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February 9, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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February 9, 1999
 

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Area news digest ,n I I CHOKIO-ALBERTA-A water main break forced the closing of the Chokio-Alberta High School Thursday and the potential danger posed by hazardous chemicals in the school's basement had local firefighters concerned for at time. According to Morris Fire Dept. Chief Ron Sharstrom, the water main break resulted in the loss of 50,000 gallons of water. A concern for the firefighters, for a time, however, was that the water coming into contact with the chemicals would pose a health hazard. "We were concerned," said Sharstrom. "I called the duty officer at the State Fire Marshal's office, however, and he told me that the small amount of chemicals stored in the school would be diluted by the water and posed no health risk." According to Sharstrom, the chemicals, stored in the basement of the school, were for use in the school's chemistry classes. The Chokio-Alberta Schools Superintendent's Office reported that school was called off due to the lack of heat and water in the building. HINCKLFY-A Pine County ambulance medic was killed and another medic was injured Thursday when they were struck by a car as they worked to extricate the victim of an earlier collision southwest of Hinckiey. Brenda Gall Hage, 39, of Hinckley was struck shortly after 6 a.m. on MN 23, four miles west of 1-35. She was pronounced dead at Kanabec County Hospital in Mora. The other medic, Joanne Gimple, 32, of Hinckley was treated at the hospital and later released. Two people were injured in the earlier collision. One was treated and released. The other was airlifted to North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale and listed in serious condition. MORRIS-Fast food junkies will have something to cheer. According to the Morris Sun, the King is coming to Morris. Burger King that is. Lakeland Management Co. of Alexandria announced recently that it had purchased the old Hardee's building and plans to open a Burger King restaurant in that location in late April "We're in the process of remodeling the building and hiring managers," said Doug Thompson,the franchise owner. "We're completely renovating the building. It's going to be bigger and better." Thompson says his company took over ownership of the building several months ago. The Hardee's restaurant closed in 1997. CLINTON-Jim Sewick began his duties as administrator at the Clinton Good Samaritan Center in January. He came to Clinton from Stillwater where his family has lived since 1997. Sewick said he is glad to be in Clinton; he started his Good Samaritan career in a facility about the same size and says he enjoys that as he can get to personally know the residents and staff. Sewick enjoys high school wrestling. He is a runner, enjoys scuba diving, weight lifting and reading. Big Stone City Gaff Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 "Big Stone American Legion Auxiliary will meet Feb. 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the Legion Clubrooms. Hostess is Julia Marie Utley. All members please attend the meeting. Harry and Lily Loeschke drove Thursday, Feb. 4th to Huron, SD to celebrate Harry's brother-in-law's birthday George Berhelst. They took Harry's three sisters along Ann Marohl of Appleton, Lillian Ninneman of Ortonville and Hilda Brehmer of Bellingham. George celebrated this 82nd bL,'thday ...... Members of the Chat and Do Club met at the Ileen Christensen home Monday afternoon, Feb. 1st. Those present were Norma Wittnebel from Ortonville, Gen Strube, Alice Holtquist, Janice Hinders, Violet Griepp and Clara Zeek from Big Stone. Clifford and Ileen Christensen of Big Stone City were Thursday evening, Feb. 4th visitors of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke. Friday, Feb. 5th Warner Dornaman of Milbank, SD was a dinner guest at the home of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke. Sunday, Jan. 31st Grace Van Hout, Pearl Pepka, and Eldora Nelson visited Gladys Erens at the St. William's home. Ruth Lauster went to Long