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Ortonville, Minnesota
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January 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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January 28, 2003
 

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Ortonville a heart" l Non00,rDv000000wE0a0er,n0000,v0000om00uEn,,, N [ ENT j ! !i I I SUPP E CHARRED REMAINS are all thai is left of SoDak Supper Club and the adjoining home of the David OsterlOhphoto.) family. The family was away at the time of the fire early Saturday morning. (Wilmot Collin Peterson visits with Big Stone County Commissioners destroys SoDak Supper ub, home on Big Stone Lake almost completely engulfed in flames. The fire department worked to keep the fire from spreading to adja- cent property, which was successful, but the fire was too far advanced to save the structure. Firemen remained on the scene until mid-morning Saturday. The Osterlohs, along with their three children, resided in the living quarters which adjoined the supper club. The contents of the business, home and garage were destroyed. The family was out of town when the fire Courtesy of Wilmot Enterprise Wilmot, SD ;upper Club and the own- mg home on the South of Big Stone Lake were by a fire early Saturday approximately 3 a.m. on • 25, the Wilmot, SD Fire was dispatched to a fire at club. Upon arrival to the found the business and and Sara Oslerloh occurred. As of press time, the origin of the fire is not known. The Osterlohs, at this point, are unsure of whether they "will rebuild. They are staying with Sara's parents, the Gary Mohs in Miibank, SD tem- porarily until a permanent place is found. A household shower will be held for the Osterlohs on Saturday, Feb. 8 from 2-5 p.m. at St. Mary's Catholic Church Center in Wilmot. ounty Fair dates anged; set July 10-13 at first; most carnivals were booked for the 2003 season. We then visited with a carmval that is just getting started and were able to book them. However, they did not have the week- end open that we were preparing for. So we had to move the dates of the Big Stone County Fair to July 10 through July 13. "It makes it two weeks earlier than last year so we are hoping that this change is not a problem but that it will bring some good things to the fair," commented Elaine Gustafson, Fair Board Secretary. Big Stone County Fair Board that the County Fair dates changed tor 2003. Secretary Elaine makes the following state- ling the new dates and the change: past three months there carnivals that have discontinue doing business This has affected many our own Big Stone of all it is very difficult lval to come to our area distance for them to travel and also the small population. Most of the carnivals are based out of the"Twin Cities area or thereabouts so that is a big consideration for them when they have to haul their equip- meat almost 200 miles, set up every- thing and get it to working by a cer- tain deadline• "We received a call from our past carnival person late in December telling us that he was no longer work- ing in Minnesota. We had tried to call a couple of carnivals that were on our list and their dates were all filled. "At the convention in Bloomington this past weekend, it didn't look good run k drivers to face inful hangover in 2003 2002. The December campaign was a success. The Ortonville Police Department reports that no one was arrested for a DWI along with 0 crash- es, 0 traffic-related injuries and 0 traf- fic related fatalities during the cam- paign. The Safe and Sober campaign is funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and administered by OTS. Safe and Sober is designed to reduce, traffic-related fatalities and injuries. take more than aspirin and to cure the hangover from citation that drunk drivers rag the Minnesota Safety Office of (OTS) Safe and Sober Dec. ! 2 - Jan. o our efforts, 'drive sober' is tdded to many Ortonville Year's resolutions," Mork of the Ortonville "Considering the it should be an easy ")." A DWI offense can result in jail time, legal fees, increased insurance premiums and loss of job. These fees, fines and increased premiums can reach $19,000. Ortonville Police Department was joined in the statewide campaign by 350 other agencies and the State Patrol. Ortonville officers did their job - they made OrtonvillCs roads safer. Our goal was to save the holi- days from being ruined by this igno- rant crime of drunk driving. This is the second statewide enforcement of impaired driving in nson informs farmers on II ,n-gifting to non-profits vator and the grain slip be put in the Looking Back on 2002 inside The Independent's 19th annual special "Looking Back" section, featuring photo highlights of the past year in this area is inside this issue of the Independent. Also complied in this sec- tion is the historical record- ings of area business firms and how long each has been in business. Collin Peterson, U.S. House of Representative from District 7 visited with County Commissioners at the meeting on Jan. 21. Peterson sits on the Agricultural Committee and dis- cussed a variety of farm programs with the Board. Commissioner Maas stated that farmers who were giving up their dairy operations were break- ing up their alfalfa fields and were at a disadvantage as there was no basis for government payments on that land. Peterson told Commissioners that large commercial growers had lobbied against including alfalfa in the program. In response to questions from Commissioner Athey, Peterson dis- cussed at length the difficulties of negotiating anything for dairy in the State due to the strong influence of the California dairy industry. Peterson made clear his support for livestock operations in the western half of the state as the best economic opportunities for the area, and with the use of new technology, he felt the environmental impact would be negli- gible. John Cunningham, of the Big Stone County Extension Service, received the Board's approval to sup- port the West Central Growth farmers are asked to of the following Blair Johnson, CPA, originally Big Stone County inquiring about the tax of gifting grain to your • organization. There are lags to do to make this you give a prior year's crop is a commod- becomes a capital asset. is not considered to be so you don't get as can be taken to the ele- !:i !i !+ BIG STONE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS met last week with U.S. House of Representative, Collin Peterson, (right), pictured with Commis- sioner Wade Athey (left) and Commissioner Bruce Swigerd. Alliance's Rural Minnesota Catch-Up Program. The program proposes that fifty-six counties from rural Minneso- ta receive CUPTax Credits amounting to $150,000 per county, to expand the economic base and job growth by uti- lizing tax credit incentives. Darren Wilke, Environmental Officer reviewed with the Board of Commissioners the status of the Hut- terite hog confinement proposal and outlined the process. Donald Dickman was named to the Water Planning Committee to serve a three-year term. Declining school enrollment may require some cuts Ortonville's School Board, at its Jan. 22nd meeting, passed a resolution directing the superintendent to recom- mend adjustments in curriculum, pro- grams and staff for next year. The resolution was needed because of a drop in enrollment from 621 to 613 at the present time. The sense of the meeting was to be immediately proactive, so that input could be had from staff and citizenry, as well as from the board. It was felt that advance planning would require fewer adjustments. Because of a number of injuries national specs for vault pits were changed this year. No added time to be in compliance was allowed• A two or three year time span for compliance is usual, but not this time, the coach said. A motion to upgrade Ortonville's pole vault pit to Olympic standard was passed by the board. This bent over backward to avoid the chance of injury. An Olympic pit is larger and better than a college pit, which in turn is larger and better than the standard high school size. Entrance lees will be adjusted as a result. A presentation was made to the board for interact based courses. These were offered thru SWWC ser- vices cooperative. The courses would be for subjects not normally offered, particularly in smaller schools. The subjects would be taught by regular instructors over the interact. Krispy Kreme donuts raise "fun" for library Krispy Kreme Donuts are coming to Ortonville! The Ortonville Public Library will be bringing in the delicious Krispy Kreme Donuts on Feb. 14, 2003 Valentine's Day. Treat your sweetheart to some wonderful donuts. Orders will be taken for the Krispy Kreme glazed donuts until noon on Monday, Feb. 10th. They come one dozen to a box. Each box cost is $6.00. All orders must be paid for in advance. Orders can be placed at the Ortonville Public Library and The Dancing Bean in Ortonville; Hansen Chevrolet in Browns Valley; Bobby Jo's Cafe in Beardsley and the Graceville Public Library. Orders are to be picked up at the same place you placed your order. Therefore, if you order in Beardsley, you must pick up in Beardsley, etc. All orders must be received no later than noon on Monday, Feb. 10th. Delivery will be done on Friday, Feb. 14th with stops in Browns Valley around I1 a.m.; Beardsley at 11:15; Graceville at 11:45 and Ortonville around noon. Orders in Ortonville must be picked up at the Library by 3 p.m. Orders in Graceville must be picked up by 5. p.m. If such a program were started, Ortonville would need to provide one person as a facilitator. Oceanography was cited as one example of such a course. At this time, SWWC has about 50 such courses to offer, at maximum. Ortonville would need to design its own program. No action was taken as this is all new. In other news, the board organized for the coming year, electing the same officers as bclore, and choosing repre- sentatives lor a number of commit- tees. January bills in the amount of 482,069.00 were approved, and the replacement of one or two buses was discussed, but not acted upon. Change in meeting for Citizen for BSL There's been a change in meeting time for "Citizens for Big Stone Lake." They will meet in the base- ment of Ortonville's VFW on Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. Featured speaker will be Julie Jensen, Regional Representative for 20,000 member Clean Water Action Alliance of Renville County. Her position is monitoring and acting for the public in regards to swine operation. Please come and bring any- one who cares about Big Stone Lake. Cookies and coffee will be served. organizations name. That way the 'organization owns the crop and it can be sold whenever the organization wishes to sell it. The organization would be liable for any storage costs, etc. "o The farmer kind of gets a double deduction. The farmer does not have (Continued on page 2) Bill Martig rites pending Funeral services for William "Bill" Martig, 47, of Clinton, are pending with the Moberg-Larson Funeral Home in Clinton. FRIGID WEATHER OF LATE has now and then created some picturesque scenes in our area.., one being the smoke that rises from the Big Stone Power Plant and the Northern Lights ethanol plant located just west of Big Stone City. Ortonville a heart" l Non00,rDv000000wE0a0er,n0000,v0000om00uEn,,, N [ ENT j ! !i I I SUPP E CHARRED REMAINS are all thai is left of SoDak Supper Club and the adjoining home of the David OsterlOhphoto.) family. The family was away at the time of the fire early Saturday morning. (Wilmot Collin Peterson visits with Big Stone County Commissioners destroys SoDak Supper ub, home on Big Stone Lake almost completely engulfed in flames. The fire department worked to keep the fire from spreading to adja- cent property, which was successful, but the fire was too far advanced to save the structure. Firemen remained on the scene until mid-morning Saturday. The Osterlohs, along with their three children, resided in the living quarters which adjoined the supper club. The contents of the business, home and garage were destroyed. The family was out of town when the fire Courtesy of Wilmot Enterprise Wilmot, SD ;upper Club and the own- mg home on the South of Big Stone Lake were by a fire early Saturday approximately 3 a.m. on • 25, the Wilmot, SD Fire was dispatched to a fire at club. Upon arrival to the found the business and and Sara Oslerloh occurred. As of press time, the origin of the fire is not known. The Osterlohs, at this point, are unsure of whether they "will rebuild. They are staying with Sara's parents, the Gary Mohs in Miibank, SD tem- porarily until a permanent place is found. A household shower will be held for the Osterlohs on Saturday, Feb. 8 from 2-5 p.m. at St. Mary's Catholic Church Center in Wilmot. ounty Fair dates anged; set July 10-13 at first; most carnivals were booked for the 2003 season. We then visited with a carmval that is just getting started and were able to book them. However, they did not have the week- end open that we were preparing for. So we had to move the dates of the Big Stone County Fair to July 10 through July 13. "It makes it two weeks earlier than last year so we are hoping that this change is not a problem but that it will bring some good things to the fair," commented Elaine Gustafson, Fair Board Secretary. Big Stone County Fair Board that the County Fair dates changed tor 2003. Secretary Elaine makes the following state- ling the new dates and the change: past three months there carnivals that have discontinue doing business This has affected many our own Big Stone of all it is very difficult lval to come to our area distance for them to travel and also the small population. Most of the carnivals are based out of the"Twin Cities area or thereabouts so that is a big consideration for them when they have to haul their equip- meat almost 200 miles, set up every- thing and get it to working by a cer- tain deadline• "We received a call from our past carnival person late in December telling us that he was no longer work- ing in Minnesota. We had tried to call a couple of carnivals that were on our list and their dates were all filled. "At the convention in Bloomington this past weekend, it didn't look good run k drivers to face inful hangover in 2003 2002. The December campaign was a success. The Ortonville Police Department reports that no one was arrested for a DWI along with 0 crash- es, 0 traffic-related injuries and 0 traf- fic related fatalities during the cam- paign. The Safe and Sober campaign is funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and administered by OTS. Safe and Sober is designed to reduce, traffic-related fatalities and injuries. take more than aspirin and to cure the hangover from citation that drunk drivers rag the Minnesota Safety Office of (OTS) Safe and Sober Dec. ! 2 - Jan. o our efforts, 'drive sober' is tdded to many Ortonville Year's resolutions," Mork of the Ortonville "Considering the it should be an easy ")." A DWI offense can result in jail time, legal fees, increased insurance premiums and loss of job. These fees, fines and increased premiums can reach $19,000. Ortonville Police Department was joined in the statewide campaign by 350 other agencies and the State Patrol. Ortonville officers did their job - they made OrtonvillCs roads safer. Our goal was to save the holi- days from being ruined by this igno- rant crime of drunk driving. This is the second statewide enforcement of impaired driving in nson informs farmers on II ,n-gifting to non-profits vator and the grain slip be put in the Looking Back on 2002 inside The Independent's 19th annual special "Looking Back" section, featuring photo highlights of the past year in this area is inside this issue of the Independent. Also complied in this sec- tion is the historical record- ings of area business firms and how long each has been in business. Collin Peterson, U.S. House of Representative from District 7 visited with County Commissioners at the meeting on Jan. 21. Peterson sits on the Agricultural Committee and dis- cussed a variety of farm programs with the Board. Commissioner Maas stated that farmers who were giving up their dairy operations were break- ing up their alfalfa fields and were at a disadvantage as there was no basis for government payments on that land. Peterson told Commissioners that large commercial growers had lobbied against including alfalfa in the program. In response to questions from Commissioner Athey, Peterson dis- cussed at length the difficulties of negotiating anything for dairy in the State due to the strong influence of the California dairy industry. Peterson made clear his support for livestock operations in the western half of the state as the best economic opportunities for the area, and with the use of new technology, he felt the environmental impact would be negli- gible. John Cunningham, of the Big Stone County Extension Service, received the Board's approval to sup- port the West Central Growth farmers are asked to of the following Blair Johnson, CPA, originally Big Stone County inquiring about the tax of gifting grain to your • organization. There are lags to do to make this you give a prior year's crop is a commod- becomes a capital asset. is not considered to be so you don't get as can be taken to the ele- !:i !i !+ BIG STONE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS met last week with U.S. House of Representative, Collin Peterson, (right), pictured with Commis- sioner Wade Athey (left) and Commissioner Bruce Swigerd. Alliance's Rural Minnesota Catch-Up Program. The program proposes that fifty-six counties from rural Minneso- ta receive CUPTax Credits amounting to $150,000 per county, to expand the economic base and job growth by uti- lizing tax credit incentives. Darren Wilke, Environmental Officer reviewed with the Board of Commissioners the status of the Hut- terite hog confinement proposal and outlined the process. Donald Dickman was named to the Water Planning Committee to serve a three-year term. Declining school enrollment may require some cuts Ortonville's School Board, at its Jan. 22nd meeting, passed a resolution directing the superintendent to recom- mend adjustments in curriculum, pro- grams and staff for next year. The resolution was needed because of a drop in enrollment from 621 to 613 at the present time. The sense of the meeting was to be immediately proactive, so that input could be had from staff and citizenry, as well as from the board. It was felt that advance planning would require fewer adjustments. Because of a number of injuries national specs for vault pits were changed this year. No added time to be in compliance was allowed• A two or three year time span for compliance is usual, but not this time, the coach said. A motion to upgrade Ortonville's pole vault pit to Olympic standard was passed by the board. This bent over backward to avoid the chance of injury. An Olympic pit is larger and better than a college pit, which in turn is larger and better than the standard high school size. Entrance lees will be adjusted as a result. A presentation was made to the board for interact based courses. These were offered thru SWWC ser- vices cooperative. The courses would be for subjects not normally offered, particularly in smaller schools. The subjects would be taught by regular instructors over the interact. Krispy Kreme donuts raise "fun" for library Krispy Kreme Donuts are coming to Ortonville! The Ortonville Public Library will be bringing in the delicious Krispy Kreme Donuts on Feb. 14, 2003 Valentine's Day. Treat your sweetheart to some wonderful donuts. Orders will be taken for the Krispy Kreme glazed donuts until noon on Monday, Feb. 10th. They come one dozen to a box. Each box cost is $6.00. All orders must be paid for in advance. Orders can be placed at the Ortonville Public Library and The Dancing Bean in Ortonville; Hansen Chevrolet in Browns Valley; Bobby Jo's Cafe in Beardsley and the Graceville Public Library. Orders are to be picked up at the same place you placed your order. Therefore, if you order in Beardsley, you must pick up in Beardsley, etc. All orders must be received no later than noon on Monday, Feb. 10th. Delivery will be done on Friday, Feb. 14th with stops in Browns Valley around I1 a.m.; Beardsley at 11:15; Graceville at 11:45 and Ortonville around noon. Orders in Ortonville must be picked up at the Library by 3 p.m. Orders in Graceville must be picked up by 5. p.m. If such a program were started, Ortonville would need to provide one person as a facilitator. Oceanography was cited as one example of such a course. At this time, SWWC has about 50 such courses to offer, at maximum. Ortonville would need to design its own program. No action was taken as this is all new. In other news, the board organized for the coming year, electing the same officers as bclore, and choosing repre- sentatives lor a number of commit- tees. January bills in the amount of 482,069.00 were approved, and the replacement of one or two buses was discussed, but not acted upon. Change in meeting for Citizen for BSL There's been a change in meeting time for "Citizens for Big Stone Lake." They will meet in the base- ment of Ortonville's VFW on Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. Featured speaker will be Julie Jensen, Regional Representative for 20,000 member Clean Water Action Alliance of Renville County. Her position is monitoring and acting for the public in regards to swine operation. Please come and bring any- one who cares about Big Stone Lake. Cookies and coffee will be served. organizations name. That way the 'organization owns the crop and it can be sold whenever the organization wishes to sell it. The organization would be liable for any storage costs, etc. "o The farmer kind of gets a double deduction. The farmer does not have (Continued on page 2) Bill Martig rites pending Funeral services for William "Bill" Martig, 47, of Clinton, are pending with the Moberg-Larson Funeral Home in Clinton. FRIGID WEATHER OF LATE has now and then created some picturesque scenes in our area.., one being the smoke that rises from the Big Stone Power Plant and the Northern Lights ethanol plant located just west of Big Stone City.