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Ortonville, Minnesota
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March 2, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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March 2, 1999
 

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FIRST ICE SCULPTURE was done this year as part of the of the Arctic Open Golf Tournament Saturday, Feb. 13th. above with the nearly finished product is Darold Bailey's John Schultz. Bailey did the sculpture for the CCSC and it great addition to the Arctic Open. sion report John Cunningham, 4 nty Extension Director 2 ;18 or 1.800-279-2518 :,'E' OF POTENTIAL ,q'IO[ ON CROP S George Flaskerud, Extension Crops Economist, NDSU Extension Service, Fargo, developed the material for this week's column. Planted acres and then yields will become more and more important to the market as current marketing years come to a close. Acres in addition to yields are highly uncertain. Acres are especially uncertain this year because of government and insurance programs. Further decreases in spring wheat acres are likely as acres are shifted into oilseeds because of favorable loan rates, although crop rotations will be a limiting factor. Some spring wheat acres may be shifted into durum because of crop revenue coverage insurance, but a small shift is anticipated given the potential for higher returns from spring wheat. Consequently, durum acres may increase by a small amount over last year. Combining the reduction in spring wheat acres with the reduction in winter wheat acres, total wheat acres should be down enough that carryover stocks will become more manageable. By the end of the current marketing year on May 31, wheat stocks are projected to be 41 percent of total use, according to USDA's February Supply and Demand Report. By the end of the next marketing year on May 31, 2000, wheat stocks are likely to be in the 29- to 36-percent of total use range. The percentage realized will depend primarily on yields. Reduced ending stocks should result in stronger wheat prices. USDA's Planting Intentions Report will be released on March 31. "Increasingly, the price of corn and soybeans will take direction from 1999 crop prospects," Darrel Good says in a Feb. 22 newsletter. The University of Illinois extension economist goes on to point out, "It appears that a reduction in yield will be required to turn prices higher, particularly for soybeans. The list of negative market factors for soybeans is extensive. Disappearance of 1998 soybeans currently is falling behind the USDA projection. A strong U.S. dollar, the weak Brazilian currency, and potential record-setting harvests in Brazil and Argentinian favor South American soybeans and meal later this spring. As a result, Good feels, and I agree, that ending stocks for U.S. soybeans could come in well above the current estimate of 410 million bushels. Meanwhile, price and weather will determine how many soybeans go in the ground in the United States this spring, but increased plantings appear to be a near certainty. The real question is, how many U.S. soybean acres will there be in 1999? The number of cattle on feed in January helped corn, but Good characterizes fundamentals as being unfriendly, a position I take as well. Increased feeding of soft red winter wheat and the continued liquidation of breeding hogs are adding to the softness in demand for corn as feed. Continuing strength of the U.S. dollar will reflect negatively on corn exports, but ending stocks for corn should be modest, and there may be a small drop in corn acreage this year. When it comes to weather factors, Good reminds traders and producers that it's summer weather, not spring weather, that drives prices especially for soybeans. Based on current weather forecasts for drier-than-normal conditions in western areas of the Corn Belt, a trouble-free planting season may push any potential weather rallies off for several months. Good says another year of trend yields would likely result in further price weakness. DATES TO REMEMBER: March 8 - Afterschool Cloverbuds