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February 16, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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Edit00)rial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... The House took an important step toward returning the current state budget surplus to the Minnesota taxpayers late last week. More, fair and now are three words that describe the new House tax rebate lc ackxage, the largest rebate package in state :hat passed 98 to 35. histT% e reb te plan has several parts: an income tax rebate, a property tax rebate and the largest relief package ever offered to Minnesota family farmers. The total amount of the rebate package is $1.5 billion; substantially more money than the other sales tax based plans. The majority of money will be used to rebate people based on their income taxes and property taxes. The rest - an additional $74.6 million - will be used to provide aid for farmers facing some of the worst economic conditions since the early 1980s. Under the bill passed by the House, people would receive their rebates now unlike other roposals to rebate the money in last 1999. The new ouse plan bases rebates on the amount a person aid in income taxes in 1997. This means the apartment of Revenue can immediately begin processing the rebate. Checks could be distribut!d within 60 days of signing by the Governor. it is important to note that an immediate return is extremely important for the farmers. Farmers need the receive the cash in time to pay their upcoming property taxes due in early spring. The new House plan is also the most [air of any proposed plan. The rebate package will return money to more than 1.9 million Minnesotans, 250,000 more than any other plan. The package More, now, fair by State Representative Torrey Westrom 0808e rebates 100 percent of the first $150 of income tax paid for tax year 1997., and 20 percent of any income tax liability over $150. The rebate is capped at $7600 for married taxpayers filing joint returns and $3800 for all other taxpayers. The property tax portion of the rebate will continue the standard 20 percent rebate that people have enjoyed for the last two years. Farmers with 160 acres or more will receive $4 cash_per acre to assist in paying their property taxes, l-armers that participate in livestock farming with hogs, cattle, sheep or poultry and have 160 acres or less will receive cash to pay the first half of their property taxes due in May. The new House rebate plan gives MORE money to MORE people in a FAIR process - NOW. While most people have told me they prefer a direct cash rebate, some have indicated the surplus should go toward increased state spending for existing state programs. Well, this option is also a part of the rebate bill. A provision in the bill allows a person to sign their refund check back over to the overnment to put toward your choice of several ifferent programs. This way those who want to see increases in certain areas can be assured that their rebate goes to a specific area. Eligible programs are the sliding fee child care program, the account to lower K-6 class sizes to a 1:17 instructor-student ratio, the affordable rental investment fund, the contaminated site cleanup and development fund and the state general fund Thus, if you wish to get your rebate check back you will, if you wish to see an increase in a particular area, you can do that too. 00onveir:0000Lti(ms WITH THE I spent what spare time I had this January listening to two very success- ful farmers talking about how they are doing it. It was of course, not for lack of other meetings to go to. Besides the usual array of machinery, chemical and seed company come-ons which feature a "free meal" in exchange for an hour or two out of my life listening to a sales pitch, there were any num- ber of "emergency meetings" about the farm crisis and political action meetings about the hog price melt- down and "guidance counseling" meetings about listening to the finan- cial experts and the rural life experts and the family stress experts and who knows what else from people who all 1"-3 r F'- _ _ ! I+r. -- __ 14 16 19 22 24 CLUES ACROSS 1. Violent collision 4. Condiment, var. 8. Organ of heanng 10. Measures weight 11. Baby accessory 12. Official decree 13. Reptile 14. Humbled 15. Fastened iS. Citizens of Eire 20. French priest 22. Consumed 23. Acquit 24. Separated wool 25. Validate know my business better than I do. And some of these meetings about