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April 1, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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April 1, 2003
 

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sion report Bob Stommes ;ion Educator, Lands and Business Extension Office Courthouse 3 Minnesota Ave. E. lenwood, MN 56334 320 634-5735 LDVISOR PROVIDES 41TIES Advisor is a master providing learning 'if: n s in nd and a ! m a landowner network you answer questions, activities and WA help understanding of and management options, and profitability sed business and general public and youth e about woodland. from WA provides input working with groups, answering questions and hosting, nd promoting educational :lasses are offered to Central Minnesota g. Two sessions, each. of three hours, will be April 5 at the Bob in New York Mills. on, "Minnesota's Forest ;tory, Ecology, and will discuss general ecosystems, how rage and how you can to direct this change. Some coverage of woodland susceptibility to insects and diseases will be discussed. The second session, "Growing and Tending Your Woodland" will provide information on tools that foresters use to keep woodland healthy and productive. Also discussed will be woodland management systems and management options. Classes will also be offered on June 14, at the Prairie Wetlands Learning Center in Fergus Falls. This class will consist of two three-hour sessions. The first session, "Forest Wildlife and Biodiversity: Game and Non-Game" will discuss basic wildlife needs and how to meet them on your land and in your area. This session wil.l be tailored to regional differences; however, the topics will include management for specific common species, habitat improvement and management to reduce impact of nuisance animals. The second session, "Planting trees and releasing seedlings in your woods" will discuss the best time to plant trees, the basics of tree planting and maintenance. Coverage of seedling release for seedlings will also be covered. The Woodland Advisor Program offers nine core sessions and 12 elective sessions. In the future, other sessions will be offered in the area that cover a broad range of natural resources topics. For more information, schedules or to get involved, go to the brand new Woodland Advisor website, at www.cnr.umn.edu/cfc/wa/. For registration materials and information contact: Bob Stommes, Pope County Extension Office, Phone (320) 634-5735 or Susan Seabury, Cloquet Forestry Center. Phone: (218) 8879-0850, e-mail: sseabury@umn.edu. Bob Stommes is an Regional Educator with the University of' Minnesota Extension Service in Natural Resources and Environment serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. Brenda Schuelke bridal shower An open house bridal shower for Brenda Schuelke, bride-to-be of Mandley Davis will be held April 6, 2003 at 2 p.m. at the Rosen School basement. Recipe cards preferred. Coming events The Mound Cemetery Association meeting will be held at 9:30 am. on Tuesday, April 8, at the Hilltop Cafe. Christine Karsky bridal shower An open house bridal shower will be held for Christina (Tina) Karsky, bride-to-be of Gabriel Larson, on Saturday, April 12 from 1-3 p.m. at the American Legion Room in Clinton. Tina and Gabe are resistered at Target. Recipes are preferred. f iiii The Ortonuille Independent For all your printing neeas call 320-839-6163 fax 320-839-3761 email- mail@ ortonvilleindependent .com Check out our web site at www. ortonvilleindependent .corn The ce Crea HOPPE WHETSTONE MALL OPEN 11 :OOam-9:OOpm/7 Days A Week -. 605-432-6007 East 12 SD 4 ,e 00ice, Cream Shoppe ,000 to Dialysis from perative, Land O' Lakes $2,000 was recently. and the Kidney to be located in of Directors of made the deci- of this meaningful trea by donating Manager, then for a match- with their gift, 1 donations desig- will be matched t $100,000 by the are Foundation. 