Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
April 8, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 4     (4 of 22 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 4     (4 of 22 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
April 8, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Editorial comment Hfci 1 The Inde possible SARS cases in state Leta00 _s'U""..'o = f the/= '. e P. W)€.€ D.D. )ublisher/M , | Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, Editor and A, •  living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a cases of Severe Acute Respiratory respiratory illness. So far, the majority, of secondary |It | small Minns0ta town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. ARLE Syndrome (SARS) in the state. We are carefully looking for any- SARS cases have been either house- Ikq, I The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Office I Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Efforts to track SARS - in thing that might be SARS, said Dr. hold contacts or health care workers,  I Rev. Dr. Ihno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the KA" Minnesota and worldwide - are being Harry Hull, state epidemiologist with Dr. Hull said.  I memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the Computer and conducted jointly by the Minnesota the Minnesota Department of Health. "Respiratory illnesses are very 11 island of Sumatra. Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000. Department of Health (MDH), local "Because we don't want to take any common at this time of year," Dr. Hull ..... EMILEIE4 public health agencies, private health care providers, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). In Minnesota three "suspect" cases of SARS have been identified and reported to CDC. All three had already recovered, or were recover- ing, by the time their cases were reported to MDH. MDH investigators say there is no concern about possible transmission of the illness from these individuals to other people. In addition to the three suspect cases state health officials have inves- tigated about 10 other possible SARS cases: including that of an 11- month- old adoptee from China who arrived in Minnesota by air on Sunday. The infant was hospitalized with a high fever and respiratory symptoms, but subsequent tests were positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is a very common cause of seri- ous respiratory illness in infants. The positive lab results for RSV make it unlikely that the infant has SARS, according to MDH officials, but addi- tional lab samples have been submit- ted to CDC for further testing. The infant is doing well, and is expected to be discharged from the hospital soon. SARS first surfaced in China and Vietnam in late February. To date. about 1,600 people worldwide, including 69 in the U.S., have been reported as having SARS. Health offi- cials say the illness is difficult to track and diagnose because the onset is rel- atively rapid (two- to ten-day incuba- chances with the public health, we are erring on the side of being cautious and considering any case with the right signs and symptoms as a possi- ble case." So far, suspected SARS has been defined by the CDC as any respirato- ry illness that meets the following conditions: • Fever of 100.5 degrees F or high- er • Cough, shortness of breath, diffi- culty breathing or abnormal chest x- ray • Patient with recent history of travel to Hong Kx)ng; People's Republic of China, Hanoi, Viet Nam, or Singapore within 10 days before the symptoms first appeared OR • Patient with a history of close contact with another person who may have had SARS. A "close contact" includes having care for, lived with, or had direct contact with a person with possible SARS. People who have returned from any of the affected areas in Asia and have respiratory illness should seek medical attention. They should inform their health care provider about their recent travel or possible exposure to SARS. Physicians should report any suspected case of SARS to MDH. "I'd like to emphasize that while SARS is a serious illness and can be fatal, we don't think that it can be spread through casual contact, such as walking past someone on the street who may have it" Dr. Hull said. "However, exactly how the disease is Independent Ads Get Noticed. (You're Reading This One Aren't You?) %.%%.%.%.%,%.%.%.%%.%.%%.'%% _1__ 45 57 58 19 I IIII 81 64 Cluee ACROSS 62. Square measure 1. Actors 63. Boone and Webster 5. Indian term of respect 64. Smooth 10. Separates with an 65. Selects instrument Clues DOWN 14. Herb 1. Compelled 15. Compound 2. 