Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
March 2, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 9     (9 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 9     (9 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
March 2, 1999
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




ections... S cagers win first game, rris next on Thursday 0rtonville Trojan boys basket- coached," stated Coach Roger Their press did not create a lot of aced off against Wheaten Sandberg. "Last weekI said Ryandid steals but it did lead to enough and again with MAC- on Saturday, coming away on both occasions. extremely slow start the Ortonville team a 20-3 point differen- third quarter and pretty the game out of reach, lead- outscored the Warriors fourth to win this one 59- 5-3 in the conference, for second place. recorded a triple points, 16 rebounds is the first time I a Trojan basketball n the 21 years I have everything but sell popcorn at half- time; well this time he not only sold popcorn but he made change! He has made tremendous strides this year, going from the perimeter position to the post. We looked good in our press and the up tempo style gave us the opportunity to get some easy hoops in the second half." Saturday in the first round of Sub- Sections, the Trojans put together a four quarter game both offensively and defensively, moving the ball well throughout the contest to find open players for good looks. They got excellent three point shooting from Jordan Botker and Dan Ross (collec- tively 5/7). turnovers to give the Ortonville boys an edge in possessions, and they did hit the clutch free throws down the stretch, going 10/15 in the fourth quar- ter (Sandberg 4/4 and Longhenry 3/4 in that period.) The win gives the Trojans three in a row but more importantly, is the con- fidence they will be playing with this Thursday, March 4. The team takes on the number one seed Morris at SWSU. Game time is 5:30. "We lost an earlier contest to the Tigers by a score of 45-36, and we - look forward to the opportunity to even this year's competition," Coach Sandberg said. FREE THROW WINNERS AT MORRIS were, from left to right, Megan Reiffenberger, Dan Larson and Cory Stattelman. low perch, walleye ndant in Lake Traverse conducted Department of (DNR) indicate walleye popula- abundant the Lake Traverse fish be characterized as a decent balance and prey," said DNR assistant fish- at Ortonville. Domeier noted, "the walleye was deft- between 15 and 20 inches were "well represented" during surveys conduct- ed last year yet "their numbers were down a whopping 70 percent from 1997," Domeier said. "This was prob- ably because fishing was excellent during the 1998 season and anglers harvested a lot of walleye," Domeier said. The majority of walleye found during the surveys were from the 1997 year class and measured between seven and ten inches. "These fish were small, considering walleye shorter 1997 growing season. Moderate numbers of northern pike, white bass and bullheads were also present. Northern pike abun- dance has remained "relatively stable for the past three years," according to Domeier. In 1998, most pike mea- sured twenty to thirty inches while white bass were primarily between six and twelve inches. Bullheads were large, with many over ten inches. Domeier said both black and white crappies are present in Lake Traverse in low to moderate numbers with 1997." heavy angling lake's larger walleye population. Walleye growth was likely due to competition and 1996 year classes amongst themselves for food and the usually 8row eleven to thirteen ines  most measuring botwoon, six and ten in Lakyer after two summer,y inches. Channel catfish up to 15 : iomeler saidDomeier said the slo  pounds were also present but in levy numbers. I championships led for grades 5-9 The regional champions will be invited to play in the 1999 Pacesetter Minnesota State Championship in St. Cloud this summer against the win- hers from the other seven regions. runner-up teams will also be invited to attend, the Minnesota Invitational Tournament in St. Cloud this summer. Other top teams will be invited to attend the Pacesetter Open Championship in New London-Spicer and Paynesville. More than 880 teams participated in the regional tournaments through- out Minnesota last spring. Tournament flyers have been sent to all teams that participated last spring and all head coaches throughout Minnesota. Each tournament is limit- ed to the first 16 teams to register. Team registration forms are avail- able by calling 320-243-7460 or by writing Pacesetter Basketball, P.O. Box 222, Paynesville, MN 56362. Pacesetter Minnesota for announced tournaments spring. tournaments will fifth and sixth State University in 10; seventh grade - University in 17, eighth grade - University in 3, ninth grade - University in 27. tournaments will fifth grade - University March 27; Southwest State 