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Ortonville, Minnesota
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February 25, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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February 25, 2003
 

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AT BUILDER SHOW. Blake Wittnebel of Wittnebel ction in Madison recently attended the Dynamic Homes Builder Show at the Shooting Star Event Center in He is shown at left with Jerry Rouleau (right) a featured Community fun benefit planned March 7 and 8 A community fun benefit will be held at Ortonville's Dancing Bean Friday and Saturday, March 7th and 8th. The idea is lot anyone who would like to sell something lor yourself or fawmte cause to have a table which will be $5. Contact Lenore Sellin or [,any McKinney at the Dancing Bean. The event will be sponsored by the Dancing Bean, Crafts, Gifts, Tupperware and More and The Ortonville Independent. County HRA reg meet set March 6 Big Stone County's Housing and Redevelopment Authority will be holding their regular monthly meeting, Thursday, March 6, 2003 at 3 p.m. in the Community Room of the Lakeside Apartments. Please note the date and time change for the meeting. k,,c an/fie D your part to help ' up Big Stone Lake! time for students to financial aid sources of year again! It's tax think about financial planning on attending xt ,ear, it is important aid forms and late and federal and guidelines. The bottom aid - fill out forms you receive the maxi- of financial aid allotted :on to learn a little more aid process. A everything you need to get started. r"'.We're here to help! is Everything!" This true when applying aid. Other than financial factor affecting your TIMING! Once your college time to think about how to fund your education. costs vary and other to your expenses, you plan to live, to eat, transportation, books, fees, and all of these things to questions to answer, it process seem a little aid office at the col- 'choice is a great resource to inform you of the answer your ques- provide additional make your college dream most important thing to applying for financial is knowing where to aid and understanding apply. DO I LOOK?" 1any options available Each year, the fed- allocates billions of aid and each state to fund higher scholarships, are offered by col- foun- organizations. Use your high school guidance counselor and college financial aid offices as resources. The Web can also provide substantial information on specific aid programs. There are many "free" resources available designed to help students in their search for aid. However, be aware of companies or Web sites that charge fees for finan- cial assistance. Two different types of student aid are available and are classified as merit-based and need-based aid. Merit-based aid includes scholarships and is given on the basis of academic achievement or talent. Need-based financial aid includes federal/state aid, grants, loans, and work-study programs through the college, and are given on the basis of financial need. A variety of loan programs are also available to students. Loans must be paid back and you are obligated to repay the principal plus interest. It is important to investigate all of your loan options thoroughly and always read the applications carefully in order to fully understand what is required of y0u. "WIt'ERE DO I START?" The::fir-tep i nappl nfor ffnan: cial aid is determining your financial need. The amount of need is deter- mined by this simple equation: College expenses minus ability to pay, equals financial need. In order to qualify for financial aid programs, all students must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. Don't forget that you must reapply for financial aid every academic year. You can obtain a copy of the FAFSA form from your high school guidance office or at a college financial aid office. You can also access it on the Web at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA form requires infor- mation that must be obtained from your income tax statement or your parents' income tax statement if you are considered a dependent. The form addresses questions that are used to determine your financial need. Try to keep all tax forms and paperwork together in a file or folder. Another example of when organization pays off! FAFSA forms are available in December and should be submitted as soon after January 1 as possible. Deadlines vary from state to state and each college has their own institution- al aid deadlines you must be aware of. Missing the deadlines will keep you from obtaining funds which you may have been eligible to receive. "WHAT IS THE NEXT STEP.'?" After your completed FAFSA is received by the processing center, the processor will send you a Student Aid Report (SAR). Tile processor will also provide this report to the college(s) of your choice. The SAR will report your Estimated Family Contribution (EFC), the number used in determin- ing your eligibility for financial aid. After the college(s) receives the report and any other necessary documenta- tion, a Financial Aid Award Notice will be sent to you by each college. Now is the time to evaluate your possible college choices. When choosing a college, always put your educational goals first and then weigh the financial factors. Take the college costs into con- sideration. Take into consideration the amount of grant and scholarship assis- tance available from each of the col- leges. Take into consideration the avail- able self-help such as loans and col- lege work study. Your Estimated Family Contribution will remain the same for each college, but the amount of your award will be different for each. You will need to determine the estimated out-of-pocket cost for each institution. After you have considered both your educational goals and your financial findings, you can determine which college best fits your needs. out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT 320.83!].7074 OR FREE ESTIMATE[ Rg .............................. 