Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
February 25, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 2     (2 of 26 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 2     (2 of 26 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 25, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




With renewal, former Clinton res- ident Bernice (Swenson) Mattke of the metro are, writes: I was sorry to read about the death of Jeri Waterman. I met her in Mpls. when we were working on a political cam- paign together. When I learned she was from Ortonville I did remember her as the pretty young girl with big blue eyes who hung out at her moth- er's bakery-restaurant. We lost touch after they moved away, but I never forgot her vibrant energy and enthu- siasm for any project with which she was involved. She graduated from Central H.S. in Mpls, and then attended the Mpls. Business School. I just thought you might be interested, if you do remember her. Thanks for all your hard work on the Independent. I appreciate it." Sad news today .... Ann Lundberg informs us that Bill Balster of Roseville, passed away Sunday, Feb. 23. Rites are set for this Thursday. Bill was the oldest son of our long-time fore- man, H. R. "Heinie" Balster....one of the greatest of all printers...and dearest of friends! Such a frenzy people of our nation and world are living in today...with the threat of war with Iraq and with Terrorism. With what seems like lit- tle appreciation for American efforts overseas, perhaps we should pull in our horns and foreign-aid dollars and turn into an isolation state?! To heck with the rest of the world. As for Iraq...why not set up a world boxing arena in some neutral country and let President Bush and Saddam battle it out for 16 rounds with boxing gloves and whoever ends up the loser, let it be agreed that he would then go into exile! End of War! Back to normal- cy! No lives lost! Elsewhere this jsu’, you'll find a boxed-writing entitled "This Is How I Feel." The authors are two young- sters of the Ortonville School...namely 7th grader Paulina Chaloupka, daugh- ter of Michelle and Sev Wollschlager, of Ortonville, and 6th grader Cassie Sherod, granddaughter of Hazel Sherod of Odessa. Paulina is the main author, for a class assignment, and Cassie assisted with the writ- ing. Paulina's teacher thought the piece was so nice for someone so young, she suggested the girls see if we would print it...to which we gladly consented. A photo of the girls can be found next to the writing. With renewal, good friends Mickey and Shirley Heffernan write from their winter haven in Lake Villa, IL, "Hey Big Bad...I just turned over my 75th birthday on the 9th (Feb.)...time flies by. No snow here in Illinois, but you sure sent us a lot of cold weather...over 2 months under freezing. Tell Herb King he's not alone in being gone 50 years. Shirley and I left the spring of 1950, at the start of the Korean Conflict and here we are back in dispute 50 years later. Say hello to your great group at the Indy and be seeing you around the first of May if the creek doesn't rise." More brief news from readers renewing...namely Katherine Barrass of San Rafaei, CA, who writes "cele- brating our 49th anniversary Feb. 14th...cost my husband a $200 fine at Rotary!" And from Aurora, MN., Alice Paul writes "we, too, enjoy the paper. We wait for it to come. Some weeks, it doesn't but that's not your fault. It's warming up now, so hope you get some good sunshine also." Very good friends, former resi- dents, long-time readers and OHS classmates, Duane and Doris Bagaus, now of Texas, send renewal and write: "Keep the news coming. Seems like more people from our Ortonville area are learning how great the winters are here in our Rio Grande Valley! Guess we are not as 'popular' as you are though, because they never give us a call. If you could see the winter activities schedules down here, you would find some- thing to keep you busy and enter- tained...and no snow! Enjoy the paper, keep up the good work...love to you and yours!" Over $43,000 donated to date for kidney dialysis As of Friday, Feb. 21 more than $43,000.00 has been donated for the Kidney Dialysis Project in Ortonville The Big Stone Health Care Foundation is matching these dona- tions dollar for dollar making a total of over $86,000 available to date. The Foundation will match up to $100,000 of donations designated for the kidney dialysis unit making a total of $200,000 for this much needed ser- vice. Currently, those needing dialysis have to drive approximately 100 miles round trip for this life-saving treat- ment. Many of us know and are assist- ing loved ones and friends who need dialysis and are very aware of the expense, time commitment and lifestyle change involved in this rou- tine. We can make a difference in our community by becoming involved with the dialysis project. Gifts have come from Ortonville and many other communities around the area and also from family mem- bers and friends who live greater dis- tances away. They have been from individuals, businesses, organizations and from family groups. Some are organizing their own fund raising event with the proceeds dedicated to the dialysis project. We are seeing very creative and innovative dona- tions. One extension club which has disbanded voted to give the final bal- ance of their treasury. One couple gave each