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Ortonville, Minnesota
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February 16, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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February 16, 1922
 

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FEBRUARY 16, 1922 THE ORTONVILLR INDEPENDENT PAGI ff @ PERSONAL, SOCIAL ] AND NEWS ITEMS I V M. Snesrud made a trip to Ren- Tuesday. Loretta Witte visited with at Correll Sunday. E. L. Eldred entertained a few Wednesday afternoon. G. Farrington was a passenger Paul Saturday night. V. Peckham of Aberdeen, S. D., Kirk Roberts Monday. Goldie Hanson left for Leith, Tuesday for a two week's visit. Irene Brennecke came home night from St. Paul for a vis- Fred Nelson, Banker of Peever, S. consulted the doctors here Tues- William Meyers of Milbank, is at the hospital here for treat- and Ralph Gunderson enjoy- visit from their father of Whea- Howard Babcock of Sis- S. D., attended to legal matters Monday. Ruth Lindig visited at the of her parents in Wheaten over week-end. Alfred Nelson of Peever was a pa- at the local hospital the first of the week. M. Warford underwent an opera- at the hospital February 8 and is steadily. King is here from Faribault for a visit with his mother, Christina King'. Dornbusch of Big Stone City, S. was operated on February 9, at hospital Mary Johnson entertained her school class Tuesday after- at a Valentine's party. H. Heft of Milbank, S. D., is a Lt at Evangelical hospital having an operation last Wednesday. hn Frizzell drove down from eville Monday on.business. He is located on the Cunningham farm. and Mrs. Ben Nordquist are of a 9 pound daughter, Irene, born on Valentine's Nelson of the Ortonville Dry establishment of this city is pneumonia at Evangelical hos- Olive Quarve who has been as- in the Register of Deed's office Monday for her home at Louis- Iva Ringer, who underwent an recently at the hospital is at the Dittes home for a few F. Harvey, proprietor of the Pal- Billiard Parlor has been here Watertown, S. D., for the past Louise Monson was summoned Falls, S. D., Thursday on ac- of the illness of a young lady daughter weighing 9, pounds to Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Ger- at Evangelical hospital a few ago. Luther League met at the home Hasslen Tuesday evening but as not as large as Carlson is home from Minne- for an in[tefinite visit at the parents, Mr. and Mrs, A. Mary Shumaker has a class and vocal students at Apple- which she teaches Thursdays of week. P. B. Vikre's Mother, Mrs. of Odessa, is seriously ill Mrs. Vikre has been with her for days. J. W. Lindell of Boone, Iowa, last week on account of the of her mother, Mrs. John of Otrey. Denver Smith of Big Stone is a patient at the local hospital. Evanson of Madison special is with her. Disterhoff returned from Falls, S. D., on Tuesday, where been in connection with the Bureau. J. R. Anderson, representative Pendergast Bridge Co., of Mil- was in the city on Tuesday at- to business matters. Ruby Odney returned to her at Benson on Monday mornin having been a uest at the A. home the past week. Tilda Lindgren of Valley City, arrived last Wednesday for a Weeks' visit with her sisters, Miss and Mrs. Albert Anderson. to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Balde- of Chokio, a 10% pound girl on day. Both mother and are getting along nicely. Mr. and Mrs. Alvah Matthews re. turned from Minneapolis Saturday night where they attended the auto SllOW. Lucian Kaercher returned to Carle- ton college at Northfield Monday morning after a week's absence on account of the death of his father. The Ladies' Aid of Eids church, northeast of town will meet with Mrs. Alfred Stanley, Wednesday, March 1. Everyone cordially invited to attend Rev. John Walseth went to St. Paul the first of the week on account oI the illness and death of Mrs. Wal- seth's brother following an operation. Mrs. F. L. Cliff who has been a pa- tient at the hospital for several weeks on account of a fractured hip has been able to sit up for the past three days. Miss Christine Miekkelson wishes to announce that prices on her winter hats have been reduced. It will be worth while to attend this special sale. E. B. Persson returned Sunday night from a trip to the cities. Mrs. Persson, who has been visiting friends in Minneapolis returned on Monday night. Roy Madera, supervising officer of the Veteran's Bureau at Aberdeen, S. D., visited friends here on Tuesday. Mr. M}dera formerly lived at Mil- bank. Mrs. Geo. Reedy and little son of Montevideo visited at the home of Mrs. Reedy's parents, Mr. ahd Mrs. A. V. Carlson the latter part of last wee. Robert Hunter, proprietor of the Milbank Mohagany Granite Works, was in town Tuesday. He states they will commeriee working full time next week in the shop. Mrs. H. Gerber, who has been Excerpts Taken From A Minnesota History DEEDS OF INSPIRATION TO THE LIFE OF AARON B. KAERCHER. (From Levang's Weekly, Lanesboro) "Preston, Minnesota, was named by John Kaercber in honor of his mill- wright, Luther Preston, who was also the first postmaster of the village. The first settlement of Preston village dates back to 1853, when John Vail, from Pennsylvania, located on the south ork of the Root river and erec- ted a log cabin on its south bank, on the exact site of the present power plant of the village of Preston. "In the meantime there had been transpiring in Iowa events which had an important influence on the future of Fillmore county. Mrs. Barbara Kaercher Schweitzer, then separated from her husband, was living in Win- nishiek county, Iowa. where, as the result of profitable investments, she owned 800 acres of rich land, fav- orably located. With her were her grown sons, Theobold and Loui.; a young son, Jacob; and two daughters, Barbara and Margaret. "In the same vicinity, and a member of the same colony, was living John Kaercher and his family. John Kaer- cher was a brother of Mrs. Barbara Kaercher Schweitzer. He, like his sis- ter, had made considerable money by wise land investments. "Michael Ansett, with his wife and two sons, Michael and John, were liv- ing in the same neighborhood, Mr. An- sett working for John Kaercher. critically ill at the Montevideo hos- Berry Olson was likewise there, he pital, is slowly improving. Miss Her- being employed by Mrs. Schweitzer. tha went down to visit her mother "To these people William Vail, a on Friday, returning Sunday night, brother of the solitaIT pioneer then A basket social will be given in living on the future site of Preston, School District No. 48 on Thursday, i madethe proposition that they come to  in,-  I this locality anti start a village lie Februar 23, accord , to an an- . - nouncement received from the Misses I pictured the.country, and the future of lrae a th el the county m gloing terms and as Florence U " h nd Ru H "n, ' 1 " teachers of that district sured them that were they to ocate w ..... "  ,, l in this vicinity with the capital they tcay . tennec oiTergus J:ans, as- ............ [would secure by the sale of their Iowa msan: supermrenuent oi ne lnver- . ...... .,. , .. .  . . , . property anti esaOllSn a sawmill an(l nailonal torresponaence bcnools Ior . . . .......... this state, is here today attending to [cgrIs. mm' .ey coma easuy secure tne . uny sea. business matters and also for a vImt ,, .............. ...........  ...... , Accorcllngly, In ne winter oI ioa, wl[n his sister, lvlrs. M. o. lunKnanl- r [John Kaereher, Theobold Schwe]tzer, me.r.. . ......... " I Michael Ansett and Berry Olson came ar. an mrs. vern tilvlngn . . .......... moved into the home of Mr and Mrs I to this locanty, an looKe(I aou Ior L  Re" nolds the -arents of Mrs" a suitable location for a village and a " Y ' P "" mill. In relation to this visit a for- Kilvington, this week, as the Rey- mer history of the county has said: nolds family are preparing to move onto their farm north of town in March. Mr. and Mrs, Ernest A. Nelson of Hibbing were guests at the Hayden French borne Sunday and Monday, while enroute to Great Falls, Mon- ana. Mrs. Nelson was formerly Miss Frances Pond, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. French. Miss Grace Kaercher and L. A. Kaercher will leave tonight for the] cities, the former to attend to busi-] hess matters and the latter to be in attendance at the Fifty-sixth Annual Convention of the Minnesota Editorial Association to be held at Minneapo- lis on Friday and Saturday. O [ OBITUARY l 'John Kaereher and Theobald Schweit- zer visited Carimona, which had an embryotic village with a sawmill which had been erected by three Pick- ett brothers. It was once decided that this was a very desirable piece of property to have, altho there was not a superlativ& abundance of first-class lumber to keep it in operation. How- ever, Kaergher and Schweitzer opened negotiations with a view of purchasing the property if it could be obtained at a satisfactory figure. Two of the brothers were consulted, and they agreed that $1,400 would be a fair valuation. When, however, the third Pickett arrived upon the scene, he af- fected the most supreme indifference about selling and placed his figures at $1,600, and to this unexpected raise the young prospectors expressed their @ surprise. The two young men thus Mrs. Carrie Mikkelson of Otreylseeking their fortunes were attired in township lassed away at Evangelical l overalls , anti shirts made of bed tick- hospital in this city Tuesday at theing, which would not create the ira- age of seventy-three years. She was formerly Miss Carrie Christenson and was boon at Lille- hammer, 'Norway, January 26, 1849, and married in 1881 to Mr. Brede Mik- kelson at Minneapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Mickkelson came to Big Stone county in the same year where Mr. Mikkel- son had lived since 1875, until his death about two years ago, having taken up a claim, in the township of Otrey. Mrs. Mikkelson is survived by three children, Arthur Mikkelson of Akeley, Minn., Bernardt Mikkelson of Otrey township, and Mrs. John Engstrom of Ceylon, Wis., also a brother, John Christenson of Fairmont, Minn., who are all in attendance. Funeral services will be held Fri- day afternoon at two o'clock at Or- tonville, in the Swedish Ltheran chu,:ch, Rev. Arnold Nelson officiating, with interment in Mound Cemetery. --Bias Tape in red, white, blue, black and stripe. Five and 6 yard bolts, 10c each. Tyler's Variety Store. Men who succeed have faith in them- selves and in their fellows. --For the next two weeks I will hold a big sale on all winter hats. Mrs. M. L. Whiting. pression that they had several thous- and dollars in ready cash. The con- vgrsation became animated with spicy remarks on both sides, and finally they were told that Carimona could get along very well without any striped Dutchmen. Of course thi abruptly closed negotiations in that quarter. It .must not be forgotten that this was then a new country, that straggling bands of Indians still roamed about their native wilds, and that the fleet- footed antelopes still held possession of the choice pastures that now, for a quarter of a century, have yielded a wealth of golden harvest to those who followed these pioneer footsteps.' "Michael Ansett, who was one of the party, does not relate the inci- dent of the negotiations at Carimona. "After looking about for a few days, the party .selected the present site of Preston as the field of their future endeavors and concluded the negotia- tions with John Vail. "The location was a most desirable one. The river afforded opportunities for a dam, there was a good place for mill sites, there was plenty of room for residences, the soil in the neigh- borhood was well adapted to agricul- ture, timber and store were available, and the water supply was excellent for domestic purposes, a fine spring being situated near the cabin. i a "'in April 1855, their Iowa taterest having been disposed of, the little colo- y came here and moved into Vails, cabin. The party consisted of Mrs. Barbara Kaereher Scbweitzer, her two sons, Theobold and Jacob; John Kaer- cher, his wife and two daughters; Michael Ansett, his wife and two sons, Michael and John; and Berry Olson. "When the Kaercher colony arrived ther began a season of busy activity for the people residing in the vicinity. Work was commenced on cabins and on the mill. The stone ill, which with additions is still standing, was started, and Luther Preston, the mill- wright, moved into it with his family. A sawmill was also erected a short distance down the river and was soon in operation. This mill was of wood and is no longer in existence. "John Kaercher needed many men to work on his mills, and millwrights, carpenters and common workmen, as well as" farmers, began to settle in or near the new tillage. "The Vail cabin was much too small for the use of the families that were crowded into it, anti soon after his arrival here John Kaereher started the erection of a house, which occu- pied the present site of the Popple & Cummings foundtsr. "The next house to be erected was that of Michael Ansett, on the present l site of the office of th Colman Lure-] ber Company. "John Kaerclmr, the founder of Pres- ton, was a man of enterprise, with originality. In addition to the two mills, he built the Stanwix House, which was a noted hotel at Preston for more than twenty years. He al- so built a comfortable brick residence in the lower part of the village. He bought a farm east of the village where he lived. After a few years he sold his mill, but out of active busi- ness he was afflicted with a spirit of unrest, and, after a time, bought back his mill property, and taking into partnership V. M. Baker, they prose- cuted the business for a number of years, but finally sold to the Conkey brothers, who still own and operate the mill. "Mr. Kaercher then resolved to per- manently retire from the milling busi- ness, but seeing a place for the expres- sion of his energies, and ,emebering the generous profits of flour manufac- ture, he leased the Nonpareil Mill, in Chatfield, of S. T. Dickson. This was put in good repair and he made a com- plete success in operating it. He af- terwards bought the Troy Mill, in Wi- nona county, and at one time had four mill at different points. Soon after- the war there was wild speculation in wheat, it went up to $2.75, and an immense quantity of wheat was pur- chased at these prices, to keep the mills in operation, when suddenly the "corner" collapsed and only found a resting place at 70 cents. Mr. Kaer- cher, it is said, lost $70,000.00 and had $80,000.00, as a debt, hanging over him. He had" before had serious re- verses, but this was the most serious. For several years he was out of bust- ness, except as to his farm near Pres- ton, but finally succeeded in trad- ing his farm for a little mill at Clear Grit with one run of stones. "He increased the power and added: five run of stones. He made the best grades of flour, and in a word, re- trieved his fallen fortunes, wil:.ing out the last dollar of his indebtedness. Again he enlarged the mill to more than double its former capacity, bu a debt was contracted, and varioas circumstances conspired to make m: unprofitable business, and on June 3, 1881, he removed to Ortonville, and in 1889 left for Portland, Oregon, whe,e he died." When I give a dinner party I al- ways have candelabra on the table. Good gracious! I wouldn't think of having a single canned thing on my table. r Seeking Good Seeds? If You are we have them. Garden seeds of high grade. Flower leeds that are grown for exacting customml end that bring you the results. Write for catalog. ARMSTRONG SEED CO. 70g ond Av@. No. Minaalxlls, M,nn. I I WALL PAPER If in need of Wall Paper this year look over my fine line of samples before buying. On display at A. C. Saeger's gro- cery store the last four days of each week--or drop a card and I will call at your home. I do Paper Haging also. Edw. Schneider P. O. Box 183 Ortonville, Minn. Subscribe for the Independent. YES vv e are in lousiness [ana are here to stay-- to help you and the old town'. Our goods are arriving daily. Our main street salesroom will be open in a few days. Complete undertaking stock and equipment has arrived and we are ready to take care of every need00in this line. PHONE 154-L OR 280--DAY OR N.GHT. Schoen-Swenson Furniture Co. Ortonville, Minn. I II I I I I MEN! Let Your Next Pair of Heavy Rubbers for "Tough" Work Be Converse's CABOOSE LOOK FOR THE RUBBER WITH THE BIG "C" ON THE SOLE Double vamp, half:storm style. Pressure cured heavy gum uppers; tire sole bottoms. The long-service, wear-resisting, heavy duty work rubber for Farm work, Labor- ers, R. R. Men, in fact for any sort of tough going. There are CABOOSES in Ortonville that have been in continuous service for over a year the best possible proof that THEY DO WEAR. KOLLITZ MERCANTILE CO. ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA I I I II IIII III I" Ill _ i KORNER KAFE POTTER & GOWAN ORTON ILLE, MINN. It is our aim to turn out Quality Bakery Goods employed a Baker that is considered as among SATURDAY SPECIALS as follows: Bread, 3 for ...... 20c Cookies, all kinds, per doz. 15c Cinnamon Rolls, per doz.. 18c Doughnuts, plain, per doz. 20c Doughnuts, raised, per doz. 20c Doughnuts, chocolate, doz. 25c Fresh FRENCH Pastry Every Saturday Watch our window for Fresh Bakery Goods i i i at all times. We have just the best and we are offering Tea Biscuits, per doz. . . 15 Parker House Rolls, doz.. 20c- Cup Cakes, per doz. : . . 20c Macaroons, per doz .... 20c Buns, per doz ...... 15c Pies, each ...... 35c FEBRUARY 16, 1922 THE ORTONVILLR INDEPENDENT PAGI ff @ PERSONAL, SOCIAL ] AND NEWS ITEMS I V M. Snesrud made a trip to Ren- Tuesday. Loretta Witte visited with at Correll Sunday. E. L. Eldred entertained a few Wednesday afternoon. G. Farrington was a passenger Paul Saturday night. V. Peckham of Aberdeen, S. D., Kirk Roberts Monday. Goldie Hanson left for Leith, Tuesday for a two week's visit. Irene Brennecke came home night from St. Paul for a vis- Fred Nelson, Banker of Peever, S. consulted the doctors here Tues- William Meyers of Milbank, is at the hospital here for treat- and Ralph Gunderson enjoy- visit from their father of Whea- Howard Babcock of Sis- S. D., attended to legal matters Monday. Ruth Lindig visited at the of her parents in Wheaten over week-end. Alfred Nelson of Peever was a pa- at the local hospital the first of the week. M. Warford underwent an opera- at the hospital February 8 and is steadily. King is here from Faribault for a visit with his mother, Christina King'. Dornbusch of Big Stone City, S. was operated on February 9, at hospital Mary Johnson entertained her school class Tuesday after- at a Valentine's party. H. Heft of Milbank, S. D., is a Lt at Evangelical hospital having an operation last Wednesday. hn Frizzell drove down from eville Monday on.business. He is located on the Cunningham farm. and Mrs. Ben Nordquist are of a 9 pound daughter, Irene, born on Valentine's Nelson of the Ortonville Dry establishment of this city is pneumonia at Evangelical hos- Olive Quarve who has been as- in the Register of Deed's office Monday for her home at Louis- Iva Ringer, who underwent an recently at the hospital is at the Dittes home for a few F. Harvey, proprietor of the Pal- Billiard Parlor has been here Watertown, S. D., for the past Louise Monson was summoned Falls, S. D., Thursday on ac- of the illness of a young lady daughter weighing 9, pounds to Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Ger- at Evangelical hospital a few ago. Luther League met at the home Hasslen Tuesday evening but as not as large as Carlson is home from Minne- for an in[tefinite visit at the parents, Mr. and Mrs, A. Mary Shumaker has a class and vocal students at Apple- which she teaches Thursdays of week. P. B. Vikre's Mother, Mrs. of Odessa, is seriously ill Mrs. Vikre has been with her for days. J. W. Lindell of Boone, Iowa, last week on account of the of her mother, Mrs. John of Otrey. Denver Smith of Big Stone is a patient at the local hospital. Evanson of Madison special is with her. Disterhoff returned from Falls, S. D., on Tuesday, where been in connection with the Bureau. J. R. Anderson, representative Pendergast Bridge Co., of Mil- was in the city on Tuesday at- to business matters. Ruby Odney returned to her at Benson on Monday mornin having been a uest at the A. home the past week. Tilda Lindgren of Valley City, arrived last Wednesday for a Weeks' visit with her sisters, Miss and Mrs. Albert Anderson. to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Balde- of Chokio, a 10% pound girl on day. Both mother and are getting along nicely. Mr. and Mrs. Alvah Matthews re. turned from Minneapolis Saturday night where they attended the auto SllOW. Lucian Kaercher returned to Carle- ton college at Northfield Monday morning after a week's absence on account of the death of his father. The Ladies' Aid of Eids church, northeast of town will meet with Mrs. Alfred Stanley, Wednesday, March 1. Everyone cordially invited to attend Rev. John Walseth went to St. Paul the first of the week on account oI the illness and death of Mrs. Wal- seth's brother following an operation. Mrs. F. L. Cliff who has been a pa- tient at the hospital for several weeks on account of a fractured hip has been able to sit up for the past three days. Miss Christine Miekkelson wishes to announce that prices on her winter hats have been reduced. It will be worth while to attend this special sale. E. B. Persson returned Sunday night from a trip to the cities. Mrs. Persson, who has been visiting friends in Minneapolis returned on Monday night. Roy Madera, supervising officer of the Veteran's Bureau at Aberdeen, S. D., visited friends here on Tuesday. Mr. M}dera formerly lived at Mil- bank. Mrs. Geo. Reedy and little son of Montevideo visited at the home of Mrs. Reedy's parents, Mr. ahd Mrs. A. V. Carlson the latter part of last wee. Robert Hunter, proprietor of the Milbank Mohagany Granite Works, was in town Tuesday. He states they will commeriee working full time next week in the shop. Mrs. H. Gerber, who has been Excerpts Taken From A Minnesota History DEEDS OF INSPIRATION TO THE LIFE OF AARON B. KAERCHER. (From Levang's Weekly, Lanesboro) "Preston, Minnesota, was named by John Kaercber in honor of his mill- wright, Luther Preston, who was also the first postmaster of the village. The first settlement of Preston village dates back to 1853, when John Vail, from Pennsylvania, located on the south ork of the Root river and erec- ted a log cabin on its south bank, on the exact site of the present power plant of the village of Preston. "In the meantime there had been transpiring in Iowa events which had an important influence on the future of Fillmore county. Mrs. Barbara Kaercher Schweitzer, then separated from her husband, was living in Win- nishiek county, Iowa. where, as the result of profitable investments, she owned 800 acres of rich land, fav- orably located. With her were her grown sons, Theobold and Loui.; a young son, Jacob; and two daughters, Barbara and Margaret. "In the same vicinity, and a member of the same colony, was living John Kaercher and his family. John Kaer- cher was a brother of Mrs. Barbara Kaercher Schweitzer. He, like his sis- ter, had made considerable money by wise land investments. "Michael Ansett, with his wife and two sons, Michael and John, were liv- ing in the same neighborhood, Mr. An- sett working for John Kaercher. critically ill at the Montevideo hos- Berry Olson was likewise there, he pital, is slowly improving. Miss Her- being employed by Mrs. Schweitzer. tha went down to visit her mother "To these people William Vail, a on Friday, returning Sunday night, brother of the solitaIT pioneer then A basket social will be given in living on the future site of Preston, School District No. 48 on Thursday, i madethe proposition that they come to  in,-  I this locality anti start a village lie Februar 23, accord , to an an- . - nouncement received from the Misses I pictured the.country, and the future of lrae a th el the county m gloing terms and as Florence U " h nd Ru H "n, ' 1 " teachers of that district sured them that were they to ocate w ..... "  ,, l in this vicinity with the capital they tcay . tennec oiTergus J:ans, as- ............ [would secure by the sale of their Iowa msan: supermrenuent oi ne lnver- . ...... .,. , .. .  . . , . property anti esaOllSn a sawmill an(l nailonal torresponaence bcnools Ior . . . .......... this state, is here today attending to [cgrIs. mm' .ey coma easuy secure tne . uny sea. business matters and also for a vImt ,, .............. ...........  ...... , Accorcllngly, In ne winter oI ioa, wl[n his sister, lvlrs. M. o. lunKnanl- r [John Kaereher, Theobold Schwe]tzer, me.r.. . ......... " I Michael Ansett and Berry Olson came ar. an mrs. vern tilvlngn . . .......... moved into the home of Mr and Mrs I to this locanty, an looKe(I aou Ior L  Re" nolds the -arents of Mrs" a suitable location for a village and a " Y ' P "" mill. In relation to this visit a for- Kilvington, this week, as the Rey- mer history of the county has said: nolds family are preparing to move onto their farm north of town in March. Mr. and Mrs, Ernest A. Nelson of Hibbing were guests at the Hayden French borne Sunday and Monday, while enroute to Great Falls, Mon- ana. Mrs. Nelson was formerly Miss Frances Pond, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. French. Miss Grace Kaercher and L. A. Kaercher will leave tonight for the] cities, the former to attend to busi-] hess matters and the latter to be in attendance at the Fifty-sixth Annual Convention of the Minnesota Editorial Association to be held at Minneapo- lis on Friday and Saturday. O [ OBITUARY l 'John Kaereher and Theobald Schweit- zer visited Carimona, which had an embryotic village with a sawmill which had been erected by three Pick- ett brothers. It was once decided that this was a very desirable piece of property to have, altho there was not a superlativ& abundance of first-class lumber to keep it in operation. How- ever, Kaergher and Schweitzer opened negotiations with a view of purchasing the property if it could be obtained at a satisfactory figure. Two of the brothers were consulted, and they agreed that $1,400 would be a fair valuation. When, however, the third Pickett arrived upon the scene, he af- fected the most supreme indifference about selling and placed his figures at $1,600, and to this unexpected raise the young prospectors expressed their @ surprise. The two young men thus Mrs. Carrie Mikkelson of Otreylseeking their fortunes were attired in township lassed away at Evangelical l overalls , anti shirts made of bed tick- hospital in this city Tuesday at theing, which would not create the ira- age of seventy-three years. She was formerly Miss Carrie Christenson and was boon at Lille- hammer, 'Norway, January 26, 1849, and married in 1881 to Mr. Brede Mik- kelson at Minneapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Mickkelson came to Big Stone county in the same year where Mr. Mikkel- son had lived since 1875, until his death about two years ago, having taken up a claim, in the township of Otrey. Mrs. Mikkelson is survived by three children, Arthur Mikkelson of Akeley, Minn., Bernardt Mikkelson of Otrey township, and Mrs. John Engstrom of Ceylon, Wis., also a brother, John Christenson of Fairmont, Minn., who are all in attendance. Funeral services will be held Fri- day afternoon at two o'clock at Or- tonville, in the Swedish Ltheran chu,:ch, Rev. Arnold Nelson officiating, with interment in Mound Cemetery. --Bias Tape in red, white, blue, black and stripe. Five and 6 yard bolts, 10c each. Tyler's Variety Store. Men who succeed have faith in them- selves and in their fellows. --For the next two weeks I will hold a big sale on all winter hats. Mrs. M. L. Whiting. pression that they had several thous- and dollars in ready cash. The con- vgrsation became animated with spicy remarks on both sides, and finally they were told that Carimona could get along very well without any striped Dutchmen. Of course thi abruptly closed negotiations in that quarter. It .must not be forgotten that this was then a new country, that straggling bands of Indians still roamed about their native wilds, and that the fleet- footed antelopes still held possession of the choice pastures that now, for a quarter of a century, have yielded a wealth of golden harvest to those who followed these pioneer footsteps.' "Michael Ansett, who was one of the party, does not relate the inci- dent of the negotiations at Carimona. "After looking about for a few days, the party .selected the present site of Preston as the field of their future endeavors and concluded the negotia- tions with John Vail. "The location was a most desirable one. The river afforded opportunities for a dam, there was a good place for mill sites, there was plenty of room for residences, the soil in the neigh- borhood was well adapted to agricul- ture, timber and store were available, and the water supply was excellent for domestic purposes, a fine spring being situated near the cabin. i a "'in April 1855, their Iowa taterest having been disposed of, the little colo- y came here and moved into Vails, cabin. The party consisted of Mrs. Barbara Kaereher Scbweitzer, her two sons, Theobold and Jacob; John Kaer- cher, his wife and two daughters; Michael Ansett, his wife and two sons, Michael and John; and Berry Olson. "When the Kaercher colony arrived ther began a season of busy activity for the people residing in the vicinity. Work was commenced on cabins and on the mill. The stone ill, which with additions is still standing, was started, and Luther Preston, the mill- wright, moved into it with his family. A sawmill was also erected a short distance down the river and was soon in operation. This mill was of wood and is no longer in existence. "John Kaercher needed many men to work on his mills, and millwrights, carpenters and common workmen, as well as" farmers, began to settle in or near the new tillage. "The Vail cabin was much too small for the use of the families that were crowded into it, anti soon after his arrival here John Kaereher started the erection of a house, which occu- pied the present site of the Popple & Cummings foundtsr. "The next house to be erected was that of Michael Ansett, on the present l site of the office of th Colman Lure-] ber Company. "John Kaerclmr, the founder of Pres- ton, was a man of enterprise, with originality. In addition to the two mills, he built the Stanwix House, which was a noted hotel at Preston for more than twenty years. He al- so built a comfortable brick residence in the lower part of the village. He bought a farm east of the village where he lived. After a few years he sold his mill, but out of active busi- ness he was afflicted with a spirit of unrest, and, after a time, bought back his mill property, and taking into partnership V. M. Baker, they prose- cuted the business for a number of years, but finally sold to the Conkey brothers, who still own and operate the mill. "Mr. Kaercher then resolved to per- manently retire from the milling busi- ness, but seeing a place for the expres- sion of his energies, and ,emebering the generous profits of flour manufac- ture, he leased the Nonpareil Mill, in Chatfield, of S. T. Dickson. This was put in good repair and he made a com- plete success in operating it. He af- terwards bought the Troy Mill, in Wi- nona county, and at one time had four mill at different points. Soon after- the war there was wild speculation in wheat, it went up to $2.75, and an immense quantity of wheat was pur- chased at these prices, to keep the mills in operation, when suddenly the "corner" collapsed and only found a resting place at 70 cents. Mr. Kaer- cher, it is said, lost $70,000.00 and had $80,000.00, as a debt, hanging over him. He had" before had serious re- verses, but this was the most serious. For several years he was out of bust- ness, except as to his farm near Pres- ton, but finally succeeded in trad- ing his farm for a little mill at Clear Grit with one run of stones. "He increased the power and added: five run of stones. He made the best grades of flour, and in a word, re- trieved his fallen fortunes, wil:.ing out the last dollar of his indebtedness. Again he enlarged the mill to more than double its former capacity, bu a debt was contracted, and varioas circumstances conspired to make m: unprofitable business, and on June 3, 1881, he removed to Ortonville, and in 1889 left for Portland, Oregon, whe,e he died." When I give a dinner party I al- ways have candelabra on