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February 18, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Krispy Kreme donut Valentine Fundraiser sweet success couple of weeks. Thanks to fans of the Krispy Kreme, the fundraiser raised $1,200 for the library. Bobby Jo's in Beardsley, Hansen Chevrolet in Browns Valley and the Graceville Library acted as satellite pick-up locations. Ortonville staff librarians Carolyn Kvidera and Sabrina Olson helped to take orders and distribute donuts, and Volunteer LaVerne Doering made deliveries in Four hundred twenty dozen Krispy Kreme donuts were enjoyed by Big Stone area resident last Friday, thanks to the Krispy Kreme Valentine Fundraiser for the Ortonville Library. Head Librarian Vicki Grimli with the assistance of her husband, Gerry Grimli, picked up the donuts at the recently opened store in Fargo, ND on Friday; enough to fill advanced orders placed with the library over the past ORTONVILLE LIBRARY STAFF unload Krispy Kreme donuts outside the library on Friday. From left, are Head Librarian, Vicky Grimli, and staff librarians, Carolyn Kvidera and Sabrina Olson. Obituaries II IIIIII I I  I Thomas B. Steinke Funeral services were held for Tom and his family were members Thomas Bodo Steinke of Sheffield, of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter AL, Friday, Feb. 7, 2003 at the Latter Day Saints Chapel in Florence, AL. Presiding over the service was Bishop Eric Stevens with opening prayer from James Smith. Eulogy was presented by Rodric Mitchell with Talk from Dennis Hasha. Burial was as Glendale Cemetery of Colbert County, AL. Tom, son of Bodo and Elfrieda Steinke was born along with his twin brother, Klaus, July 19, 1954 at Appleton. Tom grew up in and around the Bellingham area where he began his schooling. Tom was baptized at St. Peter Lutheran Church in Bellingham, Dec. 5, 1954 and was confirmed in the church April 28, 1968. After graduating from Bellingham High School in 1972, he attended Alexandria Vocational Technical School taking up accounting. On April 17, 1976 he was united in marriage to Kathleen Mannes and moved to rural Montevideo, where he worked for Moon International as a parts man. From there Tom continued in the retail business moving to Missouri, Illinois and eventually settling in Sheffield, AL. At the time of his death Tom was manager of the Big Lots store of Muscle Shoals, AL. GREAT PHOTOS - IN A FLASH Dale P, Block . A memorial service for Dale P. Block, 73, of Coos Bay, was held at 2 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 31, at Coos Bay Chapel, Seventh and Anderson. Chaplain John Sheese of South .Coast Hospice officiated. Cremation rites were held at Ocean View Crematory with inurnment at Sunset Memorial Park in Coos Bay. He was born April 11, 1929, in Correll, the son of George and Nellie (Kavlhlehiem) Block. He died Jan. 28, 2003, in Coos Bay. In 1969, he retired from the U.S. Air Force and on June 22, 1973, married Marcia L. Kishel in Brainerd. They lived together in Philomath and Lebanon and operated a Gull Service Station. In Corvallis, Dale worked at Club Foods and the Corvalis Gazette Times and was a former member of the Moose Lodge. He was also a member of the American Legion in Lebanon. In 2001, they moved to Coos Bay. Dale enjoyed fishing, camping, walking and feeding and Day Saints in Florence, AL. He will always be remembered for his sense of humor, his ability to tell a story, and his unwavering positive attitude no matter what difficulties life passed his way. Tom died Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003 at the Helen Keller Hospital in Tuscumbia, AL, having lived to reach the age of 48 years. He is survived by his wife: Kathleen Steinke of Sheffield, AL; three sons: Joshua (Anna) Steinke of Florence, AL; Trevor Steinke of Sheffield, AL; and Jesse Steinke of Sheffield, AL; his father: Bodo (Bea) Steinke of Appleton; five brothers: Peter (Pam) Steinke of Big Stone City, SD, Arthur Steinke of Lakeville; Klause (Ramona) Steinke