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February 25, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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February 25, 2003
 

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O' 'ff;00 IND ENDENT "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" Mat Men place at sectionals, + two advance to state tourney Ortonville Mat Men returned home from Sectional competitions on Sat. evening escorted by the Ortonville Fire Department, the Big Stone City Fire Department, and the Ortonville Police Department, in a celebration of their fine showing at the tournament Fans gathered at the OHS auditori- um to hold a pep rally in their honor. Two wrestlers will advance to the State competitions, Jason Keilen and Patrick Eustice. Senior Heavyweight wrestler, Kellen will be advancing for the sec- ond year in a row. This year, Jason set a school record earning 227 points, the highest in school history. Kellen also has 28 pins, nearly a state-wide record. PAL SNOW BARRIER on the Dan Wiese farm along highway 12 about 14 miles east of Ortonville, job, as evidenced b); above photo. The project is in cooperation with Minnesota's Dept. of which pays Dan $3.75 per bushel for corn that he did not pick. He left stand a total of 12 extending east and west, just north of highway 12, for a distance of about a half-mile. The nat- like a snow fence, keeps the snow from drifting on the highway. meet in SD mittee named by Counc=l use of city properties city's properties. Committee members are Lenore Sellin, Artie Arndt, and Lisa Berkner. Council Member Oakes reported to the Council that a meeting has been scheduled in Montevideo on Feb. 28 hosted by the Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission to discuss Governor Pawlenty's pro- posed JOBZ program. In response to concerns raised by the City Attorney's office, the Council briefly discussed the potential increase in airport liability insurance coverage due to potential terrorist exposure at airports. The Attorney City Council was on Tues., Feb, 18 by ban Oakes. as given to move for- architectural plans for request of the Street Lodge's request for a was approved. Council at the request of formed a commit- look at the various city- to assess the avail- needs of all city enti- recommendations to how to best use the cautioned that there may be repercus- sions involved in turning down the higher risk insurance as the City's insurance rates in other areas might be raised. The City expects follow-up information assistance from the League of MN Cities in terms of the City's exposure. The liquor license for the golf course clubhouse was approved con- tingent on completion of remaining paper work by Mark and Sheila Thompson, new managers of the club- house operation. cuts impact County get process and services Eighth grader, Patrick Eustice at 103 ill be competing at the State CBSL steering committee to An informational meeting will be held Wednesday, Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. at Schmidts Landing Resort on Big Stone Lake. Purpose of the meeting will be to learn what current setback ordinances are in place at the county and state level in South Dakota. Based on the information obtained a discussion will be made as to what action should be taken to submit a proposal to change the existing regulations. Several representatives from Grant county and state of South Dakota have been invited to attend. Any concerned citizen is encouraged to come. Call Brenda at 605-862-8318, Donna at 605-432- 6911 or Barb at 605-432-9249 for additional information. This meeting is being organized by the SD Steering Committee for Citizens for Big Stone Lake. like everyone else 0f Minnesota are worrd Pawlenty's funding the County services they affected. among County Feb. 18 at the reg- f the Big Stone County Pawlenty's bud- Speech to the Minnesota Commissioners voiced the of cuts on employees. among concerns is mandated services by the State, and County to fund. isn't going to fund the has to provide, will have to make tough decisions," said Bruce Swigerd. for the Schreiner for expanded are not set, though work has begun on remodeling, and discus- sion continue as to the best use. The County Extension Service will be the first to move into the building. Sue Kaercher-Blake asked for con- firmation regarding publishing public notices in the Ortonville Independent as the designated County paper, and if those notices and County minutes as well as the tax delinquent notices would continue to be published in the Northern Star, as in the past. The Commissioners approved a motion to continue the publications as in previ- ous years. Darren Wilke of Environmental Services updated the County Board on the special meeting of the Planning Commission to be held Thurs. Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. in Clinton. Wilke also updated the Commissioners and received approval of the GIS contract to create a zoning map layer into the parcel base map for use in establishing the location for buffers, to identify boundaries for development proposals particularly around lakes, and for enforcement of shoreline ordinances. The Regional Development Commission, (RDC), Appleton will complete the map at a cost of $4,637. Wilke also identified those environ- mental grant funding cuts as part of the un-allotment procedure already im- posed by Governor Pawlenty, includ- ing the matches for septic treatment, feedlot, wetlands, water planning and shoreline management. The programs eliminated were part of the package of programs funded through the Natural Resource Block Grant and have been completely eliminated for 2003. Although the County Board took no action at this time, it may be neces- sary to re-instate solid waste assess- ments as a surcharge to businesses and (Continued on page 9) Food Drive campaign "ns at County Food Shelf iii ': i  i .,... /... ,w The Big Stone County Emergency Food Shelf March Food Drive cam- paign is right around the corner. Many of our local churches, business, orga- nizations, and schools will be partici- pating in the event, to assist in filling it's shelves. Minnesota FoodShare is an inter- faith collaboration formed in 1982 to help restock food shelves across the state. By participating in the state- wide campaign, the Big Stone Food Shelf receives a monetary incentive from Minnesota Food Share that can be used to purchase food locally. It also allows the food shelf, on a large scale, to purchase food in bulk at a rate of 17 cents per pound from America's Second Harvest. As a community, we are all called to help those who are hungry and in need all year long. During this cam- paign season, let us put a special emphasis on sharing all that we have with the less fortunate. The Big Stone Area Emergency Food Shelf needs your help to restock the shelves. Watch for collection locations and local food drives during the coming month of March. ES ARE BARE AT THE BIG STONE COUNTY FOOD United members Ruth Hoernemann, right and with 50 additional RSVPVU volunteers are ready and give them to families and individuals who shelf. The food shelf is open Mondays 1-4 p.m. and a'm. to noon., , level for the first time this year. Patrick is carrying on the Eustice fam- ily wrestling tradition. This year eight wrestlers placed in the Section Tournament in Barrett, with six placing in the top four. This is the fourth year in a row Coach Eustice has brought wrestlers to State competitions. Since 1963 there have been 19 Ortonville * wrestlers go to State; Joe has coached 10 of them. Coach Eustice has done a lot to build this program, considering that when he came the program didn't exist. Eustice is passionate about wrestling having grown up in a fami- ly of wrestlers. Sure. it's great to be going to state, he said, but that's not what it's all about. It's about having something for the kids to do. This program is really coming along, we have 25 to 30 kids involved, doing something positive, building self esteem and learning what it means to be part of a team. That's what its all about. This team has really stuck with it. It's fun to see their hard work bring them to this level, he said. Patrick Eustice and Jason Kellen will wrestle Thurs. in the 12:30 p.m. Individual Preliminaries. If they win in this round they will wrestle again at 2:45 p.m. All wrestling will take place at the Excel Center in St. Paul. HEADING TO THE STATE wrestling tournament his Thursday at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul are lrojans Jason Kellen and Patrick Eustice. MEMBERS OF SEVERAL Ortonville area orRanizati0ns athered Thursday to hear a presentation on the proposed "business center" which would create jobs in t'e area by combining a manufacturer, labor and a Paci|ity in the former B & L building in Ortonville. Carl Skarie, president of Northern Lakes Technology, Inc.' is shown speaking to the group here. Business center opens in Big Stone County to create jobs Northern Lakes Technology met with Ortonville's Economic Development Authority and members of Big Stone Area Growth at a special meeting on Thurs., Feb. 20 to present a proposal for manufacturing and dis- tribution using the building previously occupied by B&L Industries in Ortonville on Highway 75, and now owned by Big Stone Area Growth. Northern Lakes Technology was incorporated in 2002 for the purpose of manufacturing and selling child safe outlet technology patented by Power-Off Products, LLC. According to the executive summary prepared by Northern Lakes Technology, the prod- uct they propose to manufacture in Ortonville will be an external mount- ed outlet designed for retail sales. Such devices will be valuable for improving the safety of anyone plug- ging a device into an outlet or for chil- dren who may tamper with the outlet. The product is similar to plug expanders currently available at retail stores. The configuration would allow anyone to retrofit outlets in their homes without rewiring. The proposal will partner Northern Lakes Technology as product develop- er and marketer, B&L Industries would return to Ortonville as manu- facturer, responsible for building the product, assembly, packaging, ware- house management