing for the honor will be photographed without charge and will also be given one photograph free, regardless of whether the subject is selected to appear m the paper. While no particular time was named by the paper as to when the pictures will ap- pear, it is expected that it will be towards spring. However, Mr. Din- nel, is instructed to send the photos in as soon as possible. Three Legged Rooster and Sporty Monkey At Palm's If Bill Palm could gather all of the different animals, birds and reptiles that he has displayed at various times, into one group, he would have a little menagerie all to himself. The latest advertising feature in that line which will soon be seen in the jewelry shop window is a three legged rooster. This bird looks exact- ly like the regulation early rising specimen of barnyard fame with the added appendage in the shape of a third foot. The bird was brought here from Minneapolis, where it had been shown. Mr. Palm sold the African leopard that he had on display this winter at a nice profit, and purchased a pair of monkeys, which can be seen any day in the music room of his jewelry store. They are regular cut-ups and furnish entertainment for both youngsters and grownups, and of course are a valuable advertising feature for the owner. "Bill" is having a hard time bring- ing the gentleman monkey up in the straight and narrow path that he would like to have him follow. He (the monkey) has an inclination to be a little sporty, and if given half a chance would smoke cigarettes, proven when he grabbed a cigarette out of a young man's hand near the cage. Jumping up out of reach, he put the c4garet in his mouth, like a regular fellow .and proceeded to enjoy the weed. The smoke however curled up into his eyes and nose and after a lot of blinking he removed the cigarette, and becoming confused put it back into his mouth, lighted end first, like many a young fellow has done before him. Bill is having a hard time keep- ing him straight, and young fellows of bad habits are urged to keep away from the cage. Dr. and Mrs. Neill Cliff returned to their home at Milbank, S. D., Sunday, the former having been a patient at the hospital here for several weeks with pneumonia. Farm Institute Series Will Open Jan. 31 at Prior Questions uppermost in the minds of the farmers of the county today, relative to the livestock and grain farming will be discussed in a series of meetings held thruout the county ureter the auspices of the Farm Bu- reau, by some of the leading extension department men of the Agricultural College of St. Paul, the first of which will be held at the Prior Town Hall on Tuesday, January 31, The sched- ule as announced includes a meeting at Odessa, on February 11, one at C lint o n February 25; Beardsley, February 27 and one at Correll on March 21. The meetings, it is stated, will be practical---dealing with farm prob- lems of today, and the men who will conduct them come with the reputa- tion of being real "dirt farmers" and not mere theorists. How can the farmer best utilize the crop he produces ? How shall he mar- ket it ? Will livestock return mor on the investment than traight grain farming? What is the value of an acre of alfalfa or clover utilized in different ways? These are some of the topics for consideration together with questions pertaining to the cost of producing an acre of corn, an acre of wheat and a pound of pork. Livestock Association To Meet Here Saturday A meeting of the Big Stone County Co-operative Livestock Association has been called by the officers, to be held at the courthouse in this city at 10:00 o'clock a. m., on Saturday, Jan'- uary 28, for the purpose of reporting the progress made and also to con- sider matters of importance with ref- erence to securing financial aid thrn the War Finance Corporation. Application for loans will be con- sidered at this ,meeting it is announ- ced, and an appeal is made to every farmer in the county who is desirous of securing funds on agricultural pa- per for farming purposes to be pres- ent. Appears in Cncert. The Minneapolis Tribune last Fri- day gave an account of a benefit con- rt held in Leabanon Lutheran church that city Friday, in which Miss Joyce Welch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ken Welch of this city took part as a member of the Hennepin Ladies' Trio as pianist and reader. Miss Welch is a student at McPhail School of Music and Dramatic Art. Dr. Rifenbark Adds Equipment. Announcement is made by Dr. R. D. Rifenbark that he has just received a complete up-to-date optical equip- ment and that he is now prepared to fit glasses. With the addition of this equipment Dr. R_ifenbark now has an office that is lacking in no particular. Charles Matthews retui-ned Tuesday from a trip over the counties of Tra- verse, Swift, Yellow Medicine, Kandi- oyhi and Lac qui Parle where he has been superintending the shipment of corn for the Near East Relief suffer- ers. He states that two farmers near Maynard offered to give a carload of corn providing the citizens of Mayn- ard donate a car and the surrounding country a third car, and that they are undertaking to raise the corn to meet the offer. NET EARNINGS BY DEPARTMENTS IS SHOWN IN FINANCIAL REPORT Largest Business In History Of State Transacted I n Year Just Past, Auditor's Report Shows. Minnesota did the largest business in its history during the year just closed. For the twelve calendar months ending December 31, 1921, according to figures compiled by the State Audi- tor, transactions involving a total of $102,387,474.20 were entered in the books of the department. O this amount $150,997,726.94 repre- sented receipts while the expenditures totalled $51,389,747.26. The legal book-keeping period for the state is from July to July, hence the excess of expenditures. From taxes of various kinds the state treasury was enriched to the extent of $22,744,590.39. Department- al fees and other earnings contributed the balance, $28253.236.55. The largest source of revenue was from state taxes amounting to $11,- 271,650.08 and the econd largest, the railroad gross earnings tax. From this source more than $8,000,000 was realized. Another large revenue pro- ducer was the sale of motor licenses which is the principal basis of the good roads program inaugurated to pull Minnesota out of the mud. More than $5,000,000 was received from the sale of auto tags. While direct taxation is the chief source of revenue of every common- wealth there are other lines of reve- nue and these are found, in depart- @ mental fees and earnings of various kinds. Minnesota fared well in this respect last year and to the credit of those in charge it must be said that the receipts in the majority of cases were in excess of the expenditures: The State Insurance department gave its check for over $125,000. The Dairy & Food department was credited with earnings of over $175,000, and the State Game and Fish Commission with a sum slightly under $400,000. Large earning factors were those of hotel inspection with