1836 "siege" of U.S. 16. Wings 3. Move rapidly in music 17. Emit coherent 4. Come across radiation 5, Cinctures 18: Querterba¢,.,k 6. Involvement Jurgenson 7. Guidance 19. Citrus hybdd 8. Hostelry 20. Type of RAM 9. Turkish title of respect 21. Fastened 10. Disc 22. Piles 11. Protoctlst 23. One who draws idly 12. Forest land (British) 25. Compel 13. Six (Spanish) 27. N American 21. Murder organization 22. Bob or dog 28. Every other year 24. Fix fimlly golf event 25. Exaggerates 32. Fantasy 26. Passage 35. Tasty 36. Ciarsick 28. Black bird 29. Aloha 37. U.S. Secretary of Stale •  dlol 38. Envy 39. Capital of Yemen a - o I,, i 40. Lyric poem  a v l e i 41. Equids __" -C "-; I 42. Ayoungpig  a N.-, 43. Buick Open's state ill,00 45. Monetary unit 46. Brews I v I" I i . _ 47. Comedian David  i v IN , , - , 51. Tracheophytes _ ..,..1 , iv s _• 55. Dhabi, Arabian capital I T 56. Jai , sport -ff 57. Jenny , diet method -T -   N =, O S 59. Celt air i. : : ,Ni, j v 60. Alter [M[ : : 'i" Iv 61. Pacific Islands s2 65 30. Arm bone 31. Make plan 32. Starting point 33. German car 34.1 35. Short-billed rails 38. Depnve of freedom 39. Tai 41. Metric capacity units 42. Stalk 44. Substance abuses 45. Capital of Czechoslovakia 47. Gumbel, journalist 48. Civil Rights group 49. Siskel and , cdtics 50. Determines 51. Used to have (Scottish) 52. Spanish city 53. Precipitation 54. Pakrit language 57. Cycles per second 58. Bravol Bravol Brevol 59. Crunches federal N ' a] v i v i Ill 0 R 17-r-00 • I U iN t d lll [O IO O O I ¥ I  H Page 4 said. "Symptoms alone should not be a cause of heightened concern. The association of those symptoms with recent travel to affected countries is what alerts us to the possibility of SARS," He said. The CDC is recommending that Americans postpon e non-essential trips to China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Hanoi, Vietnam until further notice. If you must travel to those areas, officials suggest avoiding peo- ple with respiratory symptoms, avoid visiting homes with sick people, avoid quarantined areas, and frequently wash your hands. "Our goal is to make sure that any possible cases are quickly reported • and investigated and that patients are properly cared for, with minimal risk to others" Hull said. "We want to stop the spread of SARS as quickly as pos- sible. Minnesota's disease surveil- lance and response system is well pre- pared to meet this challenge." MDH, other state health depart- ments and CDC are working closely with health care providers, including hospitals, to increase their level of awareness of SARS and to alert and identify members of the public who may be experiencing symptoms of the illness. Updates on SARS, recommenda- tions and travel advisories can be found on the Web at the World Health Organization site, www.who.int and the CDC site, www.cdc.gov. A link to the CDC's information on SARS is on the MDH home page at www.health.state.mn.us. "Easter Parade" featured at next CWC meeting An "Easter Parade" features a "Hat-Traction" at the Ortonville Christian Women,s Club on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at Zion Lutheran Church, Highland Highway, for 9 to 10:30 a.m. All ladies of Ortonville and the surrounding communities are especially welcomed to this morning coffee. Joyce Albert of Kimball, will be "Brimming with Music" and provide the "Crowning Touch" to the morning program. Joyce, who is a mother of two and grandmother of five, has artificial jaw joints and will ghare thoughts on "Peace Thru Pain." Ticket are $3 inclusive. Reservations are made by calling Violet (605-862-8500) or Susie (320- 273-2340) by Saturday, April 12. A nursery is available upon request. Walk-ins are most welcome! Come, see the parade of hats!!! INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY ONCE AGAIN ... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Gordon Dawald M.A. Howland Mrs. Harold Bergseth Joseph Spors Ricky Paulsen Luciile Larson Jon or Janet Henrieh Grace Van Hout Don Lindquist Lula Hagen Rev. L.F. Mueller Sena Scholberg Dale Emde Loren Kavanagh Norma Bnhoiz Dr. Donald Storm Val Karels Nina J. Birldand Jayne Buscho TTee Virginia Engen Carl Maas Bonnie Hendricks Ronald Thompson Albert Vedder Lawrence Dhaemers Arden Kraft Mike Wellnitz Jay Lindahi Richard Quist Donald Verheul Gregg Lindahl Carol Koosman Kenneth Hansen Greg Storeim Karen Huber Arthur Hoernemann Ed Kiernat Diane Rieck Larry Kiernat Marlene Kiernat Yaeger William Kiernat Donald Von Eschen Rodger Ulrich Tales from Odessa... "MINNESOTA BLIZZARDS, DUST STORMS AND GRASSHOPPER PLAGUES - OR, HOW GRANDPA BECAME A HARDY SURVIVOR" The state of Minnesota has what is commonly called a "continental cli- mate" which means that the climate and weather are not ameliorated by a large body of water - such as the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans. And of course this means that Minnesota is cold in the winter and hot in the summer. After living in the state for the 17 years of my childhood and youth, 1 can attest to the above from personal experience. 