and shipping and Big Stone Area Growth which would provide the building and would facili- tate locating private investment. According to Roger Bird, Director of Big Stone Area Growth, the project would also enable recruitment of other like-kind manufacturers and distribu- tors to share the resources and avail- able labor in place. For instance, Water Monitor, which currently rents space from Big Stone Area Growth, is planning on participating. Jim Larson, local area business man said, "It's about businesses with the same needs being able to access the skills they need to be the most effi- cient during the early growing stages of the business. It makes sense for small companies to share the costs of the services." In addition, the proposal requests assistance in obtaining up to $100,000 in a bank line of credit to act as gap financing between the manufacturing, distribution and accounts receivable time frame. In obtaining the line of credit, EDA funds could be instrumen- tal in acting as a match with a banking institution. B&L Industries would return to the Ortonville area and contract with Northern Lakes Technology, Inc. (NLTI) to manufacture and distribute the product. B&L first operated in Ortonville from 1997 through 2001, employing up to 75 people in the man- ufacture of custom toroids described as noise inhibitors for large comput- ers. Due to competition from overseas and reductions in the large computer manufacturing business, the Ortonville manufacturing plant was closed. B&L has continued to look for ways to implement their manufactur- ing expertise, and labor source to part- ner with other companies, according to Bird. "This is an opportunity for companies to share the costs of start- up, concentrate on what each business does best, access labor and distribute efficiently, all under one roof." Larson commented, "It's difficult for small companies to have all the resources necessary for start-up. To partner on the manufacturing and dis- tribution end of things enables the par- ties involved to go out and market their product most effectively. Ultimately the investors are better served." B&L continues to manufacture from their Morgan office, with Lon Johnson, ot I Morgan as chief executive officer. Northern Lakes Technology's President is Carl H. Skarie of Detroit Lakes. In attendance at the meetingwere representatives from Northern Lakes Technology, B&L Industries, Water Monitor, Big Stone Area Growth, Minnwest Bank, CenBank, Ortonville EDA, Ortonville Development Corporation and several business own- ers. The financial prospectus and mar- ket analysis, provided by Northern Lakes Technology is available at Blair Johnson Accounting and from Big Stone Area Growth by calling 320- O' 'ff;00 IND ENDENT "A Constructive Newspaper In A Live Community" Mat Men place at sectionals, + two advance to state tourney Ortonville Mat Men returned home from Sectional competitions on Sat. evening escorted by the Ortonville Fire Department, the Big Stone City Fire Department, and the Ortonville Police Department, in a celebration of their fine showing at the tournament Fans gathered at the OHS auditori- um to hold a pep rally in their honor. Two wrestlers will advance to the State competitions, Jason Keilen and Patrick Eustice. Senior Heavyweight wrestler, Kellen will be advancing for the sec- ond year in a row. This year, Jason set a school record earning 227 points, the highest in school history. Kellen also has 28 pins, nearly a state-wide record. PAL SNOW BARRIER on the Dan Wiese farm along highway 12 about 14 miles east of Ortonville, job, as evidenced b); above photo. The project is in cooperation with Minnesota's Dept. of which pays Dan $3.75 per bushel for corn that he did not pick. He left stand a total of 12 extending east and west, just north of highway 12, for a distance of about a half-mile. The nat- like a snow fence, keeps the snow from drifting on the highway. meet in SD mittee named by Counc=l use of city properties city's properties. Committee members are Lenore Sellin, Artie Arndt, and Lisa Berkner. Council Member Oakes reported to the Council that a meeting has been scheduled in Montevideo on Feb. 28 hosted by the Upper Minnesota Valley Regional Development Commission to discuss Governor Pawlenty's pro- posed JOBZ program. In response to concerns raised by the City Attorney's office, the Council briefly discussed the potential increase in airport liability insurance coverage due to potential terrorist exposure at airports. The Attorney City Council was on Tues., Feb, 18 by ban Oakes. as given to move for- architectural plans for request of the Street Lodge's request for a was approved. Council at the request of formed a commit- look at the various city- to assess the avail- needs of all city enti- recommendations to how to best use the cautioned that there may be repercus- sions involved in turning down the higher risk insurance as the City's insurance rates in other areas might be raised. The City expects follow-up information assistance from the League of MN Cities in terms of the City's exposure. The liquor license for the golf