receipts of over $41,- 000, Oil Inspection with receipts of more than $173,000, and the Secre- tary of State with fees from the fil- ing of articles of incorporation total- ling $107,705. Royalties from iron ore mined on state land exceeded $1,- ooo,ooo. Interest on state loans added materially, likewise the interest due on the sale of state lands. The two were responsible for a contribution of more than $3,000,000. Altho receipts are a necessity and their increase with the years cause for rejoicing and an indication of the state's prosperity, it is the expendi- tures that interest the average tax payer. Some large items in disburse- ments were listed last year but they were mostly in aid of some state ac- tivity such as agriculture, good roads and education. Over $10,000,000 was expended for the latter. Next came special aid to veterans of the world war and in return the construction of good roads. Minnesota's financial story however, is best told in the fol- lowing tables covering the principal items of receipts and expenditures for the year just closed. (.tinued at pate 8) PROPERTY VALUED AT $32,000 DESTROYED IN CORRELL FIRE = Must Apply for Auto License l#y February 15 In a new ruling issued by Mike Holm, Secretary of State, penalty for delayed registration will be waived for the first fifteen days in February. in other words, motor vehicle owners will be allowed until February 15 in which to make application for regis- tration without penalty for delayed registration. Figures .made public from the state secretary's office reveal the informa- tion that there is in this state one automobile for every seven of the pop- ulation. Two thirds of the entire pop- ulation could, therefore, be loaded into motor vehicles of the state and there would still be space enough to accom- modate all the people residing in the State of Nevada as invited guests for the same ride. Returns for the year 1921 shows that the neighboring counties have paid in more than Big Stone county, which indicates that they possess more autoes or else more luxurious ones and less Fords. Traverse paid $21,382.05; Swift, $39,050.39; Lac qui Parle,, $42,- 590.36 and Big Stone $25,295.05. Tra- verse county being the only one pay- ing less than this county. Ortonville Boy to Tour With Hamline Glee Club William McLane, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. McLane of this city, will tour northern Minnesota and North Dakota during the month of February, as a member of the Ham- line Glee Club, according to an arti- cle appearing in the Hamline Oracle. Mr. McLane, who is a sophomore at Hamline, was among those who toured the western coast last season, filling the position of first tenor with that organization. They appeared at all of the larger western cities, such as Seattle, Salt Lake City, San Francisco Butte and Omaha. The present schedule will take the Club to Willmar, Alexaniria, Grand Forks, N. D., Brainerd, Little Falls, and a number of other towns in the northern part of this state. Preus Asks Loan For State Farmers Adoption of "Ortonville Plan" Will Be Urged by Governor In Washington. Governor J. A. O. Preus will leave for Washington Tuesday, and while there will urge adoption of the socall- ed "Ortonville plan" of financing farm loans. He will interview the directors of the War Finance corporation and ask them to authorize loans to county co-operative organizations, such as the newly formed Big Stone County Co- operative Loan association. S. D. Duea, state superintendent of banks, has conferred with the Minne- apolis agricultural loan committee. "I understand that the Minneapolis com- mittee is favorable to the plan, and that there is nothing in the law that prevents it being carried out," Gov- ernor Preus said today. While in Washington Governor Preus also will take up several de- partment matCters affecting the state of Minnesota. He expects to return next week. Four-Day Show, Decision Of Poultry Association Extension of the Big Stone County Poultry Association's Fourth Annual Show from a three day to a four day exhibition resulted at a meeting of the directors held here yesterday. The opening date of the show is Wednes- day, February 1. All preparations are being made to handle what is expected will be the largest number of prize chickens ever exhibited at a show in this part of the state. Premium lists have been mail- ed to poultry fanciers setting out the rules governing the show and the prizes to be offered. So Local breed- ers of fine feathers have nothing left to do now but bring their birds in and "take the money." "Let's make this a cracking, cack- ling good show. Don't rest satisfied until your birds have been judged and the blue ribbon tacked to your crate. Someone is going to carry away hon- ors--why not let it be you ? Revenue CollectOr Will Aid In Making Returns Deputy Collector, John C. Douglas of the United States Internal Revenue Bureau will be in Ortonville on Febru- ary 20, 21, and 22 to assist tax payers in filing their 1921 income tax return. it was announced today by Miss Mary Mogren, postmistress. Anyone interested in securing as- sistance in making out their returns are requested to call on Mr. Douglas on the above datea. South Portion of Village Is Threatened in Spectacular Blaze That Could Be Seen For Miles. Property valued at approximately $32,000.00 was destroyed at Correll last Saturday night in the most spec- tacular fire witnessed in this section of the state in many years, when the two story frame building occupied by Bottge and Wigdahl and the lumber yards of the Botsford Company went up m smoke, while velunteer fire fighters who formed a "bucket bri- gade" fought vainly in sub-zero weather in an effort to quench the flames. Losses reported are as follows: Botsford Lumber Company, burned to the ground. 150,000 feet of lumber and sheds valued in the neighborhood of $15,000. Insured in the Lumber- men's Protective Association in pro- portion to stock carried. Bottge and Wigdahl stock valued at $13,000; in- surance $8,000. Building owned by Lynn Woods, valued at $3,500, insured for $1,000. Damage to other property was comparatively small. "Bucket Brigade" Formed. Starting in the Bottge and Wigdaht department store, shortly after 8:00 o'clock and believed to have been caus- ed by a heating stoe, the fire spread with great rapidity thru the section devoted to ladies ready-to-wear gar- ments and other inflamable merchan- dise until the building was enveloped in flames within a few minutes. Within a short time after the fire originated every available citizen of the village was on the scene with pail in hand and in a few minutes enough men were on deck to form a line from a well nearby, which was the only source of water supply, and fighting of the fire by the old time method be- gan. Handicapped by a lack of modem methods to combat the flames the fire soon spread to the Botsford yards in spite of the intrepid efforts of the volunteer fighters. With a strong wind fanning the flames the men re- alized that