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February 25, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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Eclitorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... Why is ethanol under attack? by State Rep. Aaron Peterson Rural Minnesota has faced a host of economic challenges in recent decades - low farm incomes, a lack of business investment and perhaps most critically, a shortage of good-paying jobs. One exception to the story of economic challenge has been ethanol development. With unique and ground-breaking legislation, Minnesota has created a locally owned, billion-dollar industry from virtually nothing since 1986. Some 14 ethanol plants have been developed, providing more than 1,000 jobs. They are credited with raising corn prices 3 to 7 cents a bushel in their regions. Other states have copied the "Minnesota Model" in hopes of spurring their own industries. So why should we cut the legs out from under an industry which has done everything that we want to do for the rural economy? That&apos;s the question I and other rural legislators have been asking since Gov. Tim Pawlenty proposed wiping out all state support for ethanol production last week. It's a question that was also being asked by dozens of farmers and ethanol supporters who rallied at the Capitol last week. Joining in the meetings were a large number of people who work for or with the Chippewa Valley ethanol plant in Benson, and their support was strong and warmly welcomed. On Friday, the DFL-controlled Senate found a way to restore almost all the $27 million cut proposed by Gov. Pawlenty. The Senate plan limits the cut to $2.3 million, which represents the payment to a plant in St. Paul that may be shut down due to pollution concerns. But on Tuesday, the Republican-controlled House Agriculture Finance Committee voted for an across-the-board 20% cut - reducing the producer payments for all plants from 20 to 16 cents a gallon. Admittedly, many useful and important programs will suffer as the state budget is re-balanced. But as one of the farmers participating in last week's ethanol meeting asked, why is ethanol being singled out for deep cuts - 100% in the Pawlenty plan - when some programs are taking no cut at all? It would have been nice - and useful - if all rural legislators of both parties could have presented a united front to defend ethanol. Eleven of the 14 ethanol plants are located in areas represented by Republican legislators. But some of them obviously felt it was more important to stick with their Governor and their party than their own constituents. That may be harsh, but the votes are on the record. It's impossible to predict how this story will end. The House and Senate will pass budget-fix plans with a wide range of differences, so there must be negotiations to come up with a single plan that can pass both sides of the Legislature and be signed by the Governor. Hopefully, that won't take too long - because the situation does demand action. But more importantly, we should'not let a drive for quick action lead to a rash decision that could hurt Rural Minnesota for decades to come. Rural Hospital/Pharmacy Cuts Ethanol isn't the only rural program under attack. Elsewhere in his proposal, Gov. Pawlenty sought to reduce payments to rural hospitals and pharmacies. Especially in Rural Minnesota, many hospitals and pharmacies operate close to the edge - and it wouldn't take much to close them down. The cut to hospitals in the current year is $656,000, which is relatively small in the context of the state's $30 billion two-year budget. However, the cut is in the form of a reduction in basic rates - so it would translate into millions of dollars in the coming two years. The cut to pharmacies is a $3 million reduction reimbursement for prescriptions on state medical programs. Again, a relatively small cut this year will translate into millions more in the coming two years. Of course, if we don't make this cut, what will we cut? Well, we could look at state agency operating costs - the governor asked all state agencies to shoulder less than 10% of the cuts he proposed. In the past two years, state agencies spent $865 million hiring outside consultants. Perhaps that is a more fertile area for cuts than rural hospitals and corner drugstores? You can be a master gardener! Master Gardeners are special and unique people and now you too can become a Minnesota Master Gardener. The Master Gardener pro- gram has been in Minnesota since 1977 so you will be among a family of 4,500 individuals that have taken the