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February 16, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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February 16, 1999
 

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Area news digest MILBANK, SD-Milbank snowmobile enthusiasts Cal Maser and Curt Folk had the thrill of their lifetime last month when they competed in the World Championship Snowmobile Ice Oval Races at Eagle River, WI, Jan. 21-24. They competed in the Pro Vintage Classes on the half-mile ice oval track. The two South Dakotans competed against Pro Vintage snowmobile racers from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York and Manitoba and Quebec, Canada. Cal Maser raced his 1971 Arctic Cat 340 Special to a very impressive fourth place finish in the Relic I finals. The Relic I class is for all factory modified race sleds 1971 and older, 340cc and under. Curt Folk raced his 1973 Polaris TX Starfire 295 to an amazing fifth place finish in the Pro 340 finals after taking third place in his heat race. The Pro 340 class includes all factory modified racing snowmobiles 1973 and older, up to 340cc. APPLETON-The 15th annual fishing derby sponsored by Save-A-Lake Aeration was held Sunday, Feb. 7 at Artichoke Lake. What turned out to be a most beautiful day with the sun shining, little or no wind and temps around 40 degrees; the derby was a huge success with approximately 400 people attending. Prize winners at the derby were: first fish, Steve Morrissette, $50; Walleye, non caught, Bryan Brustuen, $50; Northern, non caught, Jeremiah Sayles, $50; largest pan fish, Steve Morrissette, $50; and $50 cash from Save-A-Lake, Kendon Lange. MADISON-Julie Dammann of Minnesota Workforce Center in Montevideo and Arlene Johnson of Lac qui Parle County Family Services, rated the success of MFIP, "MFIP is a program that expects, rewards and supports work. It also has a 60-month time line. All MFIP participants are made aware of this time limit and therefore have the mindset of finding employment. We feel that MFIP has been very successful during its first year. Of the 20 individuals in Lac qui Parle count who have worked with employment services, 11 have found either full or part time employment." They continued, "During the first year of MFIP (Minnesota Family Investment Program) (Jan. I, 1998 to Dec. 31, 1998) 20 individuals have been referred for employment service help through MFIP. Out of the 20 individuals, three have found employment with wages high enough to take them off of the MFIP grant. Three are working part time and five are working full time, but receiving a partial MFIP grant. One individual is going to school and four are currently involved in job search at this point. The remaining five have either left the county or have been found exempt from Employment Services." Big Stone City I Gall Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 Eldora Nelson and Grace Van Hout played bingo Tuesday, Feb. 9th at the Ortonville Senior Center. Delores B'engtson was a Wednesday morning, Feb. lOth visitor of EIdora Nelson. Melvin Bailhagen of Beardsley and Ada Herrmann of Ortonville were Sunday, Feb. 7th guests of Ervin and :Lamoine Herrmann. : Hazel Gibson of Beardsley was a Tuesday, Feb. 9th visitor of Ervin and LLamoine Herrmann. Evelyn Zahnow and Myrtle Johnson spent Sunday afternoon, Feb. th with Ella Hanson at her apartment. " Edna Kamin of Ortonville was a Tuesday evening, Feb. 9th supper guest of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke. Calvin and Naomi Sandlin spent from Thursday, Jan. 28th to Thursday, :Feb. 4th in Sioux Falls. They were ",caring for their grandchildren Samuel ,'who is 12 and Rebekah who is 14; :while their parents Stuart and Lisa Norberg vacationed in Jamaica. Naomi Sandlin attended a Pampered Chef party at Allison 43able's home on Monday evening, :Feb. 8th. at the Pampered Chef party :Donna Peterson of Milbank was the :consultant who demonstrated many unique kitchen utensils and ideas. Naomi Sandlin also attended a "Stampin' Up" party at Jane Streed's Tuesday, Feb. 9th. The "Stampin' Up" party had Tanny Meyer as the demonstrator who illustrated many different designs of greeting cards using their products. Elmer and Charlotte Athey and Keith and Matthew visited the Living History Festival in Brookings, SD Sunday, Feb. 