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February 25, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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00ers to the editor !h lin( EIPMENT MYTH OR businesses to rural areas and all have For a community to have economic Emergency preparedness guidebooks to be distributed in major cities stated the same problems come up. development it must have certain :t,, I read Ryan Stattelman' s letter, ol ught to mind some of the things 1 pt. thought about as one who has s been a proponent of economic 0pment for our area. However, in i' to attract development one must SS]lllatT_w, hat is happening in the t t,et s really face the fact that !rica exist only because of the V of the small towns in rural LL }ad expansions 100 years ago. reason for these small towns has to exist and they will go by the i!de as time goes by. Part of the to be our stubbornness for anyone to look and visualize what the The best example I know a neighbor of mine (passed on the Ortonville School ack in the 1950's and to the rest of the board First, the management of any re- located company usually must come from outside the community because of lack of knowledge within the community. Attracting managers willing to re-locate to rural areas can be hard especially if the community does not look attractive to an outsider. One of the ways around this is for a community to look for businesses, which are compatible to the area or the expertise of people in the area. 2rid, is the fact that the pool of available workers can be low and the more productive workers already have good jobs. Unfortunately many employers do not look favorable upon young single workers 18-25. Some young workers at this age tend to think less about their job and more about party life. This fact of life happens to all generations. Thirdly, although the rural worker is steady things in place before companies will even look at coming. First, the infrastructure must be in place to handle any new business. This means water, sewer, electrical and streets must be capable of handling new industry. 2nd, the community must be attractive enough that industry would want to re-locate to it and people would want to re-locate to the area. Thirdly, it must have business people who are willing to look at expansion of their own business rather than waiting for someone else to come to the rescue of the community. For you Ryan, the Stattelman family has a perfect opportunity to expand its field of endeavor. A member of your extended family has visited me at my place of business and during the course of the day I showed them what was being done by a family in the same field as yours. This family was The American Red Cross today announced the launch of a national initiative to provide America's fami- lies with information and suggested activities to help them prepare for both man-made and natural emergen- cies. Today's announcement followed a call made yesterday by U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge for all Americans to take action to help assure their safety. The new national program, "Together We Prepare Safe Families," includes the distribution of family safety guidebooks through Red Cross chapters in many major cities, begin- ning March 6. An online version of the guidebook is available for down- load today at the Red Cross Web site (www.redcross.org). "Together We Prepare Safe Families" is an extension of the Red Cross' overall national brand and awareness campaign unveiled today, "Together We Prepare." aster plan in place, and 74 percent do not have a disaster supplies kit stored safely in their home. The "Preparedness" survey was conducted by phone among 1,021 adults across the nation on December 19-22, 2002. The survey, conducted by Harris Interactive, has a three percent margin of error. Simple emergency preparedness kits and other safety and security items can be purchased online at www.safetyandsecuritycenter.com. "We know from our research that American families simply are not ade- quately prepared to deal with emer- gencies," said Marsha J. Evans, presi- dent and CEO, American Red Cross. "While this reality has always been an area of concern, today's environment makes it a call to action. "The new program that the Red Cross has announced today is an example of the type of partnership that is needed if we hope to make true national preparedness a reality," keep America's families safe "To be better prepared for emergencies, fam- ilies need to start with the basics," said Evans. About the American Red Cross Governed by volunteers and sup- ported by community donations, the American Red Cross is a nationwide network of nearly 1,000 chapters and Blood Services regions dedicated to saving lives and helping people pre- vent, prepare for and respond to emer- gencies. Led by 1.2 million volunteers and 30,000 employees, the Red Cross annually