Island, NY for Christmas with her daughter Loy, Husband Jim Norris and family. She left the 9th of Jan. and flew to Minneapolis. Ruth took the shuttle bus to her other daughter Sandy, husband Steven Bogenrief and family in Osakis. Because the weather was bad, Ruth didn't arrive home until the 16th of January. Shirley and Louis Voeltz from Big Stone and Dick and Sandy Hansen from Twin Brooks went Friday, Jan. 29th to Monday, Feb. 1st at Leavenworth, KS for a grandson Jacob Hansen's eighth birthday. Cheryl Athey of Sioux Falls was a Sunday, Jan. 31st overnight visitor at the home of Elmer and Charlotte Athey and family. Lucille McFarland of Milbank visited Myron and Lorraine Schnaser on Thursday, Feb. 4th. Mr. and Mrs. Myron Schnaser visited the Steve Remund home of Sioux Falls on Wednesday, Feb. 3rd. Lorraine Schnaser and Irene Friedrich visited Gladys Brehmer Thursday morning, Feb. 4th. Kenny and Elaine Van Dover visited Wade and Cindy Van Dover and Joseph, Mark, and Clare Friday, Feb. 5th and Saturday, Feb. 6th. Jan. 31st the following visitors celebrated Darlene Barnhardt's birthday at Northridge Leo Barnhardt; Tom and Sandy Rice; Roger and Marilyn Barnhardt and Traci and Jesse; Rick Barnhardt; Robert and Ann Barnhardt and Darryn, Adam, Penny and Garret; Rodney and Tonya Barnhardt and Zachery and Taylor; Arvilla Bergseth; Aaron and Sharon Smith and granddaughter Kaitlyn; Alma Fredrichsen; Alice Green; and Ruth Kilvington. The family brought in birthday cake, ice cream, and punch for the lunch. Other visitors during the week of Feb. 1st were Miran Redfield, Leo Barnhardt, Taylor Banrhardt, Ruth Torgerson, Sandy Rice and Elaine Fahlgren Lakeside Club meets again on March 2nd The Lakeside Club met Feb. 3rd at the home ofCamillus Mueller. Shirley Voeltz conducted the business meeting with Ellen Mueller giving the secretary's and treasurer' reports. Roll call was answered with Valentines for Jimmy. Personal care items to be donated to the Women's Advocacy Resource Center in Ortonville were collected. Norma Frevert was in charge of the program. She demonstrated how to make a braided wool rug. Norma also showed the quilt tops she had sown for the Sew Special project. The birthday song was sung for Frances Steltz in honor of her 92nd birthday on Feb. 14. The anniversary song was sung for Camillus Mueller in honor of her 50th wedding anniversary on Feb. 27. Next meeting will be held Tuesday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Ellen Mueller. Ellen will be in charge of the program. Roll call will be childhood memories of a favorite recipe. Items will be collected for The Pantry. Big Stone City senior citizens center news By Evelyn Zahnow, Secretary Twenty-nine guests enjoyed a pot luck dinner at the Big Stone City Senior Center on Tuesday, Feb. 2nd. We sang happy birthday to Myrtle and sang the table prayer and pledge to the flag. Also we drew for many door prizes before we served dinner. Later our meeting was brought to order by Orla with the Secretary and Treasurer report given by Evelyn and Myrtle. A bill for coffee was presented and paid. A motion was made and passed to order 12 new forks to fill out our set of 50. Motion passed. Everyone signed a note for Janice who recently had surgery and is now at home. Lorraine and Mary H. will be setting our tables for our March 2nd meeting. Grace and Myrtle set our tables for Valentines Day. Orla had a short reading. Myrtle treated us to ice cream for lunch. We had 21 playing bingo and several tables of cards. 4-Hers rally in Milbank Several area 4-Hers recently gathered together to celebrate 4-H. A 4-H New Member Rally was held at Unity Square in Milbank on Saturday, Jan. 23. To open the event new and old 4- H members joined together to learn more about each other and explore 4- H. Participants talked about 4-H projects and events. Afterwards all enjoyed using the recreation facility. NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC CENTER , Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE N0W ACCE MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT (605) 882-2630 J. Vm, M.D. Len B. Kolodychuk, M.D. Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SD 4 SIZES OF STORAGE AREAS: 5'x10' "10'x10' "10'x20' "10'x30' CLOnV0000S00tio00sl[ WITH THE /I and00/I By Jim Van Der Pol  "JJ I don't see how anyone connected with the production of pigs can help but to feel a deep and pervasive anger this winter. I certainly do. Our farm centers around hogs and if anything this year has shown us how foolish that is. Our "working on the business" conversations this winter will be about diversification and getting away from the commodity markets. This year has also demonstrated that no one looks out for us except us. The problem is bad leadership. It is high time we fire the coaches. This bunch has already cost too many of us our farms. The so-called voices of agriculture; that is, the Farm Bureau and the com- modity groups that we give such loy- alty to, have recently been talking about government money and perhaps even help with keeping the markets open and making pricing "transpar- ents". Where were they last year? Much is heard today about the stream of hogs coming down from Canada and how that chokes our already strained processing capacity. Of course it does. But stopping those hogs is nearly impossible, as the lead- ership well knows, because their own insistence upon free trade has saddled us with GAT'I" and NAFrA. As far as I know, they are still charging around Washington screaming about how badly we need GAIT and fast track. Canada's labor difficulties in their processing industry are exactly none of our business. We should be putting our own house in order. It needs it. The leadership's solution to dimin- ished processing capacity is to restrain the INS so that more illegal aliens might kill hogs for us. That is irre- sponsible, given our country's recent actions tightening immigration. And it should be unnecessary. Several years ago when Dakota Pork Industries shut down there was talk in the South Dakota legislature of buying the plant in Huron and keeping it open with state backing so that smaller pro- ducers would always have a market for their hogs. The industry got wind of it, and in the form of, I think, Smithfield Farms, came in and bought the plant and closed it down perma- nently. I don't remember a single word of protest from the Pork Producers or the Bureau. Did we need that plant in 1998? You know the answer. How many more plants are we without Birthdays! Morn on Feb. and Dad last Oct. 16th Jacob because our leadership will not speak against concentration or act against the processing industry? While the sow numbers steadily built over the last three or four years and concentrat- ed under the ownership of the largest "farms" what has the farm leadership been up to? Well the Farm Bureau has con- cerned itself with the impact of regu- lations on farm operations. The Pork Producers (NPPC) has done some- thing about that, in fact. It has struck a deal with the EPA to make sure that any fines levied against the largest "farms" under the Clean Water Act do not exceed $40,000 per farm. (I know that makes me breathe easier!) The state leadership campaigned strongly against a moratorium on large livestock expansions last year, evi- dently feeling that the problem was that the sow herd was not expanding fast enough. They put out the word that the only farm organization to speak in favor of a moratorium (Farmer's Union) was anti-livestock. As incredible as that may seem to any who know some of the older la Union members, far too smaller livestock into it. Shame on us! Our leadership also able time this year battling l against a township that was II put brakes on hog use of an ordinance. This while growing sow ened profitability for all Local government, anyone? And while the byword to be that we need kets, the state Pork Producel told me by phone last mation about contracts packers of hogs entering was not something we that it was "proprietary" ers. The MPPA got their tie late. What is to be done? I Hogs may be a bust, sold above. For myself, after a raising hogs, I can that ty hog production is And that joke, wished on leadership, is going to membership dollars for zations if only because remain fewer farmers to That's bitter justice, but theless. Sometimes you do you pay for. I Stay at an Eagan Hotel & register to WIN a $1,000 Mall 0fAmerica i Shopping Spree November 1998-May 1999 Fri/Sat/Sun nights VVVVV'VVVVVVVVVVVVYVVVTTTTTTVVTVVVYVV VV' I Reserve the SILVER ANNIVERSARY ROOM SPECIAL for: I  FREE Knott's Camp Snoopy Ride Pass FairficldSuizcs, 1-651-686-0600 FREE Mall of America Coupon Book Hampton Inn. 1-651-688-3343 FREE Minnesota Zoo Youth "ticket Holiday Inn Select- Mpls AirporL FREE Shopping _.ira- I v,.t,. Bag [',-(iA  Refi&nce Inn. 1-651-688a3363 ,lk U.SOrA._.'O Hilttm Garden lnn-Eagan. 