7th. Visitors for the week of Feb. 7th of Darlene Barnhardt at Northridge were Leo Barnhardt, Rick Barnhardt, Sandra Rice, Marilyn Barnhardt and Traci, Ann Barnhardt and Garret, Arvilla Bergseth, Caroline Zahn, Marilyn Athey, Rodney Barnhardt, and Roger Barnhardt. ' Fourth and eight grade boys basketball team from Big Stone School played against Wilmot. The boys lost the first game by two points. They won the second one. The students at Big Stone School enjoyed a four day vacation. No school was held Friday, Feb. 12th or Monday, Feb. 15th for president's Day weekend. John and Florence Maki from Esko were here to visit friends in Big Stone City and Ortonville. They also attended the American Legion wild game feed on Friday, Feb. 12th. i!; ::::?::! ..................... ! ......... :;.:-i;zi""''" i; ':! ':": " i.iii- i!! i .:..i!;ii :: !:::: ::i .:.:iii! iii:: :::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Grams introduces 10% tax cut : U.S. Senator Rod Grams has introduced legislation calling for 10 percent across-the-board tax cut. Grams, a long-time advocate for tax relief, introduced the bill, S.3, the Tax Cuts for All Americans Act, along with Finance Committee Chairman William Roth (R-DE). At a ress conference this morning,-Grams ighlighted the need for tax relief for all hardworking American taxpayers. Grams stated, "Today, I introduced a 10 percent across-the-board tax cut for hard-working American taxpayers. It is not targeted relief for a small sector of poll-tested interest groups, but a tax cut where everyone will see the benefits on the bottom line come April 15." e,Y.m.nen;mL. A,,JF QILI CLOCK ..... ii REPAIR , . II Antique Mantle "! CRAXC IIII RANDLEMAN I III o.o,  ! '11 320-839-2357 : ;11 a Certified II 1, Clockmaker- Watchmaker II Call After 6,,,p.m. for Estimates, ,,IJ ] ] II 1999 ""* GREAT SEMINARS Bill Biedrich | Marine Electronics -s00ow TV's Fishing The u,.. Midwest rlellJrUl R I V E R C E N T R E" Scott Petersen Yd:AN Bass Professor SAINT PAUL !i: FE'IBR U AR "i25-28 ' For xnfo: ,l,r5.-8ztIl: I Extension report Carrie Olson, County Extension Educator THE KIDS IN OUR COMMUNITY Life in a small town is often pleasant and convenient because people know each other and watch out for one another. There are fewer people per acre so there are fewer lines to wait in and less traffic to plod through. The down side of this seemingly less complicated life, of course, can be the lack of needed services and the isolation some residents feel. I frequently hear about children who are allowed to roam the streets or stay home alone, late and often, in rural communities. This happens in larger towns too, but perhaps because we have a sense of trust and security surrounding small towns, we're less likely to worry about the children in these areas. Research has uncovered some unsettling similarities between inner- city youth and small-town youth. Laura DeHaan, North Dakota State University assistant professor and extension specialist in child development and family science, found that inner-city Chicago and rural North Dakota youth did not differ in terms of drug or alcohol use or in delinquent behaviors. Search Institute, MN, has reached similar conclusions. Kim Bushaw, Parent Line Program Specialist, NDSU Extension Service, suggests parents take these facts seriously and take action to make a difference. She says, "As adults we can make sure there are productive activities for children that are easy to Farm credit scholarships Farm Credit Services (FCS) - AgCountry will award four $1,000 scholarships to high school seniors from west central Minnesota and southeast North Dakota who plan to enroll in college this fall. Recipients must be from a farming or ranching family, or plan to pursue a career in farming or some other aspect of agriculture. Two scholarships will be given away to Minnesota residents in the counties of Becker, Big Stone, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Hubbard, Kittson, Mahnomen, Norman, Ottertail, Pope, Stevens, Todd, Traverse, Wadena or Wilkin. Selection is based on academic record, personal attributes, vocational promise, leadership and financial need. The deadline for applications is April 1, 1999. Students may obtain scholarship application forms from their high school principal, from any Farm Credit office in the Minnesota or North Dakota counties