the table. Good gracious! I wouldn't think of having a single canned thing on my table. r Seeking Good Seeds? If You are we have them. Garden seeds of high grade. Flower leeds that are grown for exacting customml end that bring you the results. Write for catalog. ARMSTRONG SEED CO. 70g ond Av@. No. Minaalxlls, M,nn. I I WALL PAPER If in need of Wall Paper this year look over my fine line of samples before buying. On display at A. C. Saeger's gro- cery store the last four days of each week--or drop a card and I will call at your home. I do Paper Haging also. Edw. Schneider P. O. Box 183 Ortonville, Minn. Subscribe for the Independent. YES vv e are in lousiness [ana are here to stay-- to help you and the old town'. Our goods are arriving daily. Our main street salesroom will be open in a few days. Complete undertaking stock and equipment has arrived and we are ready to take care of every need00in this line. PHONE 154-L OR 280--DAY OR N.GHT. Schoen-Swenson Furniture Co. Ortonville, Minn. I II I I I I MEN! Let Your Next Pair of Heavy Rubbers for "Tough" Work Be Converse's CABOOSE LOOK FOR THE RUBBER WITH THE BIG "C" ON THE SOLE Double vamp, half:storm style. Pressure cured heavy gum uppers; tire sole bottoms. The long-service, wear-resisting, heavy duty work rubber for Farm work, Labor- ers, R. R. Men, in fact for any sort of tough going. There are CABOOSES in Ortonville that have been in continuous service for over a year the best possible proof that THEY DO WEAR. KOLLITZ MERCANTILE CO. ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA I I I II IIII III I" Ill _ i KORNER KAFE POTTER & GOWAN ORTON ILLE, MINN. It is our aim to turn out Quality Bakery Goods employed a Baker that is considered as among SATURDAY SPECIALS as follows: Bread, 3 for ...... 20c Cookies, all kinds, per doz. 15c Cinnamon Rolls, per doz.. 18c Doughnuts, plain, per doz. 20c Doughnuts, raised, per doz. 20c Doughnuts, chocolate, doz. 25c Fresh FRENCH Pastry Every Saturday Watch our window for Fresh Bakery Goods i i i at all times. We have just the best and we are offering Tea Biscuits, per doz. . . 15 Parker House Rolls, doz.. 20c- Cup Cakes, per doz. : . . 20c Macaroons, per doz .... 20c Buns, per doz ...... 15c Pies, each ...... 35c FEBRUARY 16, lZ THE ORTONVILI INDIIDST PA S ,P -- Mr d Mrs. A yah Matthews re- , SOCIAL ]itued fm MinneapoLis Saturday ANY NEWS XTEm  I:o,t w. , ............. M. Snesxltd made a trip to Run- I Lucian Kher returned to Carl6 1Mesday. ton college at Nurthfle]d Monday Lorett Witte visited moing after a week's aJlsen on The Ladies' Aid of Eids church, Wednesday fteoon. northeast of town will meet with M. ay G, Farrington waz a psenger Stanley, Wednesday, March L L paul Saturday night. Eryone cordially invited to attend. V. Pkham of Aberdn, S.D., Ray. John Walseth went to St. Paul the first of the wk on aount o Halos left for Leith, th e illness nd death of Mrs. Wal )., Tuesday fur a two week's vlslt, seth's bther foflowiag an operation. Mrs. F. L. Cliff who has been a pa tlent at the hqpital for veral wks ip ha* been Bker of Per, S. abl e to t up for the pt th days the doctors here Mis Christine Miekkelson wishes to her wlnter hats have been duced. It will be worth while to attend this spia] xcerpts Taken From A Minnesota History DEEDS OF INSPIRATION TO THE LIFE OF AARON B. KAERCHER. (From ]vang's Wkly, Lanesho) "Preston, Minnesota, was nll by John Kaeer in honor of his mill wright, Luther Pston, who was also the flt poshter of the vii gage. The first settlement of Preston illage dates back. to 1853, when John Vail, from Pennsylvania, toeatot on the south ork of the Root river md e ted a log cabin on its south bank. on the exact site of the pnt power lant of the village of Pson. "In th e meantime the had bn :anspiring in Iowa events which hod ,joy- FIowal Monday. Liadig visited at the ants in WheaUn over  at the Ial hospital the de't m e at th hospital Febrry  and is steadUy. King from King. g Stone City, S. sale. a n important influen on the future E. B. Psson tumed Sunday of Fdlmo county. M. Barbara night from a trip to the cities. Mr Kaeher Schwartzr. then separated persson, who has been visiting frlends from her husband, was living in Win inneapells returned on Monday ],ishiek county. Iowa, where, as the result of plfithle investments. be Roy Madera, supelsing emir of owned 8OO res of ch land, f.v- e Veteran's Buau at Aberdeen, S. orably [ated. With her were her, vsted fren,l here on Tuely. grown sons Theobohl and Iue; a Mr. Mdera foerly heed at MiI- young n, Jcob; and two daughter, bank, Barbara and Margsre M. Gee. Rely and little son of  "In the same vielnity, and a member Montevideo visited at the home of!of the same colony was llving Jobnl Mrs. Reedy's parents Mr. ahd M.I xl I his faintly. John Kaer- I A.V. part of ast a brother of Mrs. Barbara w. He, like his sis- Robert Hunter. proprietor of th, ,y by Mohagany Works was operated on February 9, ng iu the same neighborhol, Mr. An- . , Mr H. Gerber, who has been sett working for John Kaeber. Mary Johmon entertmned her fiScal y i I at the Montevi eo he Be ry Olson was kew se he, he a school eJs Tuday after- ] pltal, is slowly improving. Mis Her- being employed by M, Sehweitzer. at a Vaenhne s party. [ tha went down to visit her mother E'To the pgie William Vail, a Ieft of Mbonk. S. D,  ales Friday, tuing Sunday night, brother of the solitary gionr then t Evans Ileal hc pital avlng A bske  a  be given n ; living on the futu site of Proton. ,peratior last  dnd ty. Schoo Istrict No 48 on Thuda adethe proposition that they come to Frlzzelt drove down from I Febrvry 23, rding to a a is Ioity a.d start a village. He He is [ounment eived from the Misses Ictured the country a.d the future of Ulrich and Rut Hein, e county in glowing terms and as rs. Ran Nuraqut alteaeb of that dlstrieL pur thr that e they o Iat b parent of a 9 pound daughter Pay V. lnnet of'Fergus FIS, - Ell this vicinity w,th he ptl the tss lrene, bum on Valentlne' sistant superintendent of the Inter- ould sur by the sale of thellOWE ............................. pesr e d eSotablsehas  saecmlll I  Ual Ne son o the Ortonville Dry h state s he today attending to g s m . y co d  y u a/ag tahshnnt of this city is : busines matters and also for a visit county seat. . . ith pueoia at Ege ieal ho ! mar.With his sister, Mrs...M.J. ..,Klinkham- MichaelIhn"ArdmgiY'Kaeher'Antt andmTheo[mldtheBerryWlnterOSchweltrson of e 1854 atg Odi:eQo-whf easeb,eenfft.ga o e [moved ,n o t e home o Mr' .a:d hM v er 'vnMr n tr. rs. ...... . c ........... ,. k edl ........ Monday for her he at Loui - L A Reyno d he pan s of Mr a suitable Itlon for a vii age and * ifdl n thi' week a the Re mill. In laon to this slt a for. vmg to s .s y- mar history of the county has said: p Iva Rmer, who undeent an holds family a pparlng to move , l hag at the Dittes home for a few Mah z bVtS a n , lC at I ar r as r e ast Fr rich home Sunday d Monday h s was a very desirable pie ol t w ter, S. D,, foth p whll e enroub to Great FAlls. Men property to hve altho the was no1 It aria. Mrs. Nelson was formerly Miss  r "v bundane of firs e as Menses was *moned[ P d u ht f Mr z .upe lati  a e . t Frances on , da g er o . robe to k p "t. p  HOW S,D. *hdayon" M* ] Fneh u r  i moe on. i s. . pene of the illness of a young Mi Grace Kaercher and L.A. purehasin will leave tonight for the me ppery if it eouM be obtained at daughter ighlng 9% pouuds e/ties ' the gunner to s satisfactory figure, Two of t tho to Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Ger- hess matters and tl latter to be in 3rothers we consulted, and the Evgeliel hospital the Fifty-sixth Aun] aged that $1,400 wouhl be a fai Luther League ahtation. When, however, the third y evening but to be Pickett arrived upon the eue, he af attendan  as no t as larg e as Friday and Saturday. Ited the most supme indifferene bout selling and placed his figure $ ,600, and o his unexpected rais OBITUARY I he young prospeeto expressed theh -- *[sulprise. The two young men thm Mrs. Carrie Mikke]so of Otysking their fortunes were attid ir township Fasse away at Evangelical ]ovells, and shirts rmade of bed tick hospital in this elty Tesday t theling, which woud