'ialysis Project as of Friday, match tally donated addition to Health Services Week that a grant from government m the amount of rnportant to raise of not quite of the available have been patients, their have to use of life. ect clos- gift such as O'Lakes for our sur- outright cash d or honorarium payable to Foundation / MEL DOMINE, MANAGER of Big Stone Cooperative presents two checks for $1,000 eachthe Dialysis Project to Jan Schmidt, Executive Director of the Big Stone Health Care Foundation. and designate that the donation is for located in the lower level of Northside the Kidney Dialysis Project. Gifts Medical Center. If you have any ques- may be mailed to 450 Eastvold tionscall 320-839-4135. Donations Avenue, Ortonville MN 56278 or are tax deductible to the extent of the brought to the Foundation office law. From the Heart A Quarterly Update of Happenings in Rice Hospice Compassionate Touch- Hands On Caregiving "Touching, listening, comforting, and relieving isolation, chronic pains, stresses, and fears are frequently the most significant gifts that can be given to any of us as we confront our inevitable aging and mortality." Deane Juhan he tender compassionate touch of the human hand is a powerful nonverbal form of communication. There are times when touch alone is much more effective than any words one could say. At Rice, compassionate touch is a way of helping patients who are in pain, or who feel isolated. It is a gentle, sensitive, and non-intrusive program of massage, touch therapy, and comfort care, and is often supported by listening, reflective com- munication, intuitive feed- back, guided relaxation, and breathing Abijah Haub, Rice Massage awareness. Its Therapist, provides massage aim is to ease to a patient in a nursing home both physical once a month at the request of his family', and emotional Adults with neck and shoulder pain in a way pain, spine problems, pain and that medication tightness in the back, anxiety, and medical and depression can benefit procedures from massage, simply cannot. "When an older aduh or ill person is depressed or in pain, being held, gently massaged, and touched in a focused, unconditional way can draw that person out of isolation and help the person feel valued as a human being," says Abijah Haub, Rice Massage Therapist. The prescription for compassionate touch for the aging, the ill, or anyone, is really quite simple. Develop the ability to "see" the wonderful person inside the body and reach out to that individual with a caring and open heart. The ability to truly focus your attention on the individual is more important than any specifically learned techniques. Rice Hospice volunteers are trained to give hand massages as a part of what they offer to patients and families. The volunteers have found that being able to offer this form of com- passionate touch is an important part of "being there" for the patient. For infor- mation about compassionate touch for patients, please call the Hospice Office at 320-231-4450 or Rice Rehabilitation Center at 320-231-4210. Abijah evaluates his hand and massages the painful muscles. Massage therapy is available to hospice patients. "Many times they will notice immediate relief from the massage," said Abijah. Rice Hospice Volunteer Training Scheduled for April ospice volunteers help provide support and bereavement care to hospice patients and their families. Their support can be offered in the home, the hospital, or the nursing home. Rice Hospice is seeking volunteers to become part of the Hospice Program. The training course will be offered in two full day sessions by the Rice Hospice Program to prepare professional staff and volunteers for hospice care. Sessions will be held on Tuesday, April 15 and Thursday, April 17 from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. in Rice Memorial Hospital's Lakeland Auditorium. HOSPICE The cost is $20.00 for all Rice Hospice participants, clergy, and all volunteers presently or planning to work with Rice Hospice. For all other participants not affiliated with Rice Hospice, the cost is $60.00. The training fee will be refunded to those participants who become volunteers at the completion of training. For additional information please contact Evy Hatjistilianos, Hospice Volunteer Coordinator at (320) 231-4433. Anyone interested may register at the Rice Education Center, Rice Memorial Hospital, 301 Becker Avenue SW, Willmar 56201. I If you would like a Speaker for your group, please call Hospice at 320-231-4450 O!7 1-800-336-7423, III III IIIIIIIII II I For more information about Rice Hospice, contact the central Hospice Office in Wiilmar at 320-231-4450.' Rice Hospice Satellites located in the following hospitals: Appleton Appleton Municipal Hospital & Nursing Home Banson Swift County Benson Hospital Dawson Montevideo Johnson Memorial Health Chippewa County Montevideo Services Hospital Granite Falls Ortonville/Graceville Granite Falls Municipal Hospital Ortonville Area Health Services & Manor Paynesville Paynesville Area Health Care Systems Willmar Rice Memorial Hospital 1, 2003 00INDEPENDENT Page 7 sion report Bob Stommes ;ion Educator, Lands and Business Extension Office Courthouse 3 Minnesota Ave. E. lenwood, MN 56334 320 634-5735 LDVISOR PROVIDES 41TIES Advisor is a master providing learning 'if: n s in nd and a ! m a landowner network you answer questions, activities and WA help understanding of and management options, and profitability sed business and general public and youth e about woodland. from WA provides input working with groups, answering questions and hosting, nd promoting educational :lasses are offered to Central Minnesota g. Two sessions, each. of three hours, will be April 5 at the Bob in New York Mills. on, "Minnesota's Forest ;tory, Ecology, and will discuss general ecosystems, how rage and how you can to direct this change. Some coverage of woodland susceptibility to insects and diseases will be discussed. The second session, "Growing and Tending Your Woodland" will provide information on tools that foresters use to keep woodland healthy and productive. Also discussed will be woodland management systems and management options. Classes will also be offered on June 14, at the Prairie Wetlands Learning Center in Fergus Falls. This class will consist of two three-hour sessions. The first session, "Forest Wildlife and Biodiversity: Game and Non-Game" will discuss basic wildlife needs and how to meet them on your land and in your area. This session wil.l be tailored to regional differences; however, the topics will include management for specific common species, habitat improvement and management to reduce impact of nuisance animals. The second session, "Planting trees and releasing seedlings in your woods" will discuss the best time to plant trees, the basics of tree planting and maintenance. Coverage of seedling release for seedlings will also be covered. The Woodland Advisor Program offers nine core sessions and 12 elective sessions. In the future, other sessions will be offered in the area that cover a broad range of natural resources topics. For more information, schedules or to get involved, go to the brand new Woodland Advisor website, at www.cnr.umn.edu/cfc/wa/. For registration materials and information contact: Bob Stommes, Pope County Extension Office, Phone (320) 634-5735 or Susan Seabury, Cloquet Forestry Center. Phone: (218) 8879-0850, e-mail: sseabury@umn.edu. Bob Stommes is an Regional Educator with the University of' Minnesota Extension Service in Natural Resources and Environment serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. Brenda Schuelke bridal shower An open house bridal shower for Brenda Schuelke, bride-to-be of Mandley Davis will be held April 6, 2003 at 2 p.m. at the Rosen School basement. Recipe cards preferred. Coming events The Mound Cemetery Association meeting will be held at 9:30 am. on Tuesday, April 8, at the Hilltop Cafe. Christine Karsky bridal shower An open house bridal shower will be held for Christina (Tina) Karsky, bride-to-be of Gabriel Larson, on Saturday, April 12 from 1-3 p.m. at the American Legion Room in Clinton. Tina and Gabe are resistered at Target. Recipes are preferred. f iiii The Ortonuille Independent For all your printing neeas call 320-839-6163 fax 320-839-3761 email- mail@ ortonvilleindependent .com Check out our web site at www. ortonvilleindependent .corn The ce Crea HOPPE WHETSTONE MALL OPEN 11 :OOam-9:OOpm/7 Days A Week -. 605-432-6007 East 12 SD 4 ,e 00ice, Cream Shoppe ,000 to Dialysis from perative, Land O' Lakes $2,000 was recently. and the Kidney to be located in of Directors of made the deci- of this meaningful trea by donating Manager, then for a match- with their gift, 1 donations desig- will be matched t $100,000 by the are Foundation. 