course clubhouse was approved con- tingent on completion of remaining paper work by Mark and Sheila Thompson, new managers of the club- house operation. cuts impact County get process and services Eighth grader, Patrick Eustice at 103 ill be competing at the State CBSL steering committee to An informational meeting will be held Wednesday, Feb. 26 at 7 p.m. at Schmidts Landing Resort on Big Stone Lake. Purpose of the meeting will be to learn what current setback ordinances are in place at the county and state level in South Dakota. Based on the information obtained a discussion will be made as to what action should be taken to submit a proposal to change the existing regulations. Several representatives from Grant county and state of South Dakota have been invited to attend. Any concerned citizen is encouraged to come. Call Brenda at 605-862-8318, Donna at 605-432- 6911 or Barb at 605-432-9249 for additional information. This meeting is being organized by the SD Steering Committee for Citizens for Big Stone Lake. like everyone else 0f Minnesota are worrd Pawlenty's funding the County services they affected. among County Feb. 18 at the reg- f the Big Stone County Pawlenty's bud- Speech to the Minnesota Commissioners voiced the of cuts on employees. among concerns is mandated services by the State, and County to fund. isn't going to fund the has to provide, will have to make tough decisions," said Bruce Swigerd. for the Schreiner for expanded are not set, though work has begun on remodeling, and discus- sion continue as to the best use. The County Extension Service will be the first to move into the building. Sue Kaercher-Blake asked for con- firmation regarding publishing public notices in the Ortonville Independent as the designated County paper, and if those notices and County minutes as well as the tax delinquent notices would continue to be published in the Northern Star, as in the past. The Commissioners approved a motion to continue the publications as in previ- ous years. Darren Wilke of Environmental Services updated the County Board on the special meeting of the Planning Commission to be held Thurs. Feb. 27 at 7 p.m. in Clinton. Wilke also updated the Commissioners and received approval of the GIS contract to create a zoning map layer into the parcel base map for use in establishing the location for buffers, to identify boundaries for development proposals particularly around lakes, and for enforcement of shoreline ordinances. The Regional Development Commission, (RDC), Appleton will complete the map at a cost of $4,637. Wilke also identified those environ- mental grant funding cuts as part of the un-allotment procedure already im- posed by Governor Pawlenty, includ- ing the matches for septic treatment, feedlot, wetlands, water planning and shoreline management. The programs eliminated were part of the package of programs funded through the Natural Resource Block Grant and have been completely eliminated for 2003. Although the County Board took no action at this time, it may be neces- sary to re-instate solid waste assess- ments as a surcharge to businesses and (Continued on page 9) Food Drive campaign "ns at County Food Shelf iii ': i  i .,... /... ,w The Big Stone County Emergency Food Shelf March Food Drive cam- paign is right around the corner. Many of our local churches, business, orga- nizations, and schools will be partici- pating in the event, to assist in filling it's shelves. Minnesota FoodShare is an inter- faith collaboration formed in 1982 to help restock food shelves across the state. By participating in the state- wide campaign, the Big Stone Food Shelf receives a monetary incentive from Minnesota Food Share that can be used to purchase food locally. It also allows the food shelf, on a large scale, to purchase food in bulk at a rate of 17 cents per pound from America's Second Harvest. As a community, we are all called to help those who are hungry and in need all year long. During this cam- paign season, let us put a special emphasis on sharing all that we have with the less fortunate. The Big Stone Area Emergency Food Shelf needs your help to restock the shelves. Watch for collection locations and local food drives during the coming month of March. ES ARE BARE AT THE BIG STONE COUNTY FOOD United members Ruth Hoernemann, right and with 50 additional RSVPVU volunteers are ready and give them to families and individuals who shelf. The food shelf is open Mondays 1-4 p.m. and a'm. to noon., , level for the first time this year. Patrick is carrying on the Eustice fam- ily wrestling tradition. This year eight wrestlers placed in the Section Tournament in Barrett, with six placing in the top four. This is the fourth year in a row Coach Eustice has brought wrestlers to State competitions. Since 1963 there have been 19 Ortonville * wrestlers go to State; Joe has coached 10 of them. Coach Eustice has done a lot to build this program, considering that when he came the program didn't exist. Eustice is passionate about wrestling having grown up in a fami- ly of wrestlers. Sure. it's great to be going to state, he said, but that's not