1 am what I choose to call a "hardy survivor" of a state 1 still am proud to name as my "home" state and still revisit annual- ly on a pilgrimage "down memory lane." First. the Minnesota blizzards. They must be experienced to be believed and experience them 1 did. One year in particular stands out in my memory. For 33 days the temper- ature outside our Odessa parsonage never rose above zero degrees. Day and night for 33 days that old ther- mometer registered the awesome, bone-chilling, sub-zero degrees of killing cold. This would have been bad enough, but coupled with this arctic cold was an unusually record-breaking accu- mulation of snow. Wind driven snow covered the land in ever-increasing depths of drifting white blanket. As I plunged through the snow to bring in firewood from our shrinking wood- pile in the back yard, the icy pellets of snow raced across the frozen sur- face and stung my face like a blast of lead shot. My English teacher in the high school thought 1 had a poetic bent in my nature so I called these snow and / I ice pellets driven over the frozen crust "the exodus of the snows." The shrouded earth presented to a 14. year-old boy a fierce and untamed beauty wrapped in a mantle of white- ness that dazzled the eye. In my father's churches the faith- ful sang, "Wash me and I shall be whiter than snow." I could not believe that anything, even a soul made pure by the grace of God could be whiter than that snow in the win- ter of '33. Of course in those subzero temper- atures the snow did not melt. Day by day as more snow blew in from the north, it piled high and higher. So high in fact that by degrees it inched its way up toward the top of the tele- phone poles. All life came to a stand- still. It was impossible to "shovel" snow in the conventional sense. How could one throw a shovelful of snow more than 10 feet high? And so tunnels were made through the snow, not for cars of course, for no one could get his car out of the garage. I made a tunnel to the wood- pile but the well "froze up" so we melted snow for water. For some rea- son I don't know or remember how we handled the "outhouse" problem. Perhaps 1 have unconsciously blotted that unpleasant experience out of my mind. In time the snow formed a hard crust of ice and when the storm relented we could walk about on the crusted mountainous drifts. Only reluctantly the extreme cold subsided and life emerged from its iron casing to blink in the bright sun like a gopher emerging from its hole after a long winter. We had survived yet another Minnesota testing of the outer limits of human endurance and could sing with conviction that old Christmas carol which has in it the line, "Earth stood hard as iron, water like a stone." Retirement won't solve all problems Sharon Danes, Family Resource Management Specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service, provides the following infor- mation. You don't like your 'job-or you're afraid you may lose it before you're eligible for retirement. If only you could retire now. It can be easy to think that retire- ment will solve your problems, says Sharon Danes, family economist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service. "But negative per- spectives aren't necessarily altered by lifestyle changes such as retirement," Danes says. "There's no better predictor of your approach to retirement than how you view life before you retire," Danes says. She's the author of a new publication from the U of M Extension Service titled, "Planning Ahead for Retirement." "Money is important, but it's not the only important part of retirement planning," Danes says. The publica- tion has worksheets that can help indi- viduals and couples sort out the important things in life. "If you have ,., .. 