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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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April 27, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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April 27, 1922
 

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THE ORTON00LLE INDEPENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, APRIL 27. 1922 NUMBER 51 JOIN 0RTONVILLE UNIT NATIONAL GUARD :Madison Officers "Swear- in" Eighteen as National Guardsmen. Full Strength Company Is Goal. Twenty-one men were mustered into the National Guard on Tuesday even- lng, at a meeting at the public library before Captain Clifford W. Pic- First Lieutenant Gerold C. Dale, Lieutenant Arthur W. Hauck, Company I, and Captain Walter N. 3rd Bttalion, of Madison, Minne- who came over by auto, pursu- ;ant to an authorization by Colonel Luce of Minneapolis, allowing Orton- a full strength company. Those who were sworn in are Clar- Beckman, Glenn Bertelson, Mer- ville Schaible, Edwin Hippie, Harold 8hult, Walter Elms, Llewely'n Van Lyle Longncker, Cecil Kaer- Erwin Slverson, Willard Tweet, Chester Zwiener, Floyd Atha, Magnus Nelson, Harry Peterson, Arnold Carl Swanson, Dr. D. M. , Earl Miller, R. C. Schoen and Bennie Hess. The enlisted men are to secure the of all men who are de- :irous of becoming members and when a sufficient number of applica- tions have been received officers will "be designated frut state headquar- ters to complete the organization. :lt is the intention of those already to secure enough men to make a company, the minimum allow- ance for which is 65 men. When this :has been accomplished application may be made for a argot range, and after approval of the site the state will either lease or purchase the thact and target practise will begin. All ammunition, uniforms, rifles, etc., will be furnished free of charge by the state. Until a company has been or- ganized the members sworn in will be unassigned, but amched to the rd company for administration. Nearly every city the size of Or- in this territory has had a Guard unit for tnany years armories have been erected at , ton, Benson, Morris, Madison, Dawson in this section. An ap- of $26,000.00 was made in each case by the state of Minnesota toward the construction of these ar rnories and with the proper spirit be- hind the National organization in this "city, it is hoped that a like amount Will be received for an armory here. Enlistments are made for a period ef three years by those who have never had military training, vhile for- mer service'men are given the option ef enliing for a period of one or three years. In case the organization is called out to any part of the stae for guard duty it is not compulsory to answer the call and in case of mov- ing from the city an application may :be wade out for discharge. The benefits derived from a guard  Company, insofar as the city is con- erned, are held to be of much impor- tance. At Madison it is said that the men belonging to the organiza- tion there brought into that city alone in the neighborhood of $10,000 last year . Enlistee 1 men will be paid on a basis cf $1.00 for every drill night, Which is one night each week, while the of- =ricers are paid in proportion to their rank, or approximat.ely $300 a year for a captaincy. A committee composed of Wayne !elly, Earl Miller, Dr- D. M. O'Don- nell, and Robert Schoen, of this city. and Captain Pickle of Madison, made a trip o Minneapolis last week, and Colonel Luce, afte learning the senti- ment in favor of a guard company, ave authority to proceed with the work. It is the belief of those who became members as well as many others that no difficuly will be ex- perieuced in securing enough appli- cants to form a company. As soon as this has been done officers will be ap- Pointed among the local members. THREE EARED PIG LATEST. 1. Z. Piper of Malta Township Pos- sessor of Freak Animal. :,  Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Duroc Jer- sey Pig a four-pound son, on Tues- day, April 25, 1922, on the farm of F. Z. Piper, Prior township, Big Stone county. And why. not such an an- nouncement for the arrival of the lit- tle fellow who was born with three ears, thereby standing out conspicu- ously among members of the swine family in this section of the state, and as the leader of his herd, which he is ure to be because of his additional appendage that will enable him to de- mct the call to "chow" at a greater iistanee than others of his family. "Ear-shot," which he wa appropri- named, is in good health. His extra ear is directly back of his "regu lar one" on the left side of his head. Some speculation is held for the safe- ty by his "owner, Mr. Piper, who fears when he grows older and be. :eomes ready for'market and the radio i reports are sent forth announcing the price of pork that he may pick the message from the air and take to larts unknowm AMATEUR LEAGUE PLANNED MONDAY IS OPENING Baseball Fans of Seven Towns Will Meet at Montevideo I Ortonville will be represented by a strictly home talent baseball nine this season, it was decided  a meeting of enthusiasts of the sport held at the Legion club rooms on Monday night A1 Jacobson, who was elected man- ager has called a try-out for 7:00 o'clock sharp on Tuesday night, May 2nd at the baseball park near the de- pot. Everyone that ass followed base- ball either in high school or other- wise is urged to be at this try-out so that selection may be made and the best possible team placed in the field at a later date. That an amateur baseball league will result from the efforts of the Legion posts over the 'district is the opinion of nearly every paper within the district. Representatives from the different towns will meet tonight at Montevideo to work out plans for a league that aim to have an eligibility clause, that "No person shall play on a team of this league unless he shall have been for 30 days a bona fide resi- dent of the town represented by such team, or shall have resided for 30 days within ten miles of such town but not within any other league town. No league team .shall be permitted to compensate or pay salary to any pLay- er." This action is a direct result of the proven failure of attempting to finance and maintain salaried players in towns with a population of from two to five thousand. Herbert Bolsta, and Al Jacobson will represent this city at the meeting. Towns that have signified their in- tention of becoming members of such a league as proposed are, Madison, Granite Falls, Boyd, Montevideo, Mi- lan, Appleton and Ortonville. Arrangements were made for the use of Kaercher's pasture near the depot for a dianond, no charge for which was ,made. UP, PAINT UP, KEEP City to Join Hands In Work * That Means for Better I Johnsons To St. Cloud. Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson, who conducted the M. M. Johnson Furni- ture Company o this city until a short time ago, when the business was taken over by the Schoen- Swen- son Company, have purchased an exclusive undertaking parlor at St. Cloud, Minnesota, and will leave for there the latter part of this week. Both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, during their residence in 0rtonville, have made many acquaintances who re- gret their departure. McLeods Return via NewYork The C. J. McLeod family returned to this city the latter part of the week, after spending the winter in Florida. They made the trip from Maimi, Fla., to New York City by boat, and report a very enjoyable journey. They have now opened UP their cottage on the peninsula, and will remain for the summer. Mrs. H. W. Palm Succumbs Suddenly Paralysis of Brain Causes Death Sun- day Morning After Illness of But A Few Days. The whole community was sad- dened by the death of Mrs. H. W. Palm early Sunday morning, April 23yd. She had been ill only a few days, so the news of her death is an additional blow to her many friends: At her bedside when death came were her husband and daughter, Marguer- ite, and a sister, Mrs. Leers La Grange, of Polo Alto, California, Death was caused by paralysis of the brain. Louise Pressly Palm was born on November 28, 1865 at Shereton, In. She wa married to H. Willard Palm at Webbter City, Iowa, on January 26, 1891. In 1892 they moved to Browns Valley, where they lived until March, 1914, when they came to Or- tonville. Mrs. Palm was an active member of the Congregational Church of this city and a member also of the Eastern Star Lodge. Short services were held at the home here on Tuesday morning and the remains taken to St. Paul where the burial was made in Oakland Cemetery, on Tuesday afternoon. Relatives and friends from out-of- town who attended the services at the home were: Mrs. Leota La Grange, a sister, Polo Al- to, Calif., Mrs. Roy Buchanan, a neice, and Mr. Buchanan, Sisseton, S. Dak., Earl Bletcher, Sioux Falls, S. D., Mr. and Mrs. E. Paul, J. L. Paul, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Barrett, George Schley, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Collins Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Bailey and Mrs. H. C. LaClaire, all of Browns Valley, and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ludke and Ed O'Neill, of Grace- ville. DAY IN CLEAN IT UP, CAMPAIGN Health, and A Spic and Span Town. To aid in making "Ortonville--the City Beautiful" is the end to which virtually every man, woman and child will work during the week of May 1 to 6, which has been designated as "clean up and paint up week." With a full realization of the bene- fits to be derived, not only to