159, 9. Sale ............................. * 1249 Bcowo, $ / / z , / / HUGE SAVINGS ON 3 TILE, CARPET & VINYL! i " -iSV- Reg .............................. 15 ""I e ............................. '12 ' I ~15 Year Warranty~ BLow0r .... $Q951 : 5A vmas R.g ................................. '2 .. se ................................. * 199 , l E R 8:00-5:30 & Floor Monday-Friday: 8:00-8:(} Thursday URNITURE Covering 9:00-4:tX)Salurday 589-3911 . 1-800-495-3911 --0 AVENUE - MORRIS, MN VlS4 I .. Engaged No one COV6YS Minnesota better. It's comforting to know that Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota has been providing quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. With the variety of plans for individuals, groups and plans that work with Medicare, we've got you covered. Give me a call for more information. U John Stolpman I.. Ortonville Bellingham 320-839-6194 320-568-2101 BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota Greg Parks and Lana Roghair, announce their engagement and forthcoming marriage. Greg is the son of Lee and Vidella Roschen of Ortonville and the late Gordon Parks. Lana is the daughter of Glen and Janice Roghair of Spencer, IA. Greg graduated from Ortonville High School and Bethel College in St. Paul, and has earned his Master's Degree in Counseling. Lana graduated from Clay Central High School in Royal, IA and Bethel College in St. Paul, and has earned her Master's Degree in Psychology from Alfred Adler Institute. After their wedding on March 5th, 2003, in Spencer, IA they will be living in Eagan. County (Continued from Page One) homes. The charges were eliminated in 1995, but due to cuts, the County faces a loss of funds up to $56,000. The recycling program was part of the SCORE grant (Select Committee of Recycling and the Environment). Wilke will compare charges and options with other counties. Commissioner Alvin Maas asked for clarification from Wilke on proce- dures necessary for the Big Stone Campground used by churches tbr summer activities. The septic system has been failing and needs to be upgraded per regulations enforced by The Department of Health and the Environmental Services Office. Commissioner Richard Lane sug- gested that it would be a good idea to begin the budget process earlier than normal this year. "Let's wait to hear from Pawlenty and the Legislature, but we need to communicate with county residents and start the process early," said Lane. The County Commissioners will begin meeting with department heads at the next scheduled meeting of the Board. THE CLASSIHED00i School board revises budget A proposal was made to reinstate the 5th grade summer band program. Little support could be found for this. In other areas, a student transporta- tion policy was revised. The board accepted with regret the retirement of Thomas Kramer at the end of this school year. A motion was passed to recognize the OEA "Notice of Desire to Negotiate" for the 2003-05 school years. February bills were approved for payment for 351,010.12. The next regular meeting of the Ortonville school board will be March 17th at 7 in the school library. By Arnold Souba The Ortonville school board decid- ed at its regular February meeting to revise the 2002-03 school budget. The revision took account of the latest financial information. Further revi- sion was postponed until more infor- mation about the state budget was available. Current enrollment (621) versus 2003-04 projected enrollment (587) was discussed, along with the possibility of implementing some of the ADM report. No action was taken beyond a sense of the meeting that an eye be kept on this. Bonanza Education Center gave the school board a report on activity. Over the last two years, programming and attendance there has increased dramatically. Staffing has grown from one halftime coordinator to one full- time coordinator and one haiftime project coordinator. The BEC has therefore applied for non profit corpo- ration status with the state. Approval is expected within two or three months. For further information con- tact BEe at (320)265-6944. Internet and college course offer- ings were discussed. Problems with completion rates were said to exist. We will continue to proceed slowly on this, and no further formal action was taken. Dave's Auto-Body &Glass is your auto body and windshield headquarters JON HOMRIGHAUSEN specializes in windshield replacement complete auto body repair vehicle detailing insurance submittals JON IS READY to get your vehicle looking like new. Jon is skilled at his work and pays attention to detail to do a professional job every time. Protect your vehicle from the elements with AUTO DETAILING Interior & Exterior Cleaning Tire