Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
January 28, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 4     (4 of 28 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 28 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
January 28, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Editorial comment OHS girl gymnasts tackled by excellent Benson program Ortonville girls gymnastic team hosted two home duals (his week. On Monday, Jan. 20, the Milbank Bulldogs visited Ortonville and on Fri. Jan. 24, the Benson Braves trav- eled to the Ortonville Armory. The Bulldogs came away victori- ous by scoring 122.57 to Ortonville's 101.87. Milbank was strong in all four events while the Trojans were weak- ened in the bar scores. The balance beam competitors have been working harder so there was a rise in those rou- tines for the night compared to ealier this season. Vault scores were once again strong for the team with Lucinda McMahon socring an 8.05 for third place, Ashley Henrich a 7.7, Julia Nelson scored 7.55, Katie Hedge a 7.25, and Kira Sherod a 6.65. Floor scores are up and down depending if the competitors hit their difficult tumble passes. Lucinda McMahon placed third with a 7.25, while other scores were Katie Hedge 6.45, Ashley Henrich 6.3, Julia Nelson 535, and Kailea Anderson 5.25. Lucinda McMahon led the balance beam competitors with a 7.3, followed by Kira Sherod 6.3, Kailea Anderson 6.0, Katie Hedge 5.4 and Karin Anderson, 5.15. The uneven bar scores were hard to understand the last two meets. The athletes are weak in difficulty ratings, but strong in execution and had been scoring in the five range all season, but lately the judges have been scor- ing them down a whole point. Lucinda McMahon managed a decent score of 6.45 even with a fall in the routine. At the all-around position, Lucinda McMahon scored a 27.05 for third place while Katie Hedge scored a 32.55. The B squad came away perform- ing well for a second meet in a row by scoring a 79.5, their second best score of the season. Milbank scored a 90.5. This group of competitors have really improved on the beam and bars the last few weeks. Individual placers were, Ashley Henrich, 2nd in beam with 5.8, Karin Anderson, 3rd in floor with a 5.85, and Jenny Maas, second in uneven bars with a 5.1. The Benson Braves were a domi- nant team of club-trained athletes that came away with a 131.05 on Friday night to Ortonville's 105.7. The Trojans improved the quality of their floor and beam routines during this meet. Lucinda McMahon was the only placer in the top with a third in all-around with a 30.15. Coach Becky Hotlquist knew the team coudn't defeat a team such as Benson who spends many hours off-season train- ing at a club, but was pleased to see the ahtletes score their second best team score of the year. Scores were: beam, Kailea Anderson 5.55, Karin Anderson 6.15, Katie Hedge 5.8, and Lucinda McMahon 6.8. Vault, Julia Nelson 6.9, Kira Sherod 7.4, Katie Hedge 7.65, Ashley Henrich 7.9, and Lucinda McMahon 8.3. Floor exer- cise, Julia Nelson 6.45, Katie Hedge 6.4, Ashley Henrich 7.45, Lucinda McMahon 8.3. Uneven bars, Jenny Maas 5.0 and Lucinda McMahon 6.75. All around, Katie Hedge, 24.8. The B-squad scored a 70.3 to Benson's 86.8. Three girls placed; Ashley Henrich placed second on bars with a 5.1 and third on beam with a 5.1, Karin Anderson placed third on bars with a 4.5 and Nicole Henrich placed second on vault with a 6.8. The team competes twice this coming week, with a quadrangular in Milbank on January 28, and a dual in Paynesville on January 31. Gymnast of the week goes to Ashley Henrich who raised her varsi- ty floor routine a point this last week to bit a personal best of 7.45. She also placed on bars and beam at the B- squad level against Benson. Bonanza Education Center receives Southwest Minnesota Foundation grant Bonanza Education Center (BEC) the ag.ing to participate in communi- The Nature in Art camp will bring was recently awarded a grant of $13,500 from the Southwest Minnesota Foundation (SWMF). SWMF is an independent, nonprofit corporation that has contributed over $32 million to date through its grant and loan programs in the 18 counties of southwest Minnesota. These counties include: Big Stone, Chippewa, Cottonwood, Jackson, Kandiyohi, Lac qui Parle, Lincoln, Lyon, McLeod, Meeker, Murray, Nobles, Pipestone, Redwood, arid Renville. The mission of the SWMF is to be a catalyst, facilitating opportunities