the city as a whole but to the individual prop- erty owners themselves as well, the spirit behind this movement this year has gained much prominence over that of former years and by the close of the campaign Ortonville will have taken on an entirely new dress from head to foot. At an enthusiastic meeting of mem- bers of the clean up committees held Saturday evening, at the A. L. Moore office, captains of the clean up squads were assigned different sections of the city, and all arrangements were made for a careful and systematic carabing and brushing campaign. On Friday, the fifth day, everyone will be treated to a dinner at the courthouse. Mrs. Win. Mullica, wh is in charge of the big "feed" issuei the statement that there will be plen- ty of free eats for all--so don't spare bearing down on the handle of your rake. The movement has the hearty endorsement and co-operation of both the city council and the health board. The division or section of the city showing the most noted improvement will be awarded a $10.00 prize, On this committee are Mrs. J. A. Bailey, Mrs. H. J. Shelver, and Earl Miller, who will ,act as judges. Last year this prize was won by "cash town," of which M. J. Hausauer was captain. In addition .to the prize mentioned a com- mittee is working on a plan to offer a prize to the owner or tenant who has shown the most interest in im- proving his or her individual resi- dence property. Details of this plan were not announced. Creation of a fund by poIular sub- criptlon for the purpose of defray- understood, for the work as it of- PROCLAMATION. Clean Up and Paint Up and Keep It Upl Know all Men, Women and Children by These Presents: That, whereas the National Cean Up and Paint Up C&m- paign has resulted in many ad- vantages to community life thruout the United States in re- lieving Unemployment; in safe- guarding Health; in promoting Thrift; in furthering Fire Pre- vention; in stimulating Civic Pride; and in making the "Home and City Beautiful." Now, therefore, be it known that plans have been perfected for a thoro Clean Up and Paint Up campaign in Ortonville, be, ginning May I, and continuing and constructive effort in clean- ing up and keeping it up. In this worthy movement we urge eech citizen to do his or her part to make our community clean, healthy, thrifty, safe and beauti- ' ful.. (Signed)--City Council Woman's Club Board of Health. fects public property. The comndttee in charge of the campaign is composed of A. L. Moore and George Fosburgh. family in the city for this purpose. Mrs. H. Cornelisen has been appoint- ed as chairman of this committee. This fund will be used exclusively, it is ing expens in carrying on the work of cleaning up the city park and oth- er public grounds is under way at this time, A donation of 50 cents is being asked from the head of each Little Ahead of Iowa. Clarke Orton drove up from A1- gona, IoWa, Monday to transact busi- ness here. He was accompanied by W. M. Brophy. According to Mr. Or- ion's report, farming operations in this section are as far along as those in Iowa. In fact he believes them a little in advance of those of that sec- tion of the country. CHARGES AGAINST BUREAU ANSWERED BY MATTHEWS Val. Cowles and Matthews Have Heat. ed Discussion at Farm Club in Prior Township. Charging that the Farm Bureau Federation endorsed the Esch-Cum- mens Law, and that after the bill was passed that officers of the Bureau were among the members of the com- mittee that called upon the President to check a threatening veto, Val. Cowles, editor of the Ortonville Star, started a heated discussion that lasted for more than an hour at a meeting of the Sunnyside Farmers Club in Prior township recently. Cowles also charged that Howard, president of the Farm Bureau, in 1919, endorsed the sale of government owned merchant marine, which was built at a cost of approximately 4 bil- lion dollars during the war. That thru this sale the government would have lost about one million dollars. He also charged that the Farm Bureau Federation in collusion with attorneys for the packers, drafted the Packer Control Bill, in which it was provided that the packers should not be pun- ished for proven violation of law until the second offense. Cowles charged further, that the president of the Board of Trade of Chicago, admitted that that body had contributed the sum of $100,000 to the Farm Bureau movement when it was initiated or very soon thereafter. Answering these charges, Charles Matthews of Prior township, presi- dent of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau, presented the following sta- tistics, emphatically denying each and every charge as made by Cowles, and throwing light upon the accomphsh - ments of the Farm Bureau movement since its inception a few years ago. I.--(a) The Farm Bureau bitterly opposed the 6 per cent guarantee to operative marketing bill conceded the country over as a great victory for the farmers, which legalizes coopera- tive marketing on a large scale. III.(a) Started National co-oper- ative marketing associations, as fol- lows: U. S. Grain Growers', already largest sales agency for grain in the United States, now controlling 150, 000,000 bushels of grain from over ]-100 elevators and 56,500 members. (b) National wool pool to store and sell wool. (c) National co-operative livestock marketing association with firms in all principal markets of the country. IV.Accomplishment o state fed- eration, include: (a) A co-operative marketing bill giving farmers one of the best co-operative laws of any state in the union, protecting co-operative enterprises. (b) Open market bill, compelling grain and livestock ex- changes to admit co-operative associa- tions to membership. (c) Grain gam- bling bill, a step in the right direc- tion toward eliminating grain gam- bling. Co-operative enterprises as ac- complished by the state federation in- clude: (a) Livestock marketing. Pro- motion of Central Co-operative Com- mission Company at South St. Paul market, uniting 350 local associations in selling livestock. This saved 50 per cent of previous commission chargeS. (b) Supportel organization of U. S. Grain Growers which rmw has contracts with 2304 growers in Minnesota and 50 elevators. (c) Sup- ported Dairy Marketing organization which has over 300 creameries united in buying supplies and selling pro- ducts. At the close of the discussion per- mission was asked by Cowles that time be granted him that he might seoars documentary evidence from Washing- ton in support of his charges, the pro- 't FINANCE MEETING CALLED. --'7 Invitation Extended To County Citi- zens to Meet at Marshall. i An invitation has been extended to farmers, bankers, livestock men and merchants of Big Stone County to be nt at a meeting at Marshall, Minnesota, on Saturday, April 29th, for the purpose of forming a district credit association thru which funds may be secured from the War Fi- nance Corporation. "It is obvious that an organiza- tion of the kind proposed be effected in this district, whereby money may be secured from the War Finance Corporation at a low rate of inter- est," said Senator James R. Hall, of Marshall, in his communication by telephone on Tuesday. "This is not a matter of slight importance, but on the contrary one that will mean the savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars to the farmers of this section of the state in the form of lowering interest rates. It is not a 'pipe dream'it is feasible and workable and it remains only for the men in- terested in their own welfare to take hold of their problem and put the plan into working order." The meeting was called by the Farm Bureau leaders in several of the southwestern Minnesota counties and it is believed that large delega- tions from practically every t0wn- ship in the district will be present. With the district organization a planned the Big Stone County IAve- stock Association, organized last Jan- uary will in all probability be merged into the larger organization, in the opinion of L. J. Keating, of Graceville, president of the association. Expressions from various county agents of the western and southern part of the state indicate a strong de- mand for such an organization. L.J. Keating, L. A. and Grace F. Kaecher will attend from here. Farm Loan Association Meets. A meeting of the Big Stone County National Farm Loan Association was called yesterday" by Grace F. Kaer- cher, secretary. At this meeting the loan committee approved 5 loans, making a total of 10 applications sent to the Federal Bank this spring. The committee expects a call for 5"htore in Jtme or July. Alfred Mathison was elected president of the Associa- tion, to succeed the late Aaron B. Kaercher, for the remainder of the year. Eahtonka Opens May 2nd Montevideo's Novelty Orchestra has been engaged to play for the opening dance at the Eahtonka Dancing Pavil- ion, which will be Tuesday evening, May 2. Announcement is made by Edgar Orton, manager, that several changes have been made at the pavilion. It is expected that many will be in atten- dance from the surrounding towns, as well as from this vicinity. Land Bank Stock Offered To Public G01d Bros. Security Compmhv An- nounce Sale of Capital Stock In' Southern Minn. Land Bank. Due to a very strong demand for its bonds in the eastern market, and a good demand for its kind of loans in the corn belt of South Dakota and Minnesota, th Southern Minnesota Joint Stock Land Bank, with offices at Redwood Falls, Minnesota, and Big Stone City, S. D., has decided to in- crease its capital stock and are offer- ing for the first time in its history, the sale of stock to local