mobilizes relief to families affected by more than 67,000 disas- ters, trains almost 12 million people in lifesaving skills and exchanges more than a million emergency messages for U.S. military service personnel and their families. The Red Cross is the largest supplier of blood and blood products to more than 3,000 hospitals across the nation and also assists vic- tims of international disasters and conflicts at locations worldwide. , should purchase all of the at Were on the same block as and will give an employer 9-10 hours building trusses and wood framings The new campaign features corn- Evans continued. About the Safety and Security oOI. The board said that the rest of hard work, he often fails to for apartments. They have 50 or 60 pelling broadcast and print advertis- The Family Safety Guide Center eawould never be needeo and understand that what he accomplished employees. Sometimes economic ing to remind people of the important At the cornerstone of the educa- The Safety and Security Center, Y Years later the school just ?Wns the block and is using all in 9-1Ohours should have been done development starts at home. role they play when, with the Red tional campaign is an all-new guide, based in Carlsbad California, was .lthriving communities have in 8hours. This slower pace of work For those of us that attended one of Cross, they help others in need. "Together We Can Become Safe founded in1990 to provide consumers trteSwho _. in the rural area is hard for an the last Blandin funded meeting with "Together We Prepare" is also intend- Families." This comprehensive work- with unique and effective safety and L . see into the future and employer to overcome. Lastly, if a several out-of-state people it became ed to raise national awareness of the book outlines the critical steps every security products for home, family, i elf COmmunity into making family should follow to be prepared office and business. You can browse company re-locates to an area where very clear that the path to economic need for preparedness.  ecisions, which makes the the education level is very low or development for Ortonville starts with New Study Finds Most Americans for all types of emergencies, their catalog of safety and security alOme reality, potential workers have many personal the foot of the lake and the downtown Unprepared The guidebook addresses pre- products at: http:/www.safetyandse- !!' I ember of the manufacturing problems, then the employer is forced area. Our medical facilities are and A new survey found that 72 per- paredness from a general perspective curitycenter.com !i ]] nave seen statistics that show to take on the task of educating a work will continue to be a golden goose but cent of Americans do not have a dis- to have the greatest effect on helping ing trends in the manufacturing force and the host of other problems, will be one only as long as there are Uf/L'Orexample, amanufacturing The commentsonthetourist people in the area. What happens DNR reminds owners not SSOciation has polled its industry are some of the same that I when the baby boomers are gone in r'ca'_and the results show that in have. Tourism does not and cannot thirty to forty years? One of the other ;ILL..2000, 95% of the members save any community. Tourism is an areas that I am concerned with is o,,,0. ,a to let dogs chase w00ldl00fe er t'Pll''o! . pnts, added to old asset to an already thriving housing. The majority of our housing :re-located. It is true that a community. I believe not long ago the units are old with small rooms and .,,,,,f,any of these companies Director of Rural Development at SW small lots. Most people today want a = I and did look at rural areas II Ill" e to expand They also looked mavailable labor force as well as ,S.Portation system. The big l _n is that only 5% had relocated IIN3.nded in the upper Midwest. ,t.. majority of the new plants or '2. runs are happening in the ?tern or Southwestern US. es it even more difficult for nnlnity in our area to attract 113' ",nat it boils down to is that emunity to get industry it !tially steal it from another IY within a given area. m does not help our state or aor at any given time a  ght up and move again. State University even made the comment that it was futile to look at tourism as a savior if any community that was more than 60 miles from the Twin Cities. In an article, twelve years ago which was published in the Star Tribune and I re-stated in an article in this paper, it was noted that 85% of the tourism dollars spent in Minnesota are spent in the Twin Cities and St Cloud areas. Another 10% is spent in Rochester and Brainerd areas. This leaves only 5% of tourism dollars spent to be divided among all other communities in Minnesota. There are individuals in our area pushing the concept of tourism who have even quoted the figures I obtained but use roomy 3-bedroom house with 2-car garage on a fairly good size