Treatments and More Dave's Auto Body & Glass Main Street, Ortonville, MN (south of Pepsi) Phone 320.839.7074 25, 2003 a INDEPENDENT Page 13 AT BUILDER SHOW. Blake Wittnebel of Wittnebel ction in Madison recently attended the Dynamic Homes Builder Show at the Shooting Star Event Center in He is shown at left with Jerry Rouleau (right) a featured Community fun benefit planned March 7 and 8 A community fun benefit will be held at Ortonville's Dancing Bean Friday and Saturday, March 7th and 8th. The idea is lot anyone who would like to sell something lor yourself or fawmte cause to have a table which will be $5. Contact Lenore Sellin or [,any McKinney at the Dancing Bean. The event will be sponsored by the Dancing Bean, Crafts, Gifts, Tupperware and More and The Ortonville Independent. County HRA reg meet set March 6 Big Stone County's Housing and Redevelopment Authority will be holding their regular monthly meeting, Thursday, March 6, 2003 at 3 p.m. in the Community Room of the Lakeside Apartments. Please note the date and time change for the meeting. k,,c an/fie D your part to help ' up Big Stone Lake! time for students to financial aid sources of year again! It's tax think about financial planning on attending xt ,ear, it is important aid forms and late and federal and guidelines. The bottom aid - fill out forms you receive the maxi- of financial aid allotted :on to learn a little more aid process. A everything you need to get started. r"'.We're here to help! is Everything!" This true when applying aid. Other than financial factor affecting your TIMING! Once your college time to think about how to fund your education. costs vary and other to your expenses, you plan to live, to eat, transportation, books, fees, and all of these things to questions to answer, it process seem a little aid office at the col- 'choice is a great resource to inform you of the answer your ques- provide additional make your college dream most important thing to applying for financial is knowing where to aid and understanding apply. DO I LOOK?" 1any options available Each year, the fed- allocates billions of aid and each state to fund higher scholarships, are offered by col- foun- organizations. Use your high school guidance counselor and college financial aid offices as resources. The Web can also provide substantial information on specific aid programs. There are many "free" resources available designed to help students in their search for aid. However, be aware of companies or Web sites that charge fees for finan- cial assistance. Two different types of student aid are available and are classified as merit-based and need-based aid. Merit-based aid includes scholarships and is given on the basis of academic achievement or talent. Need-based financial aid includes federal/state aid, grants, loans, and work-study programs through the college, and are given on the basis of financial need. A variety of loan programs are also available to students. Loans must be paid back and you are obligated to repay the principal plus interest. It is important to investigate all of your loan options thoroughly and always read the applications carefully in order to fully understand what is required of y0u. "WIt'ERE DO I START?" The::fir-tep i nappl nfor ffnan: cial aid is determining your financial need. The amount of need is deter- mined by this simple equation: College expenses minus ability to pay, equals financial need. In order to qualify for financial aid programs, all students must complete a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form. Don't forget that you must reapply for financial aid every academic year. You can obtain a copy of the FAFSA form from your high school guidance office or at a college financial aid office. You can also access it on the Web at http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA form requires infor- mation that must be obtained from your income tax statement or your parents' income tax statement if you are considered a dependent. The form addresses questions that are used to determine your financial need. Try to keep all tax forms and paperwork together in a file or folder. Another example of when organization pays off! FAFSA forms are available in December and should be submitted as soon after January 1 as possible. Deadlines vary from state to state and each college has their own institution- al aid deadlines you must be aware of. Missing the deadlines will keep you from obtaining funds which you may have been eligible to receive. "WHAT IS THE NEXT STEP.'?" After your completed FAFSA is received by the processing center, the processor will send you a Student Aid Report (SAR). Tile processor will also provide this report to the college(s) of your choice. The SAR will report your Estimated Family Contribution (EFC), the number used in determin- ing your eligibility for financial aid. After the college(s) receives the report and any other necessary documenta- tion, a Financial Aid Award Notice will be sent to you by each college. Now is the time to evaluate your possible college choices. When choosing a college, always put your educational goals first and then weigh the financial factors. Take the college costs into con- sideration. Take into consideration the amount of grant and scholarship assis- tance available from each of the col- leges. Take into consideration the avail- able self-help such as loans and col- lege work study. Your Estimated Family Contribution will remain the same for each college, but the amount of your award will be different for each. You will need to determine the estimated out-of-pocket cost for each institution. After you have considered both your educational goals and your financial findings, you can determine which college best fits your needs. out our web site at www.ortonvilleindependent.com CALL TODAY FOR AN APPOINTMENT 320.83!].7074 OR FREE ESTIMATE[ Rg .............................. 