for economic, social, and cultural ties, mcrease youth potential, and increase the SWMF's endowment. This is the second year that BEC has received grant money from the SWME The funds will be used to increase intergenerational program- ming and awareness in the communi- ties of Big Stone County. The aim is to provide an opportunity for the area youth to work with adults and seniors on projects at BEC and within their own communities. A prairie restora- tion project and a Nature in Art camp will both begin in March 2003. The prairie restoration project will bring together youth, adults and seniors, businesses and community growth by promoting philanthropy, groups with anywhere from a general leadership, innovation, and coUabora ..... to. profssit interest "tn prairie tion for the eighteen counties of southwest Minnesota. The priorities of,the SWMF are to increase the value of new and existing businesses, increase opportunities for people of color to participate in com- munities, increase opportunities for habitat and restoration to restore a small area of non-native brome grass back to native Oak savanna / tallgrass prairie. The project will include plan- ning, preparing and planting the area while everyone learns more about the prairie that is native to this area. together youth and local artists to meet and learn from each other. The participants could work in any art form as long as it incorporates the nat- ural world found at BEC. This project would culminate with an art exhibi- tion open to the public at BEC at the end of May. Other upcoming evehts at BEC include: a cross-country ski and snow- shoe workshop (Feb. 15), moonlight snowshoeing (Feb. 16), outdoor sur- vival skills (March 8), and a two evening fly tying workshop (March 11 and 13). If you are interested in learning more about any of these events, please contact Matyi Sundheim, BEC Coordinator at (320)26t-694# or bonanza@info-link.net. The SWMF may be contacted at 800-594-9480. in re@ swmnfoundation.com or through their website: www.swmn- foundation.org for more information. Governor releases budget fix, Ethanol takes big hit to economic development in rural get cuts," Sen. Kubly said. "Round Hundreds of farmers converged on the State Capitol Jan. 16 to voice their concern about Gov. Pawlenty's pro- posed cuts to ethanol producers: State Senator Gary Kubly (DFL-Granite Falls) met with many area farmers. "The governor has proposed a $26.8 million cut to the ethanol pro- ducers," Sen. Kubly said. "This elim- inates payment to a program that has been a boon for rural communities" A day before the budget cuts were announced, Sen. Kubly said the Department of Agriculture commis- sioner had told them that the ethanol producer payment would be cut by the governor by 1 cent this year and 3 cents for the 2004-05 budget cycle. "The Department of Agriculture did a study showing that Minnesota has gained $16 for every $1 it has spent on the ethanol industry," Sen. Kubly said. "Gov. Pawlenty claims that he is interested in economic development and helping farmers, yet he took this action that puts a definite crimp in the economic development for rural areas with plants. "The ethanol industry has created 750 jobs in ethanol plants here in Minnesota with a total payroll of $25 million per year. I believe that the state should continue its commitments GYMNAST OF THE WEEK goes to Ashley Henrich who raised-her varsity floor routine a point this last week to hit a personal best. communities at a time when we need to jump start Minnesota's economy and keep people working." Sen. Kubly said he was pleased with a number of farmers who were able to come to the Capitol to voice their concerns. "While rural legislators understand what these cuts will mean to our com- munities, we need help educating urban and suburban lawmakers about the ethanol industry," Sen. Kubly said. "In 1996, the Legislature passed a law providing, help to ethatml pro- ducers for 10 years." New legislators need to know this and hear firsthand from producers how important these payments are to the industry's suc- cess. "The message may have also got- ten through to the governor. To his credit, he said he will reconsider restoring some of the cuts." Ethanol is not the only area of funding to be cut. Other areas cut under the governor's proposal include transportation projects, reserves for early childhood family education (ECFE) and community education grants to battered women