lot. The best thing that I can think of for us is to develop our community into the best looking area that it can be in terms of homes, streets, etc. then people who want to live here and do business here will discover us. That is not to say we shouldn't look for outside opportunities when possible, however do not expect outside people to rescue our community, we must do it ourselves. WILLIAM POWELL Ortonville The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources reminds dog own- ers that it is illegal to allow their pets to harass deer and other big game. Every winter, conservation officers receive reports from all parts of the state of dogs chasing and sometimes killing deer or other big game. The state's wildlife regulations hold dog owners accountable for dogs chasing big game and conservation officers are authorized to put down dogs that do so. Mark Johanson, acting DNR Enforcement Division director, advis- es dog owners to be aware of the pos- sibility their dogs might be chasing big game and to take steps to prevent it. "Deer are particularly vulnerable pursues a big game animal is guilty of a petty misdemeanor and is subject to / spring light goose i0000.,,der begins March 1 i . " . " _ ". _ _" " _ " . " . . ' . ' " . - a" _ ccur under a federal www.dnr.state.mn.us, since 2000 Minnesota s harvest dur- ' - tt'l!il[ng Minnesota, to permit goose hunting seasons will also apply from a few hundred to six thousand, : , in tion. Order that allows 24 Most regulations that apply to fall ing this time has varied dramatically 'i.g_g ut geese after the close of during the spring light goose conser- depending on the weather conditions. :|S*Ons. vation action, including nontoxic shot "Minnesota is at the extreme east- it,"'ight Goose Permit-may requirements and federal baiting regu- ern edge of the spring migration oi-" mrough any of the 1,800 litmus. In addltmn, all refuges closed throu h the Midwest," stud Ra iliee . Licensing System agents to either duck or goose hunting during Nort'd, Wetland Wildlife Progra ble' b, ne .permit will also be fall seasons are also closed during the leader with the Minnesota ,lt. ' telephone and on the spring conservation action. Shooting Department of Natural Resources. 5 0 hours will be one-half hour before "March weather, particularly snow i,te r license, stamp or permit sunrise to one-half hour after sunset and ice conditions, can have a tremen- '"' uht" ,,e participate. . in the hunt., each day. No daily or possession lim- dous effect on the migration routes of "1: permit Is free, there is a its apply. Use of electronic calls and light geese." , uin =cation fee to cover the cost unplugged shotguns is allowed. A summary of regulations will be le6 e permit. Permits will be The Conservation Order is part of available from license vendors, DNR f et iicn ter Feb. 20, except that an international effort to reduce popu- wildlife offices, or by calling the DNR q kf.ensing will not be available lations of lesser snow geese (includ- Information Center at (651) 296-6157 IM _ 1. Customers using'the ing blue-phase snow geese) and Ross' or 1-888-MINNDNR (646-6367). ran, ur Internet wilt receive a geese that breed in Arctic coastal -' autho" nzatmn number to areas and the Hudson Bay area. The 00ramics forKids classes 0000nsomd by Community Ed ,';: dau - :i:,. th hter claims I'm a better My first love was sewing, but ceram- take a class." i7,' Painter." That's a great ics is such a good medium to teach to According to Shawnda Johnson, __. of"_ to Elaine Haggerty, all ages, and the results can be so Ortonville Community Education li0n eramics at community rewarding for students of all ages," Facilitator, "We're still uncertain how ! / a,,prgrams around the explained Haggerty. cuts in the State budget will impact  across State lines. "People often tell me that they're Community Education. We are certain  been teaching in school not good enough, but I tell them to that after school enrichment dollars " to 4-H groups, girls give it a try, then go look around. They were cut by the Governor from this :,l"me-schooled children find out they're a lot better than they year's budget amounting to approxi- ',; teach' children between thought. And the art reflects who they mutely $5,700 to our program. l'ih to 80," clmms Haggerty are, and that's more valuable than The direct impact will be the loss of di7 a way of looking at buying something that someone else our after school open media center for the ,t., tly than adults. I love made." students and adults. The media center "ng s that children create Haggerty is mother to eight chii- will close Feb. 27. a, team from them, and ali dren. "All my children are creative, Haggerty will be offering ceramic help them do that." but in different ways. My son loves to classes in Ortonville for children on bier wanted something cook, and he expresses his creativity the following dates: Mar. 