1-651-6864605 [ Barl on availabdqv - Adva-e reserValkm required - Not valid wilh an)' ,her oner or Park n FI FOR SALE BY BIG STONE COUNTY 4-H CLUB MEMBERS FEATURING: GIFT BOX - 6 Texas Ruby Sweet Pink Grapefruit/10 California Navel 3 Washington Red Delicious Apples/3 Washington Golden Delicious Apples/ 3 Washington Granny Smith Apples/3 Washington Braeburn Apples/ 6 Washington d'Anjou Pears ......................................... $1 #1 -20 Oranges/10 Red Delicious/8 Braeburn Apples ................ $ #2 - 16 Oranges/12 Apples/10 Pears ..................................... #3 - 8 Grapefruit/15 Oranges/10 Braebum Apples .................... 11 #4 - 6 Grapefruit/14 Oranges/8 Apples/6 Pears ........................ #5 - 15 GrapefruiU40 Oranges .............................................. #6 - 15 Grapefruit/24 Oranges/16 Braeburn Apples ................... #7 - 15 Grapefruit/20 Oranges/10 Apples/10 Pears .................. #8 - 24 Oranges/20 Apples/16 Pears ..................................... #9 - Half Box Texas Ruby Sweet Pink Grapefruit (20 ct.) ............ #10 - Full Box Texas Ruby Sweet Pink Grapefruit (40 ct.) ........... #11 - Half Box California Navel Oranges (56 ct.) ....................... #12 - Full Box Califomia Navel Oranges (113 ct.) ...................... #13 - Half Box Washington Red Delicious Apples (20 ct.) ........... #14 - Full Box Washington Red Delicious Apples (40 ct.) ............ #15 - Half Box Washington Braeburn Apples (20 ct.) ................. #16 - Full Box Washington Apple Sampler (10 Red/10 Gold/10 Granny Smith/10 Braebum) ............... 1t #17 - Half Box Washington d'Anjou Pears (18 ct.) ..................... #18 - Full Box Washington d'Anjou Pears (36 ct.) ...................... #19 - Lil' Chief Gourmet Popcom (yellow - 3 Ibs) ....................... #20 - Lil' Chief Gourmet Popcorn (white - 3 Ibs) ........................ #21 - UI' Chief Microwave Popcorn (5-5.3 oz pkgs, low salt/butter flavoring) ......................... #22 - 2.5 Ibs. Beef Sticks (40/50 count/bag) ........................... 1 4-H members will be taking orders through Feb. 24th. Fruit will be to the County on Saturday, March 13th (tentative date). You the Big Stone County Extension Office by calling 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518 to place an order. We will try to put you in 4-H member as they receive credit for the orders they receive, Orders placed with 4-H members will be delivered bY that 4-Her. Please make checks payable to "Big County 4-H." PrairieFiveR/des Public transportation system for all ages. To Fargo Moorhead Toll-Free 877-757-4337 (877) PS-RtD 7:30 am-5:00 pro, Monday--Friday (You may also call 320-269-8727) TO St. Cloud Mill;ank Wlllmar Watertown To Minneapolis Area Marshall PrairieFiveRides is a public transportation system for all ages serving a five county area in West Central Minnesota. Its flexible design can accommodate a wide variety of transportation needs for its various riders. Dispatchers will schedule transportation around a nder's individual requests, or plan raps for riders in large groups. Weekly and/or monthly trips to destinations shown on the map outside of the five-count), area are a regular part of our bus routes. Please call for more information and schedules. :llk 24-hours in il advance. , il Uthough sot e l , an be made, -.Jk ntmce is s unJ  an be lil. B ..... g'', be .sx up j - days m advance- 4, A dispatcher schedules your ride. The dispatcher will schedule: your ride with either a volunteer driver the bus. The decision will be made with regard to all the other requests that have been taken that da. The bus picks A you up. picks A staff driver will A volunteer pick you up at your their door. You will be joining additional riders joinin 4, A donaUon or your ride is Our dispatcher