at Ortonville Elementary School (3:15 p.m.) March 9- 4-H Leaders Forum in Marshall March 13 - 4-H Fruit to arrive in Big Stone County March 13- Sewing Expo in Morris March 15 - 4-H Foodstand Committee Mtg. At Clinton Community Center (6:30 p.m.) March 15 - 4-H Federation Meeting at Clinton Community Center New way of setting road weight restrictions Only a three day notice will be given for spring truck weight road restrictions this year as part of a new procedure being implemented by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) to minimize damage to some of the state's roadways. The new method also includes automatically lifting the restrictions eight weeks after the start date, which should assist suppliers who are affected by spring road restrictions. LOCAL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS FREE THROW shooter winners are, left to right in front, Megan Reiffenberger, Sara LaVoi, Amanda Krogsrud, Megan Croatt and Tiffany Larson. In back are Josh Letrud, Tony Franklin, Cory Stattelman, Dan Larson and Russel Anderson. at's entertainment PIE and COFFEE ............ 99 Pineapple Cream, Banana Cream and Chocolate Cream SERVING WEDNESDAY STARTING AT 2:30 P.M. Open 6:O0 AM to 11:30 PM - Food Orders Taken Until 11:00 P.M. Hilltop's Theatre of Seasons Cafe I-IS. 7,5 & 12 ORTONVIIIF, MN (320) 839-2233 SIOUX HISTORIC PAVILION SKATING Every Friday 7:00 to 9:00 PM ~ $4.00 Adm. All ages welcome! BUD LIGHT .1oo WINDSOR DRINKS QPEN HOUSE 70th BIRTHDAY DANCE in Honor of Donald "Tucker" Thomas to be held at the Matador Fiesta Room on Sat. March 13th at 8:30 pro. Music provided by Henry's Sights and Sounds No gifts please. ;, TUES., MARCH 2 I EVENING SPECIAL t I BBQ RIBS Ist Dinner Reg. Pdce 2nd Dinner for $ 1.00 WITH COUPON ONLY I Not redeemable with gift certificate or any other coupon, THURS., MAR-CH-Z" EVENING SPECIAL. Steak Cubes Ist Dinner Reg. Price 2nd Dinner for $ 1.00 i WiTH COUPON ONLY Not redeemable with gift certificate or any other coupon INO Friday, March 5 50 lmllO ad ODESSA FIRE HALL IT Friday & Saturday BAR SPECIALS Bud Light or Calvert Extra 1.00 FIESTA ROOM Wednesday - Ladies Nht $1.00 Beer Thursday - blens Night $I,OO Beer INDEPENDENT Page 15 FIRST ICE SCULPTURE was done this year as part of the of the Arctic Open Golf Tournament Saturday, Feb. 13th. above with the nearly finished product is Darold Bailey's John Schultz. Bailey did the sculpture for the CCSC and it great addition to the Arctic Open. sion report John Cunningham, 4 nty Extension Director 2 ;18 or 1.800-279-2518 :,'E' OF POTENTIAL ,q'IO[ ON CROP S George Flaskerud, Extension Crops Economist, NDSU Extension Service, Fargo, developed the material for this week's column. Planted acres and then yields will become more and more important to the market as current marketing years come to a close. Acres in addition to yields are highly uncertain. Acres are especially uncertain this year because of government and insurance programs. Further decreases in spring wheat acres are likely as acres are shifted into oilseeds because of favorable loan rates, although crop rotations will be a limiting factor. Some spring wheat acres may be shifted into durum because of crop revenue coverage insurance, but a small shift is anticipated given the potential for higher returns from spring wheat. Consequently, durum acres may increase by a small amount over last year. Combining the reduction in spring wheat acres with the reduction in winter wheat acres, total wheat acres should be down enough that carryover stocks will become more manageable. By the end of the current marketing year on May 31, wheat stocks are projected to be 41 percent of total use, according to USDA's February Supply and Demand Report. By the end of the next marketing year on May 31, 2000, wheat stocks are likely to be in the 29- to 36-percent of total use range. The percentage realized will depend primarily on yields. Reduced ending stocks should result in stronger wheat prices. USDA's Planting Intentions Report will be released on March 31. "Increasingly, the price of corn and soybeans will take