programs, contaminated site cleanup grants, and a program to help veterans. In addi- tion, state employees will be reduced and those remaining may also be asked to take a reduction in pay and there will be a delay in tax refunds to businesses on capital equipment. "This is only round one of the bud- Cards of thanks We would like io-than]-Jill and Marie for organizing the benefit on Willie's behalf, Patty and crew for preparing and serving the meal (It was delicious!), all of you who donat- ed baskets for the auction, Denese and Janine for taking pictures and Kristi for recording. We would espe- cially like to thank all of you who were able to attend the benefit. We could never adequately thank every- one for their generous contributions. THANK YOU ALL 1-1" The Martig Family two will be larger and far reaching. I suspect property tax payers and local units of government will be impacted, and people will notice a sharp decline in srate services. "The governor and the House Republicans say that the message from the last election was that people want less 'state "spending,' but it's important for people to know that the state does not spend money on itself, it spends money on people, When people want to camp at a state park, take part in a prescription drug pro- gram, or apply for dislocated workers benefits, they need to realize that those services may be limited or elim- inated." ONCE AGAIN ... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Clifford Thompson Debbie Brunder Lillian Wendland Cecelia Huizinga Jim & Terie McLaughlin Althea Smith Tim Kottke Charles Maletta Wallace Heffernan Nella Kvatum Stan Lynne Rick Taylor Gen Strube Adelia Knutson Robert Pflueger Jeannie Issendorf Lois Sherod Sandra Gibson Doug Fraasch Inez Fraasch Kevin Rademacher Ray Volkenant Warren Kennedy Gordon Hippen Janet Pohlen David Samuelson LeRoy Wiese Merlen Perseke Mayme Jurgens Dakota Storage Bldgs LeRoy Schoon (C 20i)3 8ochler Post-Bullelin Co. LL C Ed FEscher Syndicate fischerfpostbulletin corn [ ,uxiliary notes " By Joyce Scherer, Secretary American Legion Auxiliary Gertje Van lath Unit 229 met at 7:30 pm on Jan. 14, 2003 at Legion Club. Hostess was Shirley Voeltz. 9 members present. President called meeting to order. Secretary's & Treasurer's reports read and approved. Secretary read thank yous from Gladys Torgerson & Children's Hospital in Sioux Falls Committee reports: Membership - At 107. Calendars netted $689.50 for 2003 calendars. Elayne read letter from Joan Anderson on upcoming events and our progress report. Old business - The people for July wedding bowed out of our services. New business Bowling tournament discussed. Joyce Schercr to get back at next meeting if decision has been made to attend. Letter from Ronald McDonald House was read regarding donations. Motion made, seconded and carried that we give $25.00. Letter to be sent asking for info as to where we can send can caps. Geneve to send card and memorial to Crystal Freiwald on death of her mother. Motion made, seconded and carried that Arvilla Bergseth be our Legionnette tbr this year. The members as a whole decided we should send Valentine Cards to the following - Frances Steltz, Darlene Barnhardt, Lindy Belgum, Hilda Kaiser, Margaret Gerhardt, Winifred Balk and Ruth Hansen. Geneve to do this. Motion made, seconded that we pay bills: Joyce Scherer - $23.76 for , postage Elaync closed meeting. Hostess for February will be Virginia Bunting and Jeanne B. Cloos. Letters to the editor To the Editor: I have hesitated to write this letter, knowing that it could have increased the swollen profits of a religious fraud. The fact is we have been had! Webster defined "wizardry" as follows: "The art or practice of a wizard; witchcraft; magic; sorcery, SYN. see magic." It has had its appeal to the naive, especially children, by the use of magic to supposedly accomplish a good deed. Writer of the "Potter" books is not only promoting her witchcraft religion m schools, but she is also getting unconciencable profits. Witchcraft-wizardry is recognized by the Supreme Court as a religion. It is arecognized religion in the U.S. army. But it is in many of our public schools. Don't expect the so- called "American Civil Liberty's I III Union" to engage in a lawsuit against the witchcraft religion being in public schools. The fraudulent ACLU is only interested in destroying ethical religion, especially Christianity. Wizardry or witchcraft has no moral code, only a superficial