assistance was necessary to prevent further spread and calls were sent to both the Appleton and Ortonville departments for aid. Appleton Men Help. Twelve men from the Appleton de- ,partment responded to the call, but because of a blizzard that was raging, efforts to get the chemical truck thru the drifts near there failed and they were obliged to abandon it. They then joined in the work of the other fight- ers, using what was at hand. Special Train Asked. While the Appleton men were on he scene members of the local de- partment had the chemica[ apparatus in readiness, with a replenished tank,c but the report came that to attempt to get to Correll with the low clear- ance which the truck has, would be futile. Rather than to attempt the trip appeals were then ,made by the citizens of Correll to the Milwaukee Road, asking that an engine and fiat car be sent from Milbank to trans- port the local outfit. By a slight change in the direction of the Wind, however, further assistance was deemed  unnecessary and the report came that the fire was under control in time to save a trip of the special being made up at Milbank. Fears that prompted the call for aid were held for the safety of the Farmers' Elevator which was in the path of the fire. This was well stored with grain and the sheds adjoining it with coal and wood, Three Buildings Saved. By the use of buckets three build- ings at the rear of the Bottge and Wig- dahl store were saved. They were those occupied by 1t. E. Cobb Pro- duce Company, Ed. Kingsreiter, and the Northwestern Telephone Co. Ev. erything was moved from these build- ings to the street, including the tele- phone equipment. The fire, which was the second large one in this county within a period of a little over forty-eight hours, cattle be seen easily from Odessa and the Yel- lowbank territory, a distance o .15 miles. Fire Department Called Out On Coldest Night Fire at the Art Pufald garage orL Sunday night, caused by an overheat- ed furnace, brought out the fire de- partment on the coldest night this year and burned a tire and front wheel from a Ford car, doing damage to the car and floor of the garage valued at 60.00. The fire was reported by John Miehell, Jr., at about ten o'clock, who noticed it as he was passing the gar- age on his way home from down town. Prompt responseby the department resulted in quenching the flames by the use of chemicals. The floor about the furnace, which is a one flue heat- er, is thought to have become satur atod With gasoline drtplg from I leaky carborator of a Ford ear which was standing a short distam from thin register. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ORTONTILLE. MINN. THURSDAY, JANUARY L 1922 NUMBER S. COUNSEL MAKES RULING IN FAVOR OF LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION -- Organization Valuables Recovered from of Its Kind Ruins of Schoen Building -- Gets Recovery of th e safe"  fm th e ruin s Sec. Wallace, Also. ew]y organized Big o-Opetive holding that -operativ funds letter dated Janry 20, Hen- :e, Sretary of Agfieultu teleg authority under operating. ] , of eou, be glad to do every. t I n to helpY t. up further t that thus far advane have asala- , so the ruling nferred to In : paragraph directly the m time past the general pub" that the money nt went straight into the pock- While as a mat- country , pay back money bowl by hanks esult of the opettons of the only tempotly  payc or not. To the faer, it f ti,v, bat no nw fends to g or for pay- All In Same Bat. bank, it is held, is in oer of prorty of , have eontac M the rrengy nation d thereby decred Aslmelat Ion, placing al[ the nssary agricultural upon the banks ale. Ortonville, on Saturday, Ja. The meeting Bowlers Win 7th Tourney i senth place at the North- am blot them on Wednesday n/g that day with No rating om be giv standing of the tim vlt4ory tSO 176 ... ........... 166 156 18 14B ............. 165 178  ........ 177 19 811 837 861-- ,199, 212-- pln. Halia Club Eltc. : of the , Auga a large atan. Hell.e, predtmt; day day and the be in as good condition  if no fli had oeeued. The saf n the ms of debris an getting It ou AdJustment by the " paniec haing policies covenng th made yesterday, tha adjust er dlarng it a total by Mr. Schn on the building amount ed to $11,400 d that rried by The $I3,000. In. at the eoae of thh ye sh. $25,OO0, which, loss of $8,OO9. Oms of the Johnn Cpany have been o erie post om haildlng k owr L Moon Land ce and up to the psent um for operang Following possibility of erting a new bu d ng, an Interew w had with Mr. M Sehn and while he is the heavier Ioser it is his plans to bld. As tc haliding to be etod much depends, of coupe, upon the rental d the flg given by the New Millinery Store for City; To Open Soon Ortonviih is to have litery sto, the location of which A]I ed by The by the Miens Jeil "Alma ufi d Mar Lamberton, Minn., who yesterday and  making the aes- saey aangementa. Opening dates will be aanouncnd later ' The Citrlfften sisters have had nsiderable expefleuee in the Miliin- cry d Dre  Jdhg tmMne, hav- ing conducted a sto at Lmberton for the pt thre ie&rs. is expected to awive In a short tame. The Ortonville FAectrl Shop will e- etme building, using the Popular Company Of Bessie Rcbbins Open Day Engagement Monday At Orphm C[itt  Boccie Rabbits, North Da- will opeq Orplm theatre on nday ewning, fftutt y 80, in FI. gtt medy "The guted Lady." Miss G George, erie of Ameri- ;. produced this the part created by Miss Grge and she is at her t it this comedy. Cllnt p]a hac been engaged for eight y but her ea when the sister it killed In a Tanted that the./ will grow up, but evldtly ds not s them de of Anne's to the tuation and "wake Bill I prdint and rits hca The hugh m* thi Ac always, olnt and Be their pla i, la sh mum Is a featu by Charles Hammond, the grtt aovelty artier, Pauline The. u, operatic pn, and ethers. t to really give you worth while. The plays to be pted are "Tat ldned Lady," "Nothing But th Truth," "Polyanna." "A Runawa Match," "Fr mdl Ene 'es," "Wed. cling Bells," avd "The Lady Detc. Eh pla oue yea'c rln Chigo and N York d near lvi ab c tilt, Mba Ms number of friends Wednuday noon a hair of Mn of EvvR. Wash. , Wuh. IKim Elms lmv t City's "Prettiest Girls" Farm Institute Series To Appear In Tribune Yog ladies of this city who have bn in the habit of admiring Ol. y today, riticizlng the photogphs appearing to the livestock d grain in the /atng wl be dlssse in a series f mtinge held thout the the title, under the aspis have the opperlnity to au, by me of the Iding extension how the rst of the reade of that epartment men of the Agriltura] paper that OruvLle is the home of College of St. Pau L the first of which "pretty girls." ' will be held a t the prior In ply to a letter written by Wal- n Tuesday, January 31. er Dtnnel, of the Reed Studio hen ale as 'announced includes a meeting. in charge o at Od, on Fehry 11, one at :he department and Febry 251 Beardsley, hotographs published in the Treble, 27 and one at Corll on "We would be