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April 8, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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/...,,,% By JDK News today from OHS classmate and long-time friend and reader, Marj (Stansfield) Sartorius of Windom: "This is reality! It is 55 years since we graduated! The time has passed so quickly! It is time to get together again while we still can! Plans are made to meet in Ortonville on Aug.16th, 2003 at the Matador Supper Club at 6 p.m. This will be the same week end as the Ortonville celebration of Corn Fest so may be a good time to get together with other friends and relatives also. Some of us had dinner together last year in August and had such a good time just visiting so it was suggested that we celebrate the same way this year. No planned program or entertainment just come with conversation and sto- ries to tell or thoughts to reminisce about. We would like to hear if you plan to come and if you can't come please share a greeting with us. Plans Should be completed by July 1st. See you in August !" ***** With the sudden passing last week of long-time friend Jim Carlson_one of the best dry-wailers of all time, our prayers go out to his wife and family members at this time of bereavement. Another fine turnout for another excellent staging of Big Stone Health Care Foundation's annual Gala held last Saturday. Congrats to all who had a hand in the presentation. Congrats also to all who helped in the effort for the dialysis machine fund-raising...which exceeded its goal. The machine will be purchased in the near future...adding yet another fine asset to Ortonville's health needs[ So heartening it is to see the Iraqi war going our way...the way of freedom. Seems like it will soon be over, barring any unseen unsuspected acts from the enemy. We hope and pray now that the re-establish- ment of the new Iraqi gov- ernment will take place for the best interests of all, espe- cially the Iraqi populace! For what it's worth...some advice to our current Minnesota Twins: Beware of over-confidence, coming off your great year in 2002. Just as with this year's Golden Gophers bas- ketball team, forecasters and media had them ranked well over their heads, and their play that followed was far from expected. Though the Twins started out with a bang by sweeping a three-game series from lowly Detroit, they looked "lousy" in losing a three-game series, at home yet, to Toronto over the past week- end. True, it's a long season, and maybe we're jumping the gun, but let's hope they play up to their true abilities more often than not!! ..... Our sincere prayers go i Happenings .... By Bob Dybvig I have received many good comments on the paper written by my grandfather Nels Dybvig in 1925. This article was about my roots and I was happy to share it with you. We have had an unusual winter with our lack of snow cover. Some are wondering what effect this will have on the health of woody ornamental plants. To answer this, we need to revisit the weather conditions that occurred in 2002, particularly during the-fall and early winter. Locally we had a hot dry summer that extended into fall with just enough rain to get the grass growing into fall. The period from November through January was very dry. In years when there is little snow cover, soil freezes more deeply making moisture unavailable for uptake by tree and shrub roots. This is particularly important with evergreen species. On bright sunny days, photosynthesis and respiration takes place. Moisture lost through transpiration can't be replaced via uptake by the roots. The result is desiccation or browning of the foliage. With good snow cover, the roots of woody ornamentals are insulated and the snow cover provides much needed moisture as it melts on warm days during winter thaws. The above information by Patrick Weicherdins, Regional Extension Educator, Metro District. The following is advice from Deborah Brown, Extension Horticulturist. Approach glossy plant ads with skepticism. For example, tree tomatoes which, according to ads, are "not to be confused with an ordinary vine or t o m a t o plant"..."simply stand back and watch your tree quickly zoom to full height desired and supply you with yummy fresh garden tomatoes." Don't Dybvig you believe it! If the plants ever do produce fruit for you...and that's unlikely...it will be instantly apparent that they aren't tomatoes at all. The following article...This Winter May Hurt Home Garden Fruit Plantings by Doug Foulk, Regional Extension Educator. Considering that strawberries grow all the way north to the Canadian border, they are not as hardy as one might imagine. Perhaps surprisingly to home gardeners, the flower buds for next year's crop can be damaged by temperatures around 20 degrees above zero! And at a still moderate 15 above, the entire crown can be severely damaged or killed. Strawberry plants survive our harsh winters simply by being so short in stature that they are easily covered by even small amounts of snow. But winter snow in Minnesota doesn't always happen so this is