problems on the farm were worth- while. I chose not to go for the same reason I have been avoiding diners and other places where farmers col- lect. The reason is simple. After work- ing hard all year and then giving the year's hogs away for a price that does not even rise to the level of insult, I am determined that will never happen again. And the last thing I need is a bunch of negative talk about agricul- ture now when every decision is cru- cial. I need to listen to people who are making farming work. Two of them showed up in the area lately. Mike Hartmann, dairy farmer SOLUTIONS ACROSS I. Shock 4. Catsup 8. Ear i 0. Scale i I. Bib 12. Edict 13. Serpent 14. Abased 15. Cabled 18. Irishmen 20. Abbe 22. Eaten 23. Absolve 24. Carded 25. Credit F-- is CLUES DOWN I. Put in order 2. Wind instrument 3. Words of gratitude 5. Tree-living 6. Pelt 7. Arizona attraction 9. Bring up 16. Classified 17. Initiated 19. Bury 21. Selfish person SOLUTIONS DOWN I. Systematize 2. Ocarina 3. Keep the change 5. Arboreal 6. Sable 7. Painted desert 9. Raise 16. Labeled 17. Began 19. Inter 2 I. User c2v9OOOl from Gibbon, MN was the featured speaker at the annual meeting of the Western Minnesota Sustainable Farming Association meeting in Montevideo. And Joel Salatin, farmer from Swoope, VA was in Granite Falls a week or so later courtesy of the Land Stewardship project for an afternoon Session followed by a dinner speech in the evening. These farmers are successful. No, that's not right. They are very success- ful, even if success is calculated just by that old idea where you add up the bank account and see if you are "get- ting ahead." Though neither of these farmers would be satisfied with any such narrow financial definition of success, they are definitely getting ahead financially. They have some things in common. They both farm small acreages. Hartmann's dairy operation runs to about 260 acres, good bit of which is in grass. Salatin has 500 acres more or less, of which 400 is in brush and tim- bar. The 100 that remains is all in grass. ......................... Their families are involved. Neither wife works off the farm, and in both cases the children are involved directly with the farm work and bene- fit directly from the farm's success. Salatin particularly has much to say on this subject. He can go on at length about the need to woo children back to the farm. Hartmann's brother and his wife and children have moved from the city to join him in his business. Both farms sell almost exclusively livestock and animal products. Hartmann markets a few organic soy- beans. Salatin has figured out how to market on the farm entertainment. Neither farmer has much to do with the commodity markets or can find anything very much good to say about them. Almost all product is sold retail or directly to the establishment that will sell it retail. Starving out the mid- dleman is a "religion" for both of them. Both of these farmers seem to thrive on the things that are plaguing the rest of agriculture. It would be very useful to ask why. This year is an opportunity in one way. Rarely in my memory have the commodity markets been so univer- sally bad. Hogs are terrible, cattle have not been good. Soybeans are cheap and corn would be even cheap- er than it is were it not for government support. Corn and beans are both on the order of $30 to $50 under the cost of production per acre. Every forecast I see expects grains to be lower yet next year. Wheat is cheap enough to feed, even when and if it grows. Just about everybody is down in the mouth. Dairy guys are the only ones smiling and they are worried about the future. The opportunity is that when there is no way out, the human spirit starts to make an alternative future. That is what is happening now. From the farmers who will build their own pork processing plant to the guy who won't eat store chickens anymore, the situa- tion in this country about food and land is changing far faster than this agriculture of ours can ever hope to keep up with. The result will be a new agriculture. Joel Salatin says that we are reap- ing a harvest of bad philosophy. I will have more on that and related matters next week and the week after. Locals on Dean's List at UMM Among those named to the fall quarter 1998 Dean's list at the University of Minnesota Morris were Vaughn Kelly of Ortonville and Peggy Oletzke of Browns Valley. To be eligible for the Dean's List, a student must have a grade point aver- age of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale and be regis- tered for a minimum of 12 credits. Thanks a million Dear Mr. Ross: Have I got a story for you. It started when we had our first taste of snow this year. See, there is this elderly lady who I always see walking up and down our street and she is always wearing the same clothes. I had never really spoken with her, but my daughter talks to her and gives her our cans (5 cents each). Well, when my neighbors moved away they threw away some ragged blankets and clothes. Later that day I noticed this elderly lady going through the stuff thrown out. This prompted me to gather up a few of my own blankets, which I gave to her. I had to help her carry them home and I felt so sad when I saw where she lived. She lives in a run-down, one- room shack. It was that same day that I read your column where a lady needed beds and you helped her. That's when it hit me! Here I was-i had written you the week before asking for help because we are in debt and we wanted my step-sons to come home for Christmas. Suddenly I felt so selfish, so here's what we did. My husband and I went to the Goodwill and purchased a twin bed, some blankets, sheets, pillows and a woman's coat, mittens and ear muffs. We also purchased a recliner and I went through my closet and got some clothes together I never wear anymore. When we saw the lady walking down the road, away from her home, my husband took over all the things we purchased and dropped them off with a note, "Happy Holidays." I didn't want to offend her so that's why we did it anonymously. We later that day drove by and she was moving the items into her home with a smile! She was even wearing the coat I gave her. I can't tell you how good I felt knowing she will be warm and won't have to sleep on the floor anymore. I couldn't afford the $751 spent, but it was worth putting off one of my past due bills for one more month. The $5001 requested in my previous letter, please give it to someone else who needs it more. Mrs. T. G .... The Tribune, Sioux City, IA Dear Mrs. G.: I was about to dedicate this week's column to strictly "turn downs" because my mail was so outrageous. People asking for brand new cars," vacations, new wardrobes, etc. I was really losing faith in my philanthropy and seriously beginning to wonder if this column brought out more greed in people than need. Then your letter surfaced. How can I explain the extent to which your letter has touched me? To think I inspired you to not only give up your re quest, but to also give of yourself when you didn't have the extra to give! Wow-thank you just doesn't say enough. So, the $500 you requested? I decided to quadruple it and am sending $2,000 to a family in Fort Dodge, Iowa who I'm sure you would approve of - 5 children, mother ill, father out of work and the saddest part-little to no hope that things will improve. That is until you became the catalyst and inspired me to dig just a little deeper in my pockets and truly make a difference-just as you have done. Dear Readers: A few weeks ago I printed a letter from Mr. Billy Durham regarding an herbal alternative to Viagra called Yohimbe. I made the mistake of printing his phone number and not an address. Poor Mr. Durham has been inundated with phone calls and has felt burdened by the fact that many left a message for a return call from him. Turns out he can't afford to return long distance phone calls. A bottle of 60 pills sells for $10, which includes shipping. His profit is only $1.50. 1 am by no means endorsing the product, but if you're interested and have $10 to burn, you may contact Mr. Durham at P.O. Box 132, Plainview, Texas 79073. Your pharmacist may not love you for it, but perhaps your wife will. o Early Childhood screening clinic set Feb. 22-23 Ortonville Public School will hold the annual Early Childhood Screening Clinic (previously known as Preschool Screening) on Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 22 & 23, 1999. Location is in the Educational section of Trinity Lutheran Church, OrtonviUe. Children between the ages of 3- 1/2 and 5 years are eligible for screening. Appointment letters have been sent to parents whose childrens' names are on the Ortonville Census. If you haven't received a letter, please contact the Ortonville Public School, at 839-6181 and ask for Ext. 111. State law also required that all children be screened before entering Kindergarten, or entrance into Kindergarten will be prohibited. Call the Ortonville School if: 1. your child