training. Why should you become a Master Gardener? Because you love garden- ing; you want to learn how to become a better gardener; but most of all you are enthusiasti c about helping others appreciate gardening the way you do. What do you have to do to become a Master Gardener? First, you need to devote 48 hours of intensive horticul- ture training. Second, you then annu- ally volunteer hours. The 2003 Master Gardener train- ings will take place in Fergus Falls. The cost for taking the class is only $125.00, which includes a thick man- ual, regular updates and other bene- fits. The Fergus Falls training will be four Frilays and four Saturdays_ beginning Feb. 21 and ending March 15. Classes are from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Instruction is by University of Minnesota faculty. Classes cover lawn care, soil science, trees and shrubs, insect disease and weed control, houseplants, fruits and vegetables and other horticultural subjects. Volunteer service of 50 hours the first year, 25 hours every year plus six hours of education annually is required. One of the questions every new Master Gardener osks is: what do I had, e" todo for my volunteer hours'? Most Master Gardeners answer horti- Letters to E//ssa by the late Rev. George P. Weaner D.D. (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. lhno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the island of Sumatra• Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000, ***** Tales from Odessa... "FOOD AND ITS PREPARATION IN THE PARSONAGE" (continued from last week) The Native American called the month of February the "Hunger Month" because if he could survive this cruel cold month, he probably could survive until the spring brought plants and fruits that brought new strength and life. During the winter we ate dried foods like corn that had been ground up or whole grains that could be cooked, like oats, wheat, barley, etc. We never had fish in the winter unless someone went fishing in holes in the ice in Big Stone Lake. Of course in the summer we often had fresh pan-fried fish straight from the lake to the table in a few hours. One day in early winter cheeb began counting her jars of canned food, and looking to her store of veg- etables in the root cellar with an anx- ious eye. Would we have enough to last through that long winter? Then a miracle akin to Elijah being fed by the ravens happened in this little out of the way hamlet of Odessa. Old "Cocky" Batson. our postmaster, a rather strange gentleman, who may have been a member of my dad's church, came aknocking at our door. He was carrying a large, heavy bag of what proved to be cracked corn. Here was a gift straight from heaven. One of my favorite foods was Johnny Cake, a pan baked mixture of corn meal, eggs and water. This with syrup was a staple in our home because in tho.e depression years corn sold for 10€ a bushel and a bushel of corn could last through the winter. Even to this day I enjoy eat- ing corn products, especially "Johnny Cake," a condition no doubt created by a long exposure to this golden maize we inherited from the Native American. Cheeb's favorite method of cook- ing food was to fry everything. Out came the trusty black iron frying pan and into it went potatoes that had been boiled and sliced. These fried potatoes (home fries would be a cur- rent term for them) were even more of a staple than cornbread. Actually l liked these potatoes fried to a golden brown and many other foods that found their way into that trusty old pan. Here in the Far East we eat rice at least once and often twice a day. More people live on rice in the world than any other food, including wheat or potatoes. In midwestern America, the three foods inherited from the Native American, corn, beans and squash, made up the bulk of our diet. Every Friday for supper Cheeb would serve us a liberal helping of baked beans and corn bread. The beans would have baked slowly on the cook stove all day, slowly turning to a golden brown. The night before those navy beans had been soaked and then baked "the old fashioned way." Nothing could have been better than that Friday night feeling of blissful of beans and corn. Saturday on Cheeb's domestic schedule was baking day. Morning and early afternoon the house was filled with the heavenly fragrance of baking bread and apple pie. The bread had been kneaded and the dough placed in baking pans to raise all night before baking in the cav- ernous cookstove oven. This was an unhurried process and a crunchy brown crust formed on each golden loaf. 1 was taught to bake apple pies, so my contribution