other a donation in each other's name as Valentine gifts stating they really didn't need any more 'things' and felt strongly about the dialysis project. Gifts have been given in amounts from $1.00 to $15,000.00 and as out- right gifts as well as memorial gifts. All gifts are welcome and encouraged in any size. With every dollar being matched by the Big Stone Health Care Foundation, every gift is important. It is important to remember also, that the matching funds come from the established endowment fund invested from over 12 years of giving by our neighbors, friends and those who have gone before us. This project is a way to prove that the "Investment in the Future" started in 1990 is really pay- ing off in improving our local quality health care. Contributions should be made payable to the Big Stone Health Care Foundation and sent to the Foundation at 450 Eastvold Avenue, Ortonville, MN 56278. If you have any questions, call 320-839-4135. The Foundation office is located in the lower level of Northside Medical Center if you pre- fer to bring your donation in personal- ly. Please indicate that the donation is for the Kidney Dialysis Project: Since the Foundation is a tax exempt foun- dation under the Internal Revenue Code, all sums given are tax deductible in full, Renewable Energy Center, a potential future in Morris Boiler Plant. This location would allow for heat recovery off of the gen- erator. The third piece of the facility would be a step-up bio-refinery locat- ed at WCROC, which would take U of M laboratory research and refine the products and processes nee4ed at a commercial scale. After the facility is established, opportunities to branch out to farms, businesses, and other communities will be pursued. The Renewable Energy Project has had funding support from the West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, Ottertail Power, University of Minnesota- Morris, and University of Minnesota Central Administration to develop partnerships in the region and state and to retain services of the Energy and Environmental Research Center of Grand Forks to conduct renewable energy resource assessments. To date, the biomass resource assessment has been completed and funding is being sought to conduct wind and bio-refin- ery assessments. To learn more about the Morris Renewable Energy Center, be sure to participate in the renewable energy workshop Empowering the Countryside with Renewable Energy Imagine if your community could produce it's own energy for it's resi- dents and businesses from renewable energy sources such as wind, corn stocks, animal waste, wood or even the sun. There would be less depen- dency on centralized coal burning or nuclear energy plants where air pollu- tion and disposal of the waste contin- ues to be a problem. The need for additional large transmission line crossing the countryside would also be reduced as the energy is produced close to home where it is used. The West Central Research and Outreach Center (WCROC) is in its second year "of accessing the potential of a Renewable Energy Center with the University of Minnesota-Morris (UMM), Morris public schools, City of Morris, and DENCO Ethanol Plant through a Renewable Energy Project. The Renewable Energy Center is envisioned to be a biomass district energy system including the above University of Minnesota institutions and community partners. Three to five wind turbines would be located along the ridge at the WCROC. The wind turbines would be backed up by a 100% bio-diesel generator which may be located near the UMM Biomass II on March 13th at the University of Minnesota-Morris Science Auditorium from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. This is a nuts and bolts workshop that includes sessions on establishing a wind farm, the products, processes and potential of bio-refining and bio- mass, innovations with hydrogen energy, funding and financing renew- able energy products as well as infor- mation on the Morris Renewable Energy Center. Empowering the Countryside with Renewable Energy II is sponsored by the West Central Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota-Morris, West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, and the Minnesota Department of Commerce Energy Office. Please RSVP for the workshop by March 7th by calling 320-589-1711 or toll free 866-589-1711. Cost of the workshop is $20 per person or $10 per student, payable at the door on March 13th. For more information on the WCROC Renewable Energy Study or the workshop, contact Greg Cuomo or Mike Reese at the above numbers. • New Construction • Remodeler • Lot Loans , Second Home • VA Purchase • VA Refinance • Cash-out • No Down • Debt • Purchase ° No-Doc Loans • Bruised Credit Call now- take advantage of today's Jamie Mittelstaedt 1-800-788-4310 Midstate Mort - Ortonville - HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-5PM ORTONVlLLE, MN PHONE (320) ~ BUFFALO MEAT AVAILABLE ~ LET US CATER YOUR EVENT/ Ice fishing shelter THE LAW FIRM OF, removal dates nearing Fluegel Helseth McLaughlin Minnesota s ice fishing shelter After the date when ice or fish I /' removal dates are fast approaching, houses or shelters must be removed, Anderson & Brutlag Dark houses, fish houses and shelters portable shelters may be placed on the must be off the ice of inland waters no ice and used from one hour before later than midnight on