named above, or by writing to Pat White, Scholarship Coordinator, Farm Credit Services of NWND, PO Box 70, Minot, ND 58702. ASSET # 3 1 :,I '! N IP ": OTHER AI)ULT |! A1 SH S YOUNG PERSON IIECI:AVES SUi 10RI FROM THIH:,E OR MORE NON-PARENT AI)ULTS. Daffodil Days 1 March 16-22 are days Big Stone county residents should remember. That's when Mother Nature will be helping the American Cancer Society, Big Stone County Unit by providing thousands of yellow daffodils. Volunteers will be bringing this spring flower, the flower of hope, to area residents during Daffodil Days. This signifies the start of the local fundraising effort against cancer. Donations collected from the flower sale will be used to raise funds for cancer research, education, and patient services. access and available to all. Quality childcare is a must for young children wherever they live. Preventable injuries and fear are just two reasons children need supervision day and night. We can model the attitude that there are plenty of opportunities if we seek them out or get people together to start something new and positive, even if we have to start small and build. When parents give the impression that there is nothing to do, that their town is boring, they encourage children to do the same. Be willing to supervise other people's children, give rides, monitor, do whatever seems necessary to keep the community's children safe and active in positive endeavor. Consider working on implementing a curfew, a baby-sitting co-op or after-school homework rooms staffed with parent volunteers and high school students. Tutoring another student is a great way to enforce the tutor's own learning and keeps students off the streets too. Perhaps the older students have a talent that could be taught to a group of younger students. Lessons on guitar, painting, cooking or chess come to mind. Retired seniors have a lifetime of knowledge to share. The possibilities and skills that are enveloped within that small community are nearly limitless." Big cities and small towns alike, we need to keep our children and youth safe and involved. Our efforts will help prevent negative behaviors and promote positive ones. Source: Tamie Bremseth, Extension Educator, Lac qui Parle County; and Kim Bushaw, NDSU Extension Service. Old Mill Twirlers The Old Mill Twirlers danced to the calling of Gene Hofmann last Wednesday. There were three squares in attendance with guests from Watertown and Madison. There will be no dance on Feb. 17th. On the lunch committee for Feb. 24th will be Del and Delores Cross and Merle and Carrie Smith. Upcoming dances Feb. 24th Dennis Van Asch calling. The Old Mill Twirlers dance on Wednesday evenings at 8:00 in the High School lunchroom. Use the northeast door, visitors are always welcome. Vollmer named to Century list Citizen of this areal! YolJr mission: To be one of the "three or more" in the life of a local young person. Statistic: When our local youth were surveyed 57% did not fee.__.[ they had support from three or more non-parent adults. Make the effort! You will be richly rewarded!! Our children are our future! We all care about their lives. Look for ways to show kids you care!! Jaclyn Vollmer, daughter of Art and Arlene Vollmer of Ortonville was recently named to Century College's Dean's list in White Bear Lake for the 1998 fall semester. She is majoring in orthotics and prosthetic technology. Over two million shipped from the state for Daffodil Days in freshly cut flower will Super Valu in Ortonville 16-22. Business and encouraged to make for distribution to their as a gift to hospitals by contacting Ruth 839-3644. Volunteers Stone County Unit of the! Cancer Society will be sales to businesses on SPRING TO LIFE! Daffodil Days Locals on roll at LATI Several area students the 373 students recently current honor roll at Technical Institute Among those Volkenant, Greg Shawna Cameron of Daniel Bilben and Kelley Big Stone City, SD. START YOUR OWN BUSINESS. WORK FLEXIBLE HOURS. ENJOY UNLIMITED EARNINGS. AVO CALL TOLL FREE (800) 735-8867. [N THE "PROMOTION or THr Sl5OOln prize money/ Every Sunday Registration begins at 12:30, Tournament begins at 1:30 Call Guest Services for details Every Thursday at 7pro Free hors d'oeuvres from 6-7pro 1 free drink with buy-in -100% paybacl l Remember: If you disavow all knowledge of this mission, you community could self-destruct in.,. ....... ,,..,.o. ...... ,.o .... o ............ o..,.o...o.... ......... ,,,.,o,.o,....o Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Feb. Area news digest MILBANK, SD-Milbank snowmobile enthusiasts Cal Maser and Curt Folk had the thrill of their lifetime last month when they competed in the World Championship Snowmobile Ice Oval Races at Eagle River, WI, Jan. 21-24. They competed in the Pro Vintage Classes on the half-mile ice oval track. The two South Dakotans competed against Pro Vintage snowmobile racers from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York and Manitoba and Quebec, Canada. Cal Maser raced his 1971 Arctic Cat 340 Special to a very impressive fourth place finish in the Relic I finals. The Relic I class is for all factory modified race sleds 1971 and older, 340cc and under. Curt Folk raced his 1973 Polaris TX Starfire 295 to an amazing fifth place finish in the Pro 340 finals after taking third place in his heat race. The Pro 340 class includes all factory modified racing snowmobiles 1973 and older, up to 340cc. APPLETON-The 15th annual fishing derby sponsored by Save-A-Lake Aeration was held Sunday, Feb. 7 at Artichoke Lake. What turned out to be a most beautiful day with the sun shining, little or no wind and temps around 40 degrees; the derby was a huge success with approximately 400 people attending. Prize winners at the derby were: first fish, Steve Morrissette, $50; Walleye, non caught, Bryan Brustuen, $50; Northern, non caught, Jeremiah Sayles, $50; largest pan fish, Steve Morrissette, $50; and $50 cash from Save-A-Lake, Kendon Lange. MADISON-Julie Dammann of Minnesota Workforce Center in Montevideo and Arlene Johnson of Lac qui Parle County Family Services, rated the success of MFIP, "MFIP is a program that expects, rewards and supports work. It also has a 60-month time line. All MFIP participants are made aware of this time limit and therefore have the mindset of finding employment. We feel that MFIP has been very successful during its first year. Of the 20 individuals in Lac qui Parle count who have worked with employment services, 11 have found either full or part time employment." They continued, "During the first year of MFIP (Minnesota Family Investment Program) (Jan. I, 1998 to Dec. 31, 1998) 20 individuals have been referred for employment service help through MFIP. Out of the 20 individuals, three have found employment with wages high enough to take them off of the MFIP grant. Three are working part time and five are working full time, but receiving a partial MFIP grant. One individual is going to school and four are currently involved in job search at this point. The remaining five have either left the county or have been found exempt from Employment Services." Big Stone City I Gall Maxwell, Phone 839-2207 Eldora Nelson and Grace Van Hout played bingo Tuesday, Feb. 9th at the Ortonville Senior Center. Delores B'engtson was a Wednesday morning, Feb. lOth visitor of EIdora Nelson. Melvin Bailhagen of Beardsley and Ada Herrmann of Ortonville were Sunday, Feb. 7th guests of Ervin and :Lamoine Herrmann. : Hazel Gibson of Beardsley was a Tuesday, Feb. 9th visitor of Ervin and LLamoine Herrmann. Evelyn Zahnow and Myrtle Johnson spent Sunday afternoon, Feb. th with Ella Hanson at her apartment. " Edna Kamin of Ortonville was a Tuesday evening, Feb. 9th supper guest of Ralph and Lavina Loeschke. Calvin and Naomi Sandlin spent from Thursday, Jan. 28th to Thursday, :Feb. 4th in Sioux Falls. They were ",caring for their grandchildren Samuel ,'who is 12 and Rebekah who is 14; :while their parents Stuart and Lisa Norberg vacationed in Jamaica. Naomi Sandlin attended a Pampered Chef party at Allison 43able's home on Monday evening, :Feb. 8th. at the Pampered Chef party :Donna Peterson of Milbank was the :consultant who demonstrated many unique kitchen utensils and ideas. Naomi Sandlin also attended a "Stampin' Up" party at Jane Streed's Tuesday, Feb. 9th. The "Stampin' Up" party had Tanny Meyer as the demonstrator who illustrated many different designs of greeting cards using their products. Elmer and Charlotte Athey and Keith and Matthew visited the Living History Festival in Brookings, SD Sunday, Feb. 7th. Visitors for the week of Feb. 7th of Darlene Barnhardt at Northridge were Leo Barnhardt, Rick Barnhardt, Sandra Rice, Marilyn