is between 3-1/2 and 5 years of age; 2. hasn't received an appointment letter; 3. has never been screened before. Benefit Sunday set for Kathy Wiseman A benefit for Kathy Wiseman will be held next Sunday, Feb. 21st, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Church at 806 Highland Hwy in Ortonville. Free will donation. Matching funds by Lutheran Brotherhood Branch #8392 and AAL Branch #9735. Kathy is a daughter of Charles and Shaft Lindquist and granddaughter of Lloyd Slavers. II I III WANT ADS the inexpensive way to shop I ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Agnes May Ailys Henningson Ron Athey Mrs. Jack Lestina Barbara Sorlien Omar Peterson Karen Hollstein Mrs. Margaret Classen Donald Bull Vernon Botker Harold Dimberg Jr. Alan Paul Dimberg Brian Dimberg Yankee Clipping Service David Samuelson Joe McCarvel Marj Sertorius Maurice Hoiland Randy Letrud Pat Saeger Gertrude Rausch Thomas Hynnek Roger Hynnek Dale Johnson Doris Haugen Gene Anderson Max Gruenwald Margaret Fishbeck Bob Karels Harvey Plathe Joan Strei Roger Swanson Floyd Folkens Peter Steinke Myrtle Johnson Robert Kraemer Howard Sitter Gordon Letrud Charles Jones Jim & Cindy Nelson DeWlllis Anderson Dorothy Brown Dori Moore Mien Pearson Mrs. Dick Layton Delores Goetsc h Page 4 00I00EPENDENT The Ortonville Independent (U.S,P.S. 412-460) eeeoo JEANETTE Publisher JAMES D. Managing Editor SUZETTE Editor, SARA J. KAERCHER Ad and Printing ROBERT FULLER Plant Manager ARLENE WlESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition TAMMIE GIESE Com RYAN STATTELMAN MIKE BARNHARfff Photographer BILL DWYER & BOB Pressmen KRISTANOVAK Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater ooeoo Tues., Feb. 16, 1999 Vol. 8 Continuing the ORTON/ILLE JouRNAl. | Published Every Tuesdayat 29 2nd Ofi61Wille, MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortovile, SUBSC $25.00per year in Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant and RobedS in South Dakota. $29.00 for counties in Minnesota Dakota. All others, $33.00 per Postmaster: Send address The OrtonvIIle Independe OdonvIIle, .ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE BoStOne, Lac qui Pade, unties in Minnesota and Roberts in South February .............. 2.00 March .................. 22.00 April .................... 20.81 May ..................... 18.73 June .................... 16,60 July ...................... 14.57 ALL OTHERS February ............. 29.00 March .................. 26.61 April .................... 24.19 May ...................... 2+.77 Jgfll .................... 19.1 July ...................... 16.93 JamJiiry,,. February .............. 33,00 AUgUll, March .................. 30.2S April .................... 27.S0 May ..................... 24,75 June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 10.2 Jenuer "pUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FORI Putlllsher shall not slight changes or that do not lessen the advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in any or the refund of any advertisement. DEADLINES Chumh notes - ads Pictures - 5 p.m. Fdday News - Fdday affemoon Classified ads - (Any ad brought in later classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. & Tuesday: 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. A Wednesday: 8 a.m.-12 A Thursday: 8 a.m.-12:30 A Fdday: 8 a.m.-12 noon, A Holidays may affect office LETTERS Letters to the editor community issues are Letter writers independent reserves the and/or condense letters for paper also reserves the publish letters that which it might be Letters should printed or typed name, address and telephon( Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are themselves to one letter Please keep letter bdef, over 350 words, and to the AD ve. The Ortonvllle determining what is news is based on one If an Individual business zatlon char for event, be considered words, "If Advertislngls m( newspaper. Without it a would cease to exist. paper receives for single paper sales is used to ink and paper used In product. It no longer paper cost Increases. It cost of Ink and a small paper used. Advertisin to a products to the grocer; and underwear and plows and tractors to dealer. Without particular business ,business. ADS: We reserve the any advertising without justify our decision. POLICIES A News: Our Is to as fully e staff's opinions will opinion page. A Edltodals: rage, whether om other sources our readers. editor are her own and those of other staff expressed In Items