of sliced apples, sugar and whatever, in dough 1 hand mixed and rolled, was added to the collection in the oven. Not one batch, but several through Saturday, kept the oven, heated with wood l carried in, producing what was the most tasty part of our parsonage cooking. To this day 1 like bread with crunchy crusts and dislike that soft spongy bread people buy in the supermar- kets. After we moved from Odessa to Worthington, Minn., Cheeb kept alive that tradition of cornbread and beans on Friday night. I would hitch- hike home from college on Friday afternoon to be treated to those baked beans in brown sugar. I can still remember that fat brown pottery crock with its tan lid in which those beans always were baked. " ....... (continued next week) 1 .) 3 t3 16 u 22 29 }0 31 39 41 49 5O 56 57 62 65 Clues ACROSS 1. Adventure story 4. Stormed 9. Stinks! 13. Back 14. Epicure 15. A collection of anecdotes about a person or place 16. Glass ornament 17. Enfeeble 18. Went quickly 20. Insect 22. Imp 25. Tom _, character 27. A Dalton (Physics) 28. Dove sound 29. Strikebreaker 32, Percolate 35. Network of nerves 39. Perceptible by the ear 31. Rapid bustling 40. Dental filling movement 3. Destinations 33. Snakelike fish 4. A long thin implement 34. A whip with nine 5. Breakfast food knotted cords 6. Cold cereal 36. Your consciousness 7. Utter sounds of your own identity 8. Lair 37. Label 10. Creepy 38. Printers measures 11. The compass point 43. Item midway between 46. Besides northeast and east 48. Refers to a person 12. Stork, for one 49. Confused mixture of 19. Sweet Potato sounds 21. Vietnamese 50. Crews currency unit 52, 23. Congo River seaport 53. 24. Cradlesong 54. 25. Bribe 26. Experienced 29. Plant juice 30. Pool stick Domestic cat Spars French river 55. World's longest river 57. Brew 58. Express pleasure 59. Away from 61. The cry made by sheep 41. Unskilled laborer 42. Winged 44. Canines 45. Hit lightly 47. Tool for making holes 49. Plant science 51. Beat 54. Queen of Scotts 56. Semitic fertility god 58. Sound 60, Recedes 62. Tree 63. Intellectual sustenance 64. Conk 65. Smaller quantity 66. S California town 67. Nestling hawk Clues DOWN 1. Cavalry sword 2. Period of human life IIIE • "_1 I_ __ culture questions from citizens. If you ask veteran Master Gardeners they will tell you when people find out you are a Master Gardener they will 9 FIS C.t,JL-- stop you anywhere and ask questions about gardening - and the Master Gardeners love it! Many Master Gardeners give presentations to 4-H Or if@'S  [''] '" clubs, garden clubs and other organi- zations. Most county Master Gardener  "  groups have annual events such as ,.v. , - . -  , , ,   tours, plant sales, county fair booths ,,a˘j?..,7......-- , ,   \\; , and educational events. Some spend  lk |tN L,V \\; f  time in Extension offices answering questions. Some are on television, l q1,I ",,v-- ,,tp_  \\; \\; \\; radio, or write columns for newspa- ,  C._"j i X i" ' pers. There are lots of opportunities to help others become better gardeners. What should you do if you want .,:t'" ;T more information on the Master t "'O l • Gardner program? First, call your  ' ,C'Lut_'.=,., '  .,\\; county Extension office and ask them i f.(.', questions about the program in your county. Second, ask your county Extension office for names of current Master Gardeners then call or meet with them, Third, you can visit the Master Gardener web site at: www.mg.umn.edu. Application and registration forms are available at all Extension offices. Stop by and pick them up and be on your way to becoming a true Master Gardener. Once again, space is limited and the last day to sign-up is coming very fast, so if you are interested in attend- ing this gardening opportunity act I now! I LeRoy Williams is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Horticulture | ONCE AGAIN . . . MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Steve Barr Farm Credit Services Ailys Henningson Mary & Charles Bissett Minnie Merritt Mrs. Leo Taffe Larry Roggenbuck Carol Roggenbuck James Adeiman Richard Sinknle Yankee Clipping Service H. Alan Kuyper Shirley Kepner Avis Nelson Lloyd Christopherson Beverly Harem Agnes Bowler Jerry Fullington Clifford Semran Richard Goldsmith Dan Henningson Mrs. Michael Adams Jim Henningson I The Inde (U.S.P.S. 412-480} elsQe JAMES D. Publisher/Man; SUZETTE Editor and Advertising ARLEN; WIES Office Manager KATHIE Computer and Composition EMILEE ( ARDIE BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM 6RI NANCY Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Feb. 25. 