159, 9. Sale ............................. * 1249 Bcowo, $ / / z , / / HUGE SAVINGS ON 3 TILE, CARPET & VINYL! i " -iSV- Reg .............................. 15 ""I e ............................. '12 ' I ~15 Year Warranty~ BLow0r .... $Q951 : 5A vmas R.g ................................. '2 .. se ................................. * 199 , l E R 8:00-5:30 & Floor Monday-Friday: 8:00-8:(} Thursday URNITURE Covering 9:00-4:tX)Salurday 589-3911 . 1-800-495-3911 --0 AVENUE - MORRIS, MN VlS4 I .. Engaged No one COV6YS Minnesota better. It's comforting to know that Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota has been providing quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. With the variety of plans for individuals, groups and plans that work with Medicare, we've got you covered. Give me a call for more information. U John Stolpman I.. Ortonville Bellingham 320-839-6194 320-568-2101 BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota Greg Parks and Lana Roghair, announce their engagement and forthcoming marriage. Greg is the son of Lee and Vidella Roschen of Ortonville and the late Gordon Parks. Lana is the daughter of Glen and Janice Roghair of Spencer, IA. Greg graduated from Ortonville High School and Bethel College in St. Paul, and has earned his Master's Degree in Counseling. Lana graduated from Clay Central High School in Royal, IA and Bethel College in St. Paul, and has earned her Master's Degree in Psychology from Alfred Adler Institute. After their wedding on March 5th, 2003, in Spencer, IA they will be living in Eagan. County (Continued from Page One) homes. The charges were eliminated in 1995, but due to cuts, the County faces a loss of funds up to $56,000. The recycling program was part of the SCORE grant (Select Committee of Recycling and the Environment). Wilke will compare charges and options with other counties. Commissioner Alvin Maas asked for clarification from Wilke on proce- dures necessary for the Big Stone Campground used by churches tbr summer activities. The septic system has been failing and needs to be upgraded per regulations enforced by The Department of Health and the Environmental Services Office. Commissioner Richard Lane sug- gested that it would be a good idea to begin the budget process earlier than normal this year. "Let's wait to hear from Pawlenty and the Legislature, but we need to communicate with county residents and start the process early," said Lane. The County Commissioners will begin meeting with department heads at the next scheduled meeting of the Board. THE CLASSIHED00i School board revises budget A proposal was made to reinstate the 5th grade summer band program. Little support could be found for this. In other areas, a student transporta- tion policy was revised. The board accepted with regret the retirement of Thomas Kramer at the end of this school year. A motion was passed to recognize the OEA "Notice of Desire to Negotiate" for the 2003-05 school years. February bills were approved for payment for 351,010.12. The next regular meeting of the Ortonville school board will be March 17th at 7 in the school library. By Arnold Souba The Ortonville school board decid- ed at its regular February meeting to revise the 2002-03 school budget. The revision took account of the latest financial information. Further revi- sion was postponed until more infor- mation about the state budget was available. Current enrollment (621) versus 2003-04 projected enrollment (587) was discussed, along with the possibility of implementing some of the ADM report. No action was taken beyond a sense of the meeting that an eye be kept on this. Bonanza Education Center gave the school board a report on activity. Over the last two years, programming and attendance there has increased dramatically. Staffing has grown from one halftime coordinator to one full- time coordinator and one haiftime project coordinator. The BEC has therefore applied for non profit corpo- ration status with the state. Approval is expected within two or three months. For further information con- tact BEe at (320)265-6944. Internet and college course offer- ings were discussed. Problems with completion rates were said to exist. We will continue to proceed slowly on this, and no further formal action was taken. Dave's Auto-Body &Glass is your auto body and windshield headquarters JON HOMRIGHAUSEN specializes in windshield replacement complete auto body repair vehicle detailing insurance submittals JON IS READY to get your vehicle looking like new. Jon is skilled at his work and pays attention to detail to do a professional job every time. Protect your vehicle from the elements with AUTO DETAILING Interior & Exterior Cleaning Tire Treatments and More Dave's Auto Body & Glass Main Street, Ortonville, MN (south of Pepsi) Phone 320.839.7074 25, 2003 a INDEPENDENT Page 13