from tlons own but are general interest. Cll 3=0.B38.ele3 320 839-3761 to laeelfled Ortonville Tuesday, Edit00)rial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... The House took an important step toward returning the current state budget surplus to the Minnesota taxpayers late last week. More, fair and now are three words that describe the new House tax rebate lc ackxage, the largest rebate package in state :hat passed 98 to 35. histT% e reb te plan has several parts: an income tax rebate, a property tax rebate and the largest relief package ever offered to Minnesota family farmers. The total amount of the rebate package is $1.5 billion; substantially more money than the other sales tax based plans. The majority of money will be used to rebate people based on their income taxes and property taxes. The rest - an additional $74.6 million - will be used to provide aid for farmers facing some of the worst economic conditions since the early 1980s. Under the bill passed by the House, people would receive their rebates now unlike other roposals to rebate the money in last 1999. The new ouse plan bases rebates on the amount a person aid in income taxes in 1997. This means the apartment of Revenue can immediately begin processing the rebate. Checks could be distribut!d within 60 days of signing by the Governor. it is important to note that an immediate return is extremely important for the farmers. Farmers need the receive the cash in time to pay their upcoming property taxes due in early spring. The new House plan is also the most [air of any proposed plan. The rebate package will return money to more than 1.9 million Minnesotans, 250,000 more than any other plan. The package More, now, fair by State Representative Torrey Westrom 0808e rebates 100 percent of the first $150 of income tax paid for tax year 1997., and 20 percent of any income tax liability over $150. The rebate is capped at $7600 for married taxpayers filing joint returns and $3800 for all other taxpayers. The property tax portion of the rebate will continue the standard 20 percent rebate that people have enjoyed for the last two years. Farmers with 160 acres or more will receive $4 cash_per acre to assist in paying their property taxes, l-armers that participate in livestock farming with hogs, cattle, sheep or poultry and have 160 acres or less will receive cash to pay the first half of their property taxes due in May. The new House rebate plan gives MORE money to MORE people in a FAIR process - NOW. While most people have told me they prefer a direct cash rebate, some have indicated the surplus should go toward increased state spending for existing state programs. Well, this option is also a part of the rebate bill. A provision in the bill allows a person to sign their refund check back over to the overnment to put toward your choice of several ifferent programs. This way those who want to see increases in certain areas can be assured that their rebate goes to a specific area. Eligible programs are the sliding fee child care program, the account to lower K-6 class sizes to a 1:17 instructor-student ratio, the affordable rental investment fund, the contaminated site cleanup and development fund and the state general fund Thus, if you wish to get your rebate check back you will, if you wish to see an increase in a particular area, you can do that too. 00onveir:0000Lti(ms WITH THE I spent what spare time I had this January listening to two very success- ful farmers talking about how they are doing it. It was of course, not for lack of other meetings to go to. Besides the usual array of machinery, chemical and seed company come-ons which feature a "free meal" in exchange for an hour or two out of my life listening to a sales pitch, there were any num- ber of "emergency meetings" about the farm crisis and political action meetings about the hog price melt- down and "guidance counseling" meetings about listening to the finan- cial experts and the rural life experts and the family stress experts and who knows what else from people who all 1"-3 r F'- _ _ ! I+r. -- __ 14 16 19 22 24 CLUES ACROSS 1. Violent collision 4. Condiment, var. 8. Organ of heanng 10. Measures weight 11. Baby accessory 12. Official decree 13. Reptile 14. Humbled 15. Fastened iS. Citizens of Eire 20. French priest 22. Consumed 23. Acquit 24. Separated wool 25. Validate know my business better than I do. And some of these meetings about problems on the farm were worth- while. I chose not to go for the