10, Apr. 14, :I.7 that I knew I couldn t through food. There's all sorts of ways May 6. Register by calling Community *-so I decided to make it. that people can enjoy art. Come and Education at 839-6181 ext. 138. For with ceram- visit me sometime. I'll get you so adults, Candle Making and Healthy ever since, excited about ceramics, you'll have to Vegetarian Soups classes are planned. can urday   -W'tehers and the ,-r the Great American i Baptist Church in :th t Deanna Jensen, '.,. leader and local tg- ,, e event, the national "ls to encourage Americans to reach and maintain healthier lifestyle habits. Participants will be weighed and then their Body Mass Index will be calculated (BMI) to determine the amount of their weight that comes from fat. The connection between weight and the risk of developing other health problems has prompted the two organizations to join forces to. increase public awareness, and encourage healthy eating. WlC voucher pickup for March March 4-Countryside Community Room, Ortonville-9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 6-Prairie V Conf. Room, Madison-9 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 20-Appleton Civic Center, Appleton-9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The county Nutrition Education Assistants will be available. ( Check out our web site at www.ortonviUeindependeni.com ") 00INDEPENDENT at this time of year and the additional stress of being chased can affect their winter survival even if they escape," Johanson said. Suggested tips for dog owners: do not allow your dog to chase big game wildlife at any time keep your dog controlled within your property boundaries respect all types of wildlife report wildlife harassment to the local conservation officer. (Contact the Minnesota State Patrol for the name and phone number of a local conservation officer.) The owner of a dog that kills or a civil penalty of up to $500 for each violation. In accordance with the Minnesota Game and Fish Laws handbook, a person who observes a dog wounding, killing or pursuing in a manner that .endangers big. game may kill the dog: at any tme, if the person is a peace officer or conservation officer; or between Jan. 1 and July 14, if the person is not a peace officer or conservation officer and the discharge of firearms is allowed. The officer or person is not liable for damages for killing the dog. ' SCO'l-r MAAS, at left, is congratulated by Bank President Terry Gere. T BANK VILLE FDIC Second Street Ortonville, Minnesota 56278 www.minnwest.com Page 7 00ers to the editor !h lin( EIPMENT MYTH OR businesses to rural areas and all have For a community to have economic Emergency preparedness guidebooks to be distributed in major cities stated the same problems come up. development it must have certain :t,, I read Ryan Stattelman' s letter, ol ught to mind some of the things 1 pt. thought about as one who has s been a proponent of economic 0pment for our area. However, in i' to attract development one must SS]lllatT_w, hat is happening in the t t,et s really face the fact that !rica exist only because of the V of the small towns in rural LL }ad expansions 100 years ago. reason for these small towns has to exist and they will go by the i!de as time goes by. Part of the to be our stubbornness for anyone to look and visualize what the The best example I know a neighbor of mine (passed on the Ortonville School ack in the 1950's and to the rest of the board First, the management of any re- located company usually must come from outside the community because of lack of knowledge within the community. Attracting managers willing to re-locate to rural areas can be hard especially if the community does not look attractive to an outsider. One of the ways around this is for a community to look for businesses, which are compatible to the area or the expertise of people in the area. 2rid, is the fact that the pool of available workers can be low and the more productive workers already have good jobs. Unfortunately many employers do not look favorable upon young single workers 18-25. Some young workers at this age tend to think less about their job and more about party life. This fact of life happens to all generations. Thirdly, although the rural worker is steady things in place before companies will even look at coming. First, the infrastructure must be in place to handle any new business. This means water, sewer, electrical and streets must be capable of handling new industry. 