do-goodism. Exploiters destroy or distort christianity to accomplish their evil deeds. The Ten Commandments and Christian love are outlawed. But witchcraft is glamorized and taught to little children. Wake up America! Wesley Olson Box 142 Clinton MN 56225 ph 320-325 5565 Gausman benefit set for Feb., 9th A benefit for Mona Gausman, held Sunday, Feb. 9th, at the Chokio assistant pastor at Eidskog, will be school. More details next week. DAKOTA STOIIAGE BUItDINGS Solid, weft constructed Portable Storage Buildings FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 50 MILES DAKOTA STORAGE BUll.DINGS 605-432-6889 5.8 Miles South on Hwy. 15 Milbank, SD Mon-Fri. 8-5 Sat. by appointment The Ortonville Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) OOO110 JAMES D. KAER Publisher/Managing SUZETI'E Editor and ARLENE WlESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition EMILEE OKESON Compositor/Receptionist ARDIE ECKARDT Reporter/Photographer BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Jan. 28, 2003 Vol. 85; Continuing Published Every Ortonville, MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortonville, $30.00 per year in Big Parle, Traverse and Swift Minnesota, Grant and Roberts in South Dakota. $34.00 for counties in Minnesota and All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Independent, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE - ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE Big Stone, Lac qui Swift Counties In Grant and Roberts In South | February ........... 3000 August ....... March ................ 27.50 September., Apdt .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 November,.,., June .................. 20.00 December ..... July ................... 17.50 January ........ ALL OTHERS IN MINN. AND SO. February ........... 34.00 August March ................ 31.24 Apdl .................. 2840 October _.,... May .................. 25.56 November,., June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 January.,....; ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MI AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 August March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 October .,..." May ................... 2853 November,.., June .................. 2536 December,..; July ................... 22.19 January ,, ,.., "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY The Publisher shall not be liable changes or typographical errors not lessen the value of The Publisher's liability for other d omissions in connection with tisement is strictl' the advertisement in any issue or the refund of any monies the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be to classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM A Holidays may affect office LETTERS POLICY Letters to the munity issues are writers should be aware Independent reserves the and/or condense letters for paper also reserves the right lish letters that are unsuitable or' it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain the printed or typed name, sit address and telephone Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are asked to selves to one letter per month. keep letter brief, pefferably not words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independent determining what is advertising is news is based on one simple If an individual business or zation charges for admission for an item or for a service, it will advertising. In other we charge." Advertising is the life-blood of taper. Without it a cease to exist. The receives for subscriptions a is used to paper used in producing the no longer does so because of increases. It stilt covers the and a small portion of the paper Advertising to a news crops and livestock to farmers; cts to the grocer; and underwear to the and plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those business would not be hess. ADS: We reserve the right to advertising without obligation our decision, POLICIES: A News: Our goal is fully and accurately as staff's opinions will appear or opinion page, A Editorials: Opinions rage, whether locally written or om other sources is intended late thinking and discussion readers. Opinions. expressed tor are her own and of other staff members. expressed in "items from tions may be contradictory own views, but are eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 839-3761 to place displa sifted advertising Ortonvllle Inde mail Page 4 INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan. 28, Editorial comment OHS girl gymnasts tackled by excellent Benson program Ortonville girls gymnastic team hosted two home duals (his week. On Monday, Jan. 20, the Milbank Bulldogs visited Ortonville and on Fri. Jan. 24, the Benson Braves trav- eled to the Ortonville Armory. The Bulldogs came away victori- ous by scoring 122.57 to Ortonville's 101.87. Milbank was strong in all four events while the Trojans were weak- ened in the bar scores. The balance beam competitors have been working harder so there was a rise in those rou- tines for the night compared to ealier this season. Vault scores were once again strong for the team with Lucinda McMahon socring an 8.05 for third place, Ashley Henrich a 7.7, Julia Nelson scored 7.55, Katie Hedge a 7.25, and Kira Sherod a 6.65. Floor scores are up and down depending if the competitors hit their difficult tumble passes. Lucinda McMahon placed third with a 7.25, while other scores were Katie Hedge 6.45, Ashley Henrich 6.3, Julia Nelson 535, and Kailea Anderson 5.25. Lucinda McMahon led the balance beam competitors with a 7.3, followed by Kira Sherod 6.3, Kailea Anderson 6.0, Katie Hedge 5.4 and Karin Anderson, 5.15. The uneven bar scores were hard to understand the last two meets. The athletes are weak in difficulty ratings, but strong in execution and had been scoring in the five range all season, but lately the judges have been scor- ing them down a whole point. Lucinda McMahon managed a decent score of 6.45 even with a fall in the routine. At the all-around position, Lucinda McMahon scored a 27.05 for third place while Katie Hedge scored a 32.55. The B squad came away perform- ing well for a second meet in a row by scoring a 79.5, their second best score of the season. Milbank scored a 90.5. This group of competitors have really improved on the beam and bars the last few weeks. Individual placers were, Ashley Henrich, 2nd in beam with 5.8, Karin Anderson, 3rd in floor with a 5.85, and Jenny Maas, second in uneven bars with a 5.1. The Benson Braves were a domi- nant team of club-trained athletes that came away with a 131.05 on Friday night to Ortonville's 105.7. The Trojans improved the quality of their floor and beam routines during this meet. Lucinda McMahon was the only placer in the top with a third in all-around with a 30.15. Coach Becky Hotlquist knew the team coudn't defeat a team such as Benson who spends many hours off-season train- ing at a club, but was pleased to see the ahtletes score their second best team score of the year. Scores were: beam, Kailea Anderson 5.55, Karin Anderson 6.15, Katie Hedge 5.8, and Lucinda McMahon 6.8. Vault, Julia Nelson 6.9, Kira Sherod 7.4, Katie Hedge 7.65, Ashley Henrich 7.9, and Lucinda McMahon 8.3. Floor exer- cise, Julia Nelson 6.45, Katie Hedge 6.4, Ashley Henrich 7.45, Lucinda McMahon 8.3. Uneven bars, Jenny Maas 5.0 and Lucinda McMahon 6.75. All around, Katie Hedge, 24.8. The B-squad scored a 70.3 to Benson's 86.8. Three girls placed; Ashley Henrich placed second on bars with a 5.1 and third on beam with a 5.1, Karin Anderson placed third on bars with a 4.5 and Nicole Henrich placed second on vault with a 6.8. The team competes twice this coming week, with a quadrangular in Milbank on January 28, and a dual in Paynesville on January 31. Gymnast of the week goes to Ashley Henrich who raised her varsi- ty floor routine a point this last week to bit a personal best of 7.45. She also placed on bars and beam at the B- squad level against Benson. Bonanza Education Center receives Southwest Minnesota Foundation grant Bonanza Education Center (BEC) the ag.ing to participate in communi- The Nature in Art camp will bring was recently awarded a grant of $13,500 from the Southwest Minnesota Foundation (SWMF). SWMF is an independent, nonprofit corporation that has contributed over $32 million to date through its grant and loan programs in the 18 counties of southwest Minnesota. These counties include: Big Stone, Chippewa, Cottonwood, Jackson, Kandiyohi, Lac qui Parle, Lincoln, Lyon, McLeod, Meeker, Murray, Nobles, Pipestone, Redwood, arid Renville. The mission of the SWMF is to be a catalyst, facilitating opportunities for economic, social, and cultural ties, mcrease youth potential, and increase the SWMF's endowment. This is the second year that BEC has received grant money from the SWME The funds will be used to increase intergenerational program- ming and awareness