2003 Vol. Continuing the Published Every Ortonville Periodicals Postage Paid SUBSCRIPTI $30.00per year in Bi Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. $34.00 counties in Minnesota All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Ind Ortonville, Minnesota NEW SUBS( RATE A FEBRUARY 1ST Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, Swift Counties In Grant and Roberts in February ........... 30.00 , March ................ 27.50 Apnl .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN MINN. February ........... 3400 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28,40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................... 22.19 The Publisher shall not changes or typographical not lessen the value of an The Publisher's liability for € omissions in connection tisement is strictly limited the advertisement in any issue or the refund of any the advertisement. DEADLINES., Church notes - Saturday ms, Display ads - Friday Correspondence - Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will I to classify.) OFFICE HOURS AA Monday: 8 AM-5 PM Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12  Thursday: 8 AM-12 Friday: 8 AM-5 PM A Holidays Letters to the editor munity issues are writers should be Independent reserves the and/or condense letters isaper also reserves the h letters it might be held legalL Letters should printed or typed name, address and tele Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are asked selves to one letter keep letter brief, words, and to the AD vs. The Ortonville determining what is is news If an individual zation charges for an item or for a service sidereal In you charge, we char! Advertising is paper. Without it a cease to exist. The receives for is used to pay used in producing does increases. It still covers small Advertising to a "rops and livestock to the grocer; underwear to the md plows and tractors to dealer. Without of particular ness. ADS: We reserve the advertising without our decision. POLICIES: A News: Our goal fully and accurately as staff's opinions will opinion page. /x Editorials: rage, whether om other sources late and readers. tor are her own and of other staff expressed in items from tions may be contradictorY own views, but are offere˘ eral interest. 839-3761 to place sifted Ortonville inde Page 4 "<_n/ INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Feb. Eclitorial comment GUEST EDITORIAL... Why is ethanol under attack? by State Rep. Aaron Peterson Rural Minnesota has faced a host of economic challenges in recent decades - low farm incomes, a lack of business investment and perhaps most critically, a shortage of good-paying jobs. One exception to the story of economic challenge has been ethanol development. With unique and ground-breaking legislation, Minnesota has created a locally owned, billion-dollar industry from virtually nothing since 1986. Some 14 ethanol plants have been developed, providing more than 1,000 jobs. They are credited with raising corn prices 3 to 7 cents a bushel in their regions. Other states have copied the "Minnesota Model" in hopes of spurring their own industries. So why should we cut the legs out from under an industry which has done everything that we want to do for the rural economy? That's the question I and other rural legislators have been asking since Gov. Tim Pawlenty proposed wiping out all state support for ethanol production last week. It's a question that was also being asked by dozens of farmers and ethanol supporters who rallied at the Capitol last week. Joining in the meetings were a large number of people who work for or with the Chippewa Valley ethanol plant in Benson, and their support was strong and warmly welcomed. On Friday, the DFL-controlled Senate found a way to restore almost all the $27 million cut proposed by Gov. Pawlenty. The Senate plan limits the cut to $2.3 million, which represents the payment to a plant in St. Paul that may be shut down due to pollution concerns. But on Tuesday, the Republican-controlled House Agriculture Finance Committee voted for an across-the-board 20% cut - reducing the producer payments for all plants from 20 to 16 cents a gallon. Admittedly, many useful and important programs will suffer as the state budget is re-balanced. But as one of the farmers participating in last week's ethanol meeting asked, why is ethanol being singled out for deep cuts - 100% in the Pawlenty plan - when some programs are taking no cut at all? It would have been nice - and useful - if all rural legislators of both parties could have presented a united front to defend ethanol. Eleven of the 14 ethanol plants are