10; seventh grade - University April 17, Southwest State 3; ninth grade - March 27. Lundborg Funeral Home death of Dorothy of Milbank. She died Norden, SD. trices will be held 2rid at 1 p.m. in the Church in Jim Hulberg will will be in Mound be at the church on m. until the time of will be "all Music will be Van de Voort, was born Big Stone County; Peter and Laura Cole, She attended County and Ortonville High on June She later Lundberg on marriage. She was a farm wife for 25 years and also worked at St. Bernard's Hospital in Milbank. She worked at Maynes Hardware Store, Coast to Coast Store, and Bill's Super Valu Grocery Store, all in Milbank. She became a resident of the Lake Norden Care Center on May 29, 1996. Mr. Lundberg died Feb. 18, 1997. Dorothy Lundberg is survived by three sons and two daughters'in'law: David Van Erem of Milbank; Douglas and Sally Van Erem of Coon Rapids, and Jim and Terri Van Erem of Brookings, SD. One daughter and son- in-law: Rebecca and Allen Fordyce of Canby. Two step sons and step daughter-in-law: Jeffrey Lundberg of Colorado Springs, CO and Tom and Tammy Lundberg of Webster, SD. Two step. daughters and step son-in- law: Gml Kelley of Goring, NE and Penny and Ron Meade of Milbank. Fifteen grandchildren and two great grandchildren. One sister and brother- in-law: Helen and Karl Ruthenbeck of Mesa, AZ. The Mundwiler Funeral Home of Milbank is in charge of the arrangements for Dorothy Lundberg. at the J.C. Penny prior to her OHS B-squad ends successful season The Trojan B-squad ended a suc- cessful season last Tuesday at Wheaten with a 57-33 win. Ross Wiegman led the way with 17 points and 10 rebounds. Nathan Thompson netted 10 points, Andy Ross eight, Travis Beckman seven, Tanner Radermacher and Tony Mosey six each, Dan Rausch two, and Andy Simonitch one. Andy Ross also dished out eight assists and picked up five steals. Ortonville finished up 20-1 for the season and was sparked often with a blend of talented sophomores and freshmen. Individual team statistics will follow. Letters to the editor I I ' ' I .... Dear Editor: On Sept. 13, 1814, Francis Scott Key watched American troops hold off an aggressive British attack on Fort McHenry in Baltimore. The following morning, as the American flag continued to fly, Key wrote the "The Star Spangled Banner." Key's poem was later put to music and on March 3, 1931, by an act of Congress and the signature of President Hoover, it became our national anthem. Sixty-eight years after it became our national anthem, the "Star Spangled Banner" continues to inspire Americans because it embodies the ideals of freedom and perseverance that make our nation great. In his poem, Key described our fledgling democracy as "the land of the free and the home of the brave." His words still ring true today as the United States continues to serve as a shining example of democracy for the rest of the world. When Key wrote about the American flag over Fort McHenry, he was also writing about the brave American soldiers who keep the flag flying. "The Star Spangled Banner" is a constant reminder of that service and our military's proud heritage. The next time you hear the "Star Spangled Banner," take a moment to reflect upon Key's words and what they mean to our families, communities and nation. Those words, inspired by the long-ago sight of a flag that flew gloriously through adversity, still inspire us today. Rod Grams United States Senator INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY MEMBERS OF THE 1998-99 OHS GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM are, from left to right in front, Student Manager Jamie Swenson, Tiffany Radermacher, Tiffany Finke, Margo Reiffenberger, Ruth Goergen and Student Manager Mary Paradis. In back are Coach Connie Newman, J-leidi Wittnebel, Elizabeth Thompson, Laura Lantls, Amanda Hillman, Jenni Bowen and Student Manager Abbey Johnson. Sodak spring light goose season opens, runs through April 30 South Dakota's spring light goose season opened Feb. 18, and Ganae, Fish and Parks officials want to help hunters by noting a few points regard- ing the special season. The season is open from Feb. 18 through April 30 to resident and non- resident hunters. "Residents need a small game license or the combination license with a migratory bird certifica- tion stamp and a federal waterfowl stamp," stated Law Enforcement Coordinator Ron Catlin. "Nonresidents will need the spring light goose license and the federal waterfowl stamp." The 1998-99 fed- eral waterfowl stamp purchased last fall is valid until June 30. All spring light goose hunters over 16 years of age will be reqhired to possess the federal stamp until March 10. After that time, the season is con- sidered to be a conservation act and will not require the federal stamp. The daily limit for light geese dur- ing the season is 20 daily with no limit on the number of birds in