Barnhardt and Traci, Ann Barnhardt and Garret, Arvilla Bergseth, Caroline Zahn, Marilyn Athey, Rodney Barnhardt, and Roger Barnhardt. ' Fourth and eight grade boys basketball team from Big Stone School played against Wilmot. The boys lost the first game by two points. They won the second one. The students at Big Stone School enjoyed a four day vacation. No school was held Friday, Feb. 12th or Monday, Feb. 15th for president's Day weekend. John and Florence Maki from Esko were here to visit friends in Big Stone City and Ortonville. They also attended the American Legion wild game feed on Friday, Feb. 12th. i!; ::::?::! ..................... ! ......... :;.:-i;zi""''" i; ':! ':": " i.iii- i!! i .:..i!;ii :: !:::: ::i .:.:iii! iii:: :::::::::::::::::::::::::::: Grams introduces 10% tax cut : U.S. Senator Rod Grams has introduced legislation calling for 10 percent across-the-board tax cut. Grams, a long-time advocate for tax relief, introduced the bill, S.3, the Tax Cuts for All Americans Act, along with Finance Committee Chairman William Roth (R-DE). At a ress conference this morning,-Grams ighlighted the need for tax relief for all hardworking American taxpayers. Grams stated, "Today, I introduced a 10 percent across-the-board tax cut for hard-working American taxpayers. It is not targeted relief for a small sector of poll-tested interest groups, but a tax cut where everyone will see the benefits on the bottom line come April 15." e,Y.m.nen;mL. A,,JF QILI CLOCK ..... ii REPAIR , . II Antique Mantle "! CRAXC IIII RANDLEMAN I III o.o,  ! '11 320-839-2357 : ;11 a Certified II 1, Clockmaker- Watchmaker II Call After 6,,,p.m. for Estimates, ,,IJ ] ] II 1999 ""* GREAT SEMINARS Bill Biedrich | Marine Electronics -s00ow TV's Fishing The u,.. Midwest rlellJrUl R I V E R C E N T R E" Scott Petersen Yd:AN Bass Professor SAINT PAUL !i: FE'IBR U AR "i25-28 ' For xnfo: ,l,r5.-8ztIl: I Extension report Carrie Olson, County Extension Educator THE KIDS IN OUR COMMUNITY Life in a small town is often pleasant and convenient because people know each other and watch out for one another. There are fewer people per acre so there are fewer lines to wait in and less traffic to plod through. The down side of this seemingly less complicated life, of course, can be the lack of needed services and the isolation some residents feel. I frequently hear about children who are allowed to roam the streets or stay home alone, late and often, in rural communities. This happens in larger towns too, but perhaps because we have a sense of trust and security surrounding small towns, we're less likely to worry about the children in these areas. Research has uncovered some unsettling similarities between inner- city youth and small-town youth. Laura DeHaan, North Dakota State University assistant professor and extension specialist in child development and family science, found that inner-city Chicago and rural North Dakota youth did not differ in terms of drug or alcohol use or in delinquent behaviors. Search Institute, MN, has reached similar conclusions. Kim Bushaw, Parent Line Program Specialist, NDSU Extension Service, suggests parents take these facts seriously and take action to make a difference. She says, "As adults we can make sure there are productive activities for children that are easy to Farm credit scholarships Farm Credit Services (FCS) - AgCountry will award four $1,000 scholarships to high school seniors from west central Minnesota and southeast North Dakota who plan to enroll in college this fall. Recipients must be from a farming or ranching family, or plan to pursue a career in farming or some other aspect of agriculture. Two scholarships will be given away to Minnesota residents in the counties of Becker, Big Stone, Clay, Douglas, Grant, Hubbard, Kittson, Mahnomen, Norman, Ottertail, Pope, Stevens, Todd, Traverse, Wadena or Wilkin. Selection is based on academic record, personal attributes, vocational promise, leadership and financial need. The deadline for applications is April 1, 1999. Students may obtain scholarship application forms from their high school principal, from any Farm Credit office in the Minnesota or North Dakota counties named above, or by writing to Pat White, Scholarship Coordinator, Farm Credit Services of NWND, PO Box 70, Minot, ND 58702. ASSET # 3 1 :,I '! N IP ": OTHER AI)ULT |! A1 SH S