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Ortonville, Minnesota
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February 25, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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February 25, 2003
 

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la t Brooke visits Rothis, Letters to the editor ty events In communl 00o00.eE00ito00; revealing example. A 1992 University Land Stewardship's Clear Vision of Missouri study predicted that for corporations to grab more than their just share. John and Anna Rothi interesting visitor to their :Week who traveled via the Flat Brooke arrived up in a 9 x 12 envelope. project complied by the granddaughter of Lakeville. Her class recently read the book called F/at author Jeff Brown. a boy named Stanley bulletin board, then of a bad situation by mself to a friend. Children the country are making of themselves or flat mailing them to friends, big wheels across the y even made its way to to be with the other top officials. class participated in and traced paper dolls on big sheets of and colored them. sent them to visit someone The people who receive are then instructed to on excursions and adventures. They then back to the student with Where the paper doll went, or she visited etc. asked her granddaughter Wanted Flat Brooke to visit clearly instructed her to doll to church and out lothis have obliged Brooke's brought flat Brooke to her to the pew next get quite a few stares conversation as they Story of Flat Brooke and visit. people may have Were crazy before," said they know it." it, but is in on the as his wife. He took the Bunyon's anchor and with Flat Brooke. A Meal Will Be Served FREE WILL OFFERING BAKE SALE • RAFFLE AUCTION • ENTERTAINMENT Drawings begin at 7:00 PM Funds supplemented by lhrivent Financial For Lutherans - • Grant County Chapter 30581 • one of the welders who chain on the anchor when Hilltop site. Volunteered with deliver- Wheels and visited with Babe and JR. Parker of SD got quite a kick FLAT BROOKE, a drawing of Brooke Anderson of Lakeville, visited Grandma and Grandpa Anna and John Rothi. The threesome attended many community events. Flat Brooke is a project stemming from the popular children's book Flat Stanley. out of Flat Brooke. They went to the Odessa Rod and The threesome also went to the Gun Club fish fry and had Dairy Chautauqua Concert. There wasn't Queen Treats. They still have to go room for Flat Brooke to have her own out for Pizza. chair, so she just sat on Grandma Brooke is the daughter of Patty nee Anna's lap. They visited Great Rothi and Scott Anderson Grandma Hazel Gibson in Beardsley Flat Brooke sure gets around, and were planning to go to the pan- because John and Anna are always on cake feed at the Beardsley Methodist the go. Church. Old Mill Twirlers The Old Mill Twirlers danced to the calling of Don Nugent last Wednesday. There were no squares in attendance with guests from Chokio. 12--,1., March 1 Gene Hofmann from Dawson will oaturuay, call Wednesday, Feb. 26. 5:00 PM On the lunch committee are Mary Whiting and Daryl and Arlene LANTERN INN .MILBANK Stengel. Upcoming dances will be no dance March 6, March 12 Jim Jirnk. 01d Mill Twirlers dance on Wednesday evenings at 8 p.m. in the High School lunchroom. Use the Northeast door, visitors are always welcome. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY I read Bill Rowekamp's letter about the Land Stewardship Project. He is disturbed about the wrong group. Bill trusts spokesmen for corporations who have fooled a lot of good people into acting against their own best interests. He mistrusts his neighbors who organize with Land Stewardship Project, My husband and I have farmed for 52 years and helped start the LSP office in our area. LSP strives to learn from nature's billion year experience in sustainability. LSP strives to make producing food and fiber profitable for farmers and healthy for our neighbors. Bill is disturbed that LSP prevented the establishment of 26 factory farms and a lot of additional jobs. Those 'new' jobs would be poverty level jobs in unhealthy working conditions. The promise of factory farms differs greatly from reality. Premium Standard Farms is a every $5 million in new investment in contract swine production, between 40 and 45 new jobs would be created in the state. But University of Missouri agricultural economist John Ikerd did a follow-up study and found that the creation of those new jobs would come at the cost of THREE TIMES that number of established independent farmers. Premium Standard Farms ran into major economic problems and asked the counties to forgive its property tax. USDA recently said that in 1985 there were 346,090 (established independent) hog farmers in the US.By 1998 there were only 98,460.So much for the "additional jobs" argument. Farmers go into major debt to "upgrade" to factory farm status. They often lose what they had and become hired hands on the farm they used to own. Farmers get less than