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Ortonville, Minnesota
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January 27, 1998     The Ortonville Independent
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January 27, 1998
 

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BELLINGHAM GIRL SCOUTS received t-shirts from the Bellingham Firemen. This year the girls have three troops; Troop #132-Daisies; Troop #133-Brownies; and Troop #134 -Junior Girl Scouts. Left to right in front, are Chris Larson, leader, Brandy Larson, Shantelle Butters, Kara Maatz, Haliegh Strei, Chelsea Haugen and Pare Jacobson, leader. In back are Megan Croatt, Caitlin Spors, Amanda Krogsrud, Heidi Franzky and Jenna Radermacher. Not pictured are Whitley Strei, Kali Maatz, Maria Borgerson and Kristin Schluetter. Big Stone County Precipitation Data Charles Hanson Farm on Artichoke Lake Updated by John Cunnlngham January 20, 1998 Normal 1991 January 0.63 0.24 February 0.68 0.69 March 1.82 1.62 April 2.32 3.43 May 2.98 3.32 June 4.10 7.51 July 3.21 5.32 August 3.09 3.81 September 1.86 2.71 October 1.93 0.69 November 1.02 1.18 December 0.64 0.47 Total 24.28 30.99 Def. 1992 Def. 199____33 Def. 1994 Def. 1995 Def._.__.. 1996 Def. 1997 Def.._._._. -0.39 0.66 0.03 1.01 0.38 0.76 0.13 0.61 -0.02 2.20 1.57 3.19 2.56 0.01 0.51 -0.17 0.26 -0.42 0.93 0.25 0.29 -0.39 0.56 -0.12 0.53 -0.15 -0.20 1.15 -0.67 1.58 -0.24 0.53 -1.29 3.48 1.66 0.52 -1.30 1.43 -0.39 1.I1 1.60 -0.72 2.10 -0.22 4.31 1.99 2.98 0.66 0.60 -1.72 3.22 0.90 0.34 1.34 -1.64 .3.50 0.52 1.50 -1.48 3.39 0.41 4.25 1.27 0.99 -1.99 3.41 7.90 3.80 5".62 1.52 2.22 -1.88 2.98 -1.12 1.54 -2.56 2.01 -2.09 2.11 3.55 0.34 8.14 4.93 5.41 2.20 6.51 3.30 5.05 1.84 3.63 0.42 0.72 1.90 -1.19 2.68 -0.41 2.26 -0.83 5.19 2.10 3.39 0.30 3.59 0.59 0.85 1.71 -0.15 2.02 0.16 2.55 0.69 3.58 1.72 3.22 1.36 1.37 -0.49 -1.24 0.38 -1.55 0.47 -1.46 2.94 1.01 3.04 1.11 4.23 2.30 3.59 1.66 0.16 1.68 0.66 2.19 1.17 0.94 -0.08 0.24 -0.78 1.57 0.55 0.64 -0.38 -0.17 0.45 -0.19 0.97 0.33 0.24 -0.40 0.55 -0.09 1.74 1.10 0.17 -0.47 6.71 22.83 -1.45 30.54 6.26 24.59 0.31 32.84 8.56 28.87 4.59 24.36 0.08 Total excess precipitation January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1997 equals 25.06 inches. Extension report Jean Kvols, County Extension Educator TIPS FOR HELPING FRAIL ELDERS IN DAILY ACTIVITIES The following tips from the Parkinson&apos;s Disease Foundation and Parent Care Advisor may help caregivers in modifications which help elders function fairly effectively for a number of years despite physical limitations. These suggestions may apply to any person who is having difficulties with activities of daily living * Allow the person three to five times as long to perform simple tasks such as eating, bathing, brushing teeth and dressing. Those with Parkinson's disease can accomplish only one task at a time. * Make the home safer by removing all loose rugs and doorsills, adding handrails adjacent to all stairs or steps, and rearranging furniture to allow plenty of space for movement around a room. * Place a heavy piece of furniture next to the bed for support so the elder can get out of bed more easily. Or tie a sheet with a knot in it to the foot of the bed or a sturdy bedpost so the person can grasp the knot and pull up to a sitting position. * Use clothing that fastens in the front rather than the back. Velcro closes more easily than buttons or zippers. * If underweight, encourage frail elder to consume more calories by eating five or six light meals daily. As many meals as possible should be eaten with friends or relatives to bolster social stimulation. If chewing and handling food becomes difficult, have elder use a spoon instead of a fork and serve more semisolid foods. * Have a plumber raise the toilet seat a few inches above the bowl or purchase a raised toilet seat at a medical supply store. Either help in getting on or off the stool. * Buy a wheelchair and keep it available for times when the elder becomes tired or stiffens. * Be sure the frail elder takes medication fike Clockwork. A delay of even 15 minutes can bring on troublesome results for a Parkinson's disease patient. * If frail elder is hospitalized, provide hospital personnel with a list of the requirements for managmb the Freshest Meat in the Areat patient's Parkinson's disease, such as medication schedule and need for frequent turning in bed. Source: Adapted from "Practical tips for making your parent's daily life easier" in Parent Care Advisor, December 1992. DATES TO REMEMBER: January 27 - Big Ston.. County Extension Committee meeting at Clinton Memorial Building (7:00 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8:00 AM - 5:30 PM ORTONVILLE, MN PHONE (320) 839-2653 Per Lb. S, " QQ[ DELl HAM ................... -.