in the communi- ties of Big Stone County. The aim is to provide an opportunity for the area youth to work with adults and seniors on projects at BEC and within their own communities. A prairie restora- tion project and a Nature in Art camp will both begin in March 2003. The prairie restoration project will bring together youth, adults and seniors, businesses and community growth by promoting philanthropy, groups with anywhere from a general leadership, innovation, and coUabora ..... to. profssit interest "tn prairie tion for the eighteen counties of southwest Minnesota. The priorities of,the SWMF are to increase the value of new and existing businesses, increase opportunities for people of color to participate in com- munities, increase opportunities for habitat and restoration to restore a small area of non-native brome grass back to native Oak savanna / tallgrass prairie. The project will include plan- ning, preparing and planting the area while everyone learns more about the prairie that is native to this area. together youth and local artists to meet and learn from each other. The participants could work in any art form as long as it incorporates the nat- ural world found at BEC. This project would culminate with an art exhibi- tion open to the public at BEC at the end of May. Other upcoming evehts at BEC include: a cross-country ski and snow- shoe workshop (Feb. 15), moonlight snowshoeing (Feb. 16), outdoor sur- vival skills (March 8), and a two evening fly tying workshop (March 11 and 13). If you are interested in learning more about any of these events, please contact Matyi Sundheim, BEC Coordinator at (320)26t-694# or bonanza@info-link.net. The SWMF may be contacted at 800-594-9480. in re@ swmnfoundation.com or through their website: www.swmn- foundation.org for more information. Governor releases budget fix, Ethanol takes big hit to economic development in rural get cuts," Sen. Kubly said. "Round Hundreds of farmers converged on the State Capitol Jan. 16 to voice their concern about Gov. Pawlenty's pro- posed cuts to ethanol producers: State Senator Gary Kubly (DFL-Granite Falls) met with many area farmers. "The governor has proposed a $26.8 million cut to the ethanol pro- ducers," Sen. Kubly said. "This elim- inates payment to a program that has been a boon for rural communities" A day before the budget cuts were announced, Sen. Kubly said the Department of Agriculture commis- sioner had told them that the ethanol producer payment would be cut by the governor by 1 cent this year and 3 cents for the 2004-05 budget cycle. "The Department of Agriculture did a study showing that Minnesota has gained $16 for every $1 it has spent on the ethanol industry," Sen. Kubly said. "Gov. Pawlenty claims that he is interested in economic development and helping farmers, yet he took this action that puts a definite crimp in the economic development for rural areas with plants. "The ethanol industry has created 750 jobs in ethanol plants here in Minnesota with a total payroll of $25 million per year. I believe that the state should continue its commitments GYMNAST OF THE WEEK goes to Ashley Henrich who raised-her varsity floor routine a point this last week to hit a personal best. communities at a time when we need to jump start Minnesota's economy and keep people working." Sen. Kubly said he was pleased with a number of farmers who were able to come to the Capitol to voice their concerns. "While rural legislators understand what these cuts will mean to our com- munities, we need help educating urban and suburban lawmakers about the ethanol industry," Sen. Kubly said. "In 1996, the Legislature passed a law providing, help to ethatml pro- ducers for 10 years." New legislators need to know this and hear firsthand from producers how important these payments are to the industry's suc- cess. "The message may have also got- ten through to the governor. To his credit, he said he will reconsider restoring some of the cuts." Ethanol is not the only area of funding to be cut. Other areas cut under the governor's proposal include transportation projects, reserves for early childhood family education (ECFE) and community education grants to battered women programs, contaminated site cleanup grants, and a program to help veterans. In addi- tion, state employees will be reduced and those remaining may also be asked to take a reduction in pay and there will be a delay in tax refunds to businesses on capital