plead to have you furnish us with phoa of the The meetings it s stated will be [prettiest girls in yo to. We tltelea]itg with fa pb- would like about 15 photographs of lems of oday, and the n who will Ithe pttiest girls in Oronvi]le, pl :ottduct them me with the puta- I ferably unmarried. . ;ion of being real, , Every young lady in the city de- ot mere thermals. inus of mpeting for the honor Will] How  the f, will also be given one photograph Ge th invtment than $1traight grain r&ing? V.nat is th val of nsmed by the' pietus will ap-l lfferent ways? pear, it is expeted that it wll b h toplcs for consideration together towards pring. Howler, Mr. Dis. Ith questions pertaining to the east nel, is iteted to nd the photo f podung in ac sn  pocsible. f wheat end a pound of pork, Three Legged Rooster and Livestock Association Sporty Monkey At Palm's If Bill Palm uld gather all of the A mtLg of the Big Stone Couul , birds d ptll 3operative Livestock that he has displayed at y the oitl, to he times, into e gup. he would ha a little menagerie all to himself. The latest adverticing 'tu ir eary 28, for the prpe of reporting the pgnss made and also the jewelry shop window legged ter. to suring financiaI ]y like the gulation ely risin specimen of halyard fa with the Applitio for ]os addl appemlage in the shape of drd fnot. The bird wac bmughl ced, and an appeal is made to every  from ] [iuneapolis, where it bad fame r ia the eonnty who is designs n sown of eurlng funds on agricultural pa- Mr. Palm ld the Afrin Ipar per for fafing purpos to he pres- had  display this winter a a nice profit, and puhtmod a pair 0i monkey s, Appea in Cocert. n the touche om of Ic They a regular cut-ups and fur*ds The Minnplls Tribune lat Frl entertnment for both yo ngsterl daY gve an aeeat of a benefit con and grownups, and of  tlrs am s rt hem In Z that city ridey, in which Miss valuable odrtising f I [or th Joe Welch, daughter f r. and w'l'la is having a hard tim bring- Mrs. Ken Welch of this city took 'part ing the gent[em&n monkey p in tht straight and nW path that he Trio as piardst end reader. Mist to ha him follow. He Welch ig a tudent at MePhail Seh! (the monkey) sporty, and if g half Dr . Rifebark Adds Fluipmeat. Annoet ic made by Dr. R you n's hand near Jpitg up out of mh, e put the a complet up-to-date optics] equi F. prepaid t fellow enjoy t giants, weed. Th into his ey of blinking he moved the cigaltte and beondng eonfud put it bk into his mouth, lighted end first, like fm a trip over the verse, Swift, Yellow Medicine, Kandi. him. Bill is ha.ng a hard time kp- oyhi and Lae qni ins him raigh, and young fellow been supezntending the hipment ol a urged to keep ay fm the cage. Dr. d ........... vlding the eltins of Mayn. their home at Miibank. S. D., Sunday /he former having bn a patient at country the hpital here for I undertaking with pneumonia. NET EARNINGS BY DEPARTMENTS' IS SHOWN IN FINANCIAL and eaings of Minnesota fad web in thi Of Stats Transacted respect lt y and to the credit el tho in eharg Year Just Past, Auditor's the rp' In the mafonty Report Shows. e l ss of the , The State Insuran department g Minnesota did the Igt busine history dung the ye ju earrings of over $87,OO0, For the twelve calendar a aura elightly under $400,000. Lrg ending l)ee2mber 31, 1921, alting earning facte were thee of hate: inption with receipts of over $41., to flFt s mpiled by tar, trantiona involving a total o* O9, 01t itsptien ith reApta el $105t8774.20 we entevtd more th $175,000., and the Stt department, tary of State with ftes from the ill. OftMs amunt I150,997,72.94 p its of artiel of ivrporation total. ted receipts while the pendilalt ling" $10'/,70. Roytdtito from lt io mied on state land exceeded Sir book-keeping o o. lntest on ftm July to July, hce the teria]ly, of penditu, of state lands. me reepensibie for a state treaur w enriched f more than $,00000. extent of $22,744,590.39. Departmen Altho ipts a a necessity and beir in the balav $28,253.236.55. [or rejoicing largest ue of enue w fml tat's prosperity, it is the expdt- itate taxes amounting to all,* tu that tnte ; tt aw 71,650.08 and the *eeond largest, the payer. Some lal its 1 in gro earnings tax, merits were ]lstd It year hut they 8,000,000 a we mostly Another large enue pro- tvlty sttch as ag'ieultre, good ads the sale of motor Over tlO,o0,o00 w widch is the principal basic of the expended for th httr. good roads p itaubtrat to special aid to vetenc of pull Mlta out of the mud. Mo war and in tu the ntmmet[on of b*m $5.00000  rteeivnd from the kxmd rond Minnm' mile of auto taga sto however, Is best tom In the fob dlxet taton is the dflof Lown tabl ag" tha prlndd mum of tlam of wlth them am the ye*e lust elo*e. these Omtk ta img I0 PROPERTY VALUED AT $32,000 DESTROYED IN CORRELL FIRE Must Apply for Auto South Portion of Village Is License By February 15 Threatened in Spectacular In a new lirg issued by ike Holm, Secretary of State, penalty for delayed gistrution wifl fit fifteen days in F'ebony, in oth words, motor vehicle oxmers will be allowed until Febry 15 in which to make application or gis- without penalty for delayed gattion. Fgur .made seetary's om reveal the the s in this lation could, t hefe, be loaded into ould still be ep ough to acorn- all the people giding in the gaects for Returns for the y 1921 neighboring Tverce paid $21,882.05; Swift, $39,050.39; Lae qtti Parle,, $82,- Big Stone $85,295.0. T- verse unty being the only one ng ls th this county. 0rtenvlile Boy to Tour With Hamllne Glee Club William McLane, son of Mr. and rs, Arth, r w. McLo of thla city, 11 tour northe Minneta and North Dakota during the Febary, as a member of line GI Club, ring to an arti- :Is appearing Mr. MeLane, who is a pomo at Kamline, was among those who trod laet season, filling he position of fit tenor with that rgamzation. They appred at all f the larger wese itiec, such eattie, Salt Lake City, San Fcis The present cehedle will Forks, N. D., Brainerd. lttle Fade, d a Hmber of othar tos In the aorthern par of this tate. Preus Asks Loan For State Farmers Adoptle of "Ortoavllle Be Urged by Gover In Wuhingto. Governor J. A. O. Pret will leave Ior Whington Tueay, and while d "Or tenlle plan" of fl nanins farn cs. -e w[l interview the dirtors 'of the War Fin eorporati and as em  autno loans to unty co-opetive organition, such a.s the newly foed Big Stone County Co- S. D. Dyes, sate superintendent of favorable to the that there is nothing ], th prevents it being rried ot," Gov- ernor Pus ald today. While in Washington Governer Pre so wilL take up partment mafters affecting the of Minsot He pee to Four-Day Show, Decision Of Poultry Aeiati Extension of the Big Steve Coty eghibitim relted  a meeting of here yesterday. The lay, Feb L All pptls  being made to atlst number of t eblcl ever  of tha tate. Pmlum  b fl- sd to poRry fandwa ttng oat the ml glag the show and the  cf fine the 1 othmg loft "take the money." "Let's make thin a ceHng, ek* Ing good show. Don't mat satisfied he bbm rbben   yr ate Someone is going to rry away hon owhy not let It he ou? Revenue CoUeet6r WiU Aid In Making Returr Deputy Collector. Joh C Dgi 2C, 91, in filing tht4r 11 Im tax return, It was od todsy by Mis Msry Metren, postletress. it tg out theL thrn Mr, Du on tha abo dat Blaze That Could Be Seen For Miles. Property valued at appmxlmaty .2,000.00 w dtyed at Correli It Saturday night n the moat spee. tacui fire witnessed in this sect of the state in many years, when the two story frame building" ngied by Bott4e and Wigdalfl md the Ir yards of the Botgford Company went up in smoke, wM e vo teer fi flghte who foxed a *'hket }rl_ gede" fought vainly in sub- iu an effort to quench the Botsford Lmher Company, burned to the ground. 