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April 1, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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C BASEBALL players for the 2003 season are Travis Ninneman, Kelly Stattelman, Tony Franzky. ........... : •• , , ......... :!i! ¸¸ ii!i ¸ PLAYERS Cory Stattelman, Craig Mork and Blayn Ronglien warm up for baseball prac- their first game on April 3 at Hancock. it is watchword for ...... oar burning being issued by of Natural Resources Who are anxious to :, DNR Regional UIm, said that ng ban has not been Minnesota, condi- for fires to of snowfall the danger, caution people debris until the and leaves are fully said. "It is very get started under And it can be very difficult - and expensive - for local fire departments to have to try and put them out." When conditions permit, Romaine offers the following tips for any out- door burning: • Always obtain'a burning permit and notify the local fire authority of your plans. • Clear all vegetation for at least ten feet around the burn pile. • Have hand tools and water avail- able to control the fire. • Stay with the fire until it is dead. The DNR has announced it intends to impose burning restrictions over much of central and northern Minnesota within the next two weeks. While there are no plans to restrict burning in southern Minnesota at this point, that could occur if dry condi- tions persist, Romaine noted. Romaine also added that pre- scribed burns, which are used as a tool to enhance native grass plantings, are best done prior to green-up. "This is the time of year when many wild land management agencies are out doing prescribed burns," Romaine said. "But these burns are done only under a detailed plan and under weather conditions that allow for safe pre- scribed burning." report Educator, Nutrition 28, Suite 1 56267 IS THERE RRY ABOUT tlr " ii:il ?i see if we can help more about rat! When we eat and oils triglycerides. end up in your re often found as they are the body by the They can tr body just as we are not s the reason these confused. They Cholesterol is axy, powdery taste or see you eat. dangerous? the blood often of some sort. ˘cerides are bmcrease in LDL ad" one) and a (the are if you have high triglycerides, you have high cholesterol, but there are always exceptions to the rule. We can say then that high triglycerides are indirectly associated with heart disease, because high LDL cholesterol and low' HDL cholesterol are linked to heart disease. A triglyceride measurement by itself is useless and it must be accompanied by a complete lipoprotein cholesterol determination to give us any helpful information as triglyceride levels vary greatly. Normal triglyceride levels are 85 to 250 mg/dl and 250"to 500 mg/dl is considered borderline-high. What can you do then to improve your triglyceride number'? The treatment for high triglycerides is similar to the treatment for high cholesterol: reduce total fat and cholesterol in the diet, quit smoking, control your blood pressure, lose weight if you need to, and exercise regularly. It is also helpful to your health and triglyceride level to move the complex carbohydrates you eat in your diet to whole grains (oatmeal, brown rice, pearl barley, popcorn, whole wheat, wild rice, buckwheat, cornmeal, and whole rye) as much as possible. It is also important to remember that both triglycerides and cholesterol increase as we grow older; therefore, Craig Hassel University of Minnesota Extension Service nutrition specialist tells us, "Judging whether any treatment should be imposed is ultimately a personal matter and must be made on an individual basis in consultation with your health care professional." Karl Beran is an educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Health and Nutrition serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County, [ TAKŁ OUTTO ITHE TWl tVS t Watch your Minnesota Twins up close at the Metrodome all season! Round-trip bus & great lower level reserved ticket packages available from just $59 per person. Comfortable motorcoach buses are departing from more than 200 communities across Minnesota throughout the 2003 season! Wherever you live, a bus is leaving from somewhere nearby! No traffic, parking. or ticket hassles! We've got all the bases covered! Call (888) 894-6703 or visit www.twinsbus.com for a complete listing of dates and locations. Peterson seeks major expansion of wind energy Xcel lobbying sinks plan to expand west-central windfarms. Rep. Aaron Peterson, joined by Lincoln County Commissioner and former state agriculture commissioner Jim Nichols, launched a major effort to require expansion of wind-energy production in West-Central Minnesota as legislators considered the bill authorizing more nuclear waste stor- age in the state - but the proposal was killed as Xcel Energy continued to resist restrictions on the bill. "This was an opportunity to change the direction of energy policy in Minnesota away from costly and unsustainable nuclear power," Peterson, of rural Madison said. "This was a vote against small-scale, home- grown wind energy production that creates jobs, tax dollars and profits to small businesses in Rural Minnesota, and in favor of continued corporate control over our energy supply." As the House Environment Committee considered legislation authorizing expanded storage of nuclear waste at Xcel's Prairie Island nuclear powerplant near Red Wing, Peterson offered a proposal that laid out a road map for an orderly shut- down of the plant over the next decade. The generating capacity of Prairie Island would be replaced with 500 megawatts of new wind-energy systems in Western Minnesota. "The very fact that we are consid- ering a nuclear waste-storage bill for the second time in nine years shows