wdl be cost of your fare ;chcdulc your ri;dc Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Area news digest ,n I I CHOKIO-ALBERTA-A water main break forced the closing of the Chokio-Alberta High School Thursday and the potential danger posed by hazardous chemicals in the school's basement had local firefighters concerned for at time. According to Morris Fire Dept. Chief Ron Sharstrom, the water main break resulted in the loss of 50,000 gallons of water. A concern for the firefighters, for a time, however, was that the water coming into contact with the chemicals would pose a health hazard. "We were concerned," said Sharstrom. "I called the duty officer at the State Fire Marshal's office, however, and he told me that the small amount of chemicals stored in the school would be diluted by the water and posed no health risk." According to Sharstrom, the chemicals, stored in the basement of the school, were for use in the school's chemistry classes. The Chokio-Alberta Schools Superintendent's Office reported that school was called off due to the lack of heat and water in the building. HINCKLFY-A Pine County ambulance medic was killed and another medic was injured Thursday when they were struck by a car as they worked to extricate the victim of an earlier collision southwest of Hinckiey. Brenda Gall Hage, 39, of Hinckley was struck shortly after 6 a.m. on MN 23, four miles west of 1-35. She was pronounced dead at Kanabec County Hospital in Mora. The other medic, Joanne Gimple, 32, of Hinckley was treated at the hospital and later released. Two people were injured in the earlier collision. One was treated and released. The other was airlifted to North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale and listed in serious condition. MORRIS-Fast food junkies will have something to cheer. According to the Morris Sun, the King is coming to Morris. Burger King that is. Lakeland Management Co. of Alexandria announced recently that it had purchased the old Hardee's building and plans to open a Burger King restaurant in that location in late April "We're in the process of remodeling the building and hiring managers," said Doug Thompson,the franchise owner. "We're completely renovating the building. It's going to be bigger and better." Thompson says his company took over ownership of the building several months ago. The Hardee's restaurant closed in 1997. CLINTON-Jim Sewick began his duties as administrator at the Clinton Good Samaritan Center in January. He came to Clinton from Stillwater where his family has lived since 1997. Sewick said he is glad to be in Clinton; he started his Good Samaritan career in a facility about the same size and says he enjoys that as he can get to personally know the residents and staff. Sewick enjoys high school wrestling. He is a runner, enjoys scuba diving, weight lifting and reading. Big Stone City Gaff Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 "Big Stone American Legion Auxiliary will meet Feb. 11 at 7:30 p.m. at the Legion Clubrooms. Hostess is Julia Marie Utley. All members please attend the meeting. Harry and Lily Loeschke drove Thursday, Feb. 4th to Huron, SD to celebrate Harry's brother-in-law's birthday George Berhelst. They took Harry's three sisters along Ann Marohl of Appleton, Lillian Ninneman of Ortonville and Hilda Brehmer of Bellingham. George celebrated this 82nd bL,'thday ...... Members of the Chat and Do Club met at the Ileen Christensen home Monday afternoon, Feb. 1st. Those present were Norma Wittnebel from Ortonville, Gen Strube, Alice Holtquist, Janice Hinders, Violet Griepp and Clara Zeek from Big Stone. Clifford and Ileen Christensen of Big Stone City were Thursday evening, Feb. 4th visitors of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke. Friday, Feb. 5th Warner Dornaman of Milbank, SD was a dinner guest at the home of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke. Sunday, Jan. 31st Grace Van Hout, Pearl Pepka, and Eldora Nelson visited Gladys Erens at the St. William's home. Ruth Lauster went to Long Island, NY for Christmas with her daughter Loy, Husband Jim Norris and family. She left the 9th of Jan. and flew to Minneapolis. Ruth took the shuttle bus to her other daughter