15o,00e feet of Itr d sheds valid in the neiffhberbood t $18,ooo. itad lu the Lbr. m'a Protective Asiatien in p portio t stock rried. Bottg mad Wigdahl stock wdued at $i8.000; in. $8,000. tfilding ed by Lynn W, valued at $8 50O inked Or $1,000. Damage to other property was comparatively sH. "Bucket Brgtde" lrmed* Starting in the Bottge d W]gdaht lepartment store, shortly after $0 e'clk and believed to have bn ea- ed by a heating atone, the fire spread with gt re#dRy th the sti mdy-te-we g- ments and other inflable merchan- di until the building w veloped thin a few minute Within a short time after the fl originated every evailable eitit o the viltagc was on the e with pdl a well neat.by, which w the erJy u of ter supply, and ghtlng of the fl by the old time methed be- . ga Handicapped by a lk of mode soen spread to the Botord yards In spite of the ntrepid efforts of the volunteer fighter. With a trong wind faaing the flames the me re- alized at el.mee w nry to pn urt spread and cals were sent to both the Appleton md Dtville departments for aid; Appleto M HeI TIve men from the Appleton d nsponded to the call, but ng. effort* to get the chadd true& thru the drifts ne th failed and they we obliged to abandon It. They t joined in the work of the other fight- e, using what wtm at hd. Spal Train Asted. While the Appleton n were on partment hw the chemi aprgt in readiness, with a replhed tlmk but the portb e that to attempt o get to Caleb with the low e1 the tck h, would be futile, Rath than to attempt the tp appeals re th ,made by the C0ell t the Mllwek Road, klng that  engi and flat t from Milhank to tav ert the ]al outfit By  alight change in the diti of the [nd, further assistao aece ry and the report the f  was under trol in me to ve trip of the speid elng made up at Milbank. Fears that pmpteA the II fur old m held for the ety of the Farmers' Eldvmor wieh w in the tth o' the fl Thls agl with grain ad the sheds gd[lol it Three lild$8 Saved. By the e of budmts three bd- ved. They were those eupied by P. E. Cobb Pro- he Northwstmm ThlVlaOr rything wa* m from them M " , laln a laerlod of = ndle ;Cal Sday lghh  by  t- I floor of the  1 st "chell, r., st about tern o,el who id it  he WS psss[,Mg   ag on h wa ho m do te. prompt sptm,by the depmneat th   ehtmles Tha fle abaft THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT J ORTONVILLE, MINN, THURSDAY, JANUARY 26, 1922 NUMBER 38 S. COUNSEL MAKES RULING IN FAVOR OF LIVESTOCK ASSOCIATION # Organization Only of Its Kind In the Gets Backing Sec. Wallace, Also. newly organized Big Stone Co-Operative Livestock Asso- L has thru the assistance of Sen- llogg, ecured a ruling of the Counsel of the War Finance holding that co-operative with substantial capital to receive funds on the as banks or trust compan- letter dated January 20, Hen- Secretary of Agriculture "l have your letter of Janu- and have noted the accompany- COpy of the telegram which has to the President. I think you assured the War Finance cor- will assist in every way con- with the legal authority under is created arld is operating. I course, be glad to do every- I can to help." Gets New Ruling. the matter up further Counsel Gerard C. Henderson that thus far advances have Rde to co-operative associa- upon negotiable warehouse so the ruling referred to in paragraph directly a'dects organization which is the first organized in the United Some time past the general pub- official circles at Wash- that the money sent by the War Finance Cor- went straight into the pock- the farmers for whose benefit )rioted. While as a mat- these funds went to coun- and by return mail to the ondents of the country pay off their loans and from thruout the country the back to Chicago and New pay back money borrowed by banks. of the operations of the up to the present time the that has been paid-is per- relieved while the country only temporarily relieved as pay the money back to the Corporation whether the or not. To the farmer, it that it means only an ex- of time but no new funds to farming or for pay- or interest. All In Same Iat. COuntry bank, it is held, is in boat as the farmer and so owner of property of any The money manipulators, it is have contracted the currertcy nation and thereby decreased all property real and per- gold and cold cash that tender. associations of far- SUch as the Big Stone County Association, will enable the banker and all business men, to work together for the good without placing all the of furnishing new funds for and necessary agricultural upon the banks alone. interested in this matter attend the meeting of the Big Co-operative Livestock to be held at the Court- Ortonville, on Saturday, Jan- The meeting has been called :00 o'clock a. ,m. Bowlers Win 7th At Fargo Tourney place at the North- Bowling Association tourna- held at Fargo, N. D., this the honor theloeal team brot them on Wednesday night on that day with a of "teams from this section of No rating can be given however, with reference to of the tournament not close until Saturday the victory over a larg of teams on Wednesday is an althe they did not bowl there were, however, teams less fortunate. the team is as follows: .................. 150 176 160---486 -..h ........... 166 156 202--524 ................ 153 148 167--468 ................ 165 178 174.17 .................. 177 179 158--514 ............ 