what it's all about. It's about having something for the kids to do. This program is really coming along, we have 25 to 30 kids involved, doing something positive, building self esteem and learning what it means to be part of a team. That's what its all about. This team has really stuck with it. It's fun to see their hard work bring them to this level, he said. Patrick Eustice and Jason Kellen will wrestle Thurs. in the 12:30 p.m. Individual Preliminaries. If they win in this round they will wrestle again at 2:45 p.m. All wrestling will take place at the Excel Center in St. Paul. HEADING TO THE STATE wrestling tournament his Thursday at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul are lrojans Jason Kellen and Patrick Eustice. MEMBERS OF SEVERAL Ortonville area orRanizati0ns athered Thursday to hear a presentation on the proposed "business center" which would create jobs in t'e area by combining a manufacturer, labor and a Paci|ity in the former B & L building in Ortonville. Carl Skarie, president of Northern Lakes Technology, Inc.' is shown speaking to the group here. Business center opens in Big Stone County to create jobs Northern Lakes Technology met with Ortonville's Economic Development Authority and members of Big Stone Area Growth at a special meeting on Thurs., Feb. 20 to present a proposal for manufacturing and dis- tribution using the building previously occupied by B&L Industries in Ortonville on Highway 75, and now owned by Big Stone Area Growth. Northern Lakes Technology was incorporated in 2002 for the purpose of manufacturing and selling child safe outlet technology patented by Power-Off Products, LLC. According to the executive summary prepared by Northern Lakes Technology, the prod- uct they propose to manufacture in Ortonville will be an external mount- ed outlet designed for retail sales. Such devices will be valuable for improving the safety of anyone plug- ging a device into an outlet or for chil- dren who may tamper with the outlet. The product is similar to plug expanders currently available at retail stores. The configuration would allow anyone to retrofit outlets in their homes without rewiring. The proposal will partner Northern Lakes Technology as product develop- er and marketer, B&L Industries would return to Ortonville as manu- facturer, responsible for building the product, assembly, packaging, ware- house management and shipping and Big Stone Area Growth which would provide the building and would facili- tate locating private investment. According to Roger Bird, Director of Big Stone Area Growth, the project would also enable recruitment of other like-kind manufacturers and distribu- tors to share the resources and avail- able labor in place. For instance, Water Monitor, which currently rents space from Big Stone Area Growth, is planning on participating. Jim Larson, local area business man said, "It's about businesses with the same needs being able to access the skills they need to be the most effi- cient during the early growing stages of the business. It makes sense for small companies to share the costs of the services." In addition, the proposal requests assistance in obtaining up to $100,000 in a bank line of credit to act as gap financing between the manufacturing, distribution and accounts receivable time frame. In obtaining the line of credit, EDA funds could be instrumen- tal in acting as a match with a banking institution. B&L Industries would return to the Ortonville area and contract with Northern Lakes Technology, Inc. (NLTI) to manufacture and distribute the product. B&L first operated in Ortonville from 1997 through 2001, employing up to 75 people in the man- ufacture of custom toroids described as noise inhibitors for large comput- ers. Due to competition from overseas and reductions in the large computer manufacturing business, the Ortonville manufacturing plant was closed. B&L has continued to look for ways to implement their manufactur- ing expertise, and labor source to part- ner with other companies, according to Bird. "This is an opportunity for companies to share the costs of start- up, concentrate on what each business does best, access labor and distribute efficiently, all under one roof." Larson commented, "It's difficult for small companies to have all the resources necessary for start-up. To partner on the manufacturing and dis- tribution end of things enables the par- ties involved to go out and market their product most effectively. Ultimately the investors are better served." B&L continues to manufacture from their Morgan office, with Lon Johnson, ot I Morgan as chief executive officer. Northern Lakes Technology's President is Carl H. Skarie of Detroit Lakes. In attendance at the meetingwere representatives from Northern Lakes Technology, B&L Industries, Water Monitor, Big Stone Area Growth, Minnwest Bank, CenBank, Ortonville EDA, Ortonville Development Corporation and several business own- ers. The financial prospectus and mar- ket analysis, provided by Northern Lakes Technology is available at Blair Johnson Accounting and from Big Stone Area Growth by calling 320-