same reason I have been avoiding diners and other places where farmers col- lect. The reason is simple. After work- ing hard all year and then giving the year's hogs away for a price that does not even rise to the level of insult, I am determined that will never happen again. And the last thing I need is a bunch of negative talk about agricul- ture now when every decision is cru- cial. I need to listen to people who are making farming work. Two of them showed up in the area lately. Mike Hartmann, dairy farmer SOLUTIONS ACROSS I. Shock 4. Catsup 8. Ear i 0. Scale i I. Bib 12. Edict 13. Serpent 14. Abased 15. Cabled 18. Irishmen 20. Abbe 22. Eaten 23. Absolve 24. Carded 25. Credit F-- is CLUES DOWN I. Put in order 2. Wind instrument 3. Words of gratitude 5. Tree-living 6. Pelt 7. Arizona attraction 9. Bring up 16. Classified 17. Initiated 19. Bury 21. Selfish person SOLUTIONS DOWN I. Systematize 2. Ocarina 3. Keep the change 5. Arboreal 6. Sable 7. Painted desert 9. Raise 16. Labeled 17. Began 19. Inter 2 I. User c2v9OOOl from Gibbon, MN was the featured speaker at the annual meeting of the Western Minnesota Sustainable Farming Association meeting in Montevideo. And Joel Salatin, farmer from Swoope, VA was in Granite Falls a week or so later courtesy of the Land Stewardship project for an afternoon Session followed by a dinner speech in the evening. These farmers are successful. No, that's not right. They are very success- ful, even if success is calculated just by that old idea where you add up the bank account and see if you are "get- ting ahead." Though neither of these farmers would be satisfied with any such narrow financial definition of success, they are definitely getting ahead financially. They have some things in common. They both farm small acreages. Hartmann's dairy operation runs to about 260 acres, good bit of which is in grass. Salatin has 500 acres more or less, of which 400 is in brush and tim- bar. The 100 that remains is all in grass. ......................... Their families are involved. Neither wife works off the farm, and in both cases the children are involved directly with the farm work and bene- fit directly from the farm's success. Salatin particularly has much to say on this subject. He can go on at length about the need to woo children back to the farm. Hartmann's brother and his wife and children have moved from the city to join him in his business. Both farms sell almost exclusively livestock and animal products. Hartmann markets a few organic soy- beans. Salatin has figured out how to market on the farm entertainment. Neither farmer has much to do with the commodity markets or can find anything very much good to say about them. Almost all product is sold retail or directly to the establishment that will sell it retail. Starving out the mid- dleman is a "religion" for both of them. Both of these farmers seem to thrive on the things that are plaguing the rest of agriculture. It would be very useful to ask why. This year is an opportunity in one way. Rarely in my memory have the commodity markets been so univer- sally bad. Hogs are terrible, cattle have not been good. Soybeans are cheap and corn would be even cheap- er than it is were it not for government support. Corn and beans are both on the order of $30 to $50 under the cost of production per acre. Every forecast I see expects grains to be lower yet next year. Wheat is cheap enough to feed, even when and if it grows. Just about everybody is down in the mouth. Dairy guys are the only ones smiling and they are worried about the future. The opportunity is that when there is no way out, the human spirit starts to make an alternative future. That is what is happening now. From the farmers who will build their own pork processing plant to the guy who won't eat store chickens anymore, the situa- tion in this country about food and land is changing far faster than this agriculture of ours can ever hope to keep up with. The result will be a new agriculture. Joel Salatin says that we are reap- ing a harvest of bad philosophy. I will have more on that and related matters next week and the week after. Locals on Dean's List at UMM Among those named to the fall quarter 1998 Dean's list at the University of Minnesota Morris were Vaughn Kelly of Ortonville and Peggy Oletzke of Browns Valley. To be eligible for the Dean's List, a student must have a grade point aver- age of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale and be regis- tered for a minimum of 12 