possession. Shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset daily from February 18 through March 10. Beginning March 11, shooting hours are extended to one-half hour after sundown. Hunters are also reminded that for the entire spring light goose season shotguns may hold more than three shells and electronic goose calls may be used. Light geese includes snow geese, blue geese and Ross' geese. Catlin said that hunters are not permitted to harvest dark geese during the season. Dark geese include Canada geese, white-fi'onted g.ese, and black brant. Supplemental hunting guides con- cerning the spring light goose season have been distributed to county trea- surers and license agents. Accoridng to biologists, this hunt- ing opportunity is available because the snow and blue geese population has exploded in recent years and the birds are in danger of destroying their breeding grounds in the Canadian arc- tic. The goal of the season is to har- vest additional birds in hope of reduc- ing the population. i Bowling standings FOOTBALL MANIA - 2/15 POVERTY - 2/16 Won Lost Won Lost Pepsi 4 0 Bill's SV Plus g 0 Clinton State Bank 4 0 HenHch & Sons 7 1 Hill Motors 4 0 Jim & Sons Lumber 5 3 Mountain Dew II 4 Minnwtst Bank 4 4 Arndt's P & H 0 4 H & H Car Cars 4 4 Larry's Refrigeration 0 4 Big Stone Bowl 3 5 HTS: Pepsi 2710; Ill'G: Pepsi Sonny's Strike Avotdersl 7 976; HIS: Steve Hennen 608; I.D.S. 0 8 HIG: Mark Botker 232. HTS: Henrich & Sons 2859; HTG: Henrieh & Sons 1000; HIS: Bill Land St,. 629; HIG: Bill Land St-. 233. I I I I IIIIII II I I THURSDAY SPARKLERS-2/2S Wen Le Klrehberg Con 4 0 Splinters 3 1 B.S. Repair 3 1 Pepsi 2 2 Spars Parts 2 2 Triple T 1 3 Wanna B's 1 3 Yardiek 0 4 HIG: Diana Hults 233; HIS: Dianne 12. & Gloria D. 573; HTG: Splinters g94; HTS: Spilnters 2513. B A N KIN G He said, CDs. She said, Mutual Funds. We said, No problem. Of all the Investment tools avail- able, which are right for you? Maybe you're comfortable man- aging a little risk. Or perhaps you prefer a more conservative approach. Whatever your goals, Marquette Investment Services is a name you can trust. We're here with Investment products you need. All with the knowledge and expertise you've come to expect from us, Call Marquette Investment Services today at 605- 432-4553. Marquette Investment Services A Division of Offerman & Company A Registered Broker Dealer Member NASD and SIPC Milbonk Office: 302 South Main Big Stone City Office: 451 Main Street a Revillo Office: 325 North 2rid Averue Investment Products: Are Not FDIC Insured Are Not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value ii 2, 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 9 ections... S cagers win first game, rris next on Thursday 0rtonville Trojan boys basket- coached," stated Coach Roger Their press did not create a lot of aced off against Wheaten Sandberg. "Last weekI said Ryandid steals but it did lead to enough and again with MAC- on Saturday, coming away on both occasions. extremely slow start the Ortonville team a 20-3 point differen- third quarter and pretty the game out of reach, lead- outscored the Warriors fourth to win this one 59- 5-3 in the conference, for second place. recorded a triple points, 16 rebounds is the first time I a Trojan basketball n the 21 years I have everything but sell popcorn at half- time; well this time he not only sold popcorn but he made change! He has made tremendous strides this year, going from the perimeter position to the post. We looked good in our press and the up tempo style gave us the opportunity to get some easy hoops in the second half." Saturday in the first round of Sub- Sections, the Trojans put together a four quarter game both offensively and defensively, moving the ball well throughout the contest to find open players for good looks. They got excellent three point shooting from Jordan Botker and Dan Ross (collec- tively 5/7). turnovers to give the Ortonville boys an edge in possessions, and they did hit the clutch free throws down the stretch, going 10/15 in the fourth quar- ter (Sandberg 4/4 and Longhenry 3/4 in that period.) The win gives the Trojans three in a row but more importantly, is the con- fidence they will be playing with this Thursday, March 4. The team takes on the number one seed Morris at SWSU. Game time is 5:30. "We lost an earlier contest to the Tigers by a score of 45-36, and we - look forward to the opportunity to even this year's competition," Coach Sandberg said. FREE THROW WINNERS AT MORRIS were, from left to right, Megan Reiffenberger, Dan Larson and Cory Stattelman. low perch, walleye ndant in Lake Traverse conducted Department of (DNR) indicate walleye popula- abundant the Lake Traverse fish be characterized as a decent balance and prey," said DNR assistant fish- at Ortonville. Domeier noted, "the walleye was deft- between 15 and 20 inches were "well represented" during surveys conduct- ed last year yet "their numbers were down