equipment. "This is only round one of the bud- Cards of thanks We would like io-than]-Jill and Marie for organizing the benefit on Willie's behalf, Patty and crew for preparing and serving the meal (It was delicious!), all of you who donat- ed baskets for the auction, Denese and Janine for taking pictures and Kristi for recording. We would espe- cially like to thank all of you who were able to attend the benefit. We could never adequately thank every- one for their generous contributions. THANK YOU ALL 1-1" The Martig Family two will be larger and far reaching. I suspect property tax payers and local units of government will be impacted, and people will notice a sharp decline in srate services. "The governor and the House Republicans say that the message from the last election was that people want less 'state "spending,' but it's important for people to know that the state does not spend money on itself, it spends money on people, When people want to camp at a state park, take part in a prescription drug pro- gram, or apply for dislocated workers benefits, they need to realize that those services may be limited or elim- inated." ONCE AGAIN ... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Clifford Thompson Debbie Brunder Lillian Wendland Cecelia Huizinga Jim & Terie McLaughlin Althea Smith Tim Kottke Charles Maletta Wallace Heffernan Nella Kvatum Stan Lynne Rick Taylor Gen Strube Adelia Knutson Robert Pflueger Jeannie Issendorf Lois Sherod Sandra Gibson Doug Fraasch Inez Fraasch Kevin Rademacher Ray Volkenant Warren Kennedy Gordon Hippen Janet Pohlen David Samuelson LeRoy Wiese Merlen Perseke Mayme Jurgens Dakota Storage Bldgs LeRoy Schoon (C 20i)3 8ochler Post-Bullelin Co. LL C Ed FEscher Syndicate fischerfpostbulletin corn [ ,uxiliary notes " By Joyce Scherer, Secretary American Legion Auxiliary Gertje Van lath Unit 229 met at 7:30 pm on Jan. 14, 2003 at Legion Club. Hostess was Shirley Voeltz. 9 members present. President called meeting to order. Secretary's & Treasurer's reports read and approved. Secretary read thank yous from Gladys Torgerson & Children's Hospital in Sioux Falls Committee reports: Membership - At 107. Calendars netted $689.50 for 2003 calendars. Elayne read letter from Joan Anderson on upcoming events and our progress report. Old business - The people for July wedding bowed out of our services. New business Bowling tournament discussed. Joyce Schercr to get back at next meeting if decision has been made to attend. Letter from Ronald McDonald House was read regarding donations. Motion made, seconded and carried that we give $25.00. Letter to be sent asking for info as to where we can send can caps. Geneve to send card and memorial to Crystal Freiwald on death of her mother. Motion made, seconded and carried that Arvilla Bergseth be our Legionnette tbr this year. The members as a whole decided we should send Valentine Cards to the following - Frances Steltz, Darlene Barnhardt, Lindy Belgum, Hilda Kaiser, Margaret Gerhardt, Winifred Balk and Ruth Hansen. Geneve to do this. Motion made, seconded that we pay bills: Joyce Scherer - $23.76 for , postage Elaync closed meeting. Hostess for February will be Virginia Bunting and Jeanne B. Cloos. Letters to the editor To the Editor: I have hesitated to write this letter, knowing that it could have increased the swollen profits of a religious fraud. The fact is we have been had! Webster defined "wizardry" as follows: "The art or practice of a wizard; witchcraft; magic; sorcery, SYN. see magic." It has had its appeal to the naive, especially children, by the use of magic to supposedly accomplish a good deed. Writer of the "Potter" books is not only promoting her witchcraft religion m schools, but she is also getting unconciencable profits. Witchcraft-wizardry is recognized by the Supreme Court as a religion. It is arecognized religion in the U.S. army. But it is in many of our public schools. Don't expect the so- called "American Civil Liberty's I III Union" to engage in a lawsuit against the witchcraft religion being in public schools. The fraudulent ACLU is only interested in destroying ethical religion, especially Christianity. Wizardry or witchcraft has no moral code, only a superficial do-goodism. Exploiters destroy or distort christianity to accomplish their evil deeds. The Ten Commandments and Christian love are outlawed. But witchcraft is glamorized and taught to little children. Wake up America! Wesley Olson Box 142 Clinton MN 