Feb. 28 in the sunrise to midnight, but only if there southern two-thirds of the state and March 15 in the northern third. The Feb. 28 deadline applies to waters south of a line starting at the Minnesota-North Dakota border near Moorhead along U.S. Highway 10, then east along Highway 34 to Minnesota Highway 200, east along Highway 200 to U.S. Highway 2, and east along Highway 2 to the Minnesota-Wisconsin border near Duluth. The March 15 deadline applies to waters north of that line. For border waters, the ice shelter removal deadlines are: 1. Minnesota- Iowa, Feb. 20 2. Minnesota - Wisconsin, March 1 3. Minnesota- North Dakota and South Dakota, March 5 4. Minnesota - Canada, March 31. If houses or shelters are not removed, owners will be prosecuted and the structure may be destroyed or confiscated and removed by a conser- vation officer. Contents of the struc- ture may be seized and held for 60 days. If not claimed by the owner within that time, the items become property of the state of Minnesota. Storing or leaving fish houses or dark houses on a public access is prohibit- ed. is an open fishing season on the lake. Conservation officers also remind anglers to keep waterways clean. Litter on lakes tarnishes nature's beauty, destroys wildlife habitats and ruins many recreational opportunities. Anglers are encouraged to monitor ice conditions on lakes and make arrangements to remove their houses before travel on the ice is dangerous. According to information from the DNR Boat and Water Safety Section, a minimum of 4 inches is necessary for ice fishing; snowmobiles or all- terrain vehicle activity requires at least 5 inches; cars or small pickups require 8 to 12 inches; and medium trucks, 12-15 inches. Ice conditions can vary greatly so anglers should know about the differ- ent types and characteristics of ice. Slush shows weakening of ice and should be considered a danger sign. If ice at the shoreline is cracked or squishy, stay off. Don't go on the ice during thaws. Avoid honeycombed ice, dark snow and dark ice. Ice is generally thinner where there is mov- ing water, such as inlets and outlets, bridge abutments, islands and near objects that protrude through the ice. Morris, Elbow Lake & Ortonville, MN is proud to congratulate IN THE CI.ASSII:IED00 True Minnesota. Some things are distinctly Minnesotan -- like Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, recognized for delivering quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. That's why more MinnesOtans choose Blue Cross than any other plan. Call me for individual or group plans or plans that work with Medicare. Tom Oakes /=nt 40 NW 2nd Street Ortonvllle, MN 56278 320-839-2118 or 800-630-4978 BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota For Amy J. Doll being recognized as one of twelve "Attorneys of the Year" Page 2 00INDEPENDENT ' Tuesday, With renewal, former Clinton res- ident Bernice (Swenson) Mattke of the metro are, writes: I was sorry to read about the death of Jeri Waterman. I met her in Mpls. when we were working on a political cam- paign together. When I learned she was from Ortonville I did remember her as the pretty young girl with big blue eyes who hung out at her moth- er's bakery-restaurant. We lost touch after they moved away, but I never forgot her vibrant energy and enthu- siasm for any project with which she was involved. She graduated from Central H.S. in Mpls, and then attended the Mpls. Business School. I just thought you might be interested, if you do remember her. Thanks for all your hard work on the Independent. I appreciate it." Sad news today .... Ann Lundberg informs us that Bill Balster of Roseville, passed away Sunday, Feb. 23. Rites are set for this Thursday. Bill was the oldest son of our long-time fore- man, H. R. "Heinie" Balster....one of the greatest of all printers...and dearest of friends! Such a frenzy people of our nation and world are living in today...with the threat of war with Iraq and with Terrorism. With what seems like lit- tle appreciation for American efforts overseas, perhaps we should pull in our horns and foreign-aid dollars and turn into an isolation state?! To heck with the rest of the world. As for Iraq...why not set up a world boxing arena in some neutral country and let President Bush and Saddam battle it out for 16 rounds with boxing gloves and whoever ends up the loser, let it be agreed that he would then go into exile! End of War! Back to normal- cy! No lives lost! Elsewhere this jsu’, you'll find a boxed-writing entitled "This Is How I Feel." The authors are two young- sters of the Ortonville School...namely 7th grader Paulina Chaloupka, daugh- ter of Michelle and Sev Wollschlager, of Ortonville, and 6th grader Cassie Sherod, granddaughter of Hazel Sherod of Odessa. Paulina is the main author, for a class assignment, and Cassie assisted with the writ- ing. Paulina's teacher thought the piece was so nice for someone so young, she suggested the girls see if we would print it...to which we gladly consented. A photo of the girls can be found next to the writing. With renewal, good friends Mickey and Shirley Heffernan write from their winter haven in Lake Villa, IL, "Hey Big Bad...I just turned over my 75th birthday on the 9th (Feb.)