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April 2, 2002     The Ortonville Independent
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April 2, 2002
 

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in \\; BIG STONE COUNTY COUNTRYSIDE PUBLIC HEALTH employees celebrate Public Health week. Left to right are: back row, Liz Auch-Administrator/Director of Nurses, Renaee Schreck P.H.N., Marilee Haukos W.I.C. Technician and Jan Hansen R.N. In Front are Trudy Olson P.H.N., Julie Kunrath R.N., Beth Guse Office Coordinator and Lynette Arnold P.H.N. Countryside celebrate public health week Countryside Public Health wants to take this opportunity to remind our communities of the various ways we promote the health of our residents. If you stop for a refreshing drink from the farm well, Countryside is available to test the water to insure it's purity. We offer radon test kits to test for the presence of radon in your home. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer. Your favorite cafe is inspected by Countryside Environmental Staff to help them keep abreast of new regula- tions. You may have your blood pressure tested at your place of employment this spring by Countryside Public Health or learn about a program to pay for mammograms for women who are eligible. We offer Expectant Parent classes three times a year and new parents are contacted by a Countryside nurse to answer any of those new baby ques- tions. Pregnant, postpartum and breast- feeding women are encouraged to call and see if they and their children under age five are eligible for the WIC supplemental food program. Child and Teen Check-ups are a great way to get the needed exams for children who qualify for M.A. or Minnesota Care. Car seat clinics are sponsored by Countryside and information on car seats is available at any Countryside office. Family planning is also available to qualifying men and women. The lead project in Chippewa, Swift and Yellow Medicine counties will test your children up to age 4 for harmful lead levels. Countryside Public Health can help locate immunization records and provide immunizations as needed. We work with schools and com- munity groups to address youth risk behaviors in the areas of youth tobac- co and alcohol use, unhealthy nutri- tion, depression and other mental health issues. Long term care consultation is pro- vided for people that may need assis- tance to stay in their homes. Countryside, along with Family Services, can provide information on options and case management for home care and other services. The mission of Countryside Public Health is to bring people together to create a healthy future for all Minnesotans. Join us as we celebrate Public Health. emission standards. Whether the prices for fuel have peaked or not remains to be seen, but prices usually increasc just before Memorial Day. It may be wise to contract at least some of this year's fuel needs at current prices. SDSU's crop planning budgets for spring planted crops are being printed and will be available soon in County Extension Offices. [NFO-U TIPS FOR GARDNERS Don't be in a hurry to uncover your plants this spring. It's best to remove mulch in layers. For additional helpful gardening tips, call INFO-U at 1-800- 525-U of M (612-624-2200 metro). Enter one of the following: 458 - Spring bulbs and hard frosts 455 - Bulbs--what to do after they bloom 444- Uncovering perennials 432 - Uncovering roses 498- Uncovering strawberries 526 - Spring lawn repair Also available at www.extension.umn.edu/info-u Birthdays As Taken From The Big Stone American Legion Auxiliary Birthday Calendar. Tuesday, Apr. 2 Patrick K. Conraads. Janice Wolf, Sarah Hanratty, David Meyer, Nick Reinke, Jodi K. Beck, Nathan Adams, Marilyn Barnhardt, Rick Reinke, Mark Block II, Emily Pillatzki, Noah Richard Kottke, Joshua Pillatzki, Kay Thompson Wednesday, Apr. 3 Amanda Jo Collins, Patrick Kraemer, Paula LaVoi, Amanda Rae Mueller, Lisa Vietzke, Nicole Bogenreif, Amy Louise Danielson Thursday, Apr. 4 Ruth Hoel, Ron Rawleigh, Jodi Schneck Bungarden, Margaret Schake, Laura Streich, Peggy Wieman, Amy Vietzke, Starr Hallock, Warren Block, Traci Extension report [ " " John Cunningham County Extension Educator 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518 CROP PRODUCTION COSTS EXPECTED TO BE LOWER Don Peterson, Extension Marketing and Management Specialist, SDSU, Brookings, prepared the material for this week's column. Costs of growing spring-planted crops this year are expected to be down from 2001. Costs of production for most crops are lower this year compared to last because of lower interest rates and lower energy prices. The Federal Reserve System lowered interest rates eleven times last year, and as of the end