811 837 861- won sixth place in the a score of 183, 199, 212,-- Fred Halls accom- team, bowling in both sin- Lakeside Club Elects. successful meeting of the was held at the August Friday evening, at which a large attendance. Else- held with the fol- Mel Hegge, president; vice-president; Gilbert , secretary; and Theo Nel- A program was given WaS rv Valuables Recovered from Ruins of Schoen Building Recovery of the safe from the ruins of the M. Schoen & Son building, which was destroped by fire on Thur}- day of last week was made on Tues- day and the contents were found to be in as good condition as if no fire had occurred. The safe was buried in the mass of debris and considerable work was caused in getting it out. Adjustment by the insurance com- panies having policies covering the loss was made yesterday, the adjust- er declaring it a total loss to both stock and building. Insurance carried by Mr. Schoen on the building amount- ed to $11,400 and that carried by The M. M. Johnson Furniture Company on stock and fixtures totalled $13,000. In- ventory at the close of th year show- ed the stock and fixtures valued at $25,000, which, with the valuation of $30,000 on the building makes a total loss of $55,009. Offices of the Johnson Furniture Company have been opened in the old post office building known as the A. L. Moore Land office and up to the present time no definite arrangements for opening of a new stbre have been made. Following up the outlook for the possibility of erecting a new building, an interview was had with Mr. M. Schoen and while he is the heavier loser it is his plans to rebuild. As to the type of building to be erected much depends, of course, upon the rental and the figures given by the contractors. New Millinery Store for City; To Open Soon Ortonville is to have another mil- linery store, the location of which will be in the building occupied by The Ortonville Electric Shop. The new store will be conducted by the Misses Juliat Llma and Mary Christensen of Lamberton, Minn., who arrived here yesterday and are making the neces- sary arrangements. Opening dates will be announced later. The Christensen sisters have had considerable experience in the Millin- ery and Dressmaking business, hav- ing conducted a store at Lamberton for the past three years. A new stock is expected to mTive in a short time. The Ortonville Electric Shop will re- main in the same building, using the north one-half. Popular Company Of Entertainers Coming Clint and Bessie Robbins Open Six Day Engagement Monday At Orpheum Clint ancJ Bessie Robbins, North Da- kota's favorites, will open their en- gagement at the Orpheum theatre on Monday evening, January 30, in Fran- cis Nordstrom's great comedy "The Ruined Lady." Miss Grace George, one of Ameri- ca's best comediennes, produced this play last season in New York and Chicago and spent the entire year in these two cities. Bessie Robbins has the part created by Miss George and she is at her best in this comedy. Clint Robbins plays the "old bachelor" who has been engaged for eight years but never has even made an attempt to set the marriage date. Two children of "Ann" Mortimer's" sister are left in her care when the sister is killed in a railroad accident and "Bill" and she, t, a ,, father a:nd mother them. Bill takes everything for granted that they will be married when the children grow up, but evidently does not see them do so, for it takes a friend of Anne's to awaken her to the fact that she must do something desperate to make "Bill" see the situation and "wake Bill up." She does this and gets herself into a terrible predicament and ruins her reputation. The laughs come thick and fast and it is one of the cleanest and best comedies ever written. As always, Clint and Bessie mount their plays in lavish manner and the costuming is a feature. Unusual vaudeville numbers will be presented by Charles Hammond, the world's greatest novelty artist, Pauline Thom- as, operatic soprano, and others. A splendid orchestra is another big asset to really give you something worth while. The plays to be presented are "The Ruined Lady," "Nothing But the Truth," "Polyanna," "A Runawavy Match," "Friendly Enemies," "Wed- ding Bells," and "The Lady Detec- tive." Each play has had a six months to one yems run in Chicago and New York and never received afivrse criti- cism. Miss Mary Shumaker entertained a number o friends Wednesday Itfter- noon in honor of Mrs. Herbert Ostlind of Everett, Wash., and Miss Elms of Seattle, Wash. Miss Elms lenves this afternoon for Seattle. City's "Prettiest Girls" To Appear In Tribune Young ladies of this city who have been in the habit of admiring or criticizing the photographs appearing every Sunday in the Minneapolis Tri- bune in the rotogravure section under the title, "Fair Women of the North- west," now have the opportunity to show the rst of the readers of that paper that Ortonville is the home of "pretty girls." In reply to a letter written by Wal- ter Dinnel, of the Reed Studio here. Miss Ethel B. Calhoun, in charge o the department and who selects the photographs published in the Tribune, states: "We would be pleased to have you furnish us with photos of the prettiest girls in your town. We would like about 15 photographs of the prettiest girls in Ortonville, pre- ferably unmarried." Every young lady in the city de- sirous of competing for the honor will be photographed without charge and will also be given one photograph free, regardless of whether the subject is selected to appear m the paper. While no particular time was named by the paper as to when the pictures will ap- pear, it is expected that it will be towards spring. However, Mr. Din- nel, is instructed to send the photos in as soon as possible. Three Legged Rooster and Sporty Monkey At Palm's If Bill Palm could gather all of the different animals, birds and reptiles that he has displayed at various times, into one group, he would have a little menagerie all to himself. The latest advertising feature in that line which will soon be seen in the jewelry shop window is a three legged rooster. This bird looks exact- ly like the regulation early rising specimen of barnyard fame with the added appendage in the shape of a third foot. The bird was brought here from Minneapolis, where it had been shown. Mr. Palm sold the African leopard that he had on display this winter at a nice profit, and purchased a pair of monkeys, which can be seen any day in the music room of his jewelry store. They are regular cut-ups and furnish entertainment for both youngsters and grownups, and of course are a valuable advertising feature for the owner. "Bill" is having a hard time bring- ing the gentleman monkey up in the straight and narrow path that he would like to have him follow. He (the monkey) has an inclination to be a little sporty, and if given half a chance would smoke cigarettes, proven when he grabbed a cigarette out of a young man's hand near the cage. Jumping up out of reach, he put the c4garet in his mouth, like a regular fellow .and proceeded to enjoy the weed. The smoke however curled up into his eyes and nose and after a lot of blinking he removed the cigarette, and becoming confused put it back into his mouth, lighted end first, like many a young fellow has done before him. Bill is having a hard time keep- ing him straight, and young fellows of bad habits are urged to keep away from the cage. Dr. and Mrs. Neill Cliff returned to their home at Milbank, S. D., Sunday, the former having been a patient at the hospital here for several weeks with pneumonia. Farm Institute Series Will Open Jan. 31 at Prior Questions uppermost in the minds of the farmers of the county today, relative to the livestock and grain farming will be discussed in a series of meetings held thruout the county ureter the auspices of the Farm Bu- reau, by some of the leading extension department men of the Agricultural College of St. Paul, the first of which will be held at the