-,,v I Per Lb. I COUNTRY RING - ___ I S SAUSAGE ................... ,791 Locally Grown Pod< - Per Lb _ __ HALF A HOG ................. 89 Haft or Whole Loin - Per Lb. T-BONE STEAKS .................... *3.59 We've Added A COMPUTERIZED PPG PAINT MIXING SYSTEM Totally eliminates human error. Aninfinite number of colors to choose from. Makes a perfect color match every time. Quickly and accurately figures estimates...no need to wait. Lifetime PPG warranty STOP IN AND SEE STEVE TODAY. P_ROG R E$S I V COLLISION & GLASS CENTER, INC. Steve and Linda Roggenbuck 109 SE 2nd St.. Ortonville, MN 56278 (320) 839-2255 Toll Free 888-819-2255 i Minnesota farmland prices keep going The average sales price of Minnesota farmland went up again in 1997, according to the University of Minnesota's annual study. "The buying enthusiasm I reported a  ago seems unchecked," says Steve T, a public policy economist with the uii-versity. The 1997 study of 1,634 sales showed a median price of $916 per acre of farmland, compared to $901 in 1996 and $759 in 1995. Most 1997 sales were for parcels of 160 acres or less. "Hardly anyone buys whole farms anymore," Taft says. Most transactions are for pieces of farms, and purchasers are not new farmers, but neighbors reminding out existing operations. Some of the high prices can't be supported by conventional farming income from the parcels themselves, Taft says. "But many farmers and lenders tell me these prices make sense from a whole-farm perspective. As long as farms continue to be can- nibalized by neighbors to round out their land base, there will be higher prices." But some high farmland prices have little to do with production potential, Taft says. "As long as resi- dential development pressures at the edge of big and small towns remain unchecked by effective land use poli- cies, there will be upward pressure on farmland for conversion into residen- tial use. "And as long as people are pre- pared to buy farms to retire on, enjoy on weekends, hunt on or simply to enjoy the pleasures of ownership, there will be upward pressure on prices. The production component seems to be losing its prominence-- even in traditional farming areas--to the financial, locational and specula- tire components." Taft says use of farmland data needs scrutiny. "Is land' really a separate Possibly we should shift analysis of a single 'land' rural areas, one that operates dently of intended use, whether crops, recreation, timber or tion." The study is reported in the 1997, issue of the Agricultural Economist, "' by the University of Extension Service, http://w ww.extension.ul edu/newslet.html. Free single copies of the tion are available from Library, Department of Economics, 1994 Buford Paul, MN 55108-6040, (612) 1705 ifieds[ p.m.) January 29 - Corn-Soybean Day at Clinton Memorial Building (1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m,) January 30 - West Central Ag Expo at TACC, Montevideo (9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.) February 1 - County 4-H Fruit Sales begin February 3 - Swine Production Options meeting at Hotel Hunt, Montevideo (9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.) February 6- Private Pesticide Applicator Training at .Clinton Memorial Building (1:30 p.m.) February 16 - Courthouse closed for Presidents' Day February 16 - 4-H Federation Meeting at Clinton Memorial Building (7:30 p.m.) followed by Ambassador meeting OAHS Auxiliary to meet Feb. 10 OAHS Auxiliary will hold their February meeting on the 10th at 2 p.m. in the south dining room at Northridge. Guest speaker will be Teri Sass, Activity Director. Her topic will be Edenization for Northridge. Auxiliary members are encouraged to bring a guest. 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We can offer financing customized to YOUR needs to help carry out YOUR plans. to six the pdation f; 1 Projec ty critc on the Scott Maas Verden Gerber Dalen Roe Equal Opportunity Lender MINNWEST K d00IK ORTONVILLE MINNWEST BANK GROUP 25 No'thwest Second Street Ortonville, Minnesota 56278 Phone 320-839-2568 MoneyLine 1-888-616-2265 Page 10  INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan.'21,