why we recommend that home gardeners cover their strawberries with 4 to 6 inches of organic mulch once fall temperatures dip into the low twentys. Think Spring I Extension report I Eric Vogel Regional Extension Educator Community Youth Development Kandiyohi County Extension Office Willmar, MN 320/231-7890 YOUTH NEED ADULT RELATIONSHIPS In most cases memorials are created for people after they die. We give money, erect statues, or build buildings in memory important people. Red created his own memorial and it was so simple -- he poked me in the arm each I : Sunday after church from the time I was about 13 until he passed away about ten years ago. In most other ways he blended into the environment. He rarely spoke and seemed to avoid crowds. His social skills were limited. Given his reclusive nature he could easily have been a person who died and was forgotten. But to this day I still remember him because he took just one second a week to pay attention to me. That weekly poke in the arm (and my poke in return) created a memory so closely associated with a place that it is as if there was a statue of him standing outside the door of my hometown church. When I go back to visit I still miss my poke in the arm. I may have written about Red before and I do try to avoid using the same illustrations twice but I make this the exception. I bring it up again because I can think of no simpler example of positive relationships between youth and adults. That weekly exchange meant something to I me, yet it cost Red so little. By my calculations, if our weekly exchange lasted two seconds and we kept it up weekly for 20 years then he spent about a half hour with me total! Just a half hour spread over that entire span of time and I still remember him for the time he took with me and only me. On the other extreme, we all know people who give of themselves in such a way that it appears they do nothing else. They are always making linkages with kids in important ways. Hopefully you had some of those people in your life too. Most of us fall someplace in between. How about you? Where do you fall on the continuum of involvement? If you are like my friend Red and can only do a little, then know that you make a difference. But if you can volunteer in the community in some larger role then we need you all the more. Your work will be remembered. Positive adult influences are critical in the lives of kids. As an adult you can help kids contribute in meaningful ways to the community, help them gain independence, and feel a sense of safety and structure. Every youth should .have adults they remember as having played important roles in helping them grow and develop. Relationship building is part of MN BEST youth development training for volunteers and professionals who work with youth. For information on trainings in your area or to find out how to sponsor training, contact your local Extension Service office. Eric Vogel is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Community Youth Development serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. out today to the family of our dear and long-time friend Boy born March 10 Don Kohi, who recently retired from active owner- ship at D&K Tire here. He's been stricken with a rare fungus disease in his lungs and is currently under spe- cial care at St. Cloud Hospital. His wife says the doctors have said that com- ing down with such a disease is as rare as getting struck by lightning. She says he will be under treatment there for some time. You may write Don at "Critical Care Unit... St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, MN. 56303. to Paul Strongs Reader Burt Price of Sun City West, Arizona, sends renewal and says "the only reason lr have for being late is February is a short month and time flies. Anyway, want- ed to thank you again for your excellent paper. It cov- ers not only Ortonvtlle news, but also all of the s-urround- ing area, where I spent many years of my life, Keep up the good work.l" Burt is an OHS graduate.. A son, Andrew Dean, was born March 10th, 2003 to Paul and Ruth Strong of Ortonville. He weighed eight lbs., seven ozs and was 21 1/2 inches long. He joins a big brother Nathan. Grandparents are Marlyn and Reva Schumacher and Jim and Dee Strong, all of Ortonville Independent Ads Get Noticed. (You're rmtding this one aren t you?) r TUPPERWARE • Bridal Shower & Registry / • In Home Parties (Other locations available) I • Hostess Gift Specials 1 • Fundraisers - (5o% donated) 1 / • Career Opportunity L,fet,me Guarantee i)iii!i • Monthly Specials !I Call 800-939-5105 or 328-839-3454 * Ask for Lany k cr..agiftsandrroR@yahoo.com i ] II I I I II II REGISTRATION FOR 3-4 YEAR OLDS Applications will be taken Tuesday, April 15th, 11:00 am-l:00 pm ' Ortonville Pizza Ranch Meeting Room " 205 NW 2nd St. for more information ea!! 1.800-443-428300 11 I IIIiil IIII II I I III M in n e s ot a. "::, Some things are distinctly Minnesotan -- like Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, recognized for delivering quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. That's why