2nd, the community must be attractive enough that industry would want to re-locate to it and people would want to re-locate to the area. Thirdly, it must have business people who are willing to look at expansion of their own business rather than waiting for someone else to come to the rescue of the community. For you Ryan, the Stattelman family has a perfect opportunity to expand its field of endeavor. A member of your extended family has visited me at my place of business and during the course of the day I showed them what was being done by a family in the same field as yours. This family was The American Red Cross today announced the launch of a national initiative to provide America's fami- lies with information and suggested activities to help them prepare for both man-made and natural emergen- cies. Today's announcement followed a call made yesterday by U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Tom Ridge for all Americans to take action to help assure their safety. The new national program, "Together We Prepare Safe Families," includes the distribution of family safety guidebooks through Red Cross chapters in many major cities, begin- ning March 6. An online version of the guidebook is available for down- load today at the Red Cross Web site (www.redcross.org). "Together We Prepare Safe Families" is an extension of the Red Cross' overall national brand and awareness campaign unveiled today, "Together We Prepare." aster plan in place, and 74 percent do not have a disaster supplies kit stored safely in their home. The "Preparedness" survey was conducted by phone among 1,021 adults across the nation on December 19-22, 2002. The survey, conducted by Harris Interactive, has a three percent margin of error. Simple emergency preparedness kits and other safety and security items can be purchased online at www.safetyandsecuritycenter.com. "We know from our research that American families simply are not ade- quately prepared to deal with emer- gencies," said Marsha J. Evans, presi- dent and CEO, American Red Cross. "While this reality has always been an area of concern, today's environment makes it a call to action. "The new program that the Red Cross has announced today is an example of the type of partnership that is needed if we hope to make true national preparedness a reality," keep America's families safe "To be better prepared for emergencies, fam- ilies need to start with the basics," said Evans. About the American Red Cross Governed by volunteers and sup- ported by community donations, the American Red Cross is a nationwide network of nearly 1,000 chapters and Blood Services regions dedicated to saving lives and helping people pre- vent, prepare for and respond to emer- gencies. Led by 1.2 million volunteers and 30,000 employees, the Red Cross annually mobilizes relief to families affected by more than 67,000 disas- ters, trains almost 12 million people in lifesaving skills and exchanges more than a million emergency messages for U.S. military service personnel and their families. The Red Cross is the largest supplier of blood and blood products to more than 3,000 hospitals across the nation and also assists vic- tims of international disasters and conflicts at locations worldwide. , should purchase all of the at Were on the same block as and will give an employer 9-10 hours building trusses and wood framings The new campaign features corn- Evans continued. About the Safety and Security oOI. The board said that the rest of hard work, he often fails to for apartments. They have 50 or 60 pelling broadcast and print advertis- The Family Safety Guide Center eawould never be needeo and understand that what he accomplished employees. Sometimes economic ing to remind people of the important At the cornerstone of the educa- The Safety and Security Center, Y Years later the school just ?Wns the block and is using all in 9-1Ohours should have been done development starts at home. role they play when, with the Red tional campaign is an all-new guide, based in Carlsbad California, was .lthriving communities have in 8hours. This slower pace of work For those of us that attended one of Cross, they help others in need. "Together We Can Become Safe founded in1990 to provide consumers trteSwho _. in the rural area is hard for an the last Blandin funded meeting with "Together We Prepare" is also intend- Families." This comprehensive work- with unique and effective safety and L . see into the future and employer to overcome. Lastly, if a several out-of-state people it became ed to raise national awareness of the book outlines the critical steps every security products for home, family, i elf COmmunity into making family should follow to be prepared office and business. You can browse company re-locates to an area where very clear that the path to economic need for preparedness.  