Sandy, husband Steven Bogenrief and family in Osakis. Because the weather was bad, Ruth didn't arrive home until the 16th of January. Shirley and Louis Voeltz from Big Stone and Dick and Sandy Hansen from Twin Brooks went Friday, Jan. 29th to Monday, Feb. 1st at Leavenworth, KS for a grandson Jacob Hansen's eighth birthday. Cheryl Athey of Sioux Falls was a Sunday, Jan. 31st overnight visitor at the home of Elmer and Charlotte Athey and family. Lucille McFarland of Milbank visited Myron and Lorraine Schnaser on Thursday, Feb. 4th. Mr. and Mrs. Myron Schnaser visited the Steve Remund home of Sioux Falls on Wednesday, Feb. 3rd. Lorraine Schnaser and Irene Friedrich visited Gladys Brehmer Thursday morning, Feb. 4th. Kenny and Elaine Van Dover visited Wade and Cindy Van Dover and Joseph, Mark, and Clare Friday, Feb. 5th and Saturday, Feb. 6th. Jan. 31st the following visitors celebrated Darlene Barnhardt's birthday at Northridge Leo Barnhardt; Tom and Sandy Rice; Roger and Marilyn Barnhardt and Traci and Jesse; Rick Barnhardt; Robert and Ann Barnhardt and Darryn, Adam, Penny and Garret; Rodney and Tonya Barnhardt and Zachery and Taylor; Arvilla Bergseth; Aaron and Sharon Smith and granddaughter Kaitlyn; Alma Fredrichsen; Alice Green; and Ruth Kilvington. The family brought in birthday cake, ice cream, and punch for the lunch. Other visitors during the week of Feb. 1st were Miran Redfield, Leo Barnhardt, Taylor Banrhardt, Ruth Torgerson, Sandy Rice and Elaine Fahlgren Lakeside Club meets again on March 2nd The Lakeside Club met Feb. 3rd at the home ofCamillus Mueller. Shirley Voeltz conducted the business meeting with Ellen Mueller giving the secretary's and treasurer' reports. Roll call was answered with Valentines for Jimmy. Personal care items to be donated to the Women's Advocacy Resource Center in Ortonville were collected. Norma Frevert was in charge of the program. She demonstrated how to make a braided wool rug. Norma also showed the quilt tops she had sown for the Sew Special project. The birthday song was sung for Frances Steltz in honor of her 92nd birthday on Feb. 14. The anniversary song was sung for Camillus Mueller in honor of her 50th wedding anniversary on Feb. 27. Next meeting will be held Tuesday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Ellen Mueller. Ellen will be in charge of the program. Roll call will be childhood memories of a favorite recipe. Items will be collected for The Pantry. Big Stone City senior citizens center news By Evelyn Zahnow, Secretary Twenty-nine guests enjoyed a pot luck dinner at the Big Stone City Senior Center on Tuesday, Feb. 2nd. We sang happy birthday to Myrtle and sang the table prayer and pledge to the flag. Also we drew for many door prizes before we served dinner. Later our meeting was brought to order by Orla with the Secretary and Treasurer report given by Evelyn and Myrtle. A bill for coffee was presented and paid. A motion was made and passed to order 12 new forks to fill out our set of 50. Motion passed. Everyone signed a note for Janice who recently had surgery and is now at home. Lorraine and Mary H. will be setting our tables for our March 2nd meeting. Grace and Myrtle set our tables for Valentines Day. Orla had a short reading. Myrtle treated us to ice cream for lunch. We had 21 playing bingo and several tables of cards. 4-Hers rally in Milbank Several area 4-Hers recently gathered together to celebrate 4-H. A 4-H New Member Rally was held at Unity Square in Milbank on Saturday, Jan. 23. To open the event new and old 4- H members joined together to learn more about each other and explore 4- H. Participants talked about 4-H projects and events. Afterwards all enjoyed using the recreation facility. NORTHEAST ORTHOPAEDIC CENTER , Serving N.E. South Dakota and Western Minnesota for 13 years Seeing patients weekly at the Ortonville Hospital. Call Lori Larson at 1-320-839-2502 for an appointment. WE N0W ACCE MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT (605) 882-2630 J. Vm, M.D. Len B. Kolodychuk, M.D. Mallard Pointe Business Park Watertown, SD 4 SIZES OF STORAGE AREAS: 5'x10' "10'x10' "10'x20' "10'x30' CLOnV0000S00tio00sl[ WITH THE /I and00/I By Jim Van Der Pol  "JJ I don't see how anyone connected