more MinnesOtans choose Blue Cross than any other plan. Call me for individual or group plans or plans that work with Medicare. BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota Care for aging program set for families, care givers As Families Grow Older program is a series of workshops designed to help older adults and their families anticipate, plan for and provide the loving care that may be needed as our families grow older. Older adults, active caregivers, professional care- givers and interested middle-aged adults and all interested persons are welcome to attend. The third in this series is "Challenging Health Issues of Aging," and will be offered at the Ortonville Senior Center on April 16 at 1:30 pm. Many people live long and healthy lives with minimal loss of capability. Even when losses do occur, much caplbility is retained. The person whose eyesight is failing can still think and make decisions. Even the person who can no longer balance a checkbook can still express his or her wishes about medical treatment. A healthy approach to aging encourages independence, not depen- dence. Healthy aging focuses on capa- bilities and strengths, not losses or inabilities. Come and take in the helpful and interesting information that this work- shop has to offer. PRESENTING A DONATION check for $500 to the food shelf is Pamida Manager Earl Hills. Deb Berning, Food Shelf Manager, Karen Mack, and Dan Hanratty are pictured above receiving the check. The food shelf thanks Pamida for its donation, and reminds everyone that food shelf donations can be made at any time. Easter at for Dial, "The Love musical, will be: Ortonville's First Church this starting at 7 p.m. A free-will and used for the • Kidney Dialysis be served following! All are and The user fee at Course was in last weeks The correct the golf course is $108 $100, $108,622 donated to to date exceedit $100,000.00. are still sent to Bi Ave., Ortonvi brought to the lower level Medical donations to be Kidney We're Not Responsible For Your eeding 00olations. Save Now On The Fastest Internet In Only MidcoNet e High Speed Intemet offers you speed that's light years ahead of dial-up. You'll enjoy a constant connection, no tied-up phone lines and compatibility with all your favorite Instant Messaging services. Sign up now and savel Call today and GET HOOKED! 1-800-888-1300 SAVE $149,951 l I • One Month FREE [ Service (P,j. $.95) • FREE Installation (Reg. $0) • $79 Modem (Reg. $149) Modem purdlaae required for off. ! 1 Lease opUon wall.aide. Unlimited i cess is $29.95 per month, t %.. Of ends 5/31103. ./ Midcontinent COMMUNICATIONS Page 2 00INDEPENDENT TuesdaY' /...,,,% By JDK News today from OHS classmate and long-time friend and reader, Marj (Stansfield) Sartorius of Windom: "This is reality! It is 55 years since we graduated! The time has passed so quickly! It is time to get together again while we still can! Plans are made to meet in Ortonville on Aug.16th, 2003 at the Matador Supper Club at 6 p.m. This will be the same week end as the Ortonville celebration of Corn Fest so may be a good time to get together with other friends and relatives also. Some of us had dinner together last year in August and had such a good time just visiting so it was suggested that we celebrate the same way this year. No planned program or entertainment just come with conversation and sto- ries to tell or thoughts to reminisce about. We would like to hear if you plan to come and if you can't come please share a greeting with us. Plans Should be completed by July 1st. See you in August !" ***** With the sudden passing last week of long-time friend Jim Carlson_one of the best dry-wailers of all time, our prayers go out to his wife and family members at this time of bereavement. Another fine turnout for another excellent staging of Big Stone Health Care Foundation's annual Gala held last Saturday. Congrats to all who had a hand in the presentation. Congrats also to all who helped in the effort for the dialysis machine fund-raising...which exceeded its goal. The machine will be purchased in the near future...adding yet another fine asset to Ortonville's health needs[ So heartening it is to see the Iraqi war going our way...the way of freedom. Seems like it will soon be over, barring any unseen unsuspected acts from the enemy. We hope and pray now that the re-establish- ment of the new Iraqi gov- ernment will take place for the best interests of all, espe- cially the Iraqi populace! For what it's worth...some advice to our current Minnesota Twins: Beware of over-confidence, coming off your great year in 2002. Just as with this year's Golden Gophers bas- ketball team, forecasters and media had them ranked well over their heads, and their play that followed was far from expected. Though the Twins started out with a bang by sweeping a three-game series from lowly Detroit, they looked "lousy" in losing a three-game series, at home yet, to Toronto over the past week- end. True, it's a long season, and maybe we're jumping the gun, but let's hope they play up to their true abilities more often than