investors. This announcement was made today by J. A. Gold, of Big Stone City, who is vice-president of.the banFL Under its charter from the govern- ment, the Southern Minnesota Joint Stock Land Bank, with a paid in cap- ital of $250,000.00 are permitted to is- sue $3,750500.00 in bonds, Mr. Gold stated,--the money to be loaned to the farmers in Minnesota and South Da- kota. This amount has practically been loaned by the bank. At the present time all the stock is owned by individual members of tle Gold Bros. Security Co., of Big Stone City, S. D., and the Gold-Cooper Se- curities Co., of Redwood Falls, Minne- sota. These two concerns themselves have about $14,000,000.00 of HUNDREDS OUT TO HONOR CITY'S WAR HERO DEAD mounted by three riders, drew up in front of the building to receive the body. A company of 175 men in ar- my uniform, representing the Ameri- can Legion in command of William Engdah! stood at attention and hun- dreds stood with heads bare as the flag-draped casket was carried from the courthouse rotunda. Lead by the color bearers and es- corted by pall bearer representing the army, navy, marine corps and air service the caisson, followed in order by the flower bearers, mourners, Am- erican Legion and foreseer World War Veterans, the Red Cross nurses, Le- gion Auxiliary, Boy Scouts and mem- bers of the Grand Army of the Re- public, in autoes, proceeded to' the Methodist church. Short services were held there by Rev. G. L. Haggans, pastor, after which the procession continued to the cemetery. All along the line of march flags flew at half mast in a strong south wind. Hundreds of people joined the procession, either on foot, in autoes or by team, disregarding a threaten- ing sky." Services at the cemetery, under the auspices of the American Legion, were very impressive. The regular mili- tary services were used. Three salutes were fired over the grave by the firing squad, after which aps were sounded by Buglers Leonard Kollitz of Odessa and John Mogran of Graceville. Roy. Paul J. Bockoven officiated. Relatives in attendance from out-of- town were: Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Mar- ler and family, of Corretl; Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Spink and Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Spink, of Kingsley, Iowa; Mr. J. S. Spink, of Bronson, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Gilfillan, of Montgomery, Iowa; and Mr. R. M. Spink and family of Milbank, S. D. Taps Sounded as Remains of Ralph M. Spink are Low- ered to the Final Resting Place. Just two weeks and three days af- ter the fifth anniversary of the ap- proval by Congress of the President's war proclamation, that drew the flower of the northwest's manhood in- to the great world conflict, Big Stone County patriotic and civic organiza- tions assembled with hundreds f town and country folk around the flag draped caisson bearing the bod of Ralph M. Spink, Ortonville's War Hero Dead, Sunday afternoon, to Pay trbue to b_is memory and that of all who made the Supreme Sacrifice in defense of their country in that con- fiict. Spink was killed in action in the battle of Marchville, when marching against machine gun fire, on Novem- ber 10, 1918, the day before the Ar- mistice was signed. The courthouse grounds were cov- ered with people from every section of the country at one o'clock, an hour before the specially constructed eels- sou drawn by six black horses, and Will Leave For Wisconsin. Arne Langvid of Odessa townslil left the first of the week for Monddvi WisconSin, where he will teach th BOY ATTACKED BY COLLIE. Norwegian language, to the younger members of Rev. G. A. Westberg's conKgation for a two nonth's period, which is an annual event Mr. Lang- red taught school in Norway prior to his emigration to this count. Face Badly Torn When Dog Spurns Affection; Animal Killed. "I only wanted to pet him," was the laconic explanation uttered by Glen Vandeventer, four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs, G. E. Vandeventer living north of this city after he was attacked and bitten by a scotch col- lie dog Sunday afternoon while play- ing in the yard on the O. E. Fosher farm in Malta township. Because of his display of affoctin toward the animal Glen suffers a badly mutilated face. He received a bite about two and one-half inches long over his left ear, another over his right eye and several claw marks. Only the presence of the older folks who were visiting a few rods away saved the boy's life. Two large sticks were broken over the vicious canine before it was beaten off and finally shot. The lad was rushed to the office of Dr. Bergan at Clinton where the wounds were dressed. It is said his far-m condition is not serious, and unless symptoms of rabies or blood flroa under th Esch-Curn- sentatmn of whmh would be some time n pomon the re" ds, e ] .. " _ " loans outstanding and have bee umk- . _  .. " ..   i . mens Railroad bill and secured a sta- in me near future, at a meeting to ing farm loans in this immediate vi- m g aeveop ,ms recory wflI .be za__d. tute of limitation of 2 years. (b) Se-I be agreed upon. cinity for the past thirty years, t' e4o mlcauon was eve y cured a reduction of $1700,000.00 in/ ___. _ ..... The new stock will be offered for ne aog snowing a. llsliim for elll- ter CHA It BOLTA r'lh.;. lren, lr r'osner sine , the valuation of ratlroadSerstat orndmeet t " " the first time to the local investors, mned by the Int te t .... .... and Subscriptions are now being taken ] ___. _ . . commission, which saved the shippers/eexs ,uounty Attorney mce; unly at their office in Big Stone City. The[ First uampetw Arrive. of the United States $200,000,000 ' Candidate Thus Far. stock was offered to local people atl A party of tous enrmte to east- yearly. (c) Obtained a reduction on But one filing foryounty offices has Redwood Falls the past few days and] ern points, cped in the city park freight rates of 17 to 23 per cent on been made to date and that was on has met with much favor among the one night last wee, being the first to hay,grain and grain products and a Monday afternoon, April 24, when, friends and acquaintances of the peo- 1 remain there over night this season. 10 per cent cut on all other farm pro- Chas. H. Bolsta filed for the office of] ple who run the bank. A large amount They stated that they came tu ducts, county attorney for Big Stone County. I of stock was subscribed for, indicative Aberdeen, and while there were rob- II[ (a) Organized the Farm Bloc "Herb," who is associated in the I of the confidence of the home people bed of their tent and other belongings. in Congress which obtained passage practise of law with R. G. Farting-/in the management of the bank. : - of the following bill: (b) $25,000,000 ton, present county attorney, will in I The bank, it is known, has had some New Pharmasist Arrive. appropriation to take ever the Feder I all liklihood have the field to himself,[ very attractive propositions offered, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Petersoa ! al Land Bank Bonds and enable far-[unless some one should file from to transfer their headquarters to the arrive the latter part of the week .reefs to get loans at a lower rate.[ another part of the county, and this[ twin cities, but the Officers decided that Minneapolis, and will make their =la. (c) Secured passage of Packer Con- I is not held  probable.  this vicinity is entitled to just this ture home in this city, Mr. Petean trol bill, and a bill curbing gambling I Insofar as attorneys in Ortonville[ kind of an institution, and that the io- having accepted a position as Phar- and admitting co-opeative marketing] are concern.ed all have indicated that| cal investing public is entitled to a macist at the Gundm Drug Stre. organizations to membership in grain / there would be no filing on their part safe, conservative investment such as Mrs. Peterson is e sister of Hn,y exchanges. (d) The passage of theco- for this office, its capital stock offers, and Ralph Gunderson. : ..... .j x THE ORTON00LLE INDEPENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, APRIL 27. 1922 NUMBER 51 JOIN 0RTONVILLE UNIT NATIONAL GUARD :Madison Officers "Swear- in" Eighteen as National Guardsmen. Full Strength Company Is Goal. Twenty-one men were mustered into the National Guard on Tuesday even- lng, at a meeting at the public library before Captain Clifford W. Pic- First Lieutenant Gerold C. Dale, Lieutenant Arthur W. Hauck, Company I, and Captain Walter N. 3rd Bttalion, of Madison, Minne- who came over by auto, pursu- ;ant to an authorization by Colonel Luce of Minneapolis, allowing Orton- a full strength company. Those who were sworn in are Clar- Beckman, Glenn Bertelson, Mer- ville Schaible, Edwin Hippie, Harold 8hult, Walter Elms, Llewely'n Van Lyle Longncker, Cecil Kaer- Erwin Slverson, Willard Tweet, Chester Zwiener, Floyd Atha, Magnus Nelson, Harry Peterson, Arnold Carl Swanson, Dr. D. M. , Earl Miller, R. C. Schoen and Bennie Hess. The enlisted men are to secure the of all men who are de- :irous of becoming members and when a sufficient number of applica- tions have been received officers will "be designated frut state headquar- ters to complete the organization. :lt is the intention of those already to secure enough men to make a company, the minimum allow- ance for which is 65 men. When this :has been accomplished application may be made for a argot range, and after approval of the site the state will either lease or purchase the thact and target practise will begin. All ammunition, uniforms, rifles, etc., will be furnished free of charge by the