00INDEPENDENT a partner, it can be easy to assume you want the same thing," Danes says. But no two people have an identical picture of their later years. Whether your attitude toward retirement is positive or negative, retirement is change, which can be very stressful. "The more you plan for retirement, the less stress you'll be likely to experience," Danes says. The 80-page comprehensive guide to retirement planning includes every- thing you need to know to plan the retirement you want. The book gives . you information on setting meaning- ful goals, estimating the income you will need to retire, understanding financial products, making investment choices, financial planners, and health and life insurance. Also included are several charts and tables, glossaries and resource lists. Copies of the publication are avail- able from county offices of the University of Minnesota Extension Service. They may also be ordered with a credit card by calling toil-free (800) 876-8636 or (612) 624-4900 in the Twin Cities area. Ask for number 07775. Wanted. 0wner/0perators and Company Drivers. 48 States. Competitive package. We can also lease a tractor to you. This is the place you want to bel Call Now For An Interview! Don't Mira t.,,ol,..  IIds 010dun! .......... .,p BETH TIM Tues., April 8, 2003 Continuing Periodicals Postage paid It $30.00 per year in Pads, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties in Minnesot All Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, RATE ALL A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lee €1 1 Swift Countlea in Grant and Robert February ........... 3@00 March ................ 27.50 April .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28,40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 AND February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 " July ................... 22.19 * The Publisher shall n or The Publish omissions in the issue or the the advertisement, Church Display ads - Correspondence - Pictures - 5 News - Classified ads (Any ad brought in to classify.) A Monday: A Tuesday: A Holidays Letters to the munity issues are writers should Independent and/or condense iper also letters that it might be held Letters printed or address and Addresses and not be published. Letter writers selves to one keep letter brief, words, and to The determinin is news If an zation for an item or sidered you charge, paper. cease to exist. receives for paper sales is paper used in no longer increases. It and a small Advertising crops and to the and plows and dealer. ness. We reserve tf advertising withou our decision. A News: Our fully and staff's opinions opinion page. Editorials: page, lrom late readers. tor are her own of other expressed in tions may own views, oral interest. Phone 839-3761 to slfled Ortonvllle It mail TuesdaY' 'q(i, Editorial comment Hfci 1 The Inde possible SARS cases in state Leta00 _s'U""..'o = f the/= '. e P. W)€.€ D.D. )ublisher/M , | Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, Editor and A, •  living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a cases of Severe Acute Respiratory respiratory illness. So far, the majority, of secondary |It | small Minns0ta town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. ARLE Syndrome (SARS) in the state. We are carefully looking for any- SARS cases have been either house- Ikq, I The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Office I Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Efforts to track SARS - in thing that might be SARS, said Dr. hold contacts or health care workers,  I Rev. Dr. Ihno Janssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the KA" Minnesota and worldwide - are being Harry Hull, state epidemiologist with Dr. Hull said.  I memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the Computer and conducted jointly by the Minnesota the Minnesota Department of Health. "Respiratory illnesses are very 11 island of Sumatra. Rev. Wemer passed away late in the year 2000. Department of Health (MDH), local "Because we don't want to take any common at this time of year," Dr. Hull ..... EMILEIE4 public health agencies, private health care providers, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO). In Minnesota three "suspect" cases of SARS have been identified and reported to CDC. All three had already recovered, or were recover- ing, by the time their cases were reported to MDH. MDH investigators say there is no concern about possible transmission of the illness from these individuals to other people. In addition to the three suspect cases state health officials have inves- tigated about 10 other possible SARS cases: including that of an 11- month- old adoptee from China who arrived in Minnesota by air on Sunday. The infant was hospitalized with a high fever and respiratory symptoms, but subsequent tests were positive for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is a very common cause of seri- ous respiratory illness in infants. The positive lab results for RSV make it unlikely that the infant has SARS, according to MDH officials, but addi- tional lab samples have been submit- ted to CDC for further testing. The infant is doing well, and is expected to be discharged from the hospital soon. SARS first surfaced in China and Vietnam in late February. To date. about 1,600 people worldwide, including 69 in the U.S., have been reported as having SARS. Health offi- cials say the illness is difficult to track and diagnose because the onset is rel- atively rapid (two- to ten-day incuba- chances with the public health, we are erring on the side of being cautious and considering any case with the right signs and symptoms as a possi- ble case." So far, suspected SARS has been defined by the CDC as any respirato- ry illness that meets the following conditions: • Fever of 100.5 degrees F or high- er • Cough, shortness of breath, diffi- culty breathing or abnormal chest x- ray • Patient with recent history of travel to Hong Kx)ng; People's Republic of China, Hanoi, Viet Nam, or Singapore within 10 days before the symptoms first appeared OR • Patient with a history of close contact with another person who may have had SARS. A "close contact" includes having care for, lived with, or had direct contact with a person with possible SARS. People who have returned from any of the affected areas in Asia and have respiratory illness should seek medical attention. They should inform their health care provider about their recent travel or possible exposure to SARS. Physicians should report any suspected case of SARS to MDH. "I'd like to emphasize that while SARS is a serious illness and can be fatal, we don't think that it can be spread through casual contact, such as walking past someone on the street who may have it" Dr. Hull said. "However, exactly how the disease is Independent Ads Get Noticed. (You're Reading This One Aren't You?) %.%%.%.%.%,%.%.%.%%.%.%%.'%% _1__ 45 57 58 19 I IIII 81 64 Cluee ACROSS 62. Square measure 1. Actors 63. Boone and Webster 5. Indian term of respect 64. Smooth 10. Separates with an 65. Selects instrument Clues DOWN 14. Herb 1. Compelled 15. Compound 2. 1836 "siege" of U.S. 16. Wings 3. Move rapidly in music 17. Emit coherent 4. Come across radiation 5, Cinctures 18: Querterba¢,.,k 6. Involvement Jurgenson 7. Guidance 19. Citrus hybdd 8. Hostelry 20. Type of RAM 9. Turkish title of respect 21. Fastened 10. Disc 22. Piles 11. Protoctlst 23. One who draws idly 12. Forest land (British) 25. Compel 13. Six (Spanish) 27. N American 21. Murder organization 22. Bob or dog 28. Every other year 24. Fix fimlly golf event 25. Exaggerates 32. Fantasy 26. Passage 35. Tasty 36. Ciarsick 28. Black bird 29. Aloha 37. U.S. Secretary of Stale •  dlol 38. Envy 39. Capital of Yemen a - o I,, i 40. Lyric poem  a v l e i 41. Equids __" -C "-; I 42. Ayoungpig  a N.-, 43. Buick Open's state ill,00 45. Monetary unit 46. Brews I v I" I i . _ 47. Comedian David  i v IN , , - , 51. Tracheophytes _ ..,..1 , iv s _• 55. Dhabi, Arabian capital I T 56. Jai , sport -ff 57. Jenny , diet method -T -   N =, O S 59. Celt air i. : : ,Ni, j v 60. Alter [M[ : : 'i" Iv 61. Pacific Islands s2 65 30. Arm bone 31. Make plan 32. Starting point 33. German car 34.1 35. Short-billed rails 38. Depnve of freedom 39. Tai 41. Metric capacity units 42. Stalk 44. Substance abuses 45. Capital of Czechoslovakia 47. Gumbel, journalist 48. Civil Rights group 49. Siskel and , cdtics 50. Determines 51. Used to have (Scottish) 52. Spanish city 53. Precipitation 54. Pakrit language 57. Cycles per second 58. Bravol Bravol Brevol 59. Crunches federal N ' a] v i v i Ill 0 R 17-r-00 • I U iN t d lll [O IO O O I ¥ I  H Page 4 said. "Symptoms alone should not be a cause of heightened concern. The association of those symptoms with recent travel to affected countries is what alerts us to the possibility of SARS," He said. The CDC is recommending that Americans postpon e non-essential trips to China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Hanoi, Vietnam until further notice. If you must travel to those areas, officials suggest avoiding peo- ple with respiratory symptoms, avoid visiting homes with sick people, avoid quarantined areas, and frequently wash your hands. "Our goal is to make sure that any possible cases are quickly reported • and investigated and that patients are properly cared for, with minimal risk to others" Hull said. "We want to stop the spread of SARS as quickly as pos- sible. Minnesota's disease surveil- lance and response system is well pre- pared to meet this challenge." MDH, other state health depart- ments and CDC are working closely with health care