credits. Thanks a million Dear Mr. Ross: Have I got a story for you. It started when we had our first taste of snow this year. See, there is this elderly lady who I always see walking up and down our street and she is always wearing the same clothes. I had never really spoken with her, but my daughter talks to her and gives her our cans (5 cents each). Well, when my neighbors moved away they threw away some ragged blankets and clothes. Later that day I noticed this elderly lady going through the stuff thrown out. This prompted me to gather up a few of my own blankets, which I gave to her. I had to help her carry them home and I felt so sad when I saw where she lived. She lives in a run-down, one- room shack. It was that same day that I read your column where a lady needed beds and you helped her. That's when it hit me! Here I was-i had written you the week before asking for help because we are in debt and we wanted my step-sons to come home for Christmas. Suddenly I felt so selfish, so here's what we did. My husband and I went to the Goodwill and purchased a twin bed, some blankets, sheets, pillows and a woman's coat, mittens and ear muffs. We also purchased a recliner and I went through my closet and got some clothes together I never wear anymore. When we saw the lady walking down the road, away from her home, my husband took over all the things we purchased and dropped them off with a note, "Happy Holidays." I didn't want to offend her so that's why we did it anonymously. We later that day drove by and she was moving the items into her home with a smile! She was even wearing the coat I gave her. I can't tell you how good I felt knowing she will be warm and won't have to sleep on the floor anymore. I couldn't afford the $751 spent, but it was worth putting off one of my past due bills for one more month. The $5001 requested in my previous letter, please give it to someone else who needs it more. Mrs. T. G .... The Tribune, Sioux City, IA Dear Mrs. G.: I was about to dedicate this week's column to strictly "turn downs" because my mail was so outrageous. People asking for brand new cars," vacations, new wardrobes, etc. I was really losing faith in my philanthropy and seriously beginning to wonder if this column brought out more greed in people than need. Then your letter surfaced. How can I explain the extent to which your letter has touched me? To think I inspired you to not only give up your re quest, but to also give of yourself when you didn't have the extra to give! Wow-thank you just doesn't say enough. So, the $500 you requested? I decided to quadruple it and am sending $2,000 to a family in Fort Dodge, Iowa who I'm sure you would approve of - 5 children, mother ill, father out of work and the saddest part-little to no hope that things will improve. That is until you became the catalyst and inspired me to dig just a little deeper in my pockets and truly make a difference-just as you have done. Dear Readers: A few weeks ago I printed a letter from Mr. Billy Durham regarding an herbal alternative to Viagra called Yohimbe. I made the mistake of printing his phone number and not an address. Poor Mr. Durham has been inundated with phone calls and has felt burdened by the fact that many left a message for a return call from him. Turns out he can't afford to return long distance phone calls. A bottle of 60 pills sells for $10, which includes shipping. His profit is only $1.50. 1 am by no means endorsing the product, but if you're interested and have $10 to burn, you may contact Mr. Durham at P.O. Box 132, Plainview, Texas 79073. Your pharmacist may not love you for it, but perhaps your wife will. o Early Childhood screening clinic set Feb. 22-23 Ortonville Public School will hold the annual Early Childhood Screening Clinic (previously known as Preschool Screening) on Monday and Tuesday, Feb. 22 & 23, 1999. Location is in the Educational section of Trinity Lutheran Church, OrtonviUe. Children between the ages of 3- 1/2 and 5 years are eligible for screening. Appointment letters have been sent to parents whose childrens' names are on the Ortonville Census. If you haven't received a letter, please contact the Ortonville Public School, at 839-6181 and ask for Ext. 111. State law also required that all children be screened before entering Kindergarten, or entrance into Kindergarten will be prohibited. Call the Ortonville School if: 1. your child is between 3-1/2 and 5 years of age; 2. hasn't received an appointment letter; 3. has never