state. Until a company has been or- ganized the members sworn in will be unassigned, but amched to the rd company for administration. Nearly every city the size of Or- in this territory has had a Guard unit for tnany years armories have been erected at , ton, Benson, Morris, Madison, Dawson in this section. An ap- of $26,000.00 was made in each case by the state of Minnesota toward the construction of these ar rnories and with the proper spirit be- hind the National organization in this "city, it is hoped that a like amount Will be received for an armory here. Enlistments are made for a period ef three years by those who have never had military training, vhile for- mer service'men are given the option ef enliing for a period of one or three years. In case the organization is called out to any part of the stae for guard duty it is not compulsory to answer the call and in case of mov- ing from the city an application may :be wade out for discharge. The benefits derived from a guard  Company, insofar as the city is con- erned, are held to be of much impor- tance. At Madison it is said that the men belonging to the organiza- tion there brought into that city alone in the neighborhood of $10,000 last year . Enlistee 1 men will be paid on a basis cf $1.00 for every drill night, Which is one night each week, while the of- =ricers are paid in proportion to their rank, or approximat.ely $300 a year for a captaincy. A committee composed of Wayne !elly, Earl Miller, Dr- D. M. O'Don- nell, and Robert Schoen, of this city. and Captain Pickle of Madison, made a trip o Minneapolis last week, and Colonel Luce, afte learning the senti- ment in favor of a guard company, ave authority to proceed with the work. It is the belief of those who became members as well as many others that no difficuly will be ex- perieuced in securing enough appli- cants to form a company. As soon as this has been done officers will be ap- Pointed among the local members. THREE EARED PIG LATEST. 1. Z. Piper of Malta Township Pos- sessor of Freak Animal. :,  Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Duroc Jer- sey Pig a four-pound son, on Tues- day, April 25, 1922, on the farm of F. Z. Piper, Prior township, Big Stone county. And why. not such an an- nouncement for the arrival of the lit- tle fellow who was born with three ears, thereby standing out conspicu- ously among members of the swine family in this section of the state, and as the leader of his herd, which he is ure to be because of his additional appendage that will enable him to de- mct the call to "chow" at a greater iistanee than others of his family. "Ear-shot," which he wa appropri- named, is in good health. His extra ear is directly back of his "regu lar one" on the left side of his head. Some speculation is held for the safe- ty by his "owner, Mr. Piper, who fears when he grows older and be. :eomes ready for'market and the radio i reports are sent forth announcing the price of pork that he may pick the message from the air and take to larts unknowm AMATEUR LEAGUE PLANNED MONDAY IS OPENING Baseball Fans of Seven Towns Will Meet at Montevideo I Ortonville will be represented by a strictly home talent baseball nine this season, it was decided  a meeting of enthusiasts of the sport held at the Legion club rooms on Monday night A1 Jacobson, who was elected man- ager has called a try-out for 7:00 o'clock sharp on Tuesday night, May 2nd at the baseball park near the de- pot. Everyone that ass followed base- ball either in high school or other- wise is urged to be at this try-out so that selection may be made and the best possible team placed in the field at a later date. That an amateur baseball league will result from the efforts of the Legion posts over the 'district is the opinion of nearly every paper within the district. Representatives from the different towns will meet tonight at Montevideo to work out plans for a league that aim to have an eligibility clause, that "No person shall play on a team of this league unless he shall have been for 30 days a bona fide resi- dent of the town represented by such team, or shall have resided for 30 days within ten miles of such town but not within any other league town. No league team .shall be permitted to compensate or pay salary to any pLay- er." This action is a direct result of the proven failure of attempting to finance and maintain salaried players in towns with a population of from two to five thousand. Herbert Bolsta, and Al Jacobson will represent this city at the meeting. Towns that have signified their in- tention of becoming members of such a league as proposed are, Madison, Granite Falls, Boyd, Montevideo, Mi- lan, Appleton and Ortonville. Arrangements were made for the use of Kaercher's pasture near the depot for a dianond, no charge for which was ,made. UP, PAINT UP, KEEP City to Join Hands In Work * That Means for Better I Johnsons To St. Cloud. Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson, who conducted the M. M. Johnson Furni- ture Company o this city until a short time ago, when the business was taken over by the Schoen- Swen- son Company, have purchased an exclusive undertaking parlor at St. Cloud, Minnesota, and will leave for there the latter part of this week. Both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, during their residence in 0rtonville, have made many acquaintances who re- gret their departure. McLeods Return via NewYork The C. J. McLeod family returned to this city the latter part of the week, after spending the winter in Florida. They made the trip from Maimi, Fla., to New York City by boat, and report a very enjoyable journey. They have now opened UP their cottage on the peninsula, and will remain for the summer. Mrs. H. W. Palm Succumbs Suddenly Paralysis of Brain Causes Death Sun- day Morning After Illness of But A Few Days. The whole community was sad- dened by the death of Mrs. H. W. Palm early Sunday morning, April 23yd. She had been ill only a few days, so the news of her death is an additional blow to her many friends: At her bedside when death came were her husband and daughter, Marguer- ite, and a sister, Mrs. Leers La Grange, of Polo Alto, California, Death was caused by paralysis of the brain. Louise Pressly Palm was born on November 28, 1865 at Shereton, In. She wa married to H. Willard Palm at Webbter City, Iowa, on January 26, 1891. In 1892 they moved to Browns Valley, where they lived until March, 1914, when they came to Or- tonville. Mrs. Palm was an active member of the Congregational Church of this city and a member also of the Eastern Star Lodge. Short services were held at the home here on Tuesday morning and the remains taken to St. Paul where the burial was made in Oakland Cemetery, on Tuesday afternoon. Relatives and friends from out-of- town who attended the services at the home were: Mrs. Leota La Grange, a sister, Polo Al- to, Calif., Mrs. Roy Buchanan, a neice, and Mr. Buchanan, Sisseton, S. Dak., Earl Bletcher, Sioux Falls, S. D., Mr. and Mrs. E. Paul, J. L. Paul, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Barrett, George Schley, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Collins Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Bailey and Mrs. H. C. LaClaire, all of Browns Valley, and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ludke and Ed O'Neill, of Grace- ville. DAY IN CLEAN IT UP, CAMPAIGN Health, and ASpic and Span Town. To aid in making "Ortonville--the City Beautiful" is the end to which virtually every man, woman and child will work during the week of May 1 to 6, which has been designated as "clean up and paint up week." With a full realization of the bene- fits to be derived, not only to the city as a whole but to the individual prop- erty owners themselves as well, the spirit behind this movement this year has gained much prominence over that of former years and by the close of the campaign Ortonville will have taken on an entirely new dress from head to foot. At an enthusiastic meeting of mem- bers of the clean up committees held Saturday evening, at the A. L. Moore office, captains of the clean up squads were assigned different sections of the city, and all arrangements were made for a careful and systematic carabing and brushing campaign. On Friday, the fifth day, everyone will be treated to a dinner at the courthouse. Mrs. Win. Mullica, wh is in charge of the big "feed" issuei the statement that there will be plen- ty of free eats for all--so don't spare bearing down on the handle of your rake. The movement has the hearty endorsement and co-operation of both the city council and the health board. The division or section of the city showing the most noted improvement will be awarded a $10.00 prize, On this committee are Mrs. J. A. Bailey, Mrs. H. J. Shelver, and Earl Miller, who will ,act as judges. Last year this prize was won by "cash town," of which M. J. Hausauer was captain. In addition .to the prize mentioned a com- mittee is working on a plan to offer a prize to the owner or tenant who has shown the most interest in im- proving his or her individual resi- dence property. Details of this plan were not announced. Creation of a fund by poIular sub- criptlon for the purpose of defray- understood, for the work as it of- PROCLAMATION. Clean Up and Paint Up and Keep It Upl Know all Men, Women and Children by These Presents: That, whereas the National Cean Up and Paint Up C&m- paign has resulted in many ad- vantages to community life thruout the United States in re- lieving Unemployment; in safe- guarding Health; in promoting Thrift; in furthering Fire Pre- vention; in stimulating