Prior Town Hall on Tuesday, January 31, The sched- ule as announced includes a meeting at Odessa, on February 11, one at C lint o n February 25; Beardsley, February 27 and one at Correll on March 21. The meetings, it is stated, will be practical---dealing with farm prob- lems of today, and the men who will conduct them come with the reputa- tion of being real "dirt farmers" and not mere theorists. How can the farmer best utilize the crop he produces ? How shall he mar- ket it ? Will livestock return mor on the investment than traight grain farming? What is the value of an acre of alfalfa or clover utilized in different ways? These are some of the topics for consideration together with questions pertaining to the cost of producing an acre of corn, an acre of wheat and a pound of pork. Livestock Association To Meet Here Saturday A meeting of the Big Stone County Co-operative Livestock Association has been called by the officers, to be held at the courthouse in this city at 10:00 o'clock a. m., on Saturday, Jan'- uary 28, for the purpose of reporting the progress made and also to con- sider matters of importance with ref- erence to securing financial aid thrn the War Finance Corporation. Application for loans will be con- sidered at this ,meeting it is announ- ced, and an appeal is made to every farmer in the county who is desirous of securing funds on agricultural pa- per for farming purposes to be pres- ent. Appears in Cncert. The Minneapolis Tribune last Fri- day gave an account of a benefit con- rt held in Leabanon Lutheran church that city Friday, in which Miss Joyce Welch, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ken Welch of this city took part as a member of the Hennepin Ladies' Trio as pianist and reader. Miss Welch is a student at McPhail School of Music and Dramatic Art. Dr. Rifenbark Adds Equipment. Announcement is made by Dr. R. D. Rifenbark that he has just received a complete up-to-date optical equip- ment and that he is now prepared to fit glasses. With the addition of this equipment Dr. R_ifenbark now has an office that is lacking in no particular. Charles Matthews retui-ned Tuesday from a trip over the counties of Tra- verse, Swift, Yellow Medicine, Kandi- oyhi and Lac qui Parle where he has been superintending the shipment of corn for the Near East Relief suffer- ers. He states that two farmers near Maynard offered to give a carload of corn providing the citizens of Mayn- ard donate a car and the surrounding country a third car, and that they are undertaking to raise the corn to meet the offer. NET EARNINGS BY DEPARTMENTS IS SHOWN IN FINANCIAL REPORT Largest Business In History Of State Transacted I n Year Just Past, Auditor's Report Shows. Minnesota did the largest business in its history during the year just closed. For the twelve calendar months ending December 31, 1921, according to figures compiled by the State Audi- tor, transactions involving a total of $102,387,474.20 were entered in the books of the department. O this amount $150,997,726.94 repre- sented receipts while the expenditures totalled $51,389,747.26. The legal book-keeping period for the state is from July to July, hence the excess of expenditures. From taxes of various kinds the state treasury was enriched to the extent of $22,744,590.39. Department- al fees and other earnings contributed the balance, $28253.236.55. The largest source of revenue was from state taxes amounting to $11,- 271,650.08 and the econd largest, the railroad gross earnings tax. From this source more than $8,000,000 was realized. Another large revenue pro- ducer was the sale of motor licenses which is the principal basis of the good roads program inaugurated to pull Minnesota out of the mud. More than $5,000,000 was received from the sale of auto tags. While direct taxation is the chief source of revenue of every common- wealth there are other lines of reve- nue and these are found, in depart- @ mental fees and earnings of various kinds. Minnesota fared well in this respect last year and to the credit of those in charge it must be said that the receipts in the majority of cases were in excess of the expenditures: The State Insurance department gave its check for over $125,000. The Dairy & Food department was credited with earnings of over $175,000, and the State Game and Fish Commission with a sum slightly under $400,000. Large earning factors were those of hotel inspection with receipts of over $41,- 000, Oil Inspection with receipts of more than $173,000, and the Secre- tary of State with fees from the fil- ing of articles of incorporation total- ling $107,705. Royalties from iron ore mined on state land exceeded $1,- ooo,ooo. Interest on state loans added materially, likewise the interest due on the sale of state lands. The two were responsible for a contribution of more than $3,000,000. Altho receipts are a necessity and their increase with the years cause for rejoicing and an indication of the state's prosperity, it is the expendi- tures that interest the average tax payer. Some large items in disburse- ments were listed last year but they were mostly in aid of some state ac- tivity such as agriculture, good roads and education. Over $10,000,000 was expended for the latter. Next came special aid to veterans of the world war and in return the construction of good roads. Minnesota's financial story however, is best told in the fol- lowing tables covering the principal items of receipts and expenditures for the year just closed. (.tinued at pate 8) PROPERTY VALUED AT $32,000 DESTROYED IN CORRELL FIRE = Must Apply for Auto License l#y February 15 In a new ruling issued by Mike Holm, Secretary of State, penalty for delayed registration will be waived for the first fifteen days in February. in other words, motor vehicle owners will be allowed until February 15 in which to make application for regis- tration without penalty for delayed registration. Figures .made public from the state secretary's office reveal the informa- tion that there is in this state one automobile for every seven of the pop- ulation. Two thirds of the entire pop- ulation could, therefore, be loaded into motor vehicles of the state and there would still be space enough to accom- modate all the people residing in the State of Nevada as invited guests for the same ride. Returns for the year 1921 shows that the neighboring counties have paid in more than Big Stone county, which indicates that they possess more autoes or else more luxurious ones and less Fords. Traverse paid $21,382.05; Swift, $39,050.39; Lac qui Parle,, $42,- 590.36 and Big Stone $25,295.05. Tra- verse county being the only one pay- ing less than this county. Ortonville Boy to Tour With Hamline Glee Club William McLane, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. McLane of this city, will tour northern Minnesota and North Dakota during the month of February, as a member of the Ham- line Glee Club, according to an arti- cle appearing in the Hamline Oracle. Mr. McLane, who is a sophomore at Hamline, was