of St. Paul; Bodo (Stacey) Steinke of Ostego; Mike (Kate) Steinke of Andover; one sister: Lori (Fred) Silvers of Eden Prairie; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his grandparents and his mother Elfrieda Steinke. Pallbearers for the service and internment were his brothers and sister. Morrison Funeral Home of Tuscumbia, AL were in charge of arrangements. watching birds at his home. He is survived by his wife Marcia L. Block of Coos Bay, children, Beth and her husband, Rob Kerwin of Fort Riley, Kan., Tina Block of Seaside, Calif., Bonnie and her husband, Ted Lashley of Albany, Diana Meade of Sparks Nev., and John and his wife, Jenny Block of Barstow, Calif.; sister Sylvia Maisch of Coos Bay; brothers, Warren and his wife, Lucille Block of Ortonville, Marvin and his wife, Joan Block of Ortonville, and Alvin and his wife, Phyllis Block of St. Paul; 12 grandchildren; and two great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers and two sisters. The family suggests memorial contributions to The Kidney Association of Oregon, P.O. Box ! 5149, Portland, Ore. 97293-9149 or The American Cancer Society, Coos County Unit, 31 W. Sixth St., Medford, Ore. 97501. Arrangements were under the direction of Coos Bay Chapel. FOOTBALL CAMP Tice Brothers Football Camp "Oaily Instructions from several of the Minnesota Vikingsl" Ages 8-18 • 5th Big Year • University of St. Thomas - June 22-26 IIIIilllinliJl Oeunte Jim Tyrone Mike lance Chris M ldtchael Jadx Culpepper Kleinsasser Carter Tee Joi'ne Hovan , B#k Bennett Brewer. Limited Enrollmnl! • Oudtstandlng Coaching Steff! 'erHE B=ST FOOTBALL CAMP IN THE USAP' . I II PRINTING Is Our Business THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Page 10 Ortonville on Friday. Big eater awards go to Bill's Super Value, the Big Stone Highway Department and Unzen Chevrolet in Milbank who ordered the largest num- bers of donuts. "We'll definitely be doing this again," said Grimli. "There was a lot of enthusiasm for the project, and nothing beats a Krispy Kreme." Rosen news By Mrs. M.J. Kirchberg Sunday, Feb. 9, afternoon visitors at the Ray Schuelke home were Mrs. Wanda Schuelke and Mrs. Barbara Kanthak of Milbank. Mrs. Almira Karels returned home from the Ortonville Hospital on Saturday, Feb. 8. Eileen Karels of Fergus Falls and Andy Karels of Savage spent Feb. 8 weekend at the home of their mother Mrs. Aimira Karels. Sunday forenoon callers at the home of Mrs. Almira Karels were Mr. and Mrs. Dave Karels, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Karels and sons, Mr. and MRs. Jason Karels. Mr. and Mrs. Lester Millerbernd spent Feb. 8 weekend at the Derek Jones home in Blaine. Roger Sis visited his mother Dorothy Sis at Northridge on Friday, Feb. 7. Mr. and Mrs. Arnie Kirchberg, Cole and Craig and Brittiany Aden were Monday evening, Feb. 10 visitors at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Craig will be leaving with the National Guard on Thursday, Feb. 13. Mr. and Mrs. Dave Mark and Tracey brought takeout dinners from Walter Trinity and enjoyed them with the M.J. Kirchberg's at their home on Sunday, Feb. 9. Edward Karels was a Wednesday, Feb. 5 caller at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Mrs. Julie Henrich was a Tuesday, Feb. 11, tbrcnoon visitor at the home of Mrs. Almira Karels. Mr. and Mrs Boots Hoffman and Mrs. Joan Strei were among folks tfiat attended the Trinity Church dinner on Sunday, Feb. 9, 2003. Snow and blizzard winds on Tuesday, Feb. 11 *had many school closings before noon and cancelations of activities. Nominations due for artist award The McKnight Foundation invites nominations for its sixth Distinguished Artist Award, in recognition of individual artists with enduring and exceptional careers. Nominations for the $40,000 award must be postmarked by March 31, 2003. Please send nominations in writing (no fax or email submissions) to: McKnight Distinguished Artist Award, 710 Second Street South, Suite 400, Minneapolis, MN 55401 6UY.SEL['REHT.HIRE_,, J,J@ 