Civic Pride; and in making the "Home and City Beautiful." Now, therefore, be it known that plans have been perfected for a thoro Clean Up and Paint Up campaign in Ortonville, be, ginning May I, and continuing and constructive effort in clean- ing up and keeping it up. In this worthy movement we urge eech citizen to do his or her part to make our community clean, healthy, thrifty, safe and beauti- ' ful.. (Signed)--City Council Woman's Club Board of Health. fects public property. The comndttee in charge of the campaign is composed of A. L. Moore and George Fosburgh. family in the city for this purpose. Mrs. H. Cornelisen has been appoint- ed as chairman of this committee. This fund will be used exclusively, it is ing expens in carrying on the work of cleaning up the city park and oth- er public grounds is under way at this time, A donation of 50 cents is being asked from the head of each Little Ahead of Iowa. Clarke Orton drove up from A1- gona, IoWa, Monday to transact busi- ness here. He was accompanied by W. M. Brophy. According to Mr. Or- ion's report, farming operations in this section are as far along as those in Iowa. In fact he believes them a little in advance of those of that sec- tion of the country. CHARGES AGAINST BUREAU ANSWERED BY MATTHEWS Val. Cowles and Matthews Have Heat. ed Discussion at Farm Club in Prior Township. Charging that the Farm Bureau Federation endorsed the Esch-Cum- mens Law, and that after the bill was passed that officers of the Bureau were among the members of the com- mittee that called upon the President to check a threatening veto, Val. Cowles, editor of the Ortonville Star, started a heated discussion that lasted for more than an hour at a meeting of the Sunnyside Farmers Club in Prior township recently. Cowles also charged that Howard, president of the Farm Bureau, in 1919, endorsed the sale of government owned merchant marine, which was built at a cost of approximately 4 bil- lion dollars during the war. That thru this sale the government would have lost about one million dollars. He also charged that the Farm Bureau Federation in collusion with attorneys for the packers, drafted the Packer Control Bill, in which it was provided that the packers should not be pun- ished for proven violation of law until the second offense. Cowles charged further, that the president of the Board of Trade of Chicago, admitted that that body had contributed the sum of $100,000 to the Farm Bureau movement when it was initiated or very soon thereafter. Answering these charges, Charles Matthews of Prior township, presi- dent of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau, presented the following sta- tistics, emphatically denying each and every charge as made by Cowles, and throwing light upon the accomphsh - ments of the Farm Bureau movement since its inception a few years ago. I.--(a) The Farm Bureau bitterly opposed the 6 per cent guarantee to operative marketing bill conceded the country over as a great victory for the farmers, which legalizes coopera- tive marketing on a large scale. III.(a) Started National co-oper- ative marketing associations, as fol- lows: U. S. Grain Growers', already largest sales agency for grain in the United States, now controlling 150, 000,000 bushels of grain from over ]-100 elevators and 56,500 members. (b) National wool pool to store and sell wool. (c) National co-operative livestock marketing association with firms in all principal markets of the country. IV.Accomplishment o state fed- eration, include: (a) A co-operative marketing bill giving farmers one of the best co-operative laws of any state in the union, protecting co-operative enterprises. (b) Open market bill, compelling grain and livestock ex- changes to admit co-operative associa- tions to membership. (c) Grain gam- bling bill, a step in the right direc- tion toward eliminating grain gam- bling. Co-operative enterprises as ac- complished by the state federation in- clude: (a) Livestock marketing. Pro- motion of Central Co-operative Com- mission Company at South St. Paul market, uniting 350 local associations in selling livestock. This saved 50 per cent of previous commission chargeS. (b) Supportel organization of U. S. Grain Growers which rmw has contracts with 2304 growers in Minnesota and 50 elevators. (c) Sup- ported Dairy Marketing organization which has over 300 creameries united in buying supplies and selling pro- ducts. At the close of the discussion per- mission was asked by Cowles that time be granted him that he might seoars documentary evidence from Washing- ton in support of his charges, the pro- 't FINANCE MEETING CALLED. --'7 Invitation Extended To County Citi- zens to Meet at Marshall. i An invitation has been extended to farmers, bankers, livestock men and merchants of Big Stone County to be nt at a meeting at Marshall, Minnesota, on Saturday, April 29th, for the purpose of forming a district credit association thru which funds may be secured from the War Fi- nance Corporation. "It is obvious that an organiza- tion of the kind proposed be effected in this district, whereby money may be secured from the War Finance Corporation at a low rate of inter- est," said Senator James R. Hall, of Marshall, in his communication by telephone on Tuesday. "This is not a matter of slight importance, but on the contrary one that will mean the savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars to the farmers of this section of the state in the form of lowering interest rates. It is not a 'pipe dream'it is feasible and workable and it remains only for the men in- terested in their own welfare to take hold of their problem and put the plan into working order." The meeting was called by the Farm Bureau leaders in several of the southwestern Minnesota counties and it is believed that large delega- tions from practically every t0wn- ship in the district will be present. With the district organization a planned the Big Stone County IAve- stock Association, organized last Jan- uary will in all probability be merged into the larger organization, in the opinion of L. J. Keating, of Graceville, president of the association. Expressions from various county agents of the western and southern part of the state indicate a strong de- mand for such an organization. L.J. Keating, L. A. and Grace F. Kaecher will attend from here. Farm Loan Association Meets. A meeting of the Big Stone County National Farm Loan Association was called yesterday" by Grace F. Kaer- cher, secretary. At this meeting the loan committee approved 5 loans, making a total of 10 applications sent to the Federal Bank this spring. The committee expects a call for 5"htore in Jtme or July. Alfred Mathison was elected president of the Associa- tion, to succeed the late Aaron B. Kaercher, for the remainder of the year. Eahtonka Opens May 2nd Montevideo's Novelty Orchestra has been engaged to play for the opening dance at the Eahtonka Dancing Pavil- ion, which will be Tuesday evening, May 2. Announcement is made by Edgar Orton, manager, that several changes have been made at the pavilion. It is expected that many will be in atten- dance from the surrounding towns, as well as from this vicinity. Land Bank Stock Offered To Public G01d Bros. Security Compmhv An- nounce Sale of Capital Stock In' Southern Minn. Land Bank. Due to a very strong demand for its bonds in the eastern market, and a good demand for its kind of loans in the corn belt of South Dakota and Minnesota, th Southern Minnesota Joint Stock Land Bank, with offices at Redwood Falls, Minnesota, and Big Stone City, S. D., has decided to in- crease its capital stock and are offer- ing for the first time in its history, the sale of stock to local investors. This announcement was made today by J. A. Gold, of Big Stone City, who is vice-president of.the banFL Under its charter from the govern- ment, the Southern Minnesota Joint Stock Land Bank, with a paid in cap- ital of $250,000.00 are permitted to is- sue $3,750500.00 in bonds, Mr. Gold stated,--the money to be loaned to the farmers in Minnesota and South Da- kota. This amount has practically been loaned by the bank. At the present time all the stock is owned by individual members of tle Gold Bros. Security Co., of Big Stone City, S. D., and the Gold-Cooper Se- curities Co., of Redwood Falls, Minne- sota. These two concerns themselves have about $14,000,000.00 of HUNDREDS OUT TO HONOR CITY'S WAR HERO DEAD mounted by three riders, drew up in front of the building to receive the body. A company of 175 men in ar- my uniform, representing the Ameri- can Legion in command of William Engdah! stood at attention and hun- dreds stood with heads bare as the flag-draped casket was carried from the courthouse rotunda. Lead by the color bearers and es- corted by pall bearer representing the army, navy, marine corps and air service the caisson, followed in order by the flower bearers, mourners, Am- erican Legion and foreseer World War Veterans, the Red Cross nurses, Le- gion Auxiliary, Boy Scouts and mem- bers of the Grand Army of the Re- public, in autoes, proceeded to' the Methodist church. Short services were held there by Rev. G. L. Haggans, pastor, after which the procession continued to the cemetery. All along the line of march flags flew at half mast in a strong south wind. Hundreds of people joined the procession, either on foot, in autoes or by team, disregarding a threaten- ing sky." Services at the cemetery, under the auspices of the American Legion, were very impressive. The regular mili- tary services were used. Three salutes were fired over the grave by the firing squad, after which aps were