...time flies by. No snow here in Illinois, but you sure sent us a lot of cold weather...over 2 months under freezing. Tell Herb King he's not alone in being gone 50 years. Shirley and I left the spring of 1950, at the start of the Korean Conflict and here we are back in dispute 50 years later. Say hello to your great group at the Indy and be seeing you around the first of May if the creek doesn't rise." More brief news from readers renewing...namely Katherine Barrass of San Rafaei, CA, who writes "cele- brating our 49th anniversary Feb. 14th...cost my husband a $200 fine at Rotary!" And from Aurora, MN., Alice Paul writes "we, too, enjoy the paper. We wait for it to come. Some weeks, it doesn't but that's not your fault. It's warming up now, so hope you get some good sunshine also." Very good friends, former resi- dents, long-time readers and OHS classmates, Duane and Doris Bagaus, now of Texas, send renewal and write: "Keep the news coming. Seems like more people from our Ortonville area are learning how great the winters are here in our Rio Grande Valley! Guess we are not as 'popular' as you are though, because they never give us a call. If you could see the winter activities schedules down here, you would find some- thing to keep you busy and enter- tained...and no snow! Enjoy the paper, keep up the good work...love to you and yours!" Over $43,000 donated to date for kidney dialysis As of Friday, Feb. 21 more than $43,000.00 has been donated for the Kidney Dialysis Project in Ortonville The Big Stone Health Care Foundation is matching these dona- tions dollar for dollar making a total of over $86,000 available to date. The Foundation will match up to $100,000 of donations designated for the kidney dialysis unit making a total of $200,000 for this much needed ser- vice. Currently, those needing dialysis have to drive approximately 100 miles round trip for this life-saving treat- ment. Many of us know and are assist- ing loved ones and friends who need dialysis and are very aware of the expense, time commitment and lifestyle change involved in this rou- tine. We can make a difference in our community by becoming involved with the dialysis project. Gifts have come from Ortonville and many other communities around the area and also from family mem- bers and friends who live greater dis- tances away. They have been from individuals, businesses, organizations and from family groups. Some are organizing their own fund raising event with the proceeds dedicated to the dialysis project. We are seeing very creative and innovative dona- tions. One extension club which has disbanded voted to give the final bal- ance of their treasury. One couple gave each other a donation in each other's name as Valentine gifts stating they really didn't need any more 'things' and felt strongly about the dialysis project. Gifts have been given in amounts from $1.00 to $15,000.00 and as out- right gifts as well as memorial gifts. All gifts are welcome and encouraged in any size. With every dollar being matched by the Big Stone Health Care Foundation, every gift is important. It is important to remember also, that the matching funds come from the established endowment fund invested from over 12 years of giving by our neighbors, friends and those who have gone before us. This project is a way to prove that the "Investment in the Future" started in 1990 is really pay- ing off in improving our local quality health care. Contributions should be made payable to the Big Stone Health Care Foundation and sent to the Foundation at 450 Eastvold Avenue, Ortonville, MN 56278. If you have any questions, call 320-839-4135. The Foundation office is located in the lower level of Northside Medical Center if you pre- fer to bring your donation in personal- ly. Please indicate that the donation is for the Kidney Dialysis Project: Since the Foundation is a tax exempt foun- dation under the Internal Revenue Code, all sums given are tax deductible in full, Renewable Energy Center, a potential future in Morris Boiler Plant. This location would allow for heat recovery off of the gen- erator. The third piece of the facility would be a step-up bio-refinery locat- ed at WCROC, which would take U of M laboratory research and refine the products and processes nee4ed at a commercial scale. After the facility is established, opportunities to branch out to farms, businesses, and other communities will be pursued. The Renewable Energy Project has had funding support from the West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, Ottertail Power, University of Minnesota- Morris, and University of Minnesota Central Administration to develop partnerships in the region and state and to retain services of the Energy and Environmental Research Center of Grand Forks to conduct renewable energy resource assessments. To date, the biomass resource assessment has been completed and funding is being sought to conduct wind and bio-refin- ery assessments. To learn more about the Morris Renewable Energy Center, be sure to participate in the renewable energy workshop Empowering the Countryside with Renewable Energy Imagine if your community could produce it's own energy for it's resi- dents and businesses from renewable energy sources such as wind, corn stocks, animal waste, wood or even the sun. There would be less depen- dency on centralized coal burning or nuclear energy plants where air pollu- tion and disposal of the waste contin- ues to be a problem. The need for additional large transmission line crossing the