not create the im age of seventy-three y [ preston that they had sevel tbous She was go.arty Miss Cieland dollars in ady sh. The euu. w bunt at Lille-vrsationl because aniseed with spie3 hammer, loey, Jaunty 26, 1849, s d finally the e of his I ;s Mary Shumaker has a class d vl students at Apple- whh she teaeh Thursdays P. B. Vikre's Mother, Mrs. Oessa, i riously Ill /ars. Vie h been with her for Lindell of Boone, Iowa, wk on oant of the er mother, M. John l a patit at the Ial hospi . , Eva of Madir specid , ia with her. retued D., bu in connection th s Bu ea'. J R. Audern, repseatatlve e Pendergast Bridge C, of Mi[- , Was ha the city on Tuesday at- Odney ha.dug been a dtvlth her sisters. Mis ad Mrs. Albert Anderson. ,f Choklo, a 10 pound #rl o are getting along nicely. ig Stone county year where Mr. SOil had ived since 1875, until his death about two y nge, havlng takea up a elgim in the toshty el 0ty. , M. Mikkelson is survived by thee ehildn, Arthur kke[son of Akeley, Minn., Beardt Akkelson of Otrey tshlp Ceylon, Wie., also a bther, John Christenson of Fdrmont, Minn., who are all In attendant. Funeral seices 11 he held F- day aemn at wo o'clock at O tonvUe, in the Swedish Lthen ehh, --Bias Tape in red, white, blue, ,lack aad stripe. Five and 6 yard lts, 10e eh Tgier's Variety Sto. their fellows --Fer e next two ks I ll held a big sale ou all nter hts Mr M. L Whiting. were told that Carimuna could get along very well without any stried Of course thi abptly quarter. It be forgotten that this was than a new co.try, that straggling bands of 1.dians still ed about their native wlds, and that the fleet- footed telopes sill held psslen pastus that .uw. for y, have yielded a wealth of golden barwst to those plonr footsteps,  "Michael Antt. who was one of the party, does not relate the tnei dent ef the negotiations at Carlmo. "After looking about for a few days, the party saluted the pnt site of Preston  the field of their futu the negot/a- "The Ien was a most destble one. The river afforded epportunities fur a d, there was a good pla for mill site, the  plenty of room for sJdes, the soil in the neigh- was we  adapted to agr cul- timber d store were available, pply w.s excellent for demesne parpos, a fine pring being bin. '%n Apl 185, their Iowa htets It aving bn dhped of, the little colo- ny me he d moved nto Va bin. The party eonslsted of M. arbam Kher hweitzer, her tw, sons, Theobald a.d Jacob; John Kaer char, hh wife nd two dghte Michl Ansett, his wife and two snns Michel and Juhu; and Bevy OIson. "When the Kher colony arnv the began a sn nf by aetivlt fur the pple sd. in the vicinity Work WAS commenced on hins , on the mill. The stone mll, whie ith additions is still standing, wa ted, d Luther Pton, the mll. wright, moved into it with his fanly A wmill w aiso eced a sho istan dow the rlv and was seer n eperation This mill was of wood and is no longer n existenee. "John Kher needed ma.y mar work on hls mill, and mlllwghts carpenters d emon workmen, a elt a farmers, began te settle i. ot near the a ilage. "The Vail bln WAS much t small fur the u of the families that wer :wded into it, and sen after hi arval here John Kaeher 8tarbell :he ertlon of a house, which occu- pied the psent site of the Pupple ummings fouudry. "The next house to be ertl wa :at of Michel Aaet, o, the psent site of the oce of the Caiman Lum- er Company. "John Kaercher, the founder of Pres. ton, was a man nf enterprise, with riglnaity. In addaon to the t mills, he built the Stanvx HO which w a nnted hote at pst fur mo than twenty yoa. He al- so builI a comforble brick residenc tn the lower part ot the village.  ougbt a fa east uf the llag After a f years he ld his mll. bet out of tive busi- es he WAS alctl wlth a spirit ot angst, aml. after a time, bought ck hi mll property, and fairing iute partnership V. M. Baker they pm ted the business for a number o ears, but flnly said to the Cnkey rethers, who sll o and operat he mill. "Mr. Kaeher then resolved to per- [mane.fly retire frem the rlling bi heSS, but seeing a p[e for the ex i sion of his energ/, and emeberng the gnemus profile of flour muea tu, he lead the Nenpil Mill in ,Chatfield, of S. T. Dickso.. Ts pt in good pir nd he mae a com- plete success iu operating it. He af tabards bought the Troy Mill, in Wl- e county, and at one time had four mill at diffent point SOo after- the war there w wild speulaUoa in wht, it went up to $2.75, and immense quantity of whelt w pur- ebred at th prices, to keep the mils in opera.on, when suddenly the "eoe" collapsed and only fouud a stlng pl at 7O cents. Mr, Kaor. char, it is id, lost $7O,OOO.OO and had aS0,000.00, a a debt, hanging uver hlm. Pe habefm had serous - verses, but thi w the mt serous. Fur vel years he was out of busi- aess, except as to his fa nr Pres. on, but flaliy succeeded in tra. ...... WALL r/t wth one  of ton "He inesed the ]ower d added   of ston e de the best ,_of00 ............... PAPER rleved his fallen fortunes, wing ou he last dollar of his indebtedns Again he entged the mill to more han do.hie its foer capacity, but debt was ntmcted, and vaeae 5f in need of Wail PAper tbls :ircqmstances npired to ke m: unpfitabie bins, an6 on June , year look or my fine line of 88, h* removed o Ortenv e, and n ples Before buying. On 1889 left for portland, Oregon, whe, hedied,, display at A. C Sger's g- When I give a dinner party I - ry sto the last four days of ways ha cdelabra on the table ch weak--or drop a card and Good geious! I wuuldn't think et 1 will call t your home. having a single ned thing on my table, 1 do paper Hagng also. s.g G.ed Sas, Edw; oS chneider I if a m  vetbem G*rdea tt  that Mug You t Ortuvtll Minn. I T ARMSTRONG 8F-D Co. Ia.N MIdIM. Sub,crib O for the Indepeudent. YES We are in lbuslness land we are here to stay--to help you and the old town'. Our goods are arriving daily. Our main street salesroom will be open in a few days. Complete undertaking stock and equipment has arrived and we are ready to take care of every needin this line. pHONE 154-L OR 280DAY OR N:GHT. Schoen-Swenson Furniture Co. Orinnville, Minn. MEN! Let Your Next Pair of Hea,00 Rubbers for "Tough Work Be Converse's CABOOSE Double vamp, half-storm style. Pressure cured heavy gu m uppers; tire sole bottoms. The long-service, wear-resisting, heavy duty work rubber for Farm work, Labor- ere, R. R. Men, in fact tor any sort of tough going. LOOK FOR THE There are CABOOSES in Ortonvflle that snn. WtTa have been in continuous service for over THEtIG .C. a year--the best possible proof that ,,  OL THEY DO WEAR. KOLLITZ MERCANTILE CO. ORTONVLLE, MLNNESOTA KAFE & GOWAN ORTONVILLE, MlNN. It is our aim to turn out Quality Bakery Goods at all times. We have just employed a Baker that is considered as among the best and we are offering SATURDAY SPECIALS as follows: Bread, 3 for ...... 20c I I Cookies, all kinds, per doz. 15e Fresh FRENCH Pastry Cinnamon Rolls, per doz.. 18e Every Saturday Doughnuts, plain, per doz. 20e Watch our window |or Doughnuts, raised, per doz. 20c Fresh Bakery Goods Doughnuts, chocolate, doz. 25c Tea Biscuits, per doz. . . 15 Parker House Rolls, doz.. 20c Cup Cakes, per doz..- . 20e Macaroons, per doz.. 20e Buns, per doz ...... 15e Pies, each ...... 