not!! ..... Our sincere prayers go i Happenings .... By Bob Dybvig I have received many good comments on the paper written by my grandfather Nels Dybvig in 1925. This article was about my roots and I was happy to share it with you. We have had an unusual winter with our lack of snow cover. Some are wondering what effect this will have on the health of woody ornamental plants. To answer this, we need to revisit the weather conditions that occurred in 2002, particularly during the-fall and early winter. Locally we had a hot dry summer that extended into fall with just enough rain to get the grass growing into fall. The period from November through January was very dry. In years when there is little snow cover, soil freezes more deeply making moisture unavailable for uptake by tree and shrub roots. This is particularly important with evergreen species. On bright sunny days, photosynthesis and respiration takes place. Moisture lost through transpiration can't be replaced via uptake by the roots. The result is desiccation or browning of the foliage. With good snow cover, the roots of woody ornamentals are insulated and the snow cover provides much needed moisture as it melts on warm days during winter thaws. The above information by Patrick Weicherdins, Regional Extension Educator, Metro District. The following is advice from Deborah Brown, Extension Horticulturist. Approach glossy plant ads with skepticism. For example, tree tomatoes which, according to ads, are "not to be confused with an ordinary vine or t o m a t o plant"..."simply stand back and watch your tree quickly zoom to full height desired and supply you with yummy fresh garden tomatoes." Don't Dybvig you believe it! If the plants ever do produce fruit for you...and that's unlikely...it will be instantly apparent that they aren't tomatoes at all. The following article...This Winter May Hurt Home Garden Fruit Plantings by Doug Foulk, Regional Extension Educator. Considering that strawberries grow all the way north to the Canadian border, they are not as hardy as one might imagine. Perhaps surprisingly to home gardeners, the flower buds for next year's crop can be damaged by temperatures around 20 degrees above zero! And at a still moderate 15 above, the entire crown can be severely damaged or killed. Strawberry plants survive our harsh winters simply by being so short in stature that they are easily covered by even small amounts of snow. But winter snow in Minnesota doesn't always happen so this is why we recommend that home gardeners cover their strawberries with 4 to 6 inches of organic mulch once fall temperatures dip into the low twentys. Think Spring I Extension report I Eric Vogel Regional Extension Educator Community Youth Development Kandiyohi County Extension Office Willmar, MN 320/231-7890 YOUTH NEED ADULT RELATIONSHIPS In most cases memorials are created for people after they die. We give money, erect statues, or build buildings in memory important people. Red created his own memorial and it was so simple -- he poked me in the arm each I : Sunday after church from the time I was about 13 until he passed away about ten years ago. In most other ways he blended into the environment. He rarely spoke and seemed to avoid crowds. His social skills were limited. Given his reclusive nature he could easily have been a person who died and was forgotten. But to this day I still remember him because he took just one second a week to pay attention to me. That weekly poke in the arm (and my poke in return) created a memory so closely associated with a place that it is as if there was a statue of him standing outside the door of my hometown church. When I go back to visit I still miss my poke in the arm. I may have written about Red before and I do try to avoid using the same illustrations twice but I make this the exception. I bring it up again because I can think of no simpler example of positive relationships between youth and adults. That weekly exchange meant something to I me, yet it cost Red so little. By my calculations, if our weekly exchange lasted two seconds and we kept it up weekly for 20 years then he spent about a half hour with me total! Just a half hour spread over that entire span of time and I still remember him for the time he took with me and only me. On the other extreme, we all know people who give of themselves in such a way that it appears they do nothing else. They are always making linkages with kids in important ways. Hopefully you had some of those people in your life too. Most of us fall someplace in between. How about you? Where do you fall on the continuum of involvement? If you are like my friend Red and can only do a little, then know that you make a difference. But if you can volunteer in the community in some larger role then we need you all the more. Your work will be remembered. Positive adult influences are critical in the lives of kids. As an adult you can help kids contribute in meaningful ways to the community, help them gain independence, and feel a sense of safety and structure. Every youth should .have adults they remember as having