located in areas represented by Republican legislators. But some of them obviously felt it was more important to stick with their Governor and their party than their own constituents. That may be harsh, but the votes are on the record. It's impossible to predict how this story will end. The House and Senate will pass budget-fix plans with a wide range of differences, so there must be negotiations to come up with a single plan that can pass both sides of the Legislature and be signed by the Governor. Hopefully, that won't take too long - because the situation does demand action. But more importantly, we should'not let a drive for quick action lead to a rash decision that could hurt Rural Minnesota for decades to come. Rural Hospital/Pharmacy Cuts Ethanol isn't the only rural program under attack. Elsewhere in his proposal, Gov. Pawlenty sought to reduce payments to rural hospitals and pharmacies. Especially in Rural Minnesota, many hospitals and pharmacies operate close to the edge - and it wouldn't take much to close them down. The cut to hospitals in the current year is $656,000, which is relatively small in the context of the state's $30 billion two-year budget. However, the cut is in the form of a reduction in basic rates - so it would translate into millions of dollars in the coming two years. The cut to pharmacies is a $3 million reduction reimbursement for prescriptions on state medical programs. Again, a relatively small cut this year will translate into millions more in the coming two years. Of course, if we don't make this cut, what will we cut? Well, we could look at state agency operating costs - the governor asked all state agencies to shoulder less than 10% of the cuts he proposed. In the past two years, state agencies spent $865 million hiring outside consultants. Perhaps that is a more fertile area for cuts than rural hospitals and corner drugstores? You can be a master gardener! Master Gardeners are special and unique people and now you too can become a Minnesota Master Gardener. The Master Gardener pro- gram has been in Minnesota since 1977 so you will be among a family of 4,500 individuals that have taken the training. Why should you become a Master Gardener? Because you love garden- ing; you want to learn how to become a better gardener; but most of all you are enthusiasti c about helping others appreciate gardening the way you do. What do you have to do to become a Master Gardener? First, you need to devote 48 hours of intensive horticul- ture training. Second, you then annu- ally volunteer hours. The 2003 Master Gardener train- ings will take place in Fergus Falls. The cost for taking the class is only $125.00, which includes a thick man- ual, regular updates and other bene- fits. The Fergus Falls training will be four Frilays and four Saturdays_ beginning Feb. 21 and ending March 15. Classes are from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Instruction is by University of Minnesota faculty. Classes cover lawn care, soil science, trees and shrubs, insect disease and weed control, houseplants, fruits and vegetables and other horticultural subjects. Volunteer service of 50 hours the first year, 25 hours every year plus six hours of education annually is required. One of the questions every new Master Gardener osks is: what do I had, e" todo for my volunteer hours'? Most Master Gardeners answer horti- Letters to E//ssa by the late Rev. George P. Weaner D.D. (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. lhno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the island of Sumatra• Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000, ***** Tales from Odessa... "FOOD AND ITS PREPARATION IN THE PARSONAGE" (continued from last week) The Native American called the month of February the "Hunger Month" because if he could survive this cruel cold month, he probably could survive until the spring brought plants and fruits that brought new strength and life. During the winter we ate dried foods like corn that had been ground up or whole grains that could be cooked, like oats, wheat, barley, etc. We never had fish in the winter unless someone went fishing in holes in the ice in Big Stone Lake. Of course in the summer we often had fresh pan-fried fish straight from the lake to the table in a few hours. One day in early winter cheeb began counting her jars of canned food, and looking to her store of veg- etables in the root cellar with an anx- ious eye. Would we have enough to last through that long winter? Then a miracle akin to Elijah being fed by the ravens happened in this little out of the way hamlet of Odessa. Old "Cocky" Batson. our postmaster, a rather strange gentleman, who may have been a member of my dad's church, came aknocking at our door. He was carrying a large, heavy bag of what proved to be cracked corn. Here was a gift straight from heaven. One of my favorite foods was Johnny Cake, a pan baked mixture of corn meal, eggs and water. This with syrup was a staple in our home because in tho.e depression years corn sold for 10€ a bushel and a bushel of corn could last through the winter. Even to this day I enjoy eat- ing corn products, especially "Johnny Cake," a condition no doubt created by a long exposure to this golden maize we inherited from the Native American. Cheeb's favorite method of cook- ing food was to fry everything. Out came the trusty black iron frying pan and into it went potatoes that had been boiled and sliced. These fried potatoes (home fries would be a cur- rent term for them) were even more of a staple than cornbread. Actually l liked these potatoes fried to a golden brown and many other foods that found their way into that trusty old pan. Here in the Far East we eat rice at least once and often twice a day. More people live on rice in the world than any other food, including wheat or potatoes. In midwestern America, the three foods inherited from the Native American, corn, beans and squash, made up the bulk of our diet. Every Friday for supper Cheeb would serve us a liberal helping of baked beans and corn bread. The beans would have baked slowly on the cook stove all day, slowly turning to a golden brown. The night before those navy beans had been soaked and then baked "the old fashioned way." Nothing could have been better than that Friday night feeling of blissful of beans and corn. Saturday on Cheeb's domestic schedule was baking day. Morning and early afternoon the house was filled with the heavenly fragrance of baking bread and apple pie. The bread had been kneaded and the dough placed in baking pans to raise all night before baking in the cav- ernous cookstove oven. This was an unhurried process and a crunchy brown crust formed on each golden loaf. 1 was taught to bake apple pies, so my contribution of sliced apples, sugar and whatever, in dough 1 hand mixed and rolled, was added to the collection in the oven. Not one batch, but several through Saturday, kept the oven, heated with wood l carried in, producing what was the most tasty part of our parsonage cooking. To this day 1 like bread with crunchy crusts and dislike that soft spongy bread people buy in the supermar- kets. After we moved from Odessa to Worthington, Minn., Cheeb kept alive that tradition of cornbread and beans on Friday night. I would hitch- hike home from college on Friday afternoon to be treated to those baked beans in brown sugar. I can still remember that fat brown pottery crock with its tan lid in which those beans always were baked. " ....... (continued next week) 1 .) 3 t3 16 u 22 29 }0 31 39 41 49 5O 56 57 62 65 Clues ACROSS 1. Adventure story 4. Stormed 9. Stinks! 13. Back 14. Epicure 15. A collection of anecdotes about a person or place 16. Glass ornament 17. Enfeeble 18. Went quickly 20. Insect 22. Imp 25. Tom _, character 27. A Dalton (Physics) 28. Dove sound 29. Strikebreaker 32, Percolate 35. Network of nerves 39. Perceptible by the ear 31. Rapid bustling 40. Dental filling movement 3. Destinations 33. Snakelike fish 4. A long thin implement 34. A whip with nine 5. Breakfast food knotted cords 6. Cold cereal 36. Your consciousness 7. Utter sounds of your own identity 8. Lair 37. Label 10. Creepy 38. Printers measures 11. The compass point 43. Item midway between 46. Besides northeast and east 48. Refers to a person 12. Stork, for one 49. Confused mixture of 19. Sweet Potato sounds 21. Vietnamese 50. Crews currency unit 52, 23. Congo River seaport 53. 24. Cradlesong 54. 25. Bribe 26. Experienced 29. Plant juice 30. Pool stick Domestic cat Spars French river 55. World's longest river 57. Brew 58. Express pleasure 59. Away from 61. The cry made by sheep 41. Unskilled laborer 42. Winged 44. Canines 45. Hit lightly 47. Tool for making holes 49. Plant science 51. Beat 54. Queen of Scotts 56. Semitic fertility god 58. Sound 60, Recedes 62. Tree 63. Intellectual sustenance 64. Conk 65. Smaller quantity 66. S California town 67. Nestling hawk Clues DOWN 1. Cavalry sword 2. Period of human life IIIE • "_1 I_ __ culture questions from citizens. If you ask veteran Master Gardeners they will tell you when people find out you are a Master Gardener they will 9 FIS C.t,JL-- stop you anywhere and ask questions about gardening - and the Master Gardeners love it! Many Master Gardeners give presentations to 4-H Or if@'S  [''] '" clubs, garden clubs and other organi- zations. Most county Master Gardener  "  groups have annual events such as ,.v. , - . -  , , ,   tours, plant sales, county fair booths ,,a˘j?..,7......