providers, including hospitals, to increase their level of awareness of SARS and to alert and identify members of the public who may be experiencing symptoms of the illness. Updates on SARS, recommenda- tions and travel advisories can be found on the Web at the World Health Organization site, www.who.int and the CDC site, www.cdc.gov. A link to the CDC's information on SARS is on the MDH home page at www.health.state.mn.us. "Easter Parade" featured at next CWC meeting An "Easter Parade" features a "Hat-Traction" at the Ortonville Christian Women,s Club on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at Zion Lutheran Church, Highland Highway, for 9 to 10:30 a.m. All ladies of Ortonville and the surrounding communities are especially welcomed to this morning coffee. Joyce Albert of Kimball, will be "Brimming with Music" and provide the "Crowning Touch" to the morning program. Joyce, who is a mother of two and grandmother of five, has artificial jaw joints and will ghare thoughts on "Peace Thru Pain." Ticket are $3 inclusive. Reservations are made by calling Violet (605-862-8500) or Susie (320- 273-2340) by Saturday, April 12. A nursery is available upon request. Walk-ins are most welcome! Come, see the parade of hats!!! INDEPENDENT WANT ADS PAY ONCE AGAIN ... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Gordon Dawald M.A. Howland Mrs. Harold Bergseth Joseph Spors Ricky Paulsen Luciile Larson Jon or Janet Henrieh Grace Van Hout Don Lindquist Lula Hagen Rev. L.F. Mueller Sena Scholberg Dale Emde Loren Kavanagh Norma Bnhoiz Dr. Donald Storm Val Karels Nina J. Birldand Jayne Buscho TTee Virginia Engen Carl Maas Bonnie Hendricks Ronald Thompson Albert Vedder Lawrence Dhaemers Arden Kraft Mike Wellnitz Jay Lindahi Richard Quist Donald Verheul Gregg Lindahl Carol Koosman Kenneth Hansen Greg Storeim Karen Huber Arthur Hoernemann Ed Kiernat Diane Rieck Larry Kiernat Marlene Kiernat Yaeger William Kiernat Donald Von Eschen Rodger Ulrich Tales from Odessa... "MINNESOTA BLIZZARDS, DUST STORMS AND GRASSHOPPER PLAGUES - OR, HOW GRANDPA BECAME A HARDY SURVIVOR" The state of Minnesota has what is commonly called a "continental cli- mate" which means that the climate and weather are not ameliorated by a large body of water - such as the Atlantic or Pacific Oceans. And of course this means that Minnesota is cold in the winter and hot in the summer. After living in the state for the 17 years of my childhood and youth, 1 can attest to the above from personal experience. 1 am what I choose to call a "hardy survivor" of a state 1 still am proud to name as my "home" state and still revisit annual- ly on a pilgrimage "down memory lane." First. the Minnesota blizzards. They must be experienced to be believed and experience them 1 did. One year in particular stands out in my memory. For 33 days the temper- ature outside our Odessa parsonage never rose above zero degrees. Day and night for 33 days that old ther- mometer registered the awesome, bone-chilling, sub-zero degrees of killing cold. This would have been bad enough, but coupled with this arctic cold was an unusually record-breaking accu- mulation of snow. Wind driven snow covered the land in ever-increasing depths of drifting white blanket. As I plunged through the snow to bring in firewood from our shrinking wood- pile in the back yard, the icy pellets of snow raced across the frozen sur- face and stung my face like a blast of lead shot. My English teacher in the high school thought 1 had a poetic bent in my nature so I called these snow and / I ice pellets driven over the frozen crust "the exodus of the snows." The shrouded earth presented to a 14. year-old boy a fierce and untamed beauty wrapped in a mantle of white- ness that dazzled the eye. In my father's churches the faith- ful sang, "Wash me and I shall be whiter than snow." I could not believe that anything, even a soul made pure by the grace of God could be whiter than that snow in the win- ter of '33. Of course in those subzero temper- atures the snow did not melt. Day by day as more snow blew in from the north, it piled high and higher. So high in fact that by degrees it inched its way up toward the top of the tele- phone poles. All life came to a stand- still. It was impossible to "shovel" snow in the conventional sense. How could one throw a shovelful of snow more than 10 feet high? And so tunnels were made through the snow, not for cars of course, for no one could get his car out of the garage. I made a tunnel to the wood- pile but the well "froze up" so we melted snow for water. For some rea- son I don't know or remember how we handled the "outhouse" problem. Perhaps 1 have unconsciously blotted that unpleasant experience out of my mind. In time the snow formed a hard crust of ice and when the storm relented we could walk about on the crusted mountainous drifts. Only reluctantly the extreme cold subsided and life emerged from its iron casing to blink in the bright sun like a gopher emerging from its hole after a long winter. We had survived yet another Minnesota testing of the outer limits of human endurance and could sing with conviction that old Christmas carol which has in it the line, "Earth stood hard as iron, water like a stone." Retirement won't solve all problems Sharon Danes, Family Resource Management Specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service, provides the following infor- mation. You don't like your 'job-or you're afraid you may lose it before you're eligible for retirement. If only you could retire now. It can be easy to think that retire- ment will solve your problems, says Sharon Danes, family economist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service. "But negative per- spectives aren't necessarily altered by lifestyle changes such as retirement," Danes says. "There's no better predictor of your approach to retirement than how you view life before you retire," Danes says. She's the author of a new publication from the U of M Extension Service titled, "Planning Ahead for Retirement." "Money is important, but it's not the only important part of retirement planning," Danes says. The publica- tion has worksheets that can help indi- viduals and couples sort out the important things in life. "If you have ,., .. 00INDEPENDENT a partner, it can be easy to assume you want the same thing," Danes says. But no two people have an identical picture of their later years. Whether your attitude toward retirement is positive or negative, retirement is change, which can be very stressful. "The more you plan for retirement, the less stress you'll be likely to experience," Danes says. The 80-page comprehensive guide to retirement planning includes every- thing you need to know to plan the retirement you want. The book gives . you information on setting meaning- ful goals, estimating the income you will need to retire, understanding financial products, making investment choices, financial planners, and health and life insurance. Also included are several charts and tables, glossaries and resource lists. Copies of the publication are avail- able from county offices of the University of Minnesota Extension Service. They may also be ordered with a credit card by calling toil-free (800) 876-8636 or (612) 624-4900 in the Twin Cities area. Ask for number 07775. Wanted. 0wner/0perators and Company Drivers. 48 States. Competitive package. We can also lease a tractor to you. This is the place you want to bel Call Now For An Interview! Don't Mira t.,,ol,..  IIds 010dun! .......... .,p BETH TIM Tues., April 8, 2003 Continuing Periodicals Postage paid It $30.00 per year in Pads, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South counties in Minnesot All Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, RATE ALL A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lee €1 1 Swift Countlea in Grant and Robert February ........... 3@00 March ................ 27.50 April .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS IN February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 April .................. 28,40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19.88 AND February ........... 38.00 March ................ 34.87 April .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 " July ................... 22.19 * The Publisher shall n or The Publish omissions in the issue or the the advertisement, Church Display ads - Correspondence - Pictures - 5 News - Classified ads (Any ad brought in to classify.) A Monday: A Tuesday: A Holidays Letters to the munity issues are writers should Independent and/or condense iper also letters that it might be held Letters printed or address and Addresses and not be published. Letter writers selves to one keep letter brief, words, and to The determinin is news If an zation for an item or sidered you charge, paper. cease to exist. receives for paper sales is paper used in no longer increases. It and a small Advertising crops and to the and plows and dealer. ness. We reserve tf advertising withou our decision. A News: Our fully and staff's opinions opinion page. Editorials: page, lrom late readers. tor are her own of other expressed in tions may own views, oral interest. Phone 839-3761 to slfled Ortonvllle It mail TuesdaY' 'q(i,