the fundamental problem. Nobody knows what to do with the radioactive waste," Peterson said. "The federal government hasn't lived up to its promises to take it. No other state wants it. Prairie Island and its waste will be a burden to Minnesota taxpay- ers and consumers for decades to come." In contrast, windfarms produce no waste and do not require a costly infrastructure of publicly funded roads and security, Peterson and Nichols told the committee. Because there are no such costs, many eco- nomic calculations show wind energy is more cost-effective than nuclear or even coal plants. "The bottom line is that Xcel Energy wants to continue 'business as usual' and only gives a nod toward other forms," Peterson said. "You can't keep sweeping nuclear 'aste under the rug forever." Health purchasing alliance moving forward in Minnesota During the winters of 2002 and 2003, public forums were held in Montevideo, Morris, Alexandria and Willmar to determine the interest and need for the formation of a Health Care Purchasing Alliance in the west central region. Two hundred people representing various sectors including health care providers, businesses, insurance agents, farmers, local governments, and individuals concerned about health care access and cost participat- ed in the forums• The forums featured a presentation summarizing the challenges of insur- ing employees in our rural area and how that effects the overall economic situation. The participants shared some of the challenges regarding health care coverage for both private and public sectors, increasing rates, lack of choices, the need to stabilize premium, and retention of employees in the area. Many forum participants indicated an interest in consumer accountabili- ty. Consumers are not always aware of the costs of various procedures and medications, and would alter their behavior if they were aware of these costs. Others argued for different and more creative cost sharing plans. Most seemed interested in the ability to create customized health care plans for the region. With the help of Liz Quam Berne from Advocates for Marketplace Options for Mainstreet, and several volunteer panelists from other orga- nized regional Purchasing Alliances in Minnesota, participants were intro- duced to potential solutions to the problems of affordable and accessible health care. Forum participants expressed an interest in being able to customize a benefits package that could be competitively priced and attractive to small businesses. Participants responded to several questions regarding health care cover- age changes, importance of several related health care issues and spoke of how supportive they were in forming a Health Purchasing Alliance in west central Minnesota. 79% of the forum participants indicated that they expe- rienced significant changes in their health care coverage that has affected their ability to offer employer spon- sored health care coverage. Ninety-three percent of the forum participants supported the formation of the Health Care Purchasing Alliance in Minnesota. Thirty five of the forum participants volunteered to serve on the Steering Committee to move the process forward. Since the forums, the volunteer Steering Committee has been meeting monthly to move the process forward so that a product can be developed in a year or two. The committee is in the first phase of organizing the legal entity of an alliance, and seeking additional grant dollars to support the needed work. The West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership provided funding for the public forums, coordination and research needs to support the work of the Steering Committee. The University of Minnesota Morris and the Center for Small Towns are providing research, survey assessment and plan- ning assistance for the project, For more information on the Health Care Purchasing Alliance, con- tact Dorothy Rosemeier, staff of the West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership at (320) 589-1711, or toll free at (866) 589- 1711, or Susan Brickweg, coordinator for the project at (320) 269-8484, or check out the web site at www.insure- ruralminnesota.org. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY - Ortonville " Municipal ' Golf Course - 2003 SEASON ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA MEMBERSHIP SCHEDULE Regular Adult Membership* ..................... $295.00 (If paid by April 15th) After April 15, 2003 - $330.00 Family Memberships (Age 18 & under)* ............................... $630.00 (if paid by A:pril 15th) After April 15, 2003 - $725.00 *Discount is offered if purchased by April 15, 2003 to Adult Memberships ONLY Age 19-22 ........................ . ................................................ $158.00 Age 13-18 ......................................................................... $ 95.00 Age 12 & under ................................................................. $ 53.00 New Member Discount** ................................ , .................... $255.00 **25% Dscount is offered to NEW ADULT Memberships (This offer is for adults who haoe not had a membership within the last floe years at the Ortonuille Golf Course.) CART HOUSE RENTALS Rental Fee for Private Shed ...................................................................................... $105.00 Electricity (if needed) .................................................................................................. $20.00 User Fee (to use cart on the course) ...................................................... " ..................... $120.00 Call or stop in to purchase memberships al: Ortonville City Office 315 Madison Avenue Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839-3428 [ II I OR Ortonville Clubhouse Golf Course Road Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839-3606 III I I 1, 2003 "- INDEPENDENT Page 9 C BASEBALL players for the 2003 season are Travis Ninneman, Kelly Stattelman, Tony Franzky. ........... : •• , , ......... :!i! ¸¸ ii!i ¸ PLAYERS Cory Stattelman, Craig Mork and Blayn Ronglien warm up for baseball prac- their first game on April 3 at Hancock. it is watchword for ...... oar burning being issued by of Natural Resources Who are anxious to :, DNR Regional UIm, said that ng ban has not been Minnesota, condi- for fires to of snowfall the danger, caution people debris until the and leaves are fully said. "It is very get started under And it can be very difficult - and expensive - for local fire departments to have to try and put them out." When conditions permit, Romaine offers the following tips for any out- door burning: • Always obtain'a burning permit and notify the local fire authority of your plans. • Clear all vegetation for at least ten feet around the burn pile. • Have hand tools and water avail- able to control the fire. • Stay with the fire until it is dead. The DNR has announced it intends to impose burning restrictions over much of central and northern Minnesota within the next two weeks. While there are no plans to restrict burning in southern Minnesota at this point, that could occur if dry condi- tions persist, Romaine noted. Romaine also added that pre- scribed burns, which are used as a tool to enhance native grass plantings, are best done prior to green-up. "This is the time of year when many wild land management agencies are out doing prescribed burns," Romaine said. "But these burns are done only under a detailed plan and under weather conditions that allow for safe pre- scribed burning." report Educator, Nutrition 28, Suite 1 56267 IS THERE RRY ABOUT tlr " ii:il ?i see if we can help more about rat! When we eat and oils triglycerides. end up in your re often found as they are the body by the They can tr body just as we are not s the reason these confused. They Cholesterol is axy, powdery taste or see you eat. dangerous? the blood often of some sort. ˘cerides are bmcrease in LDL ad" one) and a (the are if you have high triglycerides, you have high cholesterol, but there are always exceptions to the rule. We can say then that high triglycerides are indirectly associated with heart disease, because high LDL cholesterol and low' HDL cholesterol are linked to heart disease. A triglyceride measurement by itself is useless and it must be accompanied by a complete lipoprotein cholesterol determination to give us any helpful information as triglyceride levels vary greatly. Normal triglyceride levels are 85 to 250 mg/dl and 250"to 500 mg/dl is considered borderline-high. What can you do then to improve your triglyceride number'? The treatment for high triglycerides is similar to the treatment for high cholesterol: reduce total fat and cholesterol in the diet, quit smoking, control your blood pressure, lose weight if you need to, and exercise regularly. It is also helpful to your health and triglyceride level to move the complex carbohydrates you eat in your diet to whole grains (oatmeal, brown rice, pearl barley, popcorn, whole wheat, wild rice, buckwheat, cornmeal, and whole rye) as much as possible. It is also important to remember that both triglycerides and cholesterol increase as we grow older; therefore, Craig Hassel University of Minnesota Extension Service nutrition specialist tells us, "Judging whether any treatment should be imposed is ultimately a personal matter and must be made on an individual basis in consultation with your health care professional." Karl Beran is an educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Health and Nutrition serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County, [ TAKŁ OUTTO ITHE TWl tVS t Watch your Minnesota Twins up close at the Metrodome all season! Round-trip bus & great lower level reserved ticket packages available from just $59 per person. Comfortable motorcoach buses are departing from more than 200 communities across Minnesota throughout the 2003 season! Wherever you live, a bus is leaving from somewhere nearby! No traffic, parking. or ticket hassles! We've got all the bases covered! Call (888) 894-6703 or visit www.twinsbus.com for a complete listing of dates and locations. Peterson seeks major expansion of wind energy Xcel lobbying sinks plan to expand west-central windfarms. Rep. Aaron Peterson, joined by Lincoln County Commissioner and former state agriculture commissioner Jim Nichols, launched a major effort to require expansion of wind-energy production in West-Central Minnesota as legislators considered the bill authorizing more nuclear waste stor- age in the state - but the proposal was killed as Xcel Energy continued to resist restrictions on the bill. "This was an opportunity to change the direction of energy policy in Minnesota away from costly and unsustainable nuclear power," Peterson, of rural Madison said. "This was a vote against small-scale, home- grown wind energy production that creates jobs, tax dollars and profits to small businesses in Rural Minnesota, and in favor of continued corporate control over our energy supply." As the House Environment Committee considered legislation authorizing expanded storage of nuclear waste at Xcel's Prairie Island nuclear powerplant near Red Wing, Peterson offered a proposal that laid out a road map for an orderly shut- down of the plant over the next decade. The generating capacity of Prairie Island would be replaced with 500 megawatts of new wind-energy systems in Western Minnesota. "The very fact that we are consid- ering a nuclear waste-storage bill for the second time in nine years shows the fundamental problem. Nobody knows what to do with the radioactive waste," Peterson