a whopping 70 percent from 1997," Domeier said. "This was prob- ably because fishing was excellent during the 1998 season and anglers harvested a lot of walleye," Domeier said. The majority of walleye found during the surveys were from the 1997 year class and measured between seven and ten inches. "These fish were small, considering walleye shorter 1997 growing season. Moderate numbers of northern pike, white bass and bullheads were also present. Northern pike abun- dance has remained "relatively stable for the past three years," according to Domeier. In 1998, most pike mea- sured twenty to thirty inches while white bass were primarily between six and twelve inches. Bullheads were large, with many over ten inches. Domeier said both black and white crappies are present in Lake Traverse in low to moderate numbers with 1997." heavy angling lake's larger walleye population. Walleye growth was likely due to competition and 1996 year classes amongst themselves for food and the usually 8row eleven to thirteen ines  most measuring botwoon, six and ten in Lakyer after two summer,y inches. Channel catfish up to 15 : iomeler saidDomeier said the slo  pounds were also present but in levy numbers. I championships led for grades 5-9 The regional champions will be invited to play in the 1999 Pacesetter Minnesota State Championship in St. Cloud this summer against the win- hers from the other seven regions. runner-up teams will also be invited to attend, the Minnesota Invitational Tournament in St. Cloud this summer. Other top teams will be invited to attend the Pacesetter Open Championship in New London-Spicer and Paynesville. More than 880 teams participated in the regional tournaments through- out Minnesota last spring. Tournament flyers have been sent to all teams that participated last spring and all head coaches throughout Minnesota. Each tournament is limit- ed to the first 16 teams to register. Team registration forms are avail- able by calling 320-243-7460 or by writing Pacesetter Basketball, P.O. Box 222, Paynesville, MN 56362. Pacesetter Minnesota for announced tournaments spring. tournaments will fifth and sixth State University in 10; seventh grade - University in 17, eighth grade - University in 3, ninth grade - University in 27. tournaments will fifth grade - University March 27; Southwest State 10; seventh grade - University April 17, Southwest State 3; ninth grade - March 27. Lundborg Funeral Home death of Dorothy of Milbank. She died Norden, SD. trices will be held 2rid at 1 p.m. in the Church in Jim Hulberg will will be in Mound be at the church on m. until the time of will be "all Music will be Van de Voort, was born Big Stone County; Peter and Laura Cole, She attended County and Ortonville High on June She later Lundberg on marriage. She was a farm wife for 25 years and also worked at St. Bernard's Hospital in Milbank. She worked at Maynes Hardware Store, Coast to Coast Store, and Bill's Super Valu Grocery Store, all in Milbank. She became a resident of the Lake Norden Care Center on May 29, 1996. Mr. Lundberg died Feb. 18, 1997. Dorothy Lundberg is survived by three sons and two daughters'in'law: David Van Erem of Milbank; Douglas and Sally Van Erem of Coon Rapids, and Jim and Terri Van Erem of Brookings, SD. One daughter and son- in-law: Rebecca and Allen Fordyce of Canby. Two step sons and step daughter-in-law: Jeffrey Lundberg of Colorado Springs, CO and Tom and Tammy Lundberg of Webster, SD. Two step. daughters and step son-in- law: Gml Kelley of Goring, NE and Penny and Ron Meade of Milbank. Fifteen grandchildren and two great grandchildren. One sister and brother- in-law: Helen and Karl Ruthenbeck of Mesa, AZ. The Mundwiler Funeral Home of Milbank is in charge of the arrangements for Dorothy Lundberg. at the J.C. Penny prior to her OHS B-squad ends successful season The Trojan B-squad ended a suc- cessful season last Tuesday at Wheaten with a 57-33 win. Ross Wiegman led the way with 17 points and 10 rebounds. Nathan Thompson netted 10 points, Andy Ross eight, Travis Beckman seven, Tanner Radermacher and Tony Mosey six each, Dan Rausch two, and Andy Simonitch one. Andy Ross also dished out eight assists and picked up five steals. Ortonville finished up 20-1 for the season and was sparked often with a blend of talented sophomores and freshmen. Individual team statistics will follow. Letters to the editor I I ' ' I .... Dear Editor: On Sept. 13, 1814, Francis Scott Key watched American troops hold off an aggressive British attack on Fort McHenry in Baltimore. The following morning, as the American flag continued to fly, Key wrote the "The Star Spangled Banner." Key's poem was later put to music and on March 3, 1931, by an act of Congress and the signature of President Hoover, it became our national anthem. Sixty-eight years after it became our national anthem, the "Star Spangled Banner" continues to inspire Americans because it embodies