0., / Sc.oo, ] Wallet Special , ... gottnded   • SENlORS dkcorners .aL " €10 r (ai' same shot) t[ reg. price 50€  h .... lfJll You must ave 35ram negative Enlargements: 8xlO s45° • 5x7 S27S D&L Photo 1-Hour Photo Processing Lab 307 Main St., Milbank • Across from Pizza Ranch 432-5222 Before mechanical refrigeration was invented, people stored their foods such as milk, butter, meat, etc. in large insulated wooden cabinets called ice boxes. One section of the cabinet stored a large block of ice. The ice cooled the contents of the box as it slowly melted, the resulting water dripped into a pan stored below. One of my first jobs as a kid was to emp the pan "of water from beneath the, ice box. A job I never quie mastered. I always seemed to spill a good portion of water on the kitchen floor. The only way o ge ice m r.hose days was o go ua to frozen takes m the cold of winter and harvest it. The ice was first scrubbed dean of snow and dirt. Then starting from the shore, a gasoline driven machine called a marker would cut a series of daep grooves approximately three feet apart in both directions to form ice blocks. Men with steel bars thenpried the blocks of ice loose and guided them to shore through channels in the ice. I marveled at how these men burdened with heavy woolen mats, miwens, and rcubber boots could jump from one block to another without slipping into the water. A conveyor belt eventually hoisted the ice up from the shore into a wide long chute that moved the ice along until it disappeared in a huge red barn. Insulated with sawdust, the stored ice awaited the hot days of summer and a mp around town to the family ice boxes. The kids always followed the ice wagon. There was a pile of chipped, cold ice to lick and chew at every stop. Slim Peterson was the Parker family ice man. Be was tall, lean, leather5" and brown from the sun except for the round circle of white bidden beneath INDEPENDENT Letters Policy Letters to the editor discussing community issues are, Writers should be aware that The Independent reserves the right to and-or condense letters for print. The paper also reserves publish letters that are unsuitable or for which it might be held liable. Letters should contain the writer's printed or typed name, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numberS l be published. Letter writers are asked to limit themselves to one letter Please keep letter brief, preferably not over 350 words and to Letters to the editor To the Editor: The law of human progress is irrevocable: Progress is dependent upon moderate greed, defined as incentive of pleasure. Without MODERATE pleasure of money, economy would deteriorate. Without MODERATE pleasure of power no one would seek a demanding responsible position. Human activity is dependent upon pleasure. Without moderate pleasure incentive, the human race would not replicate itself. But the GREED for pleasure is destructive. What is propagandized as "choice" is in reality a protection for extreme greed of free sex. Pleasure drugs destroy people. Extreme greed is not free. The result of extreme greed is crime. The super incentive of unscrupulous GREED results in corporate executives stealing on a grand scale. Law based upon greed of remuneration ability instead of justice has distorted reality. Since God condemns extreme GREED, in recent years the Court Lenin's "separation state". Germany and Saadam Hussein the rna making weapons of death. That should be there is not incentive to protecting Saadam. Russia a great amount which may not be regime change in Iraq. "in glass houses". It is nc of "throwing stones", survival. It is all about oil and for money. With oil, human killing over the world. He has It is why Hitler-type more dangerous than th( dictator of North Korea. i You li gst the best vehicle alignment! I New 4 Wheel Alignment I , Machine I We 11 handle all lour insurance work for I Kevin's is the area's most well equipped shop with two frame machinesl • Towing with wrecker and roll back • Major collision repair .Frame and