among those who toured the western coast last season, filling the position of first tenor with that organization. They appeared at all of the larger western cities, such as Seattle, Salt Lake City, San Francisco Butte and Omaha. The present schedule will take the Club to Willmar, Alexaniria, Grand Forks, N. D., Brainerd, Little Falls, and a number of other towns in the northern part of this state. Preus Asks Loan For State Farmers Adoption of "Ortonville Plan" Will Be Urged by Governor In Washington. Governor J. A. O. Preus will leave for Washington Tuesday, and while there will urge adoption of the socall- ed "Ortonville plan" of financing farm loans. He will interview the directors of the War Finance corporation and ask them to authorize loans to county co-operative organizations, such as the newly formed Big Stone County Co- operative Loan association. S. D. Duea, state superintendent of banks, has conferred with the Minne- apolis agricultural loan committee. "I understand that the Minneapolis com- mittee is favorable to the plan, and that there is nothing in the law that prevents it being carried out," Gov- ernor Preus said today. While in Washington Governor Preus also will take up several de- partment matCters affecting the state of Minnesota. He expects to return next week. Four-Day Show, Decision Of Poultry Association Extension of the Big Stone County Poultry Association's Fourth Annual Show from a three day to a four day exhibition resulted at a meeting of the directors held here yesterday. The opening date of the show is Wednes- day, February 1. All preparations are being made to handle what is expected will be the largest number of prize chickens ever exhibited at a show in this part of the state. Premium lists have been mail- ed to poultry fanciers setting out the rules governing the show and the prizes to be offered. So Local breed- ers of fine feathers have nothing left to do now but bring their birds in and "take the money." "Let's make this a cracking, cack- ling good show. Don't rest satisfied until your birds have been judged and the blue ribbon tacked to your crate. Someone is going to carry away hon- ors--why not let it be you ? Revenue CollectOr Will Aid In Making Returns Deputy Collector, John C. Douglas of the United States Internal Revenue Bureau will be in Ortonville on Febru- ary 20, 21, and 22 to assist tax payers in filing their 1921 income tax return. it was announced today by Miss Mary Mogren, postmistress. Anyone interested in securing as- sistance in making out their returns are requested to call on Mr. Douglas on the above datea. South Portion of Village Is Threatened in Spectacular Blaze That Could Be Seen For Miles. Property valued at approximately $32,000.00 was destroyed at Correll last Saturday night in the most spec- tacular fire witnessed in this section of the state in many years, when the two story frame building occupied by Bottge and Wigdahl and the lumber yards of the Botsford Company went up m smoke, while velunteer fire fighters who formed a "bucket bri- gade" fought vainly in sub-zero weather in an effort to quench the flames. Losses reported are as follows: Botsford Lumber Company, burned to the ground. 150,000 feet of lumber and sheds valued in the neighborhood of $15,000. Insured in the Lumber- men's Protective Association in pro- portion to stock carried. Bottge and Wigdahl stock valued at $13,000; in- surance $8,000. Building owned by Lynn Woods, valued at $3,500, insured for $1,000. Damage to other property was comparatively small. "Bucket Brigade" Formed. Starting in the Bottge and Wigdaht department store, shortly after 8:00 o'clock and believed to have been caus- ed by a heating stoe, the fire spread with great rapidity thru the section devoted to ladies ready-to-wear gar- ments and other inflamable merchan- dise until the building was enveloped in flames within a few minutes. Within a short time after the fire originated every available citizen of the village was on the scene with pail in hand and in a few minutes enough men were on deck to form a line from a well nearby, which was the only source of water supply, and fighting of the fire by the old time method be- gan. Handicapped by a lack of modem methods to combat the flames the fire soon spread to the Botsford yards in spite of the intrepid efforts of the volunteer fighters. With a strong wind fanning the flames the men re- alized that assistance was necessary to prevent further spread and calls were sent to both the Appleton and Ortonville departments for aid. Appleton Men Help. Twelve men from the Appleton de- ,partment responded to the call, but because of a blizzard that was raging, efforts to get the chemical truck thru the drifts near there failed and they were obliged to abandon it. They then joined in the work of the other fight- ers, using what was at hand. Special Train Asked. While the Appleton men were on he scene members of the local de- partment had the chemica[ apparatus in readiness, with a replenished tank,c but the report came that to attempt to get to Correll with the low clear- ance which the truck has, would be futile. Rather than to attempt the trip appeals were then ,made by the citizens of Correll to the Milwaukee Road, asking that an engine and fiat car be sent from Milbank to trans- port the local outfit. By a slight change in the direction of the Wind, however, further assistance was deemed  unnecessary and the report came that the fire was under control in time to save a trip of the special being made up at Milbank. Fears that prompted the call for aid were held for the safety of the Farmers' Elevator which was in the path of the fire. This was well stored with grain and the sheds adjoining it with coal and wood, Three Buildings Saved. By the use of buckets three build- ings at the rear of the Bottge and Wig- dahl store were saved. They were those occupied by 1t. E. Cobb Pro- duce Company, Ed. Kingsreiter, and the Northwestern Telephone Co. Ev. erything was moved from these build- ings to the street, including the tele- phone equipment. The fire, which was the second large one in this county within a period of a little over forty-eight hours, cattle be seen easily from Odessa and the Yel- lowbank territory, a distance o .15 miles. Fire Department Called Out On Coldest Night Fire at the Art Pufald garage orL Sunday night, caused by an overheat- ed furnace, brought out the fire de- partment on the coldest night this year and burned a tire and front wheel from a Ford car, doing damage to the car and floor of the garage valued at 60.00. The fire was reported by John Miehell, Jr., at about ten o'clock, who noticed it as he was passing the gar- age on his way home from down town. Prompt responseby the department resulted in quenching the flames by the use of chemicals. The floor about the furnace, which is a one flue heat- er, is thought to have become satur atod With gasoline drtplg from I leaky carborator of a Ford ear which was standing a short distam from thin register.