the ideals of freedom and perseverance that make our nation great. In his poem, Key described our fledgling democracy as "the land of the free and the home of the brave." His words still ring true today as the United States continues to serve as a shining example of democracy for the rest of the world. When Key wrote about the American flag over Fort McHenry, he was also writing about the brave American soldiers who keep the flag flying. "The Star Spangled Banner" is a constant reminder of that service and our military's proud heritage. The next time you hear the "Star Spangled Banner," take a moment to reflect upon Key's words and what they mean to our families, communities and nation. Those words, inspired by the long-ago sight of a flag that flew gloriously through adversity, still inspire us today. Rod Grams United States Senator INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY MEMBERS OF THE 1998-99 OHS GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM are, from left to right in front, Student Manager Jamie Swenson, Tiffany Radermacher, Tiffany Finke, Margo Reiffenberger, Ruth Goergen and Student Manager Mary Paradis. In back are Coach Connie Newman, J-leidi Wittnebel, Elizabeth Thompson, Laura Lantls, Amanda Hillman, Jenni Bowen and Student Manager Abbey Johnson. Sodak spring light goose season opens, runs through April 30 South Dakota's spring light goose season opened Feb. 18, and Ganae, Fish and Parks officials want to help hunters by noting a few points regard- ing the special season. The season is open from Feb. 18 through April 30 to resident and non- resident hunters. "Residents need a small game license or the combination license with a migratory bird certifica- tion stamp and a federal waterfowl stamp," stated Law Enforcement Coordinator Ron Catlin. "Nonresidents will need the spring light goose license and the federal waterfowl stamp." The 1998-99 fed- eral waterfowl stamp purchased last fall is valid until June 30. All spring light goose hunters over 16 years of age will be reqhired to possess the federal stamp until March 10. After that time, the season is con- sidered to be a conservation act and will not require the federal stamp. The daily limit for light geese dur- ing the season is 20 daily with no limit on the number of birds in possession. Shooting hours are one-half hour before sunrise to sunset daily from February 18 through March 10. Beginning March 11, shooting hours are extended to one-half hour after sundown. Hunters are also reminded that for the entire spring light goose season shotguns may hold more than three shells and electronic goose calls may be used. Light geese includes snow geese, blue geese and Ross' geese. Catlin said that hunters are not permitted to harvest dark geese during the season. Dark geese include Canada geese, white-fi'onted g.ese, and black brant. Supplemental hunting guides con- cerning the spring light goose season have been distributed to county trea- surers and license agents. Accoridng to biologists, this hunt- ing opportunity is available because the snow and blue geese population has exploded in recent years and the birds are in danger of destroying their breeding grounds in the Canadian arc- tic. The goal of the season is to har- vest additional birds in hope of reduc- ing the population. i Bowling standings FOOTBALL MANIA - 2/15 POVERTY - 2/16 Won Lost Won Lost Pepsi 4 0 Bill's SV Plus g 0 Clinton State Bank 4 0 HenHch & Sons 7 1 Hill Motors 4 0 Jim & Sons Lumber 5 3 Mountain Dew II 4 Minnwtst Bank 4 4 Arndt's P & H 0 4 H & H Car Cars 4 4 Larry's Refrigeration 0 4 Big Stone Bowl 3 5 HTS: Pepsi 2710; Ill'G: Pepsi Sonny's Strike Avotdersl 7 976; HIS: Steve Hennen 608; I.D.S. 0 8 HIG: Mark Botker 232. HTS: Henrich & Sons 2859; HTG: Henrieh & Sons 1000; HIS: Bill Land St,. 629; HIG: Bill Land St-. 233. I I I I IIIIII II I I THURSDAY SPARKLERS-2/2S Wen Le Klrehberg Con 4 0 Splinters 3 1 B.S. Repair 3 1 Pepsi 2 2 Spars Parts 2 2 Triple T 1 3 Wanna B's 1 3 Yardiek 0 4 HIG: Diana Hults 233; HIS: Dianne 12. & Gloria D. 573; HTG: Splinters g94; HTS: Spilnters 2513. B A N KIN G He said, CDs. She said, Mutual Funds. We said, No problem. Of all the Investment tools avail- able, which are right for you? Maybe you're comfortable man- aging a little risk. Or perhaps you prefer a more conservative approach. Whatever your goals, Marquette Investment Services is a name you can trust. We're here with Investment products you need. All with the knowledge and expertise you've come to expect from us, Call Marquette Investment Services today at 605- 432-4553. Marquette Investment Services A Division of Offerman & Company A Registered Broker Dealer Member NASD and SIPC Milbonk Office: 302 South Main Big Stone City Office: 451 Main Street a Revillo Office: 325 North 2rid Averue Investment Products: Are Not FDIC Insured Are Not Bank Guaranteed May Lose Value ii 2, 1999  INDEPENDENT Page 9