been screened before. Benefit Sunday set for Kathy Wiseman A benefit for Kathy Wiseman will be held next Sunday, Feb. 21st, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Church at 806 Highland Hwy in Ortonville. Free will donation. Matching funds by Lutheran Brotherhood Branch #8392 and AAL Branch #9735. Kathy is a daughter of Charles and Shaft Lindquist and granddaughter of Lloyd Slavers. II I III WANT ADS the inexpensive way to shop I ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Agnes May Ailys Henningson Ron Athey Mrs. Jack Lestina Barbara Sorlien Omar Peterson Karen Hollstein Mrs. Margaret Classen Donald Bull Vernon Botker Harold Dimberg Jr. Alan Paul Dimberg Brian Dimberg Yankee Clipping Service David Samuelson Joe McCarvel Marj Sertorius Maurice Hoiland Randy Letrud Pat Saeger Gertrude Rausch Thomas Hynnek Roger Hynnek Dale Johnson Doris Haugen Gene Anderson Max Gruenwald Margaret Fishbeck Bob Karels Harvey Plathe Joan Strei Roger Swanson Floyd Folkens Peter Steinke Myrtle Johnson Robert Kraemer Howard Sitter Gordon Letrud Charles Jones Jim & Cindy Nelson DeWlllis Anderson Dorothy Brown Dori Moore Mien Pearson Mrs. Dick Layton Delores Goetsc h Page 4 00I00EPENDENT The Ortonville Independent (U.S,P.S. 412-460) eeeoo JEANETTE Publisher JAMES D. Managing Editor SUZETTE Editor, SARA J. KAERCHER Ad and Printing ROBERT FULLER Plant Manager ARLENE WlESE Office Manager KATHIE LANTIS Computer and Composition TAMMIE GIESE Com RYAN STATTELMAN MIKE BARNHARfff Photographer BILL DWYER & BOB Pressmen KRISTANOVAK Camera Department NANCY SCOBLIC Collater ooeoo Tues., Feb. 16, 1999 Vol. 8 Continuing the ORTON/ILLE JouRNAl. | Published Every Tuesdayat 29 2nd Ofi61Wille, MN 56278 Periodicals Postage Paid at Ortovile, SUBSC $25.00per year in Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant and RobedS in South Dakota. $29.00 for counties in Minnesota Dakota. All others, $33.00 per Postmaster: Send address The OrtonvIIle Independe OdonvIIle, .ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS ARE A FEBRUARY 1ST DUE BoStOne, Lac qui Pade, unties in Minnesota and Roberts in South February .............. 2.00 March .................. 22.00 April .................... 20.81 May ..................... 18.73 June .................... 16,60 July ...................... 14.57 ALL OTHERS February ............. 29.00 March .................. 26.61 April .................... 24.19 May ...................... 2+.77 Jgfll .................... 19.1 July ...................... 16.93 JamJiiry,,. February .............. 33,00 AUgUll, March .................. 30.2S April .................... 27.S0 May ..................... 24,75 June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 10.2 Jenuer "pUBLISHER'S LIABILITY FORI Putlllsher shall not slight changes or that do not lessen the advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement in any or the refund of any advertisement. DEADLINES Chumh notes - ads Pictures - 5 p.m. Fdday News - Fdday affemoon Classified ads - (Any ad brought in later classify.) OFFICE HOURS A Monday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. & Tuesday: 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. A Wednesday: 8 a.m.-12 A Thursday: 8 a.m.-12:30 A Fdday: 8 a.m.-12 noon, A Holidays may affect office LETTERS Letters to the editor community issues are Letter writers independent reserves the and/or condense letters for paper also reserves the publish letters that which it might be Letters should printed or typed name, address and telephon( Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are themselves to one letter Please keep letter bdef, over 350 words, and to the AD ve. The Ortonvllle determining what is news is based on one If an Individual business zatlon char for event, be considered words, "If Advertislngls m( newspaper. Without it a would cease to exist. paper receives for single paper sales is used to ink and paper used In product. It no longer paper cost Increases. It cost of Ink and a small paper used. Advertisin to a products to the grocer; and underwear and plows and tractors to dealer. Without particular business ,business. ADS: We reserve the any advertising without justify our decision. POLICIES A News: Our Is to as fully e staff's opinions will opinion page. A Edltodals: rage, whether om other sources our readers. editor are her own and those of other staff expressed In Items from tlons own but are general interest. Cll 3=0.B38.ele3 320 839-3761 to laeelfled Ortonville Tuesday,