ecisions, which makes the the education level is very low or development for Ortonville starts with New Study Finds Most Americans for all types of emergencies, their catalog of safety and security alOme reality, potential workers have many personal the foot of the lake and the downtown Unprepared The guidebook addresses pre- products at: http:/www.safetyandse- !!' I ember of the manufacturing problems, then the employer is forced area. Our medical facilities are and A new survey found that 72 per- paredness from a general perspective curitycenter.com !i ]] nave seen statistics that show to take on the task of educating a work will continue to be a golden goose but cent of Americans do not have a dis- to have the greatest effect on helping ing trends in the manufacturing force and the host of other problems, will be one only as long as there are Uf/L'Orexample, amanufacturing The commentsonthetourist people in the area. What happens DNR reminds owners not SSOciation has polled its industry are some of the same that I when the baby boomers are gone in r'ca'_and the results show that in have. Tourism does not and cannot thirty to forty years? One of the other ;ILL..2000, 95% of the members save any community. Tourism is an areas that I am concerned with is o,,,0. ,a to let dogs chase w00ldl00fe er t'Pll''o! . p nts, added to old asset to an already thriving housing. The majority of our housing :re-located. It is true that a community. I believe not long ago the units are old with small rooms and .,,,,,f,any of these companies Director of Rural Development at SW small lots. Most people today want a = I and did look at rural areas II Ill" e to expand They also looked mavailable labor force as well as ,S.Portation system. The big l _n is that only 5% had relocated IIN3.nded in the upper Midwest. ,t.. majority of the new plants or '2. runs are happening in the ?tern or Southwestern US. es it even more difficult for nnlnity in our area to attract 113' ",nat it boils down to is that emunity to get industry it !tially steal it from another IY within a given area. m does not help our state or aor at any given time a  ght up and move again. State University even made the comment that it was futile to look at tourism as a savior if any community that was more than 60 miles from the Twin Cities. In an article, twelve years ago which was published in the Star Tribune and I re-stated in an article in this paper, it was noted that 85% of the tourism dollars spent in Minnesota are spent in the Twin Cities and St Cloud areas. Another 10% is spent in Rochester and Brainerd areas. This leaves only 5% of tourism dollars spent to be divided among all other communities in Minnesota. There are individuals in our area pushing the concept of tourism who have even quoted the figures I obtained but use roomy 3-bedroom house with 2-car garage on a fairly good size lot. The best thing that I can think of for us is to develop our community into the best looking area that it can be in terms of homes, streets, etc. then people who want to live here and do business here will discover us. That is not to say we shouldn't look for outside opportunities when possible, however do not expect outside people to rescue our community, we must do it ourselves. WILLIAM POWELL Ortonville The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources reminds dog own- ers that it is illegal to allow their pets to harass deer and other big game. Every winter, conservation officers receive reports from all parts of the state of dogs chasing and sometimes killing deer or other big game. The state's wildlife regulations hold dog owners accountable for dogs chasing big game and conservation officers are authorized to put down dogs that do so. Mark Johanson, acting DNR Enforcement Division director, advis- es dog owners to be aware of the pos- sibility their dogs might be chasing big game and to take steps to prevent it. "Deer are particularly vulnerable pursues a big game animal is guilty of a petty misdemeanor and is subject to / spring light goose i0000.,,der begins March 1 i . " . " _ ". _ _" " _ " . " . . ' . ' " . - a" _ ccur under a federal www.dnr.state.mn.us, since 2000 Minnesota s harvest dur- ' - tt'l!il[ng Minnesota, to permit goose hunting seasons will also apply from a few hundred to six thousand, : , in tion. Order that allows 24 Most regulations that apply to fall ing this time has varied dramatically 'i.g_g ut geese after the close of during the spring light goose conser- depending on the weather conditions. :|S*Ons. vation action, including nontoxic shot "Minnesota is at the extreme east- it,"'ight Goose Permit-may requirements and federal baiting regu- ern edge of the spring migration oi-" mrough any of the 1,800 litmus. In addltmn, all refuges closed throu h the Midwest," stud Ra iliee . Licensing System agents to either duck or goose hunting during Nort'd, Wetland Wildlife Progra ble' b, ne .permit will also be fall seasons are also closed during the leader with the Minnesota ,lt. ' telephone and on the spring conservation action. Shooting Department of Natural Resources. 