su: • Windshield repair and replacement LOCK YOUR KEYS IN YOUR CAR? WE'LL GET 320-839-30@ N. Minnesota St, • Ortonville, MN 56278 25th year in business at The Way it Was Slim Peterson the Ice Man By V'mce Parker From "Memoirs" a publication of the Writers Workshop Class ISD 197 Senior Center 1996. ].usla'uccor Mariiyn West. his cap and exposed when he wiped the sweat from the top of hishead with a big, blue handkerchieŁ Slim was a happy man. He would cm, rxim, shave and weigh ice all the time kidding, joking, and singing. One day, Slim looked at me and said he was going to cut a piece of ice for my mother's ice box that would weigh exactly 110 Ibs. Even at my tender age, I felt sure that it was an impessible task to cut a piece of ice so precisely! I said, "I bew2xa can't!" Slim stared at me and said, "I'll bewJaa 50 cenm against your wrist watch." I made the deal. He cut, he trimmed, he shaved, he turned the ice - he eyed it up and dow - then trimmed some more. My heart sank as he placed the ice on the scale with his ice tongs and the little pointer of the scale stopped at exactly 110 Ibs. There was a terrible empty feeling in my stomach as I surrendered my wrist waw, h. Be disappeared into the house. All I could think of was Don't tell morn! Don't tell morn! Nothing was said when I walked into the house and in a couple of days I was beginning to accept my life without a wrist watch, when all of a sudden my mother confronted me with, 'Wince, where is your wrist watch?" I was speechless, dumfounded - fortunately before I cooked up some stupid story, she opened her hand and dangled the watch front of me and said, "Mr. Peterson came into the house the other day and told me about the watch! I told him to keep it, but be refused." There is a time for tears and time for hugs - that was one of those times. Mother didn' mention it again. We laughed about it years later. I stayed away from Slim Peterson for the rest of the summer, but I was beginning to understand one of my father's favorite expressions, "Neer try to beat a mau at his own game." Tuesday, Fet), Krispy Kreme donut Valentine Fundraiser sweet success couple of weeks. Thanks to fans of the Krispy Kreme, the fundraiser raised $1,200 for the library. Bobby Jo's in Beardsley, Hansen Chevrolet in Browns Valley and the Graceville Library acted as satellite pick-up locations. Ortonville staff librarians Carolyn Kvidera and Sabrina Olson helped to take orders and distribute donuts, and Volunteer LaVerne Doering made deliveries in Four hundred twenty dozen Krispy Kreme donuts were enjoyed by Big Stone area resident last Friday, thanks to the Krispy Kreme Valentine Fundraiser for the Ortonville Library. Head Librarian Vicki Grimli with the assistance of her husband, Gerry Grimli, picked up the donuts at the recently opened store in Fargo, ND on Friday; enough to fill advanced orders placed with the library over the past ORTONVILLE LIBRARY STAFF unload Krispy Kreme donuts outside the library on Friday. From left, are Head Librarian, Vicky Grimli, and staff librarians, Carolyn Kvidera and Sabrina Olson. Obituaries II IIIIII I I  I Thomas B. Steinke Funeral services were held for Tom and his family were members Thomas Bodo Steinke of Sheffield, of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter AL, Friday, Feb. 7, 2003 at the Latter Day Saints Chapel in Florence, AL. Presiding over the service was Bishop Eric Stevens with opening prayer from James Smith. Eulogy was presented by Rodric Mitchell with Talk from Dennis Hasha. Burial was as Glendale Cemetery of Colbert County, AL. Tom, son of Bodo and Elfrieda Steinke was born along with his twin brother, Klaus, July 19, 1954 at Appleton. Tom grew up in and around the Bellingham area where he began his schooling. Tom was baptized at St. Peter Lutheran Church in Bellingham, Dec. 5, 1954 and was confirmed in the church April 28, 1968. After graduating from Bellingham High School in 1972, he attended Alexandria Vocational Technical School taking up accounting. On April 