our share of the consumer dollar because our own government allows a few How will we thrive when the earth is no longer able to produce sufficient food and can no longer recycle foul air and water back into fresh air and water? Bill, trust your LSP neighbors. We have studied both sides. Join us in rejecting the economically and ecologically unsustainable corporate policy. We are working for a way that benefits all. Lorraine Redig RR 1 Box 198 Winona, 55987 507 454-1385 Sales & Service Inc. I! NOW OFFERS... • Tire Sales & Repair • Brake Work • Suspension Work ii, 839-7197 or 00iii!i00iii00 ii 8s39s2911 MARK MUENCHOW doing a 4-wheel alignment. Ortonville, MN 56278 FE,00TURING NEW BIG ST ONE LAKE AREA RESIDENTS SUSAN AND MIKE Hurst with Nathan, on left and Sam with Teddy. i i i I Susan, Mike, Nathan and Sam Hurst "It was so hot," recalls Nathan of the family drive across Wyoming in late August on their way to a new home in Ortonville. The adventure was made more mem- orable for Nathan, 4 years old, due to a stop along the side of the road, while his Dad put out a fire in the engine of the rental truck. "We almost burned up!" according to Nathan. Mike Hurst suggested that it wasn't quite that imminent, but that the drive from eastern Washington to Ortonville was memorable, and yes, the truck was on fire, but the fire extinguisher was available and Mike put out the fire. But then, Mike is an unflappable kind of guy, calm and capable of rising to crises along the highway. Nathan, and his younger brother, Sam, 1V2, Susan and Mike Hurst arrived in Ortonville in August, and moved into their new home west of Ortonville in late December. Susan grew up in Ortonville, daughter of Donna and Alfred Roeder, graduate of OrtonviUe high school in 1990. Mike is from a small town in Idaho near the Canadian border. "We wanted to move here because we wanted a bet- ter, safer place to raise our kids," said Susan. "We're like a lot of people, that once they have kids, moving to a smaller community with family nearby becomes very important. My parents live in Clinton and I want my kids to be able to spend time with their grandparents. It's a special relationship." "And the schools are better here," said Susan. Mike added, "It's nice to be in a community where people wave at you when you drive by, even if they don't know you. It's friendlier, and people know one another," "It's always easier to stay where you are, but the deci- sion to move back wasn't one we question," added Susan. "We both grew up in small, rural communities, so we know what it means to live here. Sure, there's some things we'll miss. The diversity of food, the seafood, the vineyards and orchards. Washington State has a variety of fresh produce we can't get here, but we plan on start- ing a big garden, and growing our own. We don't miss the big city and traffic. And no place in the country has steak cubes like around here." "We think the area is really beautiful," said Susan. "People that aren't from the prairie don't understand, but I don't like too many trees. I like to see the curvature of the earth." Susan and Mike met at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Artesia, New Mexico. Mike worked with the Border patrol, and Susan was working with the Immigration and Naturalization Service. They met, kept in touch, and married in 1996. Mike's father worked as a Border Patrol Agent in Idaho and Mike started working in Federal Law Enforcement, but discovered that his job would likely demand moving his family around every few years. "We didn't want to do that." The Hursts started a tile and stone business in Washington State doing installation and restoration in homes. Meanwhile, Susan worked for the Immigration Service, and a frozen food service company, responsible for the inbound and outbound product inven- tory, and helped with the family business. Susan also did grant writing for the law enforcement STOP grants, and continues to write for the pleasure of it. Mike currently works at the prison in Appleton as a correctional officer while Susan is beginning to look around for a job that will allow her time with their two young sons. "There's a few things we would like to do in the house, and we want to get our garden started this year," said Susan. The Hursts plan on adding a big garden this summer. "Gardening is a good pastime with lots of rewards. Gardens are a lot of work, but growing your own produce is part of our coming back to the area and enjoying a sim- pler life. "We want a big garden and a place for the kids to run. We want our kids to experience the responsibility of raising pets because we think it's important that they learn an appreciation for nature, and a good work ethic," said Mike. Susan concurs, "We hope that our kids can enjoy and benefit from the same things we did growing up in a small community." Series sponsored by Minnwest Bank FREE (2ASH/CHECK CARD (1 year) * * OPEN Your NEW Checking or Savings Account Today/ 00ORTONVILLE MiNNW T BANK GROUP 320-839-2568 • 21 Southeast Second Street • Ortonville MoneyLine 1-888-616-2265 • www.minnwestbank.com LENDER * Subject to credit approval. 25, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 5 la t Brooke visits Rothis, Letters to the editor ty events In communl 00o00.eE00ito00; revealing example. A 1992 University Land Stewardship's Clear Vision of Missouri study predicted that for corporations to grab more than their just share. John and Anna Rothi interesting visitor to their :Week who traveled via the Flat Brooke arrived up in a 9 x 12 envelope. project complied by the granddaughter of Lakeville. Her class recently read the book called F/at author Jeff Brown. a boy named Stanley bulletin board, then of a bad situation by mself to a friend. Children the country are making of themselves or flat mailing them to friends, big wheels across the y even made its way to to be with the other top officials. class participated in and traced paper dolls on big sheets of and colored them. sent them to visit someone The people who receive are then instructed to on excursions and adventures. They then back to the student with Where the paper doll went, or she visited etc. asked her granddaughter Wanted Flat Brooke to visit clearly instructed her to doll to church and out lothis have obliged Brooke's brought flat Brooke to her to the pew next get quite a few stares conversation as they Story of Flat Brooke and visit. people may have Were crazy before," said they know it." it, but is in on the as his wife. He took the Bunyon's anchor and with Flat Brooke. A Meal Will Be Served FREE WILL OFFERING BAKE SALE • RAFFLE AUCTION • ENTERTAINMENT Drawings begin at 7:00 PM Funds supplemented by lhrivent Financial For Lutherans - • Grant County Chapter 30581 • one of the welders who chain on the anchor when Hilltop site. Volunteered with deliver- Wheels and visited with Babe and JR. Parker of SD got quite a kick FLAT BROOKE, a drawing of Brooke Anderson of Lakeville, visited Grandma and Grandpa Anna and John Rothi. The threesome attended many community events. Flat Brooke is a project stemming from the popular children's book Flat Stanley. out of Flat Brooke. They went to the Odessa Rod and The threesome also went to the Gun Club fish fry and had Dairy Chautauqua Concert. There wasn't Queen Treats. They still have to go room for Flat Brooke to have her own out for Pizza. chair, so she just sat on Grandma Brooke is the daughter of Patty nee Anna's lap. They visited Great Rothi and Scott Anderson Grandma Hazel Gibson in Beardsley Flat Brooke sure gets around, and were planning to go to the pan- because John and Anna are always on cake feed at the Beardsley Methodist the go. Church. Old Mill Twirlers The Old Mill Twirlers danced to the calling of Don Nugent last Wednesday. There were no squares in attendance with guests from Chokio. 12--,1., March 1 Gene Hofmann from Dawson will oaturuay, call Wednesday, Feb. 26. 5:00 PM On the lunch committee are Mary Whiting and Daryl and Arlene LANTERN INN .MILBANK Stengel. Upcoming dances will be no dance March 6, March 12 Jim Jirnk. 01d Mill Twirlers dance on Wednesday evenings at 8 p.m. in the High School lunchroom. Use the Northeast door, visitors are always welcome. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY I read Bill Rowekamp's letter about the Land Stewardship Project. He is disturbed about the wrong group. Bill trusts spokesmen for corporations who have fooled a lot of good people into acting against their own best interests. He mistrusts his neighbors who organize with Land Stewardship Project, My husband and I have farmed for 52 years and helped start the LSP office in our area. LSP strives to learn from nature's billion year experience in sustainability. LSP strives to make producing food and fiber profitable for farmers and healthy for our neighbors. Bill is disturbed that LSP prevented the establishment of 26 factory farms and a lot of additional jobs. Those 'new' jobs would be poverty level jobs in unhealthy working conditions. The promise of factory farms differs greatly from reality. Premium Standard Farms is a every $5 million in new investment in contract swine production, between 40 and 45 new jobs would be created in the state. But University of Missouri agricultural economist John Ikerd did a follow-up study and found that the creation of those new jobs would come at the cost of THREE TIMES that number of established independent farmers. Premium Standard Farms ran into major economic problems and asked the counties to forgive its property tax. USDA recently said that in 1985 there were 346,090 (established independent) hog farmers in the US.By 1998 there were only 98,460.So much for the "additional jobs" argument. Farmers go into major debt to "upgrade" to factory farm status. They often lose what they had and become hired hands on the farm they used to own. Farmers get less than our share of the consumer dollar because our own government allows a few How will we thrive when the earth is no longer able to produce sufficient