said. "The federal government hasn't lived up to its promises to take it. No other state wants it. Prairie Island and its waste will be a burden to Minnesota taxpay- ers and consumers for decades to come." In contrast, windfarms produce no waste and do not require a costly infrastructure of publicly funded roads and security, Peterson and Nichols told the committee. Because there are no such costs, many eco- nomic calculations show wind energy is more cost-effective than nuclear or even coal plants. "The bottom line is that Xcel Energy wants to continue 'business as usual' and only gives a nod toward other forms," Peterson said. "You can't keep sweeping nuclear 'aste under the rug forever." Health purchasing alliance moving forward in Minnesota During the winters of 2002 and 2003, public forums were held in Montevideo, Morris, Alexandria and Willmar to determine the interest and need for the formation of a Health Care Purchasing Alliance in the west central region. Two hundred people representing various sectors including health care providers, businesses, insurance agents, farmers, local governments, and individuals concerned about health care access and cost participat- ed in the forums• The forums featured a presentation summarizing the challenges of insur- ing employees in our rural area and how that effects the overall economic situation. The participants shared some of the challenges regarding health care coverage for both private and public sectors, increasing rates, lack of choices, the need to stabilize premium, and retention of employees in the area. Many forum participants indicated an interest in consumer accountabili- ty. Consumers are not always aware of the costs of various procedures and medications, and would alter their behavior if they were aware of these costs. Others argued for different and more creative cost sharing plans. Most seemed interested in the ability to create customized health care plans for the region. With the help of Liz Quam Berne from Advocates for Marketplace Options for Mainstreet, and several volunteer panelists from other orga- nized regional Purchasing Alliances in Minnesota, participants were intro- duced to potential solutions to the problems of affordable and accessible health care. Forum participants expressed an interest in being able to customize a benefits package that could be competitively priced and attractive to small businesses. Participants responded to several questions regarding health care cover- age changes, importance of several related health care issues and spoke of how supportive they were in forming a Health Purchasing Alliance in west central Minnesota. 79% of the forum participants indicated that they expe- rienced significant changes in their health care coverage that has affected their ability to offer employer spon- sored health care coverage. Ninety-three percent of the forum participants supported the formation of the Health Care Purchasing Alliance in Minnesota. Thirty five of the forum participants volunteered to serve on the Steering Committee to move the process forward. Since the forums, the volunteer Steering Committee has been meeting monthly to move the process forward so that a product can be developed in a year or two. The committee is in the first phase of organizing the legal entity of an alliance, and seeking additional grant dollars to support the needed work. The West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership provided funding for the public forums, coordination and research needs to support the work of the Steering Committee. The University of Minnesota Morris and the Center for Small Towns are providing research, survey assessment and plan- ning assistance for the project, For more information on the Health Care Purchasing Alliance, con- tact Dorothy Rosemeier, staff of the West Central Regional Sustainable Development Partnership at (320) 589-1711, or toll free at (866) 589- 1711, or Susan Brickweg, coordinator for the project at (320) 269-8484, or check out the web site at www.insure- ruralminnesota.org. INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY - Ortonville " Municipal ' Golf Course - 2003 SEASON ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA MEMBERSHIP SCHEDULE Regular Adult Membership* ..................... $295.00 (If paid by April 15th) After April 15, 2003 - $330.00 Family Memberships (Age 18 & under)* ............................... $630.00 (if paid by A:pril 15th) After April 15, 2003 - $725.00 *Discount is offered if purchased by April 15, 2003 to Adult Memberships ONLY Age 19-22 ........................ . ................................................ $158.00 Age 13-18 ......................................................................... $ 95.00 Age 12 & under ................................................................. $ 53.00 New Member Discount** ................................ , .................... $255.00 **25% Dscount is offered to NEW ADULT Memberships (This offer is for adults who haoe not had a membership within the last floe years at the Ortonuille Golf Course.) CART HOUSE RENTALS Rental Fee for Private Shed ...................................................................................... $105.00 Electricity (if needed) .................................................................................................. $20.00 User Fee (to use cart on the course) ...................................................... " ..................... $120.00 Call or stop in to purchase memberships al: Ortonville City Office 315 Madison Avenue Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839-3428 [ II I OR Ortonville Clubhouse Golf Course Road Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839-3606 III I I 1, 2003 "- INDEPENDENT Page 9