sounded by Buglers Leonard Kollitz of Odessa and John Mogran of Graceville. Roy. Paul J. Bockoven officiated. Relatives in attendance from out-of- town were: Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Mar- ler and family, of Corretl; Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Spink and Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Spink, of Kingsley, Iowa; Mr. J. S. Spink, of Bronson, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Gilfillan, of Montgomery, Iowa; and Mr. R. M. Spink and family of Milbank, S. D. Taps Sounded as Remains of Ralph M. Spink are Low- ered to the Final Resting Place. Just two weeks and three days af- ter the fifth anniversary of the ap- proval by Congress of the President's war proclamation, that drew the flower of the northwest's manhood in- to the great world conflict, Big Stone County patriotic and civic organiza- tions assembled with hundreds f town and country folk around the flag draped caisson bearing the bod of Ralph M. Spink, Ortonville's War Hero Dead, Sunday afternoon, to Pay trbue to b_is memory and that of all who made the Supreme Sacrifice in defense of their country in that con- fiict. Spink was killed in action in the battle of Marchville, when marching against machine gun fire, on Novem- ber 10, 1918, the day before the Ar- mistice was signed. The courthouse grounds were cov- ered with people from every section of the country at one o'clock, an hour before the specially constructed eels- sou drawn by six black horses, and Will Leave For Wisconsin. Arne Langvid of Odessa townslil left the first of the week for Monddvi WisconSin, where he will teach th BOY ATTACKED BY COLLIE. Norwegian language, to the younger members of Rev. G. A. Westberg's conKgation for a two nonth's period, which is an annual event Mr. Lang- red taught school in Norway prior to his emigration to this count. Face Badly Torn When Dog Spurns Affection; Animal Killed. "I only wanted to pet him," was the laconic explanation uttered by Glen Vandeventer, four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs, G. E. Vandeventer living north of this city after he was attacked and bitten by a scotch col- lie dog Sunday afternoon while play- ing in the yard on the O. E. Fosher farm in Malta township. Because of his display of affoctin toward the animal Glen suffers a badly mutilated face. He received a bite about two and one-half inches long over his left ear, another over his right eye and several claw marks. Only the presence of the older folks who were visiting a few rods away saved the boy's life. Two large sticks were broken over the vicious canine before it was beaten off and finally shot. The lad was rushed to the office of Dr. Bergan at Clinton where the wounds were dressed. It is said his far-m condition is not serious, and unless symptoms of rabies or blood flroa under th Esch-Curn- sentatmn of whmh would be some time n pomon the re" ds, e ] .. " _ " loans outstanding and have bee umk- . _  .. " ..   i . mens Railroad bill and secured a sta- in me near future, at a meeting to ing farm loans in this immediate vi- m g aeveop ,ms recory wflI .be za__d. tute of limitation of 2 years. (b) Se-I be agreed upon. cinity for the past thirty years, t' e4o mlcauon was eve y cured a reduction of $1700,000.00 in/ ___. _ ..... The new stock will be offered for ne aog snowing a. llsliim for elll- ter CHA It BOLTA r'lh.;. lren, lr r'osner sine , the valuation of ratlroadSerstat orndmeet t " " the first time to the local investors, mned by the Int te t .... .... and Subscriptions are now being taken ] ___. _ . . commission, which saved the shippers/eexs ,uounty Attorney mce; unly at their office in Big Stone City. The[ First uampetw Arrive. of the United States $200,000,000 ' Candidate Thus Far. stock was offered to local people atl A party of tous enrmte to east- yearly. (c) Obtained a reduction on But one filing foryounty offices has Redwood Falls the past few days and] ern points, cped in the city park freight rates of 17 to 23 per cent on been made to date and that was on has met with much favor among the one night last wee, being the first to hay,grain and grain products and a Monday afternoon, April 24, when, friends and acquaintances of the peo- 1 remain there over night this season. 10 per cent cut on all other farm pro- Chas. H. Bolsta filed for the office of] ple who run the bank. A large amount They stated that they came tu ducts, county attorney for Big Stone County. I of stock was subscribed for, indicative Aberdeen, and while there were rob- II[ (a) Organized the Farm Bloc "Herb," who is associated in the I of the confidence of the home people bed of their tent and other belongings. in Congress which obtained passage practise of law with R. G. Farting-/in the management of the bank. : - of the following bill: (b) $25,000,000 ton, present county attorney, will in I The bank, it is known, has had some New Pharmasist Arrive. appropriation to take ever the Feder I all liklihood have the field to himself,[ very attractive propositions offered, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Petersoa ! al Land Bank Bonds and enable far-[unless some one should file from to transfer their headquarters to the arrive the latter part of the week .reefs to get loans at a lower rate.[ another part of the county, and this[ twin cities, but the Officers decided that Minneapolis, and will make their =la. (c) Secured passage of Packer Con- I is not held  probable.  this vicinity is entitled to just this ture home in this city, Mr. Petean trol bill, and a bill curbing gambling I Insofar as attorneys in Ortonville[ kind of an institution, and that the io- having accepted a position as Phar- and admitting co-opeative marketing] are concern.ed all have indicated that| cal investing public is entitled to a macist at the Gundm Drug Stre. organizations to membership in grain / there would be no filing on their part safe, conservative investment such as Mrs. Peterson is e sister of Hn,y exchanges. (d) The passage of theco- for this office, its capital stock offers, and Ralph Gunderson. : ..... .j x THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE. MINN THURSDAY, APRIL 27, 1922 NUMBER 51 ORTONVILLE UNIT NATIONAL GUARD Officers "Swear- in" Eighteen as National Guardsmen. Full Strength Company Isr Goal. Twenty-one men were mustered into Grd on Tuesday even. g t Lhe pbli librar First IAeutensnt Gerald C. Dale, eond lieutenant Arth W. Hak, who came over by auto* ant horitlon by of Mieaplis, allowing Tha who wen swam in am GLenn Berten, M- htflt, Walter EI. Llewelyn V Le Lazreker, Cel Kae r, Ern Sven, WJllard Tweet, ter Zwir, Floyd Atha, Magnus Neigh, Harry Pn, Arnold Carl Swoon. Dr. D. M. El Miller, R. C Schoen are de- of bming member and of applic dignated fr ate headquae- to complete the rganiuo alady a mpany, the mlnim for w]deh , 65 men. W[ bn plLshed appiilon he nutde for g target nge, ad target pmetle will begiv. All attaed to for tdmialstrm Nearly ever tlty the size of Or- territory unit for ny y v,  erted s Appleton, Benson, Mois, MadiSon, An  by the ztste pper spirit be. !hind the National o* hoped that  Fllstmeuts are, made far a three yrs by tho enlling for a  of one or In ce the organization duty it is not compulsory to answer the, from the city an appLication may out for disvarge. The benefits derived fm g guard mpatny, in.far as ;hi ctyl n- ed, are held o b of much impor+ At Madin it s d that a bongig to the eriza- n there brought into that elty alone neighborhood of $10,000 Enll In will ba pahi on a bi$ $1.o0 or every drill oportien to their appmLmatty f00 a zee eompod of Wae 1 Mitler, D D. ItL Pickle of MadisOn. made trip to Mlnnepplis last week, d olonel Luoe, afteg Iiug the sl- in War of a girard eompmy, authority to proofed 4th It Is the belief of there w membem a well tI-Jet bat no  wall be ex. in euring ough ppll- has been do omr, wtU tm at" ]Yeinted among the local membet THIg EARED PIG LATEST+ P. z. Pipt of Malta T*ddllp Yet. r of Freak A.IL aey Pig a four-pound so ou Tues day. AMI 25, 19, t the f ,  Plr, I townsMp, Big stone eo W And why+ ot ud an an- rrlvl of the it+ tie l who t he with thre ars, thereby storming out co.plea+ of the lne seetion of the state, and leder of his herd, wMeh he is ) be bau of his adflonaa ether* et hie fnuy. "Eathot," which he w appmp ri- tmed. is in good health. Ki back of h "regu- lar one  on the left #de of his head. iptulaticn is held for the safe- hit'owner, Mr. lpr, who fn whtm be 8rws *4dr d b foFmsrket and the radio forth armature;rig th pork that he m 4ck tM the air md take tt oSev ...... Will MONDAY IS OPENING DAY IN CLEAN .............. .oc ..... ........ Z?L+t hT:== ...... I UP, PAINT UP, KEEP IT UP, CAMPAIGN[ .................... strictly hans talent baseball nine this' @   fmers, hanker livestock -- . @ mehants of Big Stone oty to be City to Join Hands In Work pmnt at a meeting * Mhe 1 Legion club ms on Monday night That Means f o r Better pROCLAMATION" i Minnesota' on Saturday' April 29th AI Jacobsen, who w elated man. I  ........ {  ] for the purpo of forming a district after h called a try.out for 7:00 leam, an A plc an Clean Up and Paint Up czdit association th which fds o'clock sarP on Tuesday night, May l a Town i and Keep It Upt amy be ard fm the w Ft- all ark near the de- ""__ ] KU all Men Women  nce orportion+ !at T O aid in making "Ortonvillthe Children by The Pxnts; It ls obvious that an orgzao tgh at, whets the NatlonM pposed be effeced City Beautiful" is the end wi is urged to be at this try-out  virtually every Clean Up d Paint Up Cam- ] district, whereby money be ide and the g the paign h rulted in my ad* be sued fm the W best poible te to 6, which has bn designated vantages to mmunity life Cerpomtlon at a low "cle up and paint up wk" thout the United S*ate in That an teur babail [eagle With a full lieving Unemployment; in Marehalt, in his will suit from the efforts of the fits to be derived, not o]y to the city guarding HeMth; in prng teleIfllo on Tuesdy. '+This is Legion P asta ver the 'district is the Shrift; in furthering Fi Pro- of slight imprtae opinion of arly every paper within erty owners venison; in stimulating Civic the contrary one that will ne ]d; and in m th 'Ram mvJn pirit behind this movement mt tnight at has gained much 1 d city lautl." to the farraen ef th3* MeuteVldeo to wot] out pla for a of fomr ye rid by the c]e of NOW, theff, be it kno ] leasue that aim to have an eliilLty the campaign Oetonvilte Will hae that gi Mve been perfted tes. It i not a clae, that "NO pen hall play on take n on an entily for tho Cin Up tm d pain t a team of this Ig Up i in Ortanville, be+ hs been for 30 days a bo fide sd. ginning y 1, d ontintdng in their o dent of the te psented by sk and nsttlve effort in cle- PrOblem d put team, or shMi have ided for 80 Saturday eving, at the A. ink up and keeping it up. lu plan Jto worM viler." days dthin ten adles this worthy mordent we urge The m'ttng w edled by the y other lgue town. r e signe diffent aete of the h citron to do ls ot her part Ide in erl of No lgtm team hall be peitted to te make our mmity el, compensate or pay Iary to y play- healthy ' thrifty, safe d bUi- larg delegs- or." This tleu is a dlreet sult of and bhing pign. tlns fm ptia]ly every tn. the prev fiie of attempting to On Friday, (Signed)ty C0untl shiP in the diset will b psent. d mahitain saIaried playe tted to a dinner at Womb'* Club With the district organization with population of from e. Mrs. W Mulli, wh Board of Hulth. P ]ned the Big Stone catty Tve- two to five thread, Herbert Balsas, is in charge of he big "feed" lsuel uI7 will in Mi probbilit y be merged d At Jacobsen will pnt thi le city at the meeting, organization, in the g, of Grseeville, ty of fr bearing do on the handle of your in ehrge of the epmKn ia eompod rake. The movement has the hearty of A. ].  oo and G ge Fesburg, sociatiom a league as pposed a, Median, endoemeat and cooperation of both fmly in the city for this purpo. Epssiens from rations unty Gnite Falls, Boyd, Men.vide% Mi- th e city Mrs. H. Coelin h been appoinV of the weste ln, ,Appleton and Ortonille. Th e division or so u of th e city ed as ehMm of this mitt Thja part of the state indite a strong de- Krrangtnt$ wer made far the showing the most noted impent be used elusivelyt it is d for such  orgtmitien. I J. u of Kaoher's pto nr the lug p in carrying on the work Keating L. A. d Ge F. Kaereher depot for a diamond, no charge for a $10.00 prize. which was ade. Mrs, J, A. of cloning up the city park and oth- fm he. Mr H. J. Shelr, d EarL er public grods is under way t who wilt a  Judges. this tim. A donation of 50 cents is Farm Loa Associative Mt. John TO st. C]d. pri wa won by "b to,,, of being ked fm the hd of A mtlng of the Rig Stone County , Mr. nd M. M+  Johnson, who whie h M. J+ Hausauer was ptaln. lu -- -- National Farm bean Aelatlon w enchwted tho  M. Johann Furut- addition+to the pri mentioned a cam- Little Ahd of Iowa. . l led yeerd&y'by Gte F; Kaer+ ture Cempmy of this city ttl a littee s working en a plan to offer Clarke Oaten dv up from AI. eher, Seel,etary. A this meeting ago, a pri to the ar or tenant who o, Ie, Moda" to transact husi+ the ]u mmittee appved  10s, wm tkou over by the has sho the most Intest in h. ne here He  mpied by making a total of lo &ppto nt n Company. haw puhased an proving his or her lndivldl si. W. M. Bphy. Arding  Mr. Or- to the Federal Bank tlds spring+ The undertaking parlor Cloud, Mlnnesot, rtp of able wetk. PPertY" Deteila of tk plan ton's rert, farrolnff operations i zaJttee expects e.ail this seegi are  ar along as those JulY+ Alfred Ci of  fd by potulm" sub- in low&. Lm feet he believes them a Both Mr. and M. Johnson, during rptlo u for the purpose of defy- little in aNr of those of that se- t ion, to su the late An B. eir regM, n in Ortonville, ve uderto0d, for the work  it f- tioaoftheotmtry. Kaereher, for the remainder of the made many acquaintances who - gret their departure. CHARGES AGAINST BUREAU ,,. o ,,,,,, =,,, Mc Reurn via N York MontevMoo% Nevty Or*hestrah T. o. .  ............  ANSWERED BY MATTHEWS to this etty the latter part of the week, e trip fm Mimi, FI& Val, Cowle$ and flthewa-- a Ht operam inn, wh will be Tuesday 0peed p thet ttage on the -- tire mrheting on a large ele. May 2. c City by boat, d report ed Dilution at Farm Club co.try er as  great vletory for Anoeent is made by Edgar a very enjoyable jouxey, qLy have in prior Township. the fae, which legalizes co opera- Orto, pavilion. It is d will remain for Charging that the F lll.--(a) Started National expired that many will be in alton- endorsed the ative marketing associations, s fol- lows: U.s. Grain Grower', ly Mrs+ H. W. Palm .............................................. United St*es+ now centre+ling 150, ..... Land Bank Stock S ccumbs S dde ly ..................................... Offered To Public u u n ,o++,.+,,tor of  o.++n+,.+., ,+, ,+.o.1 w.+ -- I paralysis of Br=tn  Dth Sa. lor mo than + marketing -intion with __ day Morning After Illness of of the SUnnyide Farme flm in. all prinpal markets of he GO d  Seerlty Company An- But A Few Days Pr tohip rtently, nounee Sale of Capital Stock In" -- Cowle also chrged that Howard, 1V.--Aee0mpliment of, state fed- Soutkem Mn Laud Imk. The whole mmunily was sad- ps+den of the Farm Buau, in etion, include: (a) ded by the death of M. H, W. 1919, erersed the sale of goeement marketing bill giving fers one o Due to a very strong dend for PIm ly Sunday morning, April meht rine, whleh was y state its bonds in the eastern market, and 23rd. She had been ill only a pxtmately 4 bil- in the urban, protecting copemti a gd demand for its kind of I days, so the ews of her tion dollars during the w. That enterprises. (h) Open market bill, in the  belt of South Dkott and blow to her many friend; thro this sale the gomment wold compelling grain and liteck ex+ Minnesota, thq outhe bnota At her bedd when death came we Lost oout one million doll.s. He ebauge to admit -opemtiv aoela. Joint Stock Land Bank, with ofees her husband d daughtel Msrg charged ons to membemhip (a) Grin g- at Redwood FMIs, Minnesota, nd Big lie, and sister, MrS. Loots La bling bill, a step in the fight dice- Stone Cty, S. D., h dedl to in+ Grango, of 1hi Alto, Csllfornl far the pker drafted tion towrd elilmnting grsin gain- ela its eagi k d  offer- Death wta  I Ctl Bill, hllng. Co-operti enterprise as . ig for the first time Jn Jt kLtory ham. the tate fedrati in- the sM e of.  to lt I ino. Louise Pronely Palm w bo elude: (a) offense, by g A. Gold. of Bi November 28, 18 at Sheraton, farther, that the president Comn is vpe dent of the bauk , City, Iow on market, tming 850 lead " they moved that that body in lling llvestoek, pr cent of pvioa , with a itd In p+ Mah, 1914, when they came to o sum of $i00,ooo to the F Bure charge (b) Supportefl organlU , of U s. Oin Mrs. Palm was  Aswehg the charge, Cha with  growem i stgted,--the aey CongnegationaI ms W d a member i a ox tastes Star Lodge, Bureau, pented the following am. Shelt servl were held [tistics in bng ppUes ome hem on Tam*day ralng and! r charge as made by Cowl, ucts. At the elee of the disien St, Pul where hrowtng light s made in Oaldad] Cemetery, on y afternoon, since its iuptlon a few  ago. he uaht n RetaU and frids fm out- I--(a) The F Buau Mtterh 5oementary town who trended the sardis append the 6 per t gumnt to ton ia suppm at the ho we: M. LoLa the Llads, under the sentation of La Gm.ge, a sister, P*ao AI- s Rail h the n , at a ting o CRf, M Roy Budaarmu, a tuteoflh0Mtatlof2 (b) Se  begttedupo ueiee, and Mr, Blman. re redti of $L.yoo,0OO.OO in CHA H-- BOITA'--'-'ILE. S. Dsk,, E  : lete the vuaUon S. D., Mr. end Mt. ued by ,catty Attorney Ote; On ks Candidate Tkus Fa. But o filing for Paul, Mr. an M H. Corge t.ldy, Mr. and M. C, W of the Uted States $2OO,OOO,OOO Coln Mr *rod yearly (e) ad d. H. C. LaCIM, freight to . per cant Vlley, mm Mr. and hay,graiu and g Monday ftemu, April 24, CI Lmlke d Ed O'Neill, of G- loper H, catty attorney for Big Stone County. IL II.--() Organized the Farm BI "Herb," wko is assoated in the Will Leave For Wlnsi in Conges which oM.e pte of law with  G. Faring. Arne Lng,d ton, prent ty attorney, will in left 2ne appFrtatioa to take oer the Fede al llkllbood hve the field to Mmself, WisooL% wh he will te t al Land Bank Bonds and enhle fa som ave theeLd file fm Norw hmga to the get another pszt of the y, mmrs of lv+ G. A. We+ther *d , of Packer Co is not held  probahl eonrqltaUon for a two month'i peflmi tl bill d a bill blag mbth Insofar  attoeys in Ortenvilh whi h an mfl even Mr. La.g. i and ad ttt co-operative ttrXtln! I a ne*red all have indictad thai wd tau4t heol in NO prior  organlts to mbehtp hi fair I the uld be no filing on their p ts igraon to this anttr. ehaugt (d) Th !masa of tho- for  ofl so The tw hs about $14,000,000.00 of fern i out stadlng d ha been mk lug farm loans in cathy for the part tMrty yrs. The ntw stk wUl be offere the fit time to the Ioel ln+ d Subdption$ are  being taken hg Sto C'y. The Io*I people Redwood Fls the gte pie who run the bank. A large amount of oek w bserhed fur, tncative of the nflde of the home lopk HUNDREDS OUT TO HONOR CITY'S WAR HERO DEAD Taps Sounded as Remainsof Ralph M. Spink are Low- ed to the Final Resting Place. Jt two weks d the 4sy llf. tar the fifth anniveary of the povd ky Congress of the '= war plaU, that dw tim flower of the northwest'e mmhood i te the great worm efliet. Rig t County pathetic d e o tis sbled with hundreds tewn d untry folk azmmd the draped caisson bmring the bod of Ralph M. Spink. Ortenvfll' s Wmr Hero Dead. Sday afternoon, to tbme to Ms memory d that ef aq Wha made the Jupm Saedfe in & efense of their country in that Sptnk w M]]ed i tion in t& battle of MarehviLle, when mn K against m.4d gxm fll on No her 10, 1918, the day befor the At. mse was gned. The urtho gronnds were r- ered wth people f ery mslan of the country at  o'clock,  hot before the specOly ntted eah son dna by  bk hore, m mouate by tbe der dre up la front of the building t rveeive the body. A company of 17 men In - my uniform, pnting the Ameri- can Legion in ond of Will Engdahl stood at attention and h+ dreds stood with heads bare  the flag-draped ket was carried from urthouse mtand bead by the ler beare d by pail bearers pxmenttg , the army, navy, rne rps and Jr ae the dsn, followed in ozxr by the flower ba, tumers, Am.  