Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
February 9, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 1     (1 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 20 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 9, 1999
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Ortonvflle a heart" IN on00,rDv.,owEo.r,o000000.Oo00muEoi,, " ND NT f BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS OF AMERICA traveled to Granite Falls for Regional competition and members will be advanclngto the state level. In back from left to right are Noah Zehringer, Dave leremy Iverson, Brian Hasslen, Mike Graham and Tom Inforzato. Next row, Mike Barnhardt, i nompson, John Thomas, Scott Sandberg, Erika Kaiser, Becca Reisdorf, Dustin Karels, and Dan Third to last row, Grant Botker, Becca Zahrbock, Amanda Hillman, Kristi Volkenant, Kristin Weber, Karels and Matt Karels. Second row, Abby Johnson, Adrienne Foster, Sarah Molden, Lynn Peterson iley. In front are Jamie Swenson, Jamie Wester and Amber Anderson. See story inside this sec- nton man pleads not guilty criminal sexual conduct Laveme Jorgenson, 50, of made his first appear- Wednesday in Big Stone Court on two counts of crimi- conduct, one in the third in the fourth degree, as well as g alcohol under 21. to Big Stone County the Sheriff's received a report of a sex- ual assault in early July of 1997. The victim, a 19-year-old male, alleged he and Jorgenson had met at a Graceville street dance and again at a Big Stone City, SD street dance the previous weekend. After Jorgenson bought the 19- year-old beer, the two went to Jorgenson's home where court doccu- merits stated Jorgenson made advances toward the victim, and asked if he minded nudity. Court documents further stated Jorgenson placed his head on the vic- tim's shoulder several times and touched the victim's pubic hair after following him to the bathroom. The documents stated Jorgenson continued to furnish alcohol to the vic- tim, who eventually fell asleep. When the victim awoke, he found Jorgenson performing oral sex on him, after which Jorgenson gave the victim a ride home and appologized for the incident. On July 15, 1997, Deputy John Haukos spoke to a juvenile who ailed- edly had a similar experience with Jorgenson, this one a 15-year old male. Jorgenson pleaded not guilty at his first appearance and was released on his own recognizance, on the condi- tion he have no contact with either young man. Criminal sexual conduct in the third degree carries a maximum penal- ty of 15 years in jail, a $30,000 fine, or both, and criminal sexual conduct in the fourth degree carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in jail, a $20,000 fine, or both. In addition, each count of furnishing alcohol to a minor car- ries a maximum penalty of one year in jail, and/or a $3,000 fine. Thanks subscribers! Still some time left The Independent thanks all readers who have renewed their subscriptions for another year. Feb. 1st being the renewal date for most readers. Postal regulations require that all subscrip- lions be paid in advance, so in case you forgot the Feb. 1st renewal, your attention to this matter can be done any time this month, which will be deeply appreciated. WITH NATUREI That's what best describes this by the Independent cameraman one day last ice-angler is trying his luck on the old just south of the wildlife refuge spillway. f m Area merchants salute the local Boy Scouts during February- Boy Scout Month! See full page ad inside for troop photos. County Veterans Service Officer now full time position Big Stone's County Board voted to make the position of Veterans Service Officer/Emergency Management Director, currently held by Doug Tomschin of Clinton, a full time posi- tion at its regular meeting last Tuesday. More than 30 veterans from Big Stone County were in attendance at the meeting to show their support for Tomschin and his request for full time employment, as he stated at an earlier meeting, "to better serve the needs of the county's veterans." Brad Jorgens of Beardsley, past commander of the American Legion, stated, "Speaking on behalf of the vet- erans in the Graceville, Beardsley area, we feel the position is a full time one if Doug is to provide the right ser- vices for the county's veterans. Several other counties have now expressed an interest in hiring Tomschin. He is a great asset to the county and we would lose a great ser- vice in losing him." Jorgens went on to state Tomschin has also done a great deal with the emergency management portion of his job. "Most don't realize he has brought a tremendous amount of money into the county for both the veterans service officer and emer- gency management positions, and