countryside would also be reduced as the energy is produced close to home where it is used. The West Central Research and Outreach Center (WCROC) is in its second year "of accessing the potential of a Renewable Energy Center with the University of Minnesota-Morris (UMM), Morris public schools, City of Morris, and DENCO Ethanol Plant through a Renewable Energy Project. The Renewable Energy Center is envisioned to be a biomass district energy system including the above University of Minnesota institutions and community partners. Three to five wind turbines would be located along the ridge at the WCROC. The wind turbines would be backed up by a 100% bio-diesel generator which may be located near the UMM Biomass II on March 13th at the University of Minnesota-Morris Science Auditorium from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. This is a nuts and bolts workshop that includes sessions on establishing a wind farm, the products, processes and potential of bio-refining and bio- mass, innovations with hydrogen energy, funding and financing renew- able energy products as well as infor- mation on the Morris Renewable Energy Center. Empowering the Countryside with Renewable Energy II is sponsored by the West Central Research and Outreach Center, University of Minnesota-Morris, West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership, and the Minnesota Department of Commerce Energy Office. Please RSVP for the workshop by March 7th by calling 320-589-1711 or toll free 866-589-1711. Cost of the workshop is $20 per person or $10 per student, payable at the door on March 13th. For more information on the WCROC Renewable Energy Study or the workshop, contact Greg Cuomo or Mike Reese at the above numbers. • New Construction • Remodeler • Lot Loans , Second Home • VA Purchase • VA Refinance • Cash-out • No Down • Debt • Purchase ° No-Doc Loans • Bruised Credit Call now- take advantage of today's Jamie Mittelstaedt 1-800-788-4310 Midstate Mort - Ortonville - HOURS: Mon.-Fri. 8AM-5:30PM; Sat. 8AM-5PM ORTONVlLLE, MN PHONE (320) ~ BUFFALO MEAT AVAILABLE ~ LET US CATER YOUR EVENT/ Ice fishing shelter THE LAW FIRM OF, removal dates nearing Fluegel Helseth McLaughlin Minnesota s ice fishing shelter After the date when ice or fish I /' removal dates are fast approaching, houses or shelters must be removed, Anderson & Brutlag Dark houses, fish houses and shelters portable shelters may be placed on the must be off the ice of inland waters no ice and used from one hour before later than midnight on Feb. 28 in the sunrise to midnight, but only if there southern two-thirds of the state and March 15 in the northern third. The Feb. 28 deadline applies to waters south of a line starting at the Minnesota-North Dakota border near Moorhead along U.S. Highway 10, then east along Highway 34 to Minnesota Highway 200, east along Highway 200 to U.S. Highway 2, and east along Highway 2 to the Minnesota-Wisconsin border near Duluth. The March 15 deadline applies to waters north of that line. For border waters, the ice shelter removal deadlines are: 1. Minnesota- Iowa, Feb. 20 2. Minnesota - Wisconsin, March 1 3. Minnesota- North Dakota and South Dakota, March 5 4. Minnesota - Canada, March 31. If houses or shelters are not removed, owners will be prosecuted and the structure may be destroyed or confiscated and removed by a conser- vation officer. Contents of the struc- ture may be seized and held for 60 days. If not claimed by the owner within that time, the items become property of the state of Minnesota. Storing or leaving fish houses or dark houses on a public access is prohibit- ed. is an open fishing season on the lake. Conservation officers also remind anglers to keep waterways clean. Litter on lakes tarnishes nature's beauty, destroys wildlife habitats and ruins many recreational opportunities. Anglers are encouraged to monitor ice conditions on lakes and make arrangements to remove their houses before travel on the ice is dangerous. According to information from the DNR Boat and Water Safety Section, a minimum of 4 inches is necessary for ice fishing; snowmobiles or all- terrain vehicle activity requires at least 5 inches; cars or small pickups require 8 to 12 inches; and medium trucks, 12-15 inches. Ice conditions can vary greatly so anglers should know about the differ- ent types and characteristics of ice. Slush shows weakening of ice and should be considered a danger sign. If ice at the shoreline is cracked or squishy, stay off. Don't go on the ice during thaws. Avoid honeycombed ice, dark snow and dark ice. Ice is generally thinner where there is mov- ing water, such as inlets and outlets, bridge abutments, islands and near objects that protrude through the ice. Morris, Elbow Lake & Ortonville, MN is proud to congratulate IN THE CI.ASSII:IED00 True Minnesota. Some things are distinctly Minnesotan -- like Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, recognized for delivering quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. That's why more MinnesOtans choose Blue Cross than any other plan. Call me for individual or group plans or plans that work with Medicare. Tom Oakes /=nt 40 NW 2nd Street Ortonvllle, MN 56278 320-839-2118 or 800-630-4978 BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota For Amy J. Doll being recognized as one of twelve "Attorneys of the Year" Page 2 00INDEPENDENT ' Tuesday,