'ialysis Project as of Friday, match tally donated addition to Health Services Week that a grant from government m the amount of rnportant to raise of not quite of the available have been patients, their have to use of life. ect clos- gift such as O'Lakes for our sur- outright cash d or honorarium payable to Foundation / MEL DOMINE, MANAGER of Big Stone Cooperative presents two checks for $1,000 eachthe Dialysis Project to Jan Schmidt, Executive Director of the Big Stone Health Care Foundation. and designate that the donation is for located in the lower level of Northside the Kidney Dialysis Project. Gifts Medical Center. If you have any ques- may be mailed to 450 Eastvold tionscall 320-839-4135. Donations Avenue, Ortonville MN 56278 or are tax deductible to the extent of the brought to the Foundation office law. From the Heart A Quarterly Update of Happenings in Rice Hospice Compassionate Touch- Hands On Caregiving "Touching, listening, comforting, and relieving isolation, chronic pains, stresses, and fears are frequently the most significant gifts that can be given to any of us as we confront our inevitable aging and mortality." Deane Juhan he tender compassionate touch of the human hand is a powerful nonverbal form of communication. There are times when touch alone is much more effective than any words one could say. At Rice, compassionate touch is a way of helping patients who are in pain, or who feel isolated. It is a gentle, sensitive, and non-intrusive program of massage, touch therapy, and comfort care, and is often supported by listening, reflective com- munication, intuitive feed- back, guided relaxation, and breathing Abijah Haub, Rice Massage awareness. Its Therapist, provides massage aim is to ease to a patient in a nursing home both physical once a month at the request of his family', and emotional Adults with neck and shoulder pain in a way pain, spine problems, pain and that medication tightness in the back, anxiety, and medical and depression can benefit procedures from massage, simply cannot. "When an older aduh or ill person is depressed or in pain, being held, gently massaged, and touched in a focused, unconditional way can draw that person out of isolation and help the person feel valued as a human being," says Abijah Haub, Rice Massage Therapist. The prescription for compassionate touch for the aging, the ill, or anyone, is really quite simple. Develop the ability to "see" the wonderful person inside the body and reach out to that individual with a caring and open heart. The ability to truly focus your attention on the individual is more important than any specifically learned techniques. Rice Hospice volunteers are trained to give hand massages as a part of what they offer to patients and families. The volunteers have found that being able to offer this form of com- passionate touch is an important part of "being there" for the patient. For infor- mation about compassionate touch for patients, please call the Hospice Office at 320-231-4450 or Rice Rehabilitation Center at 320-231-4210. Abijah evaluates his hand and massages the painful muscles. Massage therapy is available to hospice patients. "Many times they will notice immediate relief from the massage," said Abijah. Rice Hospice Volunteer Training Scheduled for April ospice volunteers help provide support and bereavement care to hospice patients and their families. Their support can be offered in the home, the hospital, or the nursing home. Rice Hospice is seeking volunteers to become part of the Hospice Program. The training course will be offered in two full day sessions by the Rice Hospice Program to prepare professional staff and volunteers for hospice care. Sessions will be held on Tuesday, April 15 and Thursday, April 17 from 8 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. in Rice Memorial Hospital's Lakeland Auditorium. HOSPICE The cost is $20.00 for all Rice Hospice participants, clergy, and all volunteers presently or planning to work with Rice Hospice. For all other participants not affiliated with Rice Hospice, the cost is $60.00. The training fee will be refunded to those participants who become volunteers at the completion of training. For additional information please contact Evy Hatjistilianos, Hospice Volunteer Coordinator at (320) 231-4433. Anyone interested may register at the Rice Education Center, Rice Memorial Hospital, 301 Becker Avenue SW, Willmar 56201. I If you would like a Speaker for your group, please call Hospice at 320-231-4450 O!7 1-800-336-7423, III III IIIIIIIII II I For more information about Rice Hospice, contact the central Hospice Office in Wiilmar at 320-231-4450.' Rice Hospice Satellites located in the following hospitals: Appleton Appleton Municipal Hospital & Nursing Home Banson Swift County Benson Hospital Dawson Montevideo Johnson Memorial Health Chippewa County Montevideo Services Hospital Granite Falls Ortonville/Graceville Granite Falls Municipal Hospital Ortonville Area Health Services & Manor Paynesville Paynesville Area Health Care Systems Willmar Rice Memorial Hospital 1, 2003 00INDEPENDENT Page 7