we urge (the board) to give him your sin- cere consideration." (Continued on page 3) Loads of offers at Ortonville Auto In a full-page ad in this issue, found on the back of this front section, you'll find a wide assortment of used vehi- cles offered on the, lot of Ortonville Auto and Supply. Wild game feed to be held Friday There will be a wild game feed held this Friday, Feb. 12 at the Big Stone American Legion Gertje-Van Lith Post in Big Stone City, SD, starting at 5:30 p.m. Proceeds will go to Christmas Trees and Rearing Ponds, a program which creates refuges for panfish, perch and crappies in Big Stone Lake. Using entirely volunteer help, the program will be placing close to 500 trees in the refuge this year. WINNER OF THE 12 GAUGE SHOTGUN at Pioneer Meat Market and Sausage Kitchen of Ortonville was Gary.. Wollschlager of Bellingham. Wollschlaer is shown at right with Dale Bender of Pioneer. The staff at Pioneer would like to thank all their deer cus- tomers for a very good deer season, and all other customers for a record year of I. tchering hogs and beef. "It's been a great year and we'd like to extend our thanks to everyone," Bender said (Adv.) Council votes to extend loan to Summit Tractor Company Ortonville's City Council voted to extend the eligibility period for three months on the $20,000 revolving loan fund loan to the Summit Tractor Company, formerly MSI, Inc., which will soon be relocating to Ortonville. A manufacturer of a complete line of four wheel drive lawn tractors, the Summit Tractor Company will assem- ble its own machines as well as build- ing its own transaxles in the former Morris Rod Weeder building in Ortonville. In a letter to the Ortonville Economic Development Authority, David Giere of the Summit Tractor Company stated there had been a $100,000 shortfall in funding for the move to Ortonville, and though the group had already located another investor, they would need a bit more time to prepare for the move. "Things are really close to complet- ed right now," Giere stated when con- tacted later about the status of the relo- cation. "Some things had taken a bit longer than we had expected, but we're looking forward to getting going soon." In other business last Monday night, Dallas Hanson spoke on the progress and upcoming projects at the Ortonville Airport. "We will soon be painting and making other renovations to the build- ing to make the airport more desirable for pilots," he said. "This will include new paint and updated maps for the building." Hanson also stated the beacon at the airport has been refurbished with a new gear and is now operating better than ever, and new striping and seal coating of the runways and taxiways is set to take place this summer. Area snowmobilers can now benefit from new trail system The Big Stone Lake Snowriders, a snowmobile club in the Graceville, Clinton and Ortonville area for more than 25 years, has been working to groom a system of trails for area snowmobilers, and the group has made plans to expand the trail system even further in the future. Currently with 42 memberships, the group is looking to expand any- where in Big Stone County. This fall, the club purchased a used Sno-plane blade to groom the trails. The blade consists of a mogul cutter, two blades and a pan in the back to level and pack the trail. Grooming a trail ten feet wide, the machine is pulled by a Caterpillar Challenger tractor. Mark Chase of the Snowriders stat- ed, "Currently, the group has a marked trail from the foot of Big Stone Lake through Ortonville and 15 miles cross country to Clinton. They are in the process of getting land permits signed to continue the trail north to Graceville yet this year." Chase added future plans are to try to connect with the Morris trail sys- tem. Also, at some point the group would like to connect with Beardsley and Browns Valley if there is enough interest shown in that area. The Snowriders have also talked about running a trail from Ortonviile to Browns Valley on the crest of the hills overlooking the lake. "We would also like to thank the Sno Barons snowmobile club for the $1,000 donation that we used to help purchase the blade with," Chase said. "Also, Clinton State Bank for provid- ing the financing to help purchase the blade, all of the land owners who signed permits to allow the trail to cross their land, the Ortonville and Clinton City Councils for approving the trail through town and the Big Stone County Commissioners for approving to be the sponsor in the event the club can qualify for some (Continued on page 3) THIS TRAIL GROOMING MACHINE, pulled by a Caterpillar Challenger, has been used to condition trails for the Big Stone Lake Sno Riders throughout the OrtonviUe