direction from 1999 crop prospects," Darrel Good says in a Feb. 22 newsletter. The University of Illinois extension economist goes on to point out, "It appears that a reduction in yield will be required to turn prices higher, particularly for soybeans. The list of negative market factors for soybeans is extensive. Disappearance of 1998 soybeans currently is falling behind the USDA projection. A strong U.S. dollar, the weak Brazilian currency, and potential record-setting harvests in Brazil and Argentinian favor South American soybeans and meal later this spring. As a result, Good feels, and I agree, that ending stocks for U.S. soybeans could come in well above the current estimate of 410 million bushels. Meanwhile, price and weather will determine how many soybeans go in the ground in the United States this spring, but increased plantings appear to be a near certainty. The real question is, how many U.S. soybean acres will there be in 1999? The number of cattle on feed in January helped corn, but Good characterizes fundamentals as being unfriendly, a position I take as well. Increased feeding of soft red winter wheat and the continued liquidation of breeding hogs are adding to the softness in demand for corn as feed. Continuing strength of the U.S. dollar will reflect negatively on corn exports, but ending stocks for corn should be modest, and there may be a small drop in corn acreage this year. When it comes to weather factors, Good reminds traders and producers that it's summer weather, not spring weather, that drives prices especially for soybeans. Based on current weather forecasts for drier-than-normal conditions in western areas of the Corn Belt, a trouble-free planting season may push any potential weather rallies off for several months. Good says another year of trend yields would likely result in further price weakness. DATES TO REMEMBER: March 8 - Afterschool Cloverbuds at Ortonville Elementary School (3:15 p.m.) March 9- 4-H Leaders Forum in Marshall March 13 - 4-H Fruit to arrive in Big Stone County March 13- Sewing Expo in Morris March 15 - 4-H Foodstand Committee Mtg. At Clinton Community Center (6:30 p.m.) March 15 - 4-H Federation Meeting at Clinton Community Center New way of setting road weight restrictions Only a three day notice will be given for spring truck weight road restrictions this year as part of a new procedure being implemented by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) to minimize damage to some of the state's roadways. The new method also includes automatically lifting the restrictions eight weeks after the start date, which should assist suppliers who are affected by spring road restrictions. LOCAL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS FREE THROW shooter winners are, left to right in front, Megan Reiffenberger, Sara LaVoi, Amanda Krogsrud, Megan Croatt and Tiffany Larson. In back are Josh Letrud, Tony Franklin, Cory Stattelman, Dan Larson and Russel Anderson. at's entertainment PIE and COFFEE ............ 99 Pineapple Cream, Banana Cream and Chocolate Cream SERVING WEDNESDAY STARTING AT 2:30 P.M. Open 6:O0 AM to 11:30 PM - Food Orders Taken Until 11:00 P.M. Hilltop's Theatre of Seasons Cafe I-IS. 7,5 & 12 ORTONVIIIF, MN (320) 839-2233 SIOUX HISTORIC PAVILION SKATING Every Friday 7:00 to 9:00 PM ~ $4.00 Adm. All ages welcome! BUD LIGHT .1oo WINDSOR DRINKS QPEN HOUSE 70th BIRTHDAY DANCE in Honor of Donald "Tucker" Thomas to be held at the Matador Fiesta Room on Sat. March 13th at 8:30 pro. Music provided by Henry's Sights and Sounds No gifts please. ;, TUES., MARCH 2 I EVENING SPECIAL t I BBQ RIBS Ist Dinner Reg. Pdce 2nd Dinner for $ 1.00 WITH COUPON ONLY I Not redeemable with gift certificate or any other coupon, THURS., MAR-CH-Z" EVENING SPECIAL. Steak Cubes Ist Dinner Reg. Price 2nd Dinner for $ 1.00 i WiTH COUPON ONLY Not redeemable with gift certificate or any other coupon INO Friday, March 5 50 lmllO ad ODESSA FIRE HALL IT Friday & Saturday BAR SPECIALS Bud Light or Calvert Extra 1.00 FIESTA ROOM Wednesday - Ladies Nht $1.00 Beer Thursday - blens Night $I,OO Beer INDEPENDENT Page 15