of the fourth quarter 2001, the average interest rates charged to farmers are around 7.75 percent for operating loans, machinery loans, and real estate loans. A year ago, the average rate was about 10 percent for all three types of loans. Lower interest rates mean lower ownership costs for land and machinery and lower interest payments. The two reasons for this year's lower energy costs are lower crude oil prices and a slower economy. Lower energy prices translate into lower operating costs for machinery, namely lower gasoline and diesel costs. But lower energy costs make their biggest difference in the prices for fertilizer, especially nitrogen. Currently, anhydrous ammonia prices are about $280 per ton, down about $50 compared to a year ago. Urea is down nearly $70 at $175 per ton and DAP is down about $30 at $215 per ton. Seed costs are mixed and in some cases not very comparable to 2001 due to lower market prices for home grown seeds and changing technology. Chemical costs are unchanged from last year's budgets. The new price list published by the SDSU Plant Science was not available at the time the budgets were calculated. Peterson expects that the net effect is mixed, with some chemical costs higher and others lower. Machinery ownership and operating costs are mostly lower due to lower interest rates and fuel prices. Partially offsetting these reduced costs are higher repair costs and higher purchase prices for most new equipment. Machine rental rates are higher and custom rates are generally higher. Land costs are mixed. In some areas, land rental rates actually declined, but in most counties, they are higher this spring. The lower rates occur mostly in the western end of South Dakota, while the biggest increases are in the eastern end. In some counties, rental rates increased enough to consume the entire decline in operating costs. However, in most counties, the total costs of production are actually lower from what they were a year ago. Fuel costs have been increasing rapidly in the past two weeks, for several reasons. Crude oil prices are rising in response to OPEC's efforts to cut production. The econom.y is recovering from a recession, increasing demand. Some refineries have shut down or are on reduced production schedules to conduct preventive maintenance and/or reformulate gasoline to meet summer D&L Photo Advantix 1-Hour Photo Processin9 Lab rrceosm9 Same Day - Next Day - 307 Main St., Milbank Same Pr/ce 432-5222 Across from Pizza Ranch (25 exp) (without panoramics) Stop in and see us at flw Taste of Home Cooking School Thursday, April 4, at the Mil nk High School! Copy Prints Now Available! No negative needed. We can make any size photo from your photo. we can also make photos from your digital cameras, CDs and floppy discs. Conroy Friday, Apr. 5 Lori Gustafson Strei, Jo Kelzer, Brian Hasslen, Val Rausch, Amber Anderson, Mark Torgerson Saturday, Apr. 6 Matthew Alan Knip, Pat Danielson, Jessica Anne Marie Bankers, Natasha Thompson Sunday, Apr. 7 Brian Rheingans, Gary Streich. Janice Mack Hering, John Ness, Jon Hull, Alex Johnson, Andy Rausch, True Minnesota. Some things are distinctly Minnesotan -- like Minnesota, recognized for delivering quality years. That's why more MinnesOtans choose Call me for individual or group plans or Tom Oakes /pmt 40 NW 2nd Street Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839-2118 or 800-630-4978 rtonv Earl Dr. Dan Utsch [] [] unlci t> olf 2002 ORTONVILLE, HI MEMBERSHIP SCHEDULE Regular Adult Membership ....................... $280.00 (if paid by April 15th) After April 15, 2002 - $315.00 II Family Memberships (Age 18 & under) ........................... Of After April 15, Age 19-22 ............................................................ Age 13-18 .............................................................. Age 12 & under ....................................................... New Member .................................. ....................... (to qualify must not have had a membership within the last 00,.ART 9 Holes ........ " ......... 18 Holes ............................ All Day (Monday-ThursdaY)'" Private Carts (per Rental Fee for Private Electricity (if needed) User Fee (to use cart on the GREEN FEES 9 HOLES Monday-Thursday ............................... $14.00 Friday-Sunday/Holidays ...................... $16.00 18 HOLES Monday-Thursday ............................... $20.00 Friday-Sunday/Holidays ...................... $23.00 ALL-DAY PASS Monday-Thursday ............................... $ 30.00 7-Day Pass (unlimited) ....................... $120.00 Call or stop in to purchase Ortonville City Office OR Ortonville Golf Ortonville, 3 315 Madison Avenue Ortonville, MN 56278 320-839-3428 Page 4b 00iNDEPENDENT