and Clinton area. Future trails for the group may include connecting to the Morris trail system, Graceville, and the Beardsley and Browns Valley areas. Ortonvflle a heart" IN on00,rDv.,owEo.r,o000000.Oo00muEoi,, " ND NT f BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS OF AMERICA traveled to Granite Falls for Regional competition and members will be advanclngto the state level. In back from left to right are Noah Zehringer, Dave leremy Iverson, Brian Hasslen, Mike Graham and Tom Inforzato. Next row, Mike Barnhardt, i nompson, John Thomas, Scott Sandberg, Erika Kaiser, Becca Reisdorf, Dustin Karels, and Dan Third to last row, Grant Botker, Becca Zahrbock, Amanda Hillman, Kristi Volkenant, Kristin Weber, Karels and Matt Karels. Second row, Abby Johnson, Adrienne Foster, Sarah Molden, Lynn Peterson iley. In front are Jamie Swenson, Jamie Wester and Amber Anderson. See story inside this sec- nton man pleads not guilty criminal sexual conduct Laveme Jorgenson, 50, of made his first appear- Wednesday in Big Stone Court on two counts of crimi- conduct, one in the third in the fourth degree, as well as g alcohol under 21. to Big Stone County the Sheriff's received a report of a sex- ual assault in early July of 1997. The victim, a 19-year-old male, alleged he and Jorgenson had met at a Graceville street dance and again at a Big Stone City, SD street dance the previous weekend. After Jorgenson bought the 19- year-old beer, the two went to Jorgenson's home where court doccu- merits stated Jorgenson made advances toward the victim, and asked if he minded nudity. Court documents further stated Jorgenson placed his head on the vic- tim's shoulder several times and touched the victim's pubic hair after following him to the bathroom. The documents stated Jorgenson continued to furnish alcohol to the vic- tim, who eventually fell asleep. When the victim awoke, he found Jorgenson performing oral sex on him, after which Jorgenson gave the victim a ride home and appologized for the incident. On July 15, 1997, Deputy John Haukos spoke to a juvenile who ailed- edly had a similar experience with Jorgenson, this one a 15-year old male. Jorgenson pleaded not guilty at his first appearance and was released on his own recognizance, on the condi- tion he have no contact with either young man. Criminal sexual conduct in the third degree carries a maximum penal- ty of 15 years in jail, a $30,000 fine, or both, and criminal sexual conduct in the fourth degree carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in jail, a $20,000 fine, or both. In addition, each count of furnishing alcohol to a minor car- ries a maximum penalty of one year in jail, and/or a $3,000 fine. Thanks subscribers! Still some time left The Independent thanks all readers who have renewed their subscriptions for another year. Feb. 1st being the renewal date for most readers. Postal regulations require that all subscrip- lions be paid in advance, so in case you forgot the Feb. 1st renewal, your attention to this matter can be done any time this month, which will be deeply appreciated. WITH NATUREI That's what best describes this by the Independent cameraman one day last ice-angler is trying his luck on the old just south of the wildlife refuge spillway. f m Area merchants salute the local Boy Scouts during February- Boy Scout Month! See full page ad inside for troop photos. County Veterans Service Officer now full time position Big Stone's County Board voted to make the position of Veterans Service Officer/Emergency Management Director, currently held by Doug Tomschin of Clinton, a full time posi- tion at its regular meeting last Tuesday. More than 30 veterans from Big Stone County were in attendance at the meeting to show their support for Tomschin and his request for full time employment, as he stated at an earlier meeting, "to better serve the needs of the county's veterans." Brad Jorgens of Beardsley, past commander of the American Legion, stated, "Speaking on behalf of the vet- erans in the Graceville, Beardsley area, we feel the position is a full time one if Doug is to provide the right ser- vices for the county's veterans. Several other counties have now expressed an interest in hiring Tomschin. He is a great asset to the county and we would lose a great ser- vice in losing him." Jorgens went on to state Tomschin has also done a great deal with the emergency management portion of his job. "Most don't realize he has brought a tremendous amount of money into the county for both the veterans service officer and emer- gency management positions, and we urge (the board) to give him your sin- cere consideration." (Continued on page 3) Loads of offers at Ortonville Auto In a full-page ad in this