played important roles in helping them grow and develop. Relationship building is part of MN BEST youth development training for volunteers and professionals who work with youth. For information on trainings in your area or to find out how to sponsor training, contact your local Extension Service office. Eric Vogel is an Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service in Community Youth Development serving the West Central District that includes Big Stone County. out today to the family of our dear and long-time friend Boy born March 10 Don Kohi, who recently retired from active owner- ship at D&K Tire here. He's been stricken with a rare fungus disease in his lungs and is currently under spe- cial care at St. Cloud Hospital. His wife says the doctors have said that com- ing down with such a disease is as rare as getting struck by lightning. She says he will be under treatment there for some time. You may write Don at "Critical Care Unit... St. Cloud Hospital, St. Cloud, MN. 56303. to Paul Strongs Reader Burt Price of Sun City West, Arizona, sends renewal and says "the only reason lr have for being late is February is a short month and time flies. Anyway, want- ed to thank you again for your excellent paper. It cov- ers not only Ortonvtlle news, but also all of the s-urround- ing area, where I spent many years of my life, Keep up the good work.l" Burt is an OHS graduate.. A son, Andrew Dean, was born March 10th, 2003 to Paul and Ruth Strong of Ortonville. He weighed eight lbs., seven ozs and was 21 1/2 inches long. He joins a big brother Nathan. Grandparents are Marlyn and Reva Schumacher and Jim and Dee Strong, all of Ortonville Independent Ads Get Noticed. (You're rmtding this one aren t you?) r TUPPERWARE • Bridal Shower & Registry / • In Home Parties (Other locations available) I • Hostess Gift Specials 1 • Fundraisers - (5o% donated) 1 / • Career Opportunity L,fet,me Guarantee i)iii!i • Monthly Specials !I Call 800-939-5105 or 328-839-3454 * Ask for Lany k cr..agiftsandrroR@yahoo.com i ] II I I I II II REGISTRATION FOR 3-4 YEAR OLDS Applications will be taken Tuesday, April 15th, 11:00 am-l:00 pm ' Ortonville Pizza Ranch Meeting Room " 205 NW 2nd St. for more information ea!! 1.800-443-428300 11 I IIIiil IIII II I I III M in n e s ot a. "::, Some things are distinctly Minnesotan -- like Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Minnesota, recognized for delivering quality health care plans for nearly 70 years. That's why more MinnesOtans choose Blue Cross than any other plan. Call me for individual or group plans or plans that work with Medicare. BlueCross BlueShield of Minnesota Care for aging program set for families, care givers As Families Grow Older program is a series of workshops designed to help older adults and their families anticipate, plan for and provide the loving care that may be needed as our families grow older. Older adults, active caregivers, professional care- givers and interested middle-aged adults and all interested persons are welcome to attend. The third in this series is "Challenging Health Issues of Aging," and will be offered at the Ortonville Senior Center on April 16 at 1:30 pm. Many people live long and healthy lives with minimal loss of capability. Even when losses do occur, much caplbility is retained. The person whose eyesight is failing can still think and make decisions. Even the person who can no longer balance a checkbook can still express his or her wishes about medical treatment. A healthy approach to aging encourages independence, not depen- dence. Healthy aging focuses on capa- bilities and strengths, not losses or inabilities. Come and take in the helpful and interesting information that this work- shop has to offer. PRESENTING A DONATION check for $500 to the food shelf is Pamida Manager Earl Hills. Deb Berning, Food Shelf Manager, Karen Mack, and Dan Hanratty are pictured above receiving the check. The food shelf thanks Pamida for its donation, and reminds everyone that food shelf donations can be made at any time. Easter at for Dial, "The Love musical, will be: Ortonville's First Church this starting at 7 p.m. A free-will and used for the • Kidney Dialysis be served following! All are and The user fee at Course was in last weeks The correct the golf course is $108 $100, $108,622 donated to to date exceedit $100,000.00. are still sent to Bi Ave., Ortonvi brought to the lower level Medical donations to be Kidney We're Not Responsible For Your eeding 00olations. Save Now On The Fastest Internet In Only MidcoNet e High Speed Intemet offers you speed that's light years ahead of dial-up. You'll enjoy a constant connection, no tied-up phone lines and compatibility with all your favorite Instant Messaging services. Sign up now and savel Call today and GET HOOKED! 1-800-888-1300 SAVE $149,951 l I • One Month FREE [ Service (P,j. $.95) • FREE Installation (Reg. $0) • $79 Modem (Reg. $149) Modem purdlaae required for off. ! 1 Lease opUon wall.aide. Unlimited i cess is $29.95 per month, t %.. Of ends 5/31103. ./ Midcontinent COMMUNICATIONS Page 2 00INDEPENDENT TuesdaY'