food and can no longer recycle foul air and water back into fresh air and water? Bill, trust your LSP neighbors. We have studied both sides. Join us in rejecting the economically and ecologically unsustainable corporate policy. We are working for a way that benefits all. Lorraine Redig RR 1 Box 198 Winona, 55987 507 454-1385 Sales & Service Inc. I! NOW OFFERS... • Tire Sales & Repair • Brake Work • Suspension Work ii, 839-7197 or 00iii!i00iii00 ii 8s39s2911 MARK MUENCHOW doing a 4-wheel alignment. Ortonville, MN 56278 FE,00TURING NEW BIG ST ONE LAKE AREA RESIDENTS SUSAN AND MIKE Hurst with Nathan, on left and Sam with Teddy. i i i I Susan, Mike, Nathan and Sam Hurst "It was so hot," recalls Nathan of the family drive across Wyoming in late August on their way to a new home in Ortonville. The adventure was made more mem- orable for Nathan, 4 years old, due to a stop along the side of the road, while his Dad put out a fire in the engine of the rental truck. "We almost burned up!" according to Nathan. Mike Hurst suggested that it wasn't quite that imminent, but that the drive from eastern Washington to Ortonville was memorable, and yes, the truck was on fire, but the fire extinguisher was available and Mike put out the fire. But then, Mike is an unflappable kind of guy, calm and capable of rising to crises along the highway. Nathan, and his younger brother, Sam, 1V2, Susan and Mike Hurst arrived in Ortonville in August, and moved into their new home west of Ortonville in late December. Susan grew up in Ortonville, daughter of Donna and Alfred Roeder, graduate of OrtonviUe high school in 1990. Mike is from a small town in Idaho near the Canadian border. "We wanted to move here because we wanted a bet- ter, safer place to raise our kids," said Susan. "We're like a lot of people, that once they have kids, moving to a smaller community with family nearby becomes very important. My parents live in Clinton and I want my kids to be able to spend time with their grandparents. It's a special relationship." "And the schools are better here," said Susan. Mike added, "It's nice to be in a community where people wave at you when you drive by, even if they don't know you. It's friendlier, and people know one another," "It's always easier to stay where you are, but the deci- sion to move back wasn't one we question," added Susan. "We both grew up in small, rural communities, so we know what it means to live here. Sure, there's some things we'll miss. The diversity of food, the seafood, the vineyards and orchards. Washington State has a variety of fresh produce we can't get here, but we plan on start- ing a big garden, and growing our own. We don't miss the big city and traffic. And no place in the country has steak cubes like around here." "We think the area is really beautiful," said Susan. "People that aren't from the prairie don't understand, but I don't like too many trees. I like to see the curvature of the earth." Susan and Mike met at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Artesia, New Mexico. Mike worked with the Border patrol, and Susan was working with the Immigration and Naturalization Service. They met, kept in touch, and married in 1996. Mike's father worked as a Border Patrol Agent in Idaho and Mike started working in Federal Law Enforcement, but discovered that his job would likely demand moving his family around every few years. "We didn't want to do that." The Hursts started a tile and stone business in Washington State doing installation and restoration in homes. Meanwhile, Susan worked for the Immigration Service, and a frozen food service company, responsible for the inbound and outbound product inven- tory, and helped with the family business. Susan also did grant writing for the law enforcement STOP grants, and continues to write for the pleasure of it. Mike currently works at the prison in Appleton as a correctional officer while Susan is beginning to look around for a job that will allow her time with their two young sons. "There's a few things we would like to do in the house, and we want to get our garden started this year," said Susan. The Hursts plan on adding a big garden this summer. "Gardening is a good pastime with lots of rewards. Gardens are a lot of work, but growing your own produce is part of our coming back to the area and enjoying a sim- pler life. "We want a big garden and a place for the kids to run. We want our kids to experience the responsibility of raising pets because we think it's important that they learn an appreciation for nature, and a good work ethic," said Mike. Susan concurs, "We hope that our kids can enjoy and benefit from the same things we did growing up in a small community." Series sponsored by Minnwest Bank FREE (2ASH/CHECK CARD (1 year) * * OPEN Your NEW Checking or Savings Account Today/ 00ORTONVILLE MiNNW T BANK GROUP 320-839-2568 • 21 Southeast Second Street • Ortonville MoneyLine 1-888-616-2265 • www.minnwestbank.com LENDER * Subject to credit approval. 25, 2003  INDEPENDENT Page 5