-- , ,   \\; , and educational events. Some spend  lk |tN L,V \\; f  time in Extension offices answering questions. Some are on television, l q1,I ",,v-- ,,tp_  \\; \\; \\; radio, or write columns for newspa- ,  C._"j i X i" ' pers. There are lots of opportunities to help others become better gardeners. What should you do if you want .,:t'" ;T more information on the Master t "'O l • Gardner program? First, call your  ' ,C'Lut_'.=,., '  .,\\; county Extension office and ask them i f.(.', questions about the program in your county. Second, ask your county Extension office for names of current Master Gardeners then call or meet with them, Third, you can visit the Master Gardener web site at: www.mg.umn.edu. Application and registration forms are available at all Extension offices. Stop by and pick them up and be on your way to becoming a true Master Gardener. Once again, space is limited and the last day to sign-up is coming very fast, so if you are interested in attend- ing this gardening opportunity act I now! I LeRoy Williams is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Horticulture | ONCE AGAIN . . . MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Steve Barr Farm Credit Services Ailys Henningson Mary & Charles Bissett Minnie Merritt Mrs. Leo Taffe Larry Roggenbuck Carol Roggenbuck James Adeiman Richard Sinknle Yankee Clipping Service H. Alan Kuyper Shirley Kepner Avis Nelson Lloyd Christopherson Beverly Harem Agnes Bowler Jerry Fullington Clifford Semran Richard Goldsmith Dan Henningson Mrs. Michael Adams Jim Henningson I The Inde (U.S.P.S. 412-480} elsQe JAMES D. Publisher/Man; SUZETTE Editor and Advertising ARLEN; WIES Office Manager KATHIE Computer and Composition EMILEE ( ARDIE BILL DWYER Pressman BOB SHEROD Pressman TIM 6RI NANCY Collater PHIL BLAKE Layout Tues., Feb. 25. 2003 Vol. Continuing the Published Every Ortonville Periodicals Postage Paid SUBSCRIPTI $30.00per year in Bi Parle, Traverse and Minnesota, Grant and in South Dakota. $34.00 counties in Minnesota All others, $38.00 per year. Postmaster: Send address The Ortonville Ind Ortonville, Minnesota NEW SUBS( RATE A FEBRUARY 1ST Big Stone, Lac qui Parle, Swift Counties In Grant and Roberts in February ........... 30.00 , March ................ 27.50 Apnl .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN MINN. February ........... 3400 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28,40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 ALL AREA OUTSIDE OF AND SO. DAK. February ........... 3800 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................... 22.19 The Publisher shall not changes or typographical not lessen the value of an The Publisher's liability for € omissions in connection tisement is strictly limited the advertisement in any issue or the refund of any the advertisement. DEADLINES., Church notes - Saturday ms, Display ads - Friday Correspondence - Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Friday afternoon Classified ads - Friday noon (Any ad brought in later will I to classify.) OFFICE HOURS AA Monday: 8 AM-5 PM Tuesday: 8 AM-5 PM A Wednesday: 8 AM-12  Thursday: 8 AM-12 Friday: 8 AM-5 PM A Holidays Letters to the editor munity issues are writers should be Independent reserves the and/or condense letters isaper also reserves the h letters it might be held legalL Letters should printed or typed name, address and tele Addresses and telephone not be published. Letter writers are asked selves to one letter keep letter brief, words, and to the AD vs. The Ortonville determining what is is news If an individual zation charges for an item or for a service sidereal In you charge, we char! Advertising is paper. Without it a cease to exist. The receives for is used to pay used in producing does increases. It still covers small Advertising to a "rops and livestock to the grocer; underwear to the md plows and tractors to dealer. Without of particular ness. ADS: We reserve the advertising without our decision. POLICIES: A News: Our goal fully and accurately as staff's opinions will opinion page. /x Editorials: rage, whether om other sources late and readers. tor are her own and of other staff expressed in items from tions may be contradictorY own views, but are offere˘ eral interest. 839-3761 to place sifted Ortonville inde Page 4 "<_n/ INDEPENDENT Tuesday, Feb.