17, 1976 he was united in marriage to Kathleen Mannes and moved to rural Montevideo, where he worked for Moon International as a parts man. From there Tom continued in the retail business moving to Missouri, Illinois and eventually settling in Sheffield, AL. At the time of his death Tom was manager of the Big Lots store of Muscle Shoals, AL. GREAT PHOTOS - IN A FLASH Dale P, Block . A memorial service for Dale P. Block, 73, of Coos Bay, was held at 2 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 31, at Coos Bay Chapel, Seventh and Anderson. Chaplain John Sheese of South .Coast Hospice officiated. Cremation rites were held at Ocean View Crematory with inurnment at Sunset Memorial Park in Coos Bay. He was born April 11, 1929, in Correll, the son of George and Nellie (Kavlhlehiem) Block. He died Jan. 28, 2003, in Coos Bay. In 1969, he retired from the U.S. Air Force and on June 22, 1973, married Marcia L. Kishel in Brainerd. They lived together in Philomath and Lebanon and operated a Gull Service Station. In Corvallis, Dale worked at Club Foods and the Corvalis Gazette Times and was a former member of the Moose Lodge. He was also a member of the American Legion in Lebanon. In 2001, they moved to Coos Bay. Dale enjoyed fishing, camping, walking and feeding and Day Saints in Florence, AL. He will always be remembered for his sense of humor, his ability to tell a story, and his unwavering positive attitude no matter what difficulties life passed his way. Tom died Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003 at the Helen Keller Hospital in Tuscumbia, AL, having lived to reach the age of 48 years. He is survived by his wife: Kathleen Steinke of Sheffield, AL; three sons: Joshua (Anna) Steinke of Florence, AL; Trevor Steinke of Sheffield, AL; and Jesse Steinke of Sheffield, AL; his father: Bodo (Bea) Steinke of Appleton; five brothers: Peter (Pam) Steinke of Big Stone City, SD, Arthur Steinke of Lakeville; Klause (Ramona) Steinke of St. Paul; Bodo (Stacey) Steinke of Ostego; Mike (Kate) Steinke of Andover; one sister: Lori (Fred) Silvers of Eden Prairie; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his grandparents and his mother Elfrieda Steinke. Pallbearers for the service and internment were his brothers and sister. Morrison Funeral Home of Tuscumbia, AL were in charge of arrangements. watching birds at his home. He is survived by his wife Marcia L. Block of Coos Bay, children, Beth and her husband, Rob Kerwin of Fort Riley, Kan., Tina Block of Seaside, Calif., Bonnie and her husband, Ted Lashley of Albany, Diana Meade of Sparks Nev., and John and his wife, Jenny Block of Barstow, Calif.; sister Sylvia Maisch of Coos Bay; brothers, Warren and his wife, Lucille Block of Ortonville, Marvin and his wife, Joan Block of Ortonville, and Alvin and his wife, Phyllis Block of St. Paul; 12 grandchildren; and two great grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers and two sisters. The family suggests memorial contributions to The Kidney Association of Oregon, P.O. Box ! 5149, Portland, Ore. 97293-9149 or The American Cancer Society, Coos County Unit, 31 W. Sixth St., Medford, Ore. 97501. Arrangements were under the direction of Coos Bay Chapel. FOOTBALL CAMP Tice Brothers Football Camp "Oaily Instructions from several of the Minnesota Vikingsl" Ages 8-18 • 5th Big Year • University of St. Thomas - June 22-26 IIIIilllinliJl Oeunte Jim Tyrone Mike lance Chris M ldtchael Jadx Culpepper Kleinsasser Carter Tee Joi'ne Hovan , B#k Bennett Brewer. Limited Enrollmnl! • Oudtstandlng Coaching Steff! 