5 0 hours will be one-half hour before "March weather, particularly snow i,te r license, stamp or permit sunrise to one-half hour after sunset and ice conditions, can have a tremen- '"' uht" ,,e participate. . in the hunt., each day. No daily or possession lim- dous effect on the migration routes of "1: permit Is free, there is a its apply. Use of electronic calls and light geese." , uin =cation fee to cover the cost unplugged shotguns is allowed. A summary of regulations will be le6 e permit. Permits will be The Conservation Order is part of available from license vendors, DNR f et iicn ter Feb. 20, except that an international effort to reduce popu- wildlife offices, or by calling the DNR q kf.ensing will not be available lations of lesser snow geese (includ- Information Center at (651) 296-6157 IM _ 1. Customers using'the ing blue-phase snow geese) and Ross' or 1-888-MINNDNR (646-6367). ran, ur Internet wilt receive a geese that breed in Arctic coastal -' autho" nzatmn number to areas and the Hudson Bay area. The 00ramics forKids classes 0000nsomd by Community Ed ,';: dau - :i:,. th hter claims I'm a better My first love was sewing, but ceram- take a class." i7,' Painter." That's a great ics is such a good medium to teach to According to Shawnda Johnson, __. of"_ to Elaine Haggerty, all ages, and the results can be so Ortonville Community Education li0n eramics at community rewarding for students of all ages," Facilitator, "We're still uncertain how ! / a,,prgrams around the explained Haggerty. cuts in the State budget will impact  across State lines. "People often tell me that they're Community Education. We are certain  been teaching in school not good enough, but I tell them to that after school enrichment dollars " to 4-H groups, girls give it a try, then go look around. They were cut by the Governor from this :,l"me-schooled children find out they're a lot better than they year's budget amounting to approxi- ',; teach' children between thought. And the art reflects who they mutely $5,700 to our program. l'ih to 80," clmms Haggerty are, and that's more valuable than The direct impact will be the loss of di7 a way of looking at buying something that someone else our after school open media center for the ,t., tly than adults. I love made." students and adults. The media center "ng s that children create Haggerty is mother to eight chii- will close Feb. 27. a, team from them, and ali dren. "All my children are creative, Haggerty will be offering ceramic help them do that." but in different ways. My son loves to classes in Ortonville for children on bier wanted something cook, and he expresses his creativity the following dates: Mar. 10, Apr. 14, :I.7 that I knew I couldn t through food. There's all sorts of ways May 6. Register by calling Community *-so I decided to make it. that people can enjoy art. Come and Education at 839-6181 ext. 138. For with ceram- visit me sometime. I'll get you so adults, Candle Making and Healthy ever since, excited about ceramics, you'll have to Vegetarian Soups classes are planned. can urday   -W'tehers and the ,-r the Great American i Baptist Church in :th t Deanna Jensen, '.,. leader and local tg- ,, e event, the national "ls to encourage Americans to reach and maintain healthier lifestyle habits. Participants will be weighed and then their Body Mass Index will be calculated (BMI) to determine the amount of their weight that comes from fat. The connection between weight and the risk of developing other health problems has prompted the two organizations to join forces to. increase public awareness, and encourage healthy eating. WlC voucher pickup for March March 4-Countryside Community Room, Ortonville-9 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 6-Prairie V Conf. Room, Madison-9 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 20-Appleton Civic Center, Appleton-9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The county Nutrition Education Assistants will be available. ( Check out our web site at www.ortonviUeindependeni.com ") 00INDEPENDENT at this time of year and the additional stress of being chased can affect their winter survival even if they escape," Johanson said. Suggested tips for dog owners: do not allow your dog to chase big game wildlife at any time keep your dog controlled within your property boundaries respect all types of wildlife report wildlife harassment to the local conservation officer. (Contact the Minnesota State Patrol for the name and phone number of a local conservation officer.) The owner of a dog that kills or a civil penalty of up to $500 for each violation. In accordance with the Minnesota Game and Fish Laws handbook, a person who observes a dog wounding, killing or pursuing in a manner that .endangers big. game may kill the dog: at any tme, if the person is a peace officer or conservation officer; or between Jan. 1 and July 14, if the person is not a peace officer or conservation officer and the discharge of firearms is allowed. The officer or person is not liable for damages for killing the dog. ' SCO'l-r MAAS, at left, is congratulated by Bank President Terry Gere. T BANK VILLE FDIC Second Street Ortonville, Minnesota 56278 www.minnwest.com Page 7