YOUNG PERSON IIECI:AVES SUi 10RI FROM THIH:,E OR MORE NON-PARENT AI)ULTS. Daffodil Days 1 March 16-22 are days Big Stone county residents should remember. That's when Mother Nature will be helping the American Cancer Society, Big Stone County Unit by providing thousands of yellow daffodils. Volunteers will be bringing this spring flower, the flower of hope, to area residents during Daffodil Days. This signifies the start of the local fundraising effort against cancer. Donations collected from the flower sale will be used to raise funds for cancer research, education, and patient services. access and available to all. Quality childcare is a must for young children wherever they live. Preventable injuries and fear are just two reasons children need supervision day and night. We can model the attitude that there are plenty of opportunities if we seek them out or get people together to start something new and positive, even if we have to start small and build. When parents give the impression that there is nothing to do, that their town is boring, they encourage children to do the same. Be willing to supervise other people's children, give rides, monitor, do whatever seems necessary to keep the community's children safe and active in positive endeavor. Consider working on implementing a curfew, a baby-sitting co-op or after-school homework rooms staffed with parent volunteers and high school students. Tutoring another student is a great way to enforce the tutor's own learning and keeps students off the streets too. Perhaps the older students have a talent that could be taught to a group of younger students. Lessons on guitar, painting, cooking or chess come to mind. Retired seniors have a lifetime of knowledge to share. The possibilities and skills that are enveloped within that small community are nearly limitless." Big cities and small towns alike, we need to keep our children and youth safe and involved. Our efforts will help prevent negative behaviors and promote positive ones. Source: Tamie Bremseth, Extension Educator, Lac qui Parle County; and Kim Bushaw, NDSU Extension Service. Old Mill Twirlers The Old Mill Twirlers danced to the calling of Gene Hofmann last Wednesday. There were three squares in attendance with guests from Watertown and Madison. There will be no dance on Feb. 17th. On the lunch committee for Feb. 24th will be Del and Delores Cross and Merle and Carrie Smith. Upcoming dances Feb. 24th Dennis Van Asch calling. The Old Mill Twirlers dance on Wednesday evenings at 8:00 in the High School lunchroom. Use the northeast door, visitors are always welcome. Vollmer named to Century list Citizen of this areal! YolJr mission: To be one of the "three or more" in the life of a local young person. Statistic: When our local youth were surveyed 57% did not fee.__.[ they had support from three or more non-parent adults. Make the effort! You will be richly rewarded!! Our children are our future! We all care about their lives. Look for ways to show kids you care!! Jaclyn Vollmer, daughter of Art and Arlene Vollmer of Ortonville was recently named to Century College's Dean's list in White Bear Lake for the 1998 fall semester. She is majoring in orthotics and prosthetic technology. Over two million shipped from the state for Daffodil Days in freshly cut flower will Super Valu in Ortonville 16-22. Business and encouraged to make for distribution to their as a gift to hospitals by contacting Ruth 839-3644. Volunteers Stone County Unit of the! Cancer Society will be sales to businesses on SPRING TO LIFE! Daffodil Days Locals on roll at LATI Several area students the 373 students recently current honor roll at Technical Institute Among those Volkenant, Greg Shawna Cameron of Daniel Bilben and Kelley Big Stone City, SD. START YOUR OWN BUSINESS. WORK FLEXIBLE HOURS. ENJOY UNLIMITED EARNINGS. AVO CALL TOLL FREE (800) 735-8867. [N THE "PROMOTION or THr Sl5OOln prize money/ Every Sunday Registration begins at 12:30, Tournament begins at 1:30 Call Guest Services for details Every Thursday at 7pro Free hors d'oeuvres from 6-7pro 1 free drink with buy-in -100% paybacl l Remember: If you disavow all knowledge of this mission, you community could self-destruct in.,. ....... ,,..,.o. ...... ,.o .... o ............ o..,.o...o.... ......... ,,,.,o,.o,....o Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Feb.