with the production of pigs can help but to feel a deep and pervasive anger this winter. I certainly do. Our farm centers around hogs and if anything this year has shown us how foolish that is. Our "working on the business" conversations this winter will be about diversification and getting away from the commodity markets. This year has also demonstrated that no one looks out for us except us. The problem is bad leadership. It is high time we fire the coaches. This bunch has already cost too many of us our farms. The so-called voices of agriculture; that is, the Farm Bureau and the com- modity groups that we give such loy- alty to, have recently been talking about government money and perhaps even help with keeping the markets open and making pricing "transpar- ents". Where were they last year? Much is heard today about the stream of hogs coming down from Canada and how that chokes our already strained processing capacity. Of course it does. But stopping those hogs is nearly impossible, as the lead- ership well knows, because their own insistence upon free trade has saddled us with GAT'I" and NAFrA. As far as I know, they are still charging around Washington screaming about how badly we need GAIT and fast track. Canada's labor difficulties in their processing industry are exactly none of our business. We should be putting our own house in order. It needs it. The leadership's solution to dimin- ished processing capacity is to restrain the INS so that more illegal aliens might kill hogs for us. That is irre- sponsible, given our country's recent actions tightening immigration. And it should be unnecessary. Several years ago when Dakota Pork Industries shut down there was talk in the South Dakota legislature of buying the plant in Huron and keeping it open with state backing so that smaller pro- ducers would always have a market for their hogs. The industry got wind of it, and in the form of, I think, Smithfield Farms, came in and bought the plant and closed it down perma- nently. I don't remember a single word of protest from the Pork Producers or the Bureau. Did we need that plant in 1998? You know the answer. How many more plants are we without Birthdays! Morn on Feb. and Dad last Oct. 16th Jacob because our leadership will not speak against concentration or act against the processing industry? While the sow numbers steadily built over the last three or four years and concentrat- ed under the ownership of the largest "farms" what has the farm leadership been up to? Well the Farm Bureau has con- cerned itself with the impact of regu- lations on farm operations. The Pork Producers (NPPC) has done some- thing about that, in fact. It has struck a deal with the EPA to make sure that any fines levied against the largest "farms" under the Clean Water Act do not exceed $40,000 per farm. (I know that makes me breathe easier!) The state leadership campaigned strongly against a moratorium on large livestock expansions last year, evi- dently feeling that the problem was that the sow herd was not expanding fast enough. They put out the word that the only farm organization to speak in favor of a moratorium (Farmer's Union) was anti-livestock. As incredible as that may seem to any who know some of the older la Union members, far too smaller livestock into it. Shame on us! Our leadership also able time this year battling l against a township that was II put brakes on hog use of an ordinance. This while growing sow ened profitability for all Local government, anyone? And while the byword to be that we need kets, the state Pork Producel told me by phone last mation about contracts packers of hogs entering was not something we that it was "proprietary" ers. The MPPA got their tie late. What is to be done? I Hogs may be a bust, sold above. For myself, after a raising hogs, I can that ty hog production is And that joke, wished on leadership, is going to membership dollars for zations if only because remain fewer farmers to That's bitter justice, but theless. Sometimes you do you pay for. I Stay at an Eagan Hotel & register to WIN a $1,000 Mall 0fAmerica i Shopping Spree November 1998-May 1999 Fri/Sat/Sun nights VVVVV'VVVVVVVVVVVVYVVVTTTTTTVVTVVVYVV VV' I Reserve the SILVER ANNIVERSARY ROOM SPECIAL for: I  FREE Knott's Camp Snoopy Ride Pass FairficldSuizcs, 1-651-686-0600 FREE Mall of America Coupon Book Hampton Inn. 1-651-688-3343 FREE Minnesota Zoo Youth "ticket Holiday Inn Select- Mpls AirporL FREE Shopping _.ira- I v,.t,. Bag [',-(iA  Refi&nce Inn. 1-651-688a3363 ,lk U.SOrA._.'O Hilttm Garden lnn-Eagan. 