issue, found on the back of this front section, you'll find a wide assortment of used vehi- cles offered on the, lot of Ortonville Auto and Supply. Wild game feed to be held Friday There will be a wild game feed held this Friday, Feb. 12 at the Big Stone American Legion Gertje-Van Lith Post in Big Stone City, SD, starting at 5:30 p.m. Proceeds will go to Christmas Trees and Rearing Ponds, a program which creates refuges for panfish, perch and crappies in Big Stone Lake. Using entirely volunteer help, the program will be placing close to 500 trees in the refuge this year. WINNER OF THE 12 GAUGE SHOTGUN at Pioneer Meat Market and Sausage Kitchen of Ortonville was Gary.. Wollschlager of Bellingham. Wollschlaer is shown at right with Dale Bender of Pioneer. The staff at Pioneer would like to thank all their deer cus- tomers for a very good deer season, and all other customers for a record year of I. tchering hogs and beef. "It's been a great year and we'd like to extend our thanks to everyone," Bender said (Adv.) Council votes to extend loan to Summit Tractor Company Ortonville's City Council voted to extend the eligibility period for three months on the $20,000 revolving loan fund loan to the Summit Tractor Company, formerly MSI, Inc., which will soon be relocating to Ortonville. A manufacturer of a complete line of four wheel drive lawn tractors, the Summit Tractor Company will assem- ble its own machines as well as build- ing its own transaxles in the former Morris Rod Weeder building in Ortonville. In a letter to the Ortonville Economic Development Authority, David Giere of the Summit Tractor Company stated there had been a $100,000 shortfall in funding for the move to Ortonville, and though the group had already located another investor, they would need a bit more time to prepare for the move. "Things are really close to complet- ed right now," Giere stated when con- tacted later about the status of the relo- cation. "Some things had taken a bit longer than we had expected, but we're looking forward to getting going soon." In other business last Monday night, Dallas Hanson spoke on the progress and upcoming projects at the Ortonville Airport. "We will soon be painting and making other renovations to the build- ing to make the airport more desirable for pilots," he said. "This will include new paint and updated maps for the building." Hanson also stated the beacon at the airport has been refurbished with a new gear and is now operating better than ever, and new striping and seal coating of the runways and taxiways is set to take place this summer. Area snowmobilers can now benefit from new trail system The Big Stone Lake Snowriders, a snowmobile club in the Graceville, Clinton and Ortonville area for more than 25 years, has been working to groom a system of trails for area snowmobilers, and the group has made plans to expand the trail system even further in the future. Currently with 42 memberships, the group is looking to expand any- where in Big Stone County. This fall, the club purchased a used Sno-plane blade to groom the trails. The blade consists of a mogul cutter, two blades and a pan in the back to level and pack the trail. Grooming a trail ten feet wide, the machine is pulled by a Caterpillar Challenger tractor. Mark Chase of the Snowriders stat- ed, "Currently, the group has a marked trail from the foot of Big Stone Lake through Ortonville and 15 miles cross country to Clinton. They are in the process of getting land permits signed to continue the trail north to Graceville yet this year." Chase added future plans are to try to connect with the Morris trail sys- tem. Also, at some point the group would like to connect with Beardsley and Browns Valley if there is enough interest shown in that area. The Snowriders have also talked about running a trail from Ortonviile to Browns Valley on the crest of the hills overlooking the lake. "We would also like to thank the Sno Barons snowmobile club for the $1,000 donation that we used to help purchase the blade with," Chase said. "Also, Clinton State Bank for provid- ing the financing to help purchase the blade, all of the land owners who signed permits to allow the trail to cross their land, the Ortonville and Clinton City Councils for approving the trail through town and the Big Stone County Commissioners for approving to be the sponsor in the event the club can qualify for some (Continued on page 3) THIS TRAIL GROOMING MACHINE, pulled by a Caterpillar Challenger, has been used to condition trails for the Big Stone Lake Sno Riders throughout the OrtonviUe and Clinton area. Future trails for the group may include connecting to the Morris trail system, Graceville, and the Beardsley and Browns Valley areas.