'erHE B=ST FOOTBALL CAMP IN THE USAP' . I II PRINTING Is Our Business THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Page 10 Ortonville on Friday. Big eater awards go to Bill's Super Value, the Big Stone Highway Department and Unzen Chevrolet in Milbank who ordered the largest num- bers of donuts. "We'll definitely be doing this again," said Grimli. "There was a lot of enthusiasm for the project, and nothing beats a Krispy Kreme." Rosen news By Mrs. M.J. Kirchberg Sunday, Feb. 9, afternoon visitors at the Ray Schuelke home were Mrs. Wanda Schuelke and Mrs. Barbara Kanthak of Milbank. Mrs. Almira Karels returned home from the Ortonville Hospital on Saturday, Feb. 8. Eileen Karels of Fergus Falls and Andy Karels of Savage spent Feb. 8 weekend at the home of their mother Mrs. Aimira Karels. Sunday forenoon callers at the home of Mrs. Almira Karels were Mr. and Mrs. Dave Karels, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Karels and sons, Mr. and MRs. Jason Karels. Mr. and Mrs. Lester Millerbernd spent Feb. 8 weekend at the Derek Jones home in Blaine. Roger Sis visited his mother Dorothy Sis at Northridge on Friday, Feb. 7. Mr. and Mrs. Arnie Kirchberg, Cole and Craig and Brittiany Aden were Monday evening, Feb. 10 visitors at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Craig will be leaving with the National Guard on Thursday, Feb. 13. Mr. and Mrs. Dave Mark and Tracey brought takeout dinners from Walter Trinity and enjoyed them with the M.J. Kirchberg's at their home on Sunday, Feb. 9. Edward Karels was a Wednesday, Feb. 5 caller at the M.J. Kirchberg home. Mrs. Julie Henrich was a Tuesday, Feb. 11, tbrcnoon visitor at the home of Mrs. Almira Karels. Mr. and Mrs Boots Hoffman and Mrs. Joan Strei were among folks tfiat attended the Trinity Church dinner on Sunday, Feb. 9, 2003. Snow and blizzard winds on Tuesday, Feb. 11 *had many school closings before noon and cancelations of activities. Nominations due for artist award The McKnight Foundation invites nominations for its sixth Distinguished Artist Award, in recognition of individual artists with enduring and exceptional careers. Nominations for the $40,000 award must be postmarked by March 31, 2003. Please send nominations in writing (no fax or email submissions) to: McKnight Distinguished Artist Award, 710 Second Street South, Suite 400, Minneapolis, MN 55401 6UY.SEL['REHT.HIRE_,, J,J@ 0., / Sc.oo, ] Wallet Special , ... gottnded   • SENlORS dkcorners .aL " €10 r (ai' same shot) t[ reg. price 50€  h .... lfJll You must ave 35ram negative Enlargements: 8xlO s45° • 5x7 S27S D&L Photo 1-Hour Photo Processing Lab 307 Main St., Milbank • Across from Pizza Ranch 432-5222 Before mechanical refrigeration was invented, people stored their foods such as milk, butter, meat, etc. in large insulated wooden cabinets called ice boxes. One section of the cabinet stored a large block of ice. The ice cooled the contents of the box as it slowly melted, the resulting water dripped into a pan stored below. One of my first jobs as a kid was to emp the pan "of water from beneath the, ice box. A job I never quie mastered. I always seemed to spill a good portion of water on the kitchen floor. The only way o ge ice m r.hose days was o go ua to frozen takes m the cold of winter and harvest it. The ice was first scrubbed dean of snow and dirt. Then starting from the shore, a gasoline driven machine called a marker would cut a series of daep grooves approximately three feet apart in both directions to form ice blocks. Men with steel bars thenpried the blocks of ice loose and guided them to shore through channels in the ice. I marveled at how these men burdened with heavy woolen mats, miwens, and rcubber boots could jump from one block to another without slipping into the water. A conveyor belt eventually hoisted the ice up from the shore into a wide long chute that moved the ice along until it disappeared in a huge red barn. Insulated with sawdust, the stored ice awaited the hot days of summer and a mp around town to the family ice boxes. The kids always followed the ice wagon. There was a pile of chipped, cold ice to lick and chew at every stop. Slim Peterson was the Parker family ice man. Be was tall, lean, leather5" and brown from the sun except for the round circle of white bidden beneath INDEPENDENT Letters Policy Letters to the editor discussing community issues are, Writers should be aware that The Independent reserves the right to and-or condense letters for print. The paper also reserves publish letters that are unsuitable or for which it might be held liable. Letters should contain the writer's printed or typed name, address and telephone number. Addresses and telephone numberS l be published. Letter writers are asked to limit themselves to one letter Please keep letter brief, preferably not over 350 words and to Letters to the editor To the Editor: The law of human progress is irrevocable: Progress is dependent upon moderate greed, defined as incentive of pleasure. Without MODERATE pleasure of money, economy would deteriorate. Without MODERATE pleasure of power no one would seek a demanding responsible position. Human activity is dependent upon pleasure. Without moderate pleasure incentive, the human race would not replicate itself. But the GREED for pleasure is destructive. What is propagandized as "choice" is in reality a protection for extreme greed of free sex. Pleasure drugs destroy people. Extreme greed is not free. The result of extreme greed is crime. The super incentive of unscrupulous GREED results in corporate executives stealing on a grand scale. Law based upon greed of remuneration ability instead of justice has distorted reality. Since God condemns extreme GREED, in recent years the Court Lenin's "separation state". Germany and Saadam Hussein the rna making weapons of death. That should be there is not incentive to protecting Saadam. Russia a great amount which may not be regime change in Iraq. "in glass houses". It is nc of "throwing stones", survival. It is all about oil and for money. With oil, human killing over the world. He has It is why Hitler-type more dangerous than th( dictator of North Korea. i You li gst the best vehicle alignment! I New 4 Wheel Alignment I , Machine I We 11 handle all lour insurance work for I Kevin's is the area's most well equipped shop with two frame machinesl • Towing with wrecker and roll back • Major collision repair .Frame and su: • Windshield repair and replacement LOCK YOUR KEYS IN YOUR CAR? WE'LL GET 320-839-30@ N. Minnesota St, • Ortonville, MN 56278 25th year in business at The Way it Was Slim Peterson the Ice Man By V'mce Parker From "Memoirs" a publication of the Writers Workshop Class ISD 197 Senior Center 1996. ].usla'uccor Mariiyn West. his cap and exposed when he wiped the sweat from the top of hishead with a big, blue handkerchieŁ Slim was a happy man. He would cm, rxim, shave and weigh ice all the time kidding, joking, and singing. One day, Slim looked at me and said he was going to cut a piece of ice for my mother's ice box that would weigh exactly 110 Ibs. Even at my tender age, I felt sure that it was an impessible task to cut a piece of ice so precisely! I said, "I bew2xa can't!" Slim stared at me and said, "I'll bewJaa 50 cenm against your wrist watch." I made the deal. He cut, he trimmed, he shaved, he turned the ice - he eyed it up and dow - then trimmed some more. My heart sank as he placed the ice on the scale with his ice tongs and the little pointer of the scale stopped at exactly 110 Ibs. There was a terrible empty feeling in my stomach as I surrendered my wrist waw, h. Be disappeared into the house. All I could think of was Don't tell morn! Don't tell morn! Nothing was said when I walked into the house and in a couple of days I was beginning to accept my life without a wrist watch, when all of a sudden my mother confronted me with, 'Wince, where is your wrist watch?" I was speechless, dumfounded - fortunately before I cooked up some stupid story, she opened her hand and dangled the watch front of me and said, "Mr. Peterson came into the house the other day and told me about the watch! I told him to keep it, but be refused." There is a time for tears and time for hugs - that was one of those times. Mother didn' mention it again. We laughed about it years later. I stayed away from Slim Peterson for the rest of the summer, but I was beginning to understand one of my father's favorite expressions, "Neer try to beat a mau at his own game." Tuesday, Fet),