35e FEBRUARY 16, 1922 THE ORTONVILLR INDEPENDENT PAGI ff @ PERSONAL, SOCIAL ] AND NEWS ITEMS I V M. Snesrud made a trip to Ren- Tuesday. Loretta Witte visited with at Correll Sunday. E. L. Eldred entertained a few Wednesday afternoon. G. Farrington was a passenger Paul Saturday night. V. Peckham of Aberdeen, S. D., Kirk Roberts Monday. Goldie Hanson left for Leith, Tuesday for a two week's visit. Irene Brennecke came home night from St. Paul for a vis- Fred Nelson, Banker of Peever, S. consulted the doctors here Tues- William Meyers of Milbank, is at the hospital here for treat- and Ralph Gunderson enjoy- visit from their father of Whea- Howard Babcock of Sis- S. D., attended to legal matters Monday. Ruth Lindig visited at the of her parents in Wheaten over week-end. Alfred Nelson of Peever was a pa- at the local hospital the first of the week. M. Warford underwent an opera- at the hospital February 8 and is steadily. King is here from Faribault for a visit with his mother, Christina King'. Dornbusch of Big Stone City, S. was operated on February 9, at hospital Mary Johnson entertained her school class Tuesday after- at a Valentine's party. H. Heft of Milbank, S. D., is a Lt at Evangelical hospital having an operation last Wednesday. hn Frizzell drove down from eville Monday on.business. He is located on the Cunningham farm. and Mrs. Ben Nordquist are of a 9 pound daughter, Irene, born on Valentine's Nelson of the Ortonville Dry establishment of this city is pneumonia at Evangelical hos- Olive Quarve who has been as- in the Register of Deed's office Monday for her home at Louis- Iva Ringer, who underwent an recently at the hospital is at the Dittes home for a few F. Harvey, proprietor of the Pal- Billiard Parlor has been here Watertown, S. D., for the past Louise Monson was summoned Falls, S. D., Thursday on ac- of the illness of a young lady daughter weighing 9, pounds to Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Ger- at Evangelical hospital a few ago. Luther League met at the home Hasslen Tuesday evening but as not as large as Carlson is home from Minne- for an in[tefinite visit at the parents, Mr. and Mrs, A. Mary Shumaker has a class and vocal students at Apple- which she teaches Thursdays of week. P. B. Vikre's Mother, Mrs. of Odessa, is seriously ill Mrs. Vikre has been with her for days. J. W. Lindell of Boone, Iowa, last week on account of the of her mother, Mrs. John of Otrey. Denver Smith of Big Stone is a patient at the local hospital. Evanson of Madison special is with her. Disterhoff returned from Falls, S. D., on Tuesday, where been in connection with the Bureau. J. R. Anderson, representative Pendergast Bridge Co., of Mil- was in the city on Tuesday at- to business matters. Ruby Odney returned to her at Benson on Monday mornin having been a uest at the A. home the past week. Tilda Lindgren of Valley City, arrived last Wednesday for a Weeks' visit with her sisters, Miss and Mrs. Albert Anderson. to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Balde- of Chokio, a 10% pound girl on day. Both mother and are getting along nicely. Mr. and Mrs. Alvah Matthews re. turned from Minneapolis Saturday night where they attended the auto SllOW. Lucian Kaercher returned to Carle- ton college at Northfield Monday morning after a week's absence on account of the death of his father. The Ladies' Aid of Eids church, northeast of town will meet with Mrs. Alfred Stanley, Wednesday, March 1. Everyone cordially invited to attend Rev. John Walseth went to St. Paul the first of the week on account oI the illness and death of Mrs. Wal- seth's brother following an operation. Mrs. F. L. Cliff who has been a pa- tient at the hospital for several weeks on account of a fractured hip has been able to sit up for the past three days. Miss Christine Miekkelson wishes to announce that prices on her winter hats have been reduced. It will be worth while to attend this special sale. E. B. Persson returned Sunday night from a trip to the cities. Mrs. Persson, who has been visiting friends in Minneapolis returned on Monday night. Roy Madera, supervising officer of the Veteran's Bureau at Aberdeen, S. D., visited friends here on Tuesday. Mr. M}dera formerly lived at Mil- bank. Mrs. Geo. Reedy and little son of Montevideo visited at the home of Mrs. Reedy's parents, Mr. ahd Mrs. A. V. Carlson the latter part of last wee. Robert Hunter, proprietor of the Milbank Mohagany Granite Works, was in town Tuesday. He states they will commeriee working full time next week in the shop. Mrs. H. Gerber, who has been Excerpts Taken From A Minnesota History DEEDS OF INSPIRATION TO THE LIFE OF AARON B. KAERCHER. (From Levang's Weekly, Lanesboro) "Preston, Minnesota, was named by John Kaercber in honor of his mill- wright, Luther Preston, who was also the first postmaster of the village. The first settlement of Preston village dates back to 1853, when John Vail, from Pennsylvania, located on the south ork of the Root river and erec- ted a log cabin on its south bank, on the exact site of the present power plant of the village of Preston. "In the meantime there had been transpiring in Iowa events which had an important influence on the future of Fillmore county. Mrs. Barbara Kaercher Schweitzer, then separated from her husband, was living in Win- nishiek county, Iowa. where, as the result of profitable investments, she owned 800 acres of rich land, fav- orably located. With her were her grown sons, Theobold and Loui.; a young son, Jacob; and two daughters, Barbara and Margaret. "In the same vicinity, and a member of the same colony, was living John Kaercher and his family. John Kaer- cher was a brother of Mrs. Barbara Kaercher Schweitzer. He, like his sis- ter, had made considerable money by wise land investments. "Michael Ansett, with his wife and two sons, Michael and John, were liv- ing in the same neighborhood, Mr. An- sett working for John Kaercher. critically ill at the Montevideo hos- Berry Olson was likewise there, he pital, is slowly improving. Miss Her- being employed by Mrs. Schweitzer. tha went down to visit her mother "To these people William Vail, a on Friday, returning Sunday night, brother of the solitaIT pioneer then A basket social will be given in living on the future site of Preston, School District No. 48 on Thursday, i madethe proposition that they come to  in,-  I this locality anti start a village lie Februar 23, accord , to an an- . - nouncement received from the Misses I pictured the.country, and the future of lrae a th el the county m gloing terms and as Florence U " h nd Ru H "n, ' 1 " teachers of that district sured them that were they to ocate w ..... "  ,, l in this vicinity with the capital they tcay . tennec oiTergus J:ans, as- ............ [would secure by the sale of their Iowa msan: supermrenuent oi ne lnver- . ...... .,. , .. .  . . , . property anti esaOllSn a sawmill an(l nailonal torresponaence bcnools Ior . . . .......... this state, is here today attending to [cgrIs. mm' .ey coma easuy secure tne . uny sea. business matters and also for a vImt ,, .............. ...........  ...... , Accorcllngly, In ne winter oI ioa, wl[n his sister, lvlrs. M. o. lunKnanl- r [John Kaereher, Theobold Schwe]tzer, me.r.. . ......... " I Michael Ansett and Berry Olson came ar. an mrs. vern tilvlngn . . .......... moved into the home of Mr and Mrs I to this locanty, an looKe(I aou Ior L  Re" nolds the -arents of Mrs" a suitable location for a village and a " Y ' P "" mill. In relation to this visit a for- Kilvington, this week, as the Rey- mer history of the county has said: nolds family are preparing to move onto their farm north of town in March. Mr. and Mrs, Ernest A. Nelson of Hibbing were guests at the Hayden French borne Sunday and Monday, while enroute to Great Falls, Mon- ana. Mrs. Nelson was formerly Miss Frances Pond, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. French. Miss Grace Kaercher and L. A. Kaercher will leave tonight for the] cities, the former to attend to busi-] hess matters and the latter to be in attendance at the Fifty-sixth Annual Convention of the Minnesota Editorial Association to be held at Minneapo- lis on Friday and Saturday. O [ OBITUARY l 'John Kaereher and Theobald Schweit- zer visited Carimona, which had an embryotic village with a sawmill which had been erected by three Pick- ett brothers. It was once decided that this was a very desirable piece of property to have, altho there was not a superlativ& abundance of first-class lumber to keep it in operation. How- ever, Kaergher and Schweitzer opened negotiations with a view of purchasing the property if it could be obtained at a satisfactory figure. Two of the brothers were consulted, and they agreed that $1,400 would be a fair valuation. When, however, the third Pickett arrived upon the scene, he af- fected the most supreme indifference about selling and placed his figures at $1,600, and to this unexpected raise the young prospectors expressed their @ surprise. The two young men thus Mrs. Carrie Mikkelson of Otreylseeking their fortunes were attired in township lassed away at Evangelical l overalls , anti shirts made of bed