1-651-6864605 [ Barl on availabdqv - Adva-e reserValkm required - Not valid wilh an)' ,her oner or Park n FI FOR SALE BY BIG STONE COUNTY 4-H CLUB MEMBERS FEATURING: GIFT BOX - 6 Texas Ruby Sweet Pink Grapefruit/10 California Navel 3 Washington Red Delicious Apples/3 Washington Golden Delicious Apples/ 3 Washington Granny Smith Apples/3 Washington Braeburn Apples/ 6 Washington d'Anjou Pears ......................................... $1 #1 -20 Oranges/10 Red Delicious/8 Braeburn Apples ................ $ #2 - 16 Oranges/12 Apples/10 Pears ..................................... #3 - 8 Grapefruit/15 Oranges/10 Braebum Apples .................... 11 #4 - 6 Grapefruit/14 Oranges/8 Apples/6 Pears ........................ #5 - 15 GrapefruiU40 Oranges .............................................. #6 - 15 Grapefruit/24 Oranges/16 Braeburn Apples ................... #7 - 15 Grapefruit/20 Oranges/10 Apples/10 Pears .................. #8 - 24 Oranges/20 Apples/16 Pears ..................................... #9 - Half Box Texas Ruby Sweet Pink Grapefruit (20 ct.) ............ #10 - Full Box Texas Ruby Sweet Pink Grapefruit (40 ct.) ........... #11 - Half Box California Navel Oranges (56 ct.) ....................... #12 - Full Box Califomia Navel Oranges (113 ct.) ...................... #13 - Half Box Washington Red Delicious Apples (20 ct.) ........... #14 - Full Box Washington Red Delicious Apples (40 ct.) ............ #15 - Half Box Washington Braeburn Apples (20 ct.) ................. #16 - Full Box Washington Apple Sampler (10 Red/10 Gold/10 Granny Smith/10 Braebum) ............... 1t #17 - Half Box Washington d'Anjou Pears (18 ct.) ..................... #18 - Full Box Washington d'Anjou Pears (36 ct.) ...................... #19 - Lil' Chief Gourmet Popcom (yellow - 3 Ibs) ....................... #20 - Lil' Chief Gourmet Popcorn (white - 3 Ibs) ........................ #21 - UI' Chief Microwave Popcorn (5-5.3 oz pkgs, low salt/butter flavoring) ......................... #22 - 2.5 Ibs. Beef Sticks (40/50 count/bag) ........................... 1 4-H members will be taking orders through Feb. 24th. Fruit will be to the County on Saturday, March 13th (tentative date). You the Big Stone County Extension Office by calling 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518 to place an order. We will try to put you in 4-H member as they receive credit for the orders they receive, Orders placed with 4-H members will be delivered bY that 4-Her. Please make checks payable to "Big County 4-H." PrairieFiveR/des Public transportation system for all ages. To Fargo Moorhead Toll-Free 877-757-4337 (877) PS-RtD 7:30 am-5:00 pro, Monday--Friday (You may also call 320-269-8727) TO St. Cloud Mill;ank Wlllmar Watertown To Minneapolis Area Marshall PrairieFiveRides is a public transportation system for all ages serving a five county area in West Central Minnesota. Its flexible design can accommodate a wide variety of transportation needs for its various riders. Dispatchers will schedule transportation around a nder's individual requests, or plan raps for riders in large groups. Weekly and/or monthly trips to destinations shown on the map outside of the five-count), area are a regular part of our bus routes. Please call for more information and schedules. :llk 24-hours in il advance. , il Uthough sot e l , an be made, -.Jk ntmce is s unJ  an be lil. B ..... g'', be .sx up j - days m advance- 4, A dispatcher schedules your ride. The dispatcher will schedule: your ride with either a volunteer driver the bus. The decision will be made with regard to all the other requests that have been taken that da. The bus picks A you up. picks A staff driver will A volunteer pick you up at your their door. You will be joining additional riders joinin 4, A donaUon or your ride is Our dispatcher wdl be cost of your fare ;chcdulc your ri;dc Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday,