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February 18, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Come and join the fun of Big Stone Lake Area&apos;s February 16-23, 2003 Sponsored by above listed local merchants and Big Stone Lake Area Retail Committee $500 Medallion Hunt New clue (5 in all) available daily at one of following businesses! Monday, Feb. 17 - Cenex C-Store (worth $500) Watch Tuesday, Feb. 18 - Otrey Lake Gallery (worth $450) or Wednesday, Feb. 19 - NAPA (worth $400) |urther into! Thursday, Feb. 20 - Radio Shack (worth $350) Friday, Feb. 21 - Curves or Conroy Eye Care (worth $300) Finding medallion on Saturday, Feb. 22 or later is worth $2.50. Medallion will be hidden within Ortonville or Big Stone City city limits! SPEED SKATING CONTEST- Sat., Feb. 22 9:30 AM Registration - Race starts at 10:00 - Ortonville Skating Rink Energy assistance program Have you fallen behind on your heating bills this last heating season? Do you need help to catch up'? The Energy Program, delivered by Prairie Five Community Action Council. Inc.. is taking applications to help pay heating costs The Energy Progrmn pays only part of your heating costs and makes payments directly to the vender. Eligibility is based on three months Income. Income Guidelines (3 MonthsJ Household size InconK 1 $4,586 2 $5,997 3 $7,408 4 $8,819 For more information contact the Big Stone County Outreach Worker, Felicia Athey at (320)-325-5227, in Clinton. J J y, F t' OF THE DIGNITARIES present for the public send-off ceremony held last week for Milbank's National Guard unit which has been are shown above. Left to right, you see Capt. Patrick Stapleton, Company Commander from Sioux Falls, South Dakota Governor ds, AI Cornelia, Sodak State Chairman of the National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve from Rapid City, Birnbaum of Rapid City, Rob Skjonsberg of Pierre, SD, Chief of Staff of the Governor's office, and Miibank Mayor Dale Aesoph. sion report Jean Kvols Extension Educator Relations County Mn 56256 3325 TO DO WHEN HAVE BEHAVIORS complain about their to ays push the limits, requests and are Stem and energetic can a )arent. Keep in g parenting ared specifically to behavior and praise good behavior. Don't ing and fussing or .. your child will are rewarded with Our child for change. know ahead of time ill be a change in his few minutes you need because it will Your child choices. spirited child the some control in gwe choices you are "I will lay out School tomorrow and in may choose which wear". "We are and potatoes for for a vegetable .... would you like your carrots raw or cooked'?" Be sure to ask you child to do something with very specific and Extension report clear directions. Ask your child to repeat back your request in their words. Don't use unclear demands like ... "shape up" or "knock it off" instead say; "I want you to take your feet off the table." Or "clean your room" is also too vague. Be sure to ,. indicate exactly, what you want done tdthe room'... ' put your dirty clothes by the washing machine and vacuum your floor." Show your child how you want him to behave. Seeing how to do something is much easier than understanding words. Parents need to behave as they expect their children to behave ... it is not ok for you to swear and insist that your child does not. STOP bad behavior immediately. Say NO with a quick few words that explain why. Moving close to your child to say NO helps and sometimes physically removing her from the situation to a calmer spot and talking calmly for a few minutes will stop the bad behavior. Use the When/Then rule. "When you put your toys away, then you may watch T.V. or a video." "When you have washed your hands, then you may eat supper." This only works if the child wants what comes after "then." Be a "broken record." Keep repeating what you want the child to do no matter what his excuse or response. The child eventually wears down and has no more responses. Be patient with yourself and your child. You may have to try these Craig Haugaard Regional Extension Educator Ag Production Systems.Business Management Swift County Benson, MN 56215 320 843-3796 DEVELOP A MARKET PLAN Year after depressing year the survey results come in the same. Two-thirds of the grain sold in the United States IllE gllSSl[I[00 each year is sold in the bottom third of the market. While these numbers the editor are cause for Letters to concern it takes only a little more research to unveil the predominant reason for the recurring pOUT :" performance. Each year 10% of farmers write a marketing plan and only 3% actually implement a plan. Without a plan it is all to easy to fall into the greed, hope, fear cycle of marketing that almost guarantee that we will continue to sell at the bottom of the market. A marketing plan will help to remove the emotion from the market and give you the courage to sell early and sell into the teeth of a rising market. In other words it is a proactive strategy to price your grain. It will take into account your financial goals, cash flow needs, price objectives, storage capacity, crop insurance coverage, anticipated production, and appetite for risk. A pre-harvest marketing plan assumes that you will purchase a revenue crop insurance product. The plan has two key elements, pricing targets and decision dates. The first step is to set your minimum price target.For a pre- harvest marketing plan many producers choose to use either the loan rate or their cost of production. Records from producers in West- techniques several times before you are successful. Jean Kvols is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Family Relationships serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone and Traverse Counties. 00gham school news To the Editor: I read the letter from Paul Sobobcinski of the Land Stewardship Project about the Commissioner of Agriculture's so-called "Livestock Friendly" county program and I'm in strong agreement. I've raised hogs on a farrow to finish hog operation near Pine Island for 25 years. Over these years I've seen Minnesota lose more and more of its independent livestock producers. Large corporate-backed livestock operations, with close ties to packers and processors, have pushed independent producers out of business. In fact, the turkey industry is almost a monopoly and hogs are getting close. While this has happened Commissioner of Agriculture Gene Hugoson has done little (or nothing). In fact, his policies have favored corporate-backed livestock operations. With record low prices for farmers (but not consumers) in the hog and dairy industry, Commissioner Hugoson's proposed solution is the "Livestock Friendly" county program. This program should be called the "corporate ag friendly" program. To get Hugoson's so called "Livestock Friendly" label a county must remove any limit on how large livestock Illll Ill operations can be in the county! This program is about undermining county control and paving the way for corporate backed livestock operations at the expense of independent producers. For seven years now Commissioner Hugoson has failed to help independent livestock producers. Instead his policies have shifted the productiorl of our food into fewer and fewer corporate hands. Corporate interests controlling fanning is bad for the land, bad for consumers and bad for the future of family farms in Minnesota. The corporate takeover of agriculture is being driven by unchecked greed and is the result of capitalism without morality. If livestock is going to have a future in Minnesota we need a Commissioner of Agriculture who understands and works for independent producers. Commissioner Hugoson should resign and go to work directly for Cargill, Hormel or the Turkey Store, instead of working for them on our tax dollar. Ed Gad[eat 48741 230th Ave Pine Island, MN 55963 507 843-2452 si ,,SWeetheart Dan :m . ce i r, _ dmission will be $i at iilUaPben dor ther re fre, s h me nt s Otis t DUe. we WOUlO b0,.wo Wear dresses or skirts .% "hould wear nice pants 'i|l he 1 b!ue jeans please. The %1  OCked at 7'05, so be at re efore 7"00 'lqope to see I. Calendar [Y' ?"18 BBB (A) Big Stone il  and 6th 1 ty, 2-19 6:30 wrestling I I'a i 1,. -, laool bd meetin i  'Zl - " g' r / m 3. 6 p. . Sweetheart Ireakfast I lll Tuesday--grape juice, cold cereals, granola bar and milk Wednesdayapple juice, waffles, ham slice and milk. Thursdayorange juice, egg patty on toast, cheese slices and milk. Fridayapple juice, mini pancakes, breakfast links and milk. Lunch Tuesdaycheese pizza, lettuce salad, apple wedges, orange slices, PB/PBJ and milk. Wednesdaypolish sausage, tator tots, baked beans, diced pears, fruit salad, vanilla pudding, PB/PBJ and milk. Thursday--turkey roast, mashed potatoes, corn, sliced peaches, PB/PBJ and milk. FridayBearcats burgers, fries, carrot and celery sticks with dip, apple slices with caramel dip, PB/PBJ and milk "Unparalleled customer service, a wide array of products, competitive interest rates, ann minimal to non-existent fees. Truly hometown banking at its best.r' Stop in today to see Kevin Tetzlaff or any of our banking professionals for all of your banking needs. "I invite each of you to come experience how banking ought to be! Come grow with us, as a partner and a friend." 5:1: <i: f COMMUNITY STATE BANK The Way A to Be/  INDEPENDENT I Central Minnesota show that the average cost of production for corn is $1.90/bu. and $4.57/bu. for soybeans. [laving established the minimum price you now set a series of price targets based on reasonable expectations of levels that the market may reach in the coming year and a half of your marketing plan. Having chosen your price levels you now assign a number of bushels to be sold at each price level. Many producers with a revenue insurance product will sell up to 100% of the bushels that they have covered by insurance. The second and equally important step is to pick decision dates. Decision dates are needed to make the plan a real plan for action. The dates should be structured to take advantage of the seasonal trends that exist in the markets. For example, in the past 23 years, December corn futures have gone down in value 70% of the time from May 1 to October 1. Decision dates are dates on which you are going to make a sale, even if your price target hasn't been hit, as long as you are above your minimum price. Your marketing plan would then look something like this: Amount Tool Price Target Trigger Date 5,000/bu., Forward Contract, $1.95 cash, April 9 5,000lbu., Hedge to Arrive, $2,45, futures, April 23 5,000/bu., Forward Contract, $2.10 cash, May 7 Writing a marketing plan such as this and then conscientiously implementing it will help you to remove emotion from your marketing decisions and go a long ways down the road to helping you sell in the upper third of the market on a regular basis. Craig Haugaard is an Educator with the Universitv of Minnesota Extension Service in Ag. Business Management and Marketing serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. i ,;) ' , Page 5b Come and join the fun of Big Stone Lake Area's February 16-23, 2003 Sponsored by above listed local merchants and Big Stone Lake Area Retail Committee $500 Medallion Hunt New clue (5 in all) available daily at one of following businesses! Monday, Feb. 17 - Cenex C-Store (worth $500) Watch Tuesday, Feb. 18 - Otrey Lake Gallery (worth $450) or Wednesday, Feb. 19 - NAPA (worth $400) |urther into! Thursday, Feb. 20 - Radio Shack (worth $350) Friday, Feb. 21 - Curves or Conroy Eye Care (worth $300) Finding medallion on Saturday, Feb. 22 or later is worth $2.50. Medallion will be hidden within Ortonville or Big Stone City city limits! SPEED SKATING CONTEST- Sat., Feb. 22 9:30 AM Registration - Race starts at 10:00 - Ortonville Skating Rink Energy assistance program Have you fallen behind on your heating bills this last heating season? Do you need help to catch up'? The Energy Program, delivered by Prairie Five Community Action Council. Inc.. is taking applications to help pay heating costs The Energy Progrmn pays only part of your heating costs and makes payments directly to the vender. Eligibility is based on three months Income. Income Guidelines (3 MonthsJ Household size InconK 1 $4,586 2 $5,997 3 $7,408 4 $8,819 For more information contact the Big Stone County Outreach Worker, Felicia Athey at (320)-325-5227, in Clinton. J J y, F t' OF THE DIGNITARIES present for the public send-off ceremony held last week for Milbank's National Guard unit which has been are shown above. Left to right, you see Capt. Patrick Stapleton, Company Commander from Sioux Falls, South Dakota Governor ds, AI Cornelia, Sodak State Chairman of the National Committee for Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve from Rapid City, Birnbaum of Rapid City, Rob Skjonsberg of Pierre, SD, Chief of Staff of the Governor's office, and Miibank Mayor Dale Aesoph. sion report Jean Kvols Extension Educator Relations County Mn 56256 3325 TO DO WHEN HAVE BEHAVIORS complain about their to ays push the limits, requests and are Stem and energetic can a )arent. Keep in g parenting ared specifically to behavior and praise good behavior. Don't ing and fussing or .. your child will are rewarded with Our child for change. know ahead of time ill be a change in his few minutes you need because it will Your child choices. spirited child the some control in gwe choices you are "I will lay out School tomorrow and in may choose which wear". "We are and potatoes for for a vegetable .... would you like your carrots raw or cooked'?" Be sure to ask you child to do something with very specific and Extension report clear directions. Ask your child to repeat back your request in their words. Don't use unclear demands like ... "shape up" or "knock it off" instead say; "I want you to take your feet off the table." Or "clean your room" is also too vague. Be sure to ,. indicate exactly, what you want done tdthe room'... ' put your dirty clothes by the washing machine and vacuum your floor." Show your child how you want him to behave. Seeing how to do something is much easier than understanding words. Parents need to behave as they expect their children to behave ... it is not ok for you to swear and insist that your child does not. STOP bad behavior immediately. Say NO with a quick few words that explain why. Moving close to your child to say NO helps and sometimes physically removing her from the situation to a calmer spot and talking calmly for a few minutes will stop the bad behavior. Use the When/Then rule. "When you put your toys away, then you may watch T.V. or a video." "When you have washed your hands, then you may eat supper." This only works if the child wants what comes after "then." Be a "broken record." Keep repeating what you want the child to do no matter what his excuse or response. The child eventually wears down and has no more responses. Be patient with yourself and your child. You may have to try these Craig Haugaard Regional Extension Educator Ag Production Systems.Business Management Swift County Benson, MN 56215 320 843-3796 DEVELOP A MARKET PLAN Year after depressing year the survey results come in the same. Two-thirds of the grain sold in the United States IllE gllSSl[I[00 each year is sold in the bottom third of the market. While these numbers the editor are cause for Letters to concern it takes only a little more research to unveil the predominant reason for the recurring pOUT :" performance. Each year 10% of farmers write a marketing plan and only 3% actually implement a plan. Without a plan it is all to easy to fall into the greed, hope, fear cycle of marketing that almost guarantee that we will continue to sell at the bottom of the market. A marketing plan will help to remove the emotion from the market and give you the courage to sell early and sell into the teeth of a rising market. In other words it is a proactive strategy to price your grain. It will take into account your financial goals, cash flow needs, price objectives, storage capacity, crop insurance coverage, anticipated production, and appetite for risk. A pre-harvest marketing plan assumes that you will purchase a revenue crop insurance product. The plan has two key elements, pricing targets and decision dates. The first step is to set your minimum price target.For a pre- harvest marketing plan many producers choose to use either the loan rate or their cost of production. Records from producers in West- techniques several times before you are successful. Jean Kvols is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Family Relationships serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone and Traverse Counties. 00gham school news To the Editor: I read the letter from Paul Sobobcinski of the Land Stewardship Project about the Commissioner of Agriculture's so-called "Livestock Friendly" county program and I'm in strong agreement. I've raised hogs on a farrow to finish hog operation near Pine Island for 25 years. Over these years I've seen Minnesota lose more and more of its independent livestock producers. Large corporate-backed livestock operations, with close ties to packers and processors, have pushed independent producers out of business. In fact, the turkey industry is almost a monopoly and hogs are getting close. While this has happened Commissioner of Agriculture Gene Hugoson has done little (or nothing). In fact, his policies have favored corporate-backed livestock operations. With record low prices for farmers (but not consumers) in the hog and dairy industry, Commissioner Hugoson's proposed solution is the "Livestock Friendly" county program. This program should be called the "corporate ag friendly" program. To get Hugoson's so called "Livestock Friendly" label a county must remove any limit on how large livestock Illll Ill operations can be in the county! This program is about undermining county control and paving the way for corporate backed livestock operations at the expense of independent producers. For seven years now Commissioner Hugoson has failed to help independent livestock producers. Instead his policies have shifted the productiorl of our food into fewer and fewer corporate hands. Corporate interests controlling fanning is bad for the land, bad for consumers and bad for the future of family farms in Minnesota. The corporate takeover of agriculture is being driven by unchecked greed and is the result of capitalism without morality. If livestock is going to have a future in Minnesota we need a Commissioner of Agriculture who understands and works for independent producers. Commissioner Hugoson should resign and go to work directly for Cargill, Hormel or the Turkey Store, instead of working for them on our tax dollar. Ed Gad[eat 48741 230th Ave Pine Island, MN 55963 507 843-2452 si ,,SWeetheart Dan :m . ce i r, _ dmission will be $i at iilUaPben dor ther re fre, s h me nt s Otis t DUe. we WOUlO b0,.wo Wear dresses or skirts .% "hould wear nice pants 'i|l he 1 b!ue jeans please. The %1  OCked at 7'05, so be at re efore 7"00 'lqope to see I. Calendar [Y' ?"18 BBB (A) Big Stone il  and 6th 1 ty, 2-19 6:30 wrestling I I'a i 1,. -, laool bd meetin i  'Zl - " g' r / m 3. 6 p. . Sweetheart Ireakfast I lll Tuesday--grape juice, cold cereals, granola bar and milk Wednesdayapple juice, waffles, ham slice and milk. Thursdayorange juice, egg patty on toast, cheese slices and milk. Fridayapple juice, mini pancakes, breakfast links and milk. Lunch Tuesdaycheese pizza, lettuce salad, apple wedges, orange slices, PB/PBJ and milk. Wednesdaypolish sausage, tator tots, baked beans, diced pears, fruit salad, vanilla pudding, PB/PBJ and milk. Thursday--turkey roast, mashed potatoes, corn, sliced peaches, PB/PBJ and milk. FridayBearcats burgers, fries, carrot and celery sticks with dip, apple slices with caramel dip, PB/PBJ and milk "Unparalleled customer service, a wide array of products, competitive interest rates, ann minimal to non-existent fees. Truly hometown banking at its best.r' Stop in today to see Kevin Tetzlaff or any of our banking professionals for all of your banking needs. "I invite each of you to come experience how banking ought to be! Come grow with us, as a partner and a friend." 5:1: <i: f COMMUNITY STATE BANK The Way A to Be/  INDEPENDENT I Central Minnesota show that the average cost of production for corn is $1.90/bu. and $4.57/bu. for soybeans. [laving established the minimum price you now set a series of price targets based on reasonable expectations of levels that the market may reach in the coming year and a half of your marketing plan. Having chosen your price levels you now assign a number of bushels to be sold at each price level. Many producers with a revenue insurance product will sell up to 100% of the bushels that they have covered by insurance. The second and equally important step is to pick decision dates. Decision dates are needed to make the plan a real plan for action. The dates should be structured to take advantage of the seasonal trends that exist in the markets. For example, in the past 23 years, December corn futures have gone down in value 70% of the time from May 1 to October 1. Decision dates are dates on which you are going to make a sale, even if your price target hasn't been hit, as long as you are above your minimum price. Your marketing plan would then look something like this: Amount Tool Price Target Trigger Date 5,000/bu., Forward Contract, $1.95 cash, April 9 5,000lbu., Hedge to Arrive, $2,45, futures, April 23 5,000/bu., Forward Contract, $2.10 cash, May 7 Writing a marketing plan such as this and then conscientiously implementing it will help you to remove emotion from your marketing decisions and go a long ways down the road to helping you sell in the upper third of the market on a regular basis. Craig Haugaard is an Educator with the Universitv of Minnesota Extension Service in Ag. Business Management and Marketing serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. i ,;) ' , Page 5b