tick- hospital in this city Tuesday at theing, which would not create the ira- age of seventy-three years. She was formerly Miss Carrie Christenson and was boon at Lille- hammer, 'Norway, January 26, 1849, and married in 1881 to Mr. Brede Mik- kelson at Minneapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Mickkelson came to Big Stone county in the same year where Mr. Mikkel- son had lived since 1875, until his death about two years ago, having taken up a claim, in the township of Otrey. Mrs. Mikkelson is survived by three children, Arthur Mikkelson of Akeley, Minn., Bernardt Mikkelson of Otrey township, and Mrs. John Engstrom of Ceylon, Wis., also a brother, John Christenson of Fairmont, Minn., who are all in attendance. Funeral services will be held Fri- day afternoon at two o'clock at Or- tonville, in the Swedish Ltheran chu,:ch, Rev. Arnold Nelson officiating, with interment in Mound Cemetery. --Bias Tape in red, white, blue, black and stripe. Five and 6 yard bolts, 10c each. Tyler's Variety Store. Men who succeed have faith in them- selves and in their fellows. --For the next two weeks I will hold a big sale on all winter hats. Mrs. M. L. Whiting. pression that they had several thous- and dollars in ready cash. The con- vgrsation became animated with spicy remarks on both sides, and finally they were told that Carimona could get along very well without any striped Dutchmen. Of course thi abruptly closed negotiations in that quarter. It .must not be forgotten that this was then a new country, that straggling bands of Indians still roamed about their native wilds, and that the fleet- footed antelopes still held possession of the choice pastures that now, for a quarter of a century, have yielded a wealth of golden harvest to those who followed these pioneer footsteps.' "Michael Ansett, who was one of the party, does not relate the inci- dent of the negotiations at Carimona. "After looking about for a few days, the party .selected the present site of Preston as the field of their future endeavors and concluded the negotia- tions with John Vail. "The location was a most desirable one. The river afforded opportunities for a dam, there was a good place for mill sites, there was plenty of room for residences, the soil in the neigh- borhood was well adapted to agricul- ture, timber and store were available, and the water supply was excellent for domestic purposes, a fine spring being situated near the cabin. i a "'in April 1855, their Iowa taterest having been disposed of, the little colo- y came here and moved into Vails, cabin. The party consisted of Mrs. Barbara Kaereher Scbweitzer, her two sons, Theobold and Jacob; John Kaer- cher, his wife and two daughters; Michael Ansett, his wife and two sons, Michael and John; and Berry Olson. "When the Kaercher colony arrived ther began a season of busy activity for the people residing in the vicinity. Work was commenced on cabins and on the mill. The stone ill, which with additions is still standing, was started, and Luther Preston, the mill- wright, moved into it with his family. A sawmill was also erected a short distance down the river and was soon in operation. This mill was of wood and is no longer in existence. "John Kaercher needed many men to work on his mills, and millwrights, carpenters and common workmen, as well as" farmers, began to settle in or near the new tillage. "The Vail cabin was much too small for the use of the families that were crowded into it, anti soon after his arrival here John Kaereher started the erection of a house, which occu- pied the present site of the Popple & Cummings foundtsr. "The next house to be erected was that of Michael Ansett, on the present l site of the office of th Colman Lure-] ber Company. "John Kaerclmr, the founder of Pres- ton, was a man of enterprise, with originality. In addition to the two mills, he built the Stanwix House, which was a noted hotel at Preston for more than twenty years. He al- so built a comfortable brick residence in the lower part of the village. He bought a farm east of the village where he lived. After a few years he sold his mill, but out of active busi- ness he was afflicted with a spirit of unrest, and, after a time, bought back his mill property, and taking into partnership V. M. Baker, they prose- cuted the business for a number of years, but finally sold to the Conkey brothers, who still own and operate the mill. "Mr. Kaercher then resolved to per- manently retire from the milling busi- ness, but seeing a place for the expres- sion of his energies, and ,emebering the generous profits of flour manufac- ture, he leased the Nonpareil Mill, in Chatfield, of S. T. Dickson. This was put in good repair and he made a com- plete success in operating it. He af- terwards bought the Troy Mill, in Wi- nona county, and at one time had four mill at different points. Soon after- the war there was wild speculation in wheat, it went up to $2.75, and an immense quantity of wheat was pur- chased at these prices, to keep the mills in operation, when suddenly the "corner" collapsed and only found a resting place at 70 cents. Mr. Kaer- cher, it is said, lost $70,000.00 and had $80,000.00, as a debt, hanging over him. He had" before had serious re- verses, but this was the most serious. For several years he was out of bust- ness, except as to his farm near Pres- ton, but finally succeeded in trad- ing his farm for a little mill at Clear Grit with one run of stones. "He increased the power and added: five run of stones. He made the best grades of flour, and in a word, re- trieved his fallen fortunes, wil:.ing out the last dollar of his indebtedness. Again he enlarged the mill to more than double its former capacity, bu a debt was contracted, and varioas circumstances conspired to make m: unprofitable business, and on June 3, 1881, he removed to Ortonville, and in 1889 left for Portland, Oregon, whe,e he died." When I give a dinner party I al- ways have candelabra on the table. Good gracious! I wouldn't think of having a single canned thing on my table. r Seeking Good Seeds? If You are we have them. Garden seeds of high grade. Flower leeds that are grown for exacting customml end that bring you the results. Write for catalog. ARMSTRONG SEED CO. 70g ond Av@. No. Minaalxlls, M,nn. I I WALL PAPER If in need of Wall Paper this year look over my fine line of samples before buying. On display at A. C. Saeger's gro- cery store the last four days of each week--or drop a card and I will call at your home. I do Paper Haging also. Edw. Schneider P. O. Box 183 Ortonville, Minn. Subscribe for the Independent. YES vv e are in lousiness [ana are here to stay-- to help you and the old town'. Our goods are arriving daily. Our main street salesroom will be open in a few days. Complete undertaking stock and equipment has arrived and we are ready to take care of every need00in this line. PHONE 154-L OR 280--DAY OR N.GHT. Schoen-Swenson Furniture Co. Ortonville, Minn. I II I I I I MEN! Let Your Next Pair of Heavy Rubbers for "Tough" Work Be Converse's CABOOSE LOOK FOR THE RUBBER WITH THE BIG "C" ON THE SOLE Double vamp, half:storm style. Pressure cured heavy gum uppers; tire sole bottoms. The long-service, wear-resisting, heavy duty work rubber for Farm work, Labor- ers, R. R. Men, in fact for any sort of tough going. There are CABOOSES in Ortonville that have been in continuous service for over a year the best possible proof that THEY DO WEAR. KOLLITZ MERCANTILE CO. ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA I I I II IIII III I" Ill _ i KORNER KAFE POTTER & GOWAN ORTON ILLE, MINN. It is our aim to turn out Quality Bakery Goods employed a Baker that is considered as among SATURDAY SPECIALS as follows: Bread, 3 for ...... 20c Cookies, all kinds, per doz. 15c Cinnamon Rolls, per doz.. 18c Doughnuts, plain, per doz. 20c Doughnuts, raised, per doz. 20c Doughnuts, chocolate, doz. 25c Fresh FRENCH Pastry Every Saturday Watch our window for Fresh Bakery Goods i i i at all times. We have just the best and we are offering Tea Biscuits, per doz. . . 15 Parker House Rolls, doz.. 20c- Cup Cakes, per doz. : . . 20c Macaroons, per doz .... 20c Buns, per doz ...... 15c Pies, each ...... 35c