56225 ph 320-325 5565 Gausman benefit set for Feb., 9th A benefit for Mona Gausman, held Sunday, Feb. 9th, at the Chokio assistant pastor at Eidskog, will be school. More details next week. DAKOTA STOIIAGE BUItDINGS Solid, weft constructed Portable Storage Buildings FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 50 MILES DAKOTA STORAGE BUll.DINGS 605-432-6889 5.8 Miles South on Hwy. 15 Milbank, SD Mon-Fri. 8-5 Sat. by appointment The Ortonville Independent (U.S.P.S. 412-460) OOO110 JAMES D. KAER Publisher/Managing SUZETI'E Editor and ARLENE WlESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition EMILEE OKESON Compositor/Receptionist ARDIE ECKARDT Reporter/Photographer BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM GRONFELD Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Jan. 28, 2003 Vol. 85; Continuing Published Every Ortonville, MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortonville, $30.00 per year in Big Parle, Traverse and Swift Minnesota, Grant and Roberts in South Dakota. $34.00 for counties in Minnesota and All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Independent, Ortonville, Minnesota 56278. NEW SUBSCRIPTION RATE SCHEDULE - ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE Big Stone, Lac qui Swift Counties In Grant and Roberts In South | February ........... 3000 August ....... March ................ 27.50 September., Apdt .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 November,.,., June .................. 20.00 December ..... July ................... 17.50 January ........ ALL OTHERS IN MINN. AND SO. February ........... 34.00 August March ................ 31.24 Apdl .................. 2840 October _.,... May .................. 25.56 November,., June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 January.,....; ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF MI AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 August March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 October .,..." May ................... 2853 November,.., June .................. 2536 December,..; July ................... 22.19 January ,, ,.., "PUBLISHER'S LIABILITY The Publisher shall not be liable changes or typographical errors not lessen the value of The Publisher's liability for other d omissions in connection with tisement is strictl' the advertisement in any issue or the refund of any monies the advertisement. DEADLINES Church notes - Saturday mail Display ads - Friday mail Correspondence - Monday mail Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will be to classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 AM-5 PM A Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Thursday: 8 AM-12 NOON; A Friday: 8 AM-5 PM A Holidays may affect office LETTERS POLICY Letters to the munity issues are writers should be aware Independent reserves the and/or condense letters for paper also reserves the right lish letters that are unsuitable or' it might be held legally liable. Letters should contain the printed or typed name, sit address and telephone Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are asked to selves to one letter per month. keep letter brief, pefferably not words, and to the point. AD vs. NEWS The Ortonville Independent determining what is advertising is news is based on one simple If an individual business or zation charges for admission for an item or for a service, it will advertising. In other we charge." Advertising is the life-blood of taper. Without it a cease to exist. The receives for subscriptions a is used to paper used in producing the no longer does so because of increases. It stilt covers the and a small portion of the paper Advertising to a news crops and livestock to farmers; cts to the grocer; and underwear to the and plows and tractors to the dealer. Without any of those business would not be hess. ADS: We reserve the right to advertising without obligation our decision, POLICIES: A News: Our goal is fully and accurately as staff's opinions will appear or opinion page, A Editorials: Opinions rage, whether locally written or om other sources is intended late thinking and discussion readers. Opinions. expressed tor are her own and of other staff members. expressed in "items from tions may be contradictory own views, but are eral interest. Phone 320-839-6163 839-3761 to place displa sifted advertising Ortonvllle Inde mail Page 4 INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Jan. 28,