Legion and fner World War Vetes, the Rd C nmss, Le- gnn Amdllary. Boy Seams mad m- bel of the Gd Ay of the Re+ pub[L, in atoes, proceeded t the Methedtt huh. Shet serves wet held he by Ray. G. L. Ha*fgans t pasor, after which the proce metery. along the line of reh figs at half mast 1. a strong uth wind. Hundred s of people otned the pesaion, either on foc, in auto 9r by team, disganfing a threaten. mg sky. Services at the cemetery, drr the au spie of the American Legion, we very xmpsslve. Th e rul mili. tary so.does we used. Three salutes y the fmg by Bugle Lrd Knfllz of Ode and John Mogran of GeeVille+ p.ev. Pau J Bockvv omelated Rtis in attendan from out-of+ E. W. Mar2 ler and feanily, of ColJ; Mr. d Mr Charles L. Sp[nk d Mr, d M. Edg A Spink. of Kingsley, Iowa; Mr. J. s. s htk, of Broken, [own; Mr. and Mrs. . A. Gilfllla of Motg0mery, Ion; nd Mr. R. M. Spink and ramie2 of Mllbauk, S. D. BOY ATTACKED By COLLI* Face Baby TOm Wht Dog 8rns Afftle; Animal Kille. "l 0my wnted to pet him." s the loJ explaatio utterl GLen Vaadeventer, f+yeaold sn f Mr. and M. G. E. Vsndv-.atter llvir, g rth of this dry Iffte he w aad bitea by seoth el- lie dog Sdy  while piny. ing in the yard  the O. E. Foeher farm in MJt townbi Bau of his displ of affn towszd th aninml Glen suffers a badl mutilated face. e v a te about two ott-hf lh Itatff olr ta left e, another *r Ms riser eye aad everal dew mark Otdy the pte of the eldr folks kot TMs ount has ptill g a few vos ay been loaned ky the bank. ved the boy's le. T lalg stks we bken or the .m marine ed by hore R w beaten off and ulty Gold Bros. Sseuly abet City, S D., d the Gold-Cooper Se ' The lad was rash to the  of uats Co.. of Red Fail, Man Dr Bergen at CIatou whe the woda r drssL It ta todd Ms is not u, and mptome of rbi or blood lamn. b detop his roeoW will  Ne Ineaoa    b- the do shof  for 11. dren, Mr. Fosh said.. An4 A py of tourls mrose to sd em pnt emraId  t1 ty Q nlght it w,mk, btr @e flr * They ated that t4  thtm Ab4rdm, d wki them w* rob- in the management of the bank. The bk* it is kno, has hd e New Pha r mamt araeve propesons er Mr. d Mm  D. Peterkin twin ele but the +meets d*elded thai, MnneapoUm and 1 mak tba- tms lty +s entitl to at tMi ure h in this tty, Mr. P knd o m lmmUon, md that the Io. ang aeeeptl zl ta ihvt ,g pui* is ,  to t ma*it at the   8tEe. h nm tiv* lasb su u 1rs6a 1  of epita] atoek ages  Gtm. THE ORTON00LLE INDEPENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINN., THURSDAY, APRIL 27. 1922 NUMBER 51 JOIN 0RTONVILLE UNIT NATIONAL GUARD :Madison Officers "Swear- in" Eighteen as National Guardsmen. Full Strength Company Is Goal. Twenty-one men were mustered into the National Guard on Tuesday even- lng, at a meeting at the public library before Captain Clifford W. Pic- First Lieutenant Gerold C. Dale, Lieutenant Arthur W. Hauck, Company I, and Captain Walter N. 3rd Bttalion, of Madison, Minne- who came over by auto, pursu- ;ant to an authorization by Colonel Luce of Minneapolis, allowing Orton- a full strength company. Those who were sworn in are Clar- Beckman, Glenn Bertelson, Mer- ville Schaible, Edwin Hippie, Harold 8hult, Walter Elms, Llewely'n Van Lyle Longncker, Cecil Kaer- Erwin Slverson, Willard Tweet, Chester Zwiener, Floyd Atha, Magnus Nelson, Harry Peterson, Arnold Carl Swanson, Dr. D. M. , Earl Miller, R. C. Schoen and Bennie Hess. The enlisted men are to secure the of all men who are de- :irous of becoming members and when a sufficient number of applica- tions have been received officers will "be designated frut state headquar- ters to complete the organization. :lt is the intention of those already to secure enough men to make a company, the minimum allow- ance for which is 65 men. When this :has been accomplished application may be made for a argot range, and after approval of the site the state will either lease or purchase the thact and target practise will begin. All ammunition, uniforms, rifles, etc., will be furnished free of charge by the state. Until a company has been or- ganized the members sworn in will be unassigned, but amched to the rd company for administration. Nearly every city the size of Or- in this territory has had a Guard unit for tnany years armories have been erected at , ton, Benson, Morris, Madison, Dawson in this section. An ap- of $26,000.00 was made in each case by the state of Minnesota toward the construction of these ar rnories and with the proper spirit be- hind the National organization in this "city, it is hoped that a like amount Will be received for an armory here. Enlistments are made for a period ef three years by those who have never had military training, vhile for- mer service'men are given the option ef enliing for a period of one or three years. In case the organization is called out to any part of the stae for guard duty it is not compulsory to answer the call and in case of mov- ing from the city an application may :be wade out for discharge. The benefits derived from a guard  Company, insofar as the city is con- erned, are held to be of much impor- tance. At Madison it is said that the men belonging to the organiza- tion there brought into that city alone in the neighborhood of $10,000 last year . Enlistee 1 men will be paid on a basis cf $1.00 for every drill night, Which is one night each week, while the of- =ricers are paid in proportion to their rank, or approximat.ely $300 a year for a captaincy. A committee composed of Wayne !elly, Earl Miller, Dr- D. M. O'Don- nell, and Robert Schoen, of this city. and Captain Pickle of Madison, made a trip o Minneapolis last week, and Colonel Luce, afte learning the senti- ment in favor of a guard company, ave authority to proceed with the work. It is the belief of those who became members as well as many others that no difficuly will be ex- perieuced in securing enough appli- cants to form a company. As soon as this has been done officers will be ap- Pointed among the local members. THREE EARED PIG LATEST. 1. Z. Piper of Malta Township Pos- sessor of Freak Animal. :,  Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Duroc Jer- sey Pig a four-pound son, on Tues- day, April 25, 1922, on the farm of F. Z. Piper, Prior township, Big Stone county. And why. not such an an- nouncement for the arrival of the lit- tle fellow who was born with three ears, thereby standing out conspicu- ously among members of the swine family in this section of the state, and as the leader of his herd, which he is ure to be because of his additional appendage that will enable him to de- mct the call to "chow" at a greater iistanee than others of his family. "Ear-shot," which he wa appropri- named, is in good health. His extra ear is directly back of his "regu lar one" on the left side of his head. Some speculation is held for the safe- ty by his "owner, Mr. Piper, who fears when he grows older and be. :eomes ready for'market and the radio i reports are sent forth announcing the price of pork that he may pick the message from the air and take to larts unknowm AMATEUR LEAGUE PLANNED MONDAY IS OPENING Baseball Fans of Seven Towns Will Meet at Montevideo I Ortonville will be represented by a strictly home talent baseball nine this season, it was decided  a meeting of enthusiasts of the sport held at the Legion club rooms on Monday night A1 Jacobson, who was elected man- ager has called a try-out for 7:00 o'clock sharp on Tuesday night, May 2nd at the baseball park near the de- pot. Everyone that ass followed base- ball either in high school or other- wise is urged to be at this try-out so that selection may be made and the best possible team placed in the field at a later date. That an amateur baseball league will result from the efforts of the Legion posts over the 'district is the opinion of nearly every paper within the district. Representatives from the different towns will meet tonight at Montevideo to work out plans for a league that aim to have an eligibility clause, that "No person shall play on a team of this league unless he shall have been for 30 days a bona fide resi- dent of the town represented by such team, or shall have resided for 30 days within ten miles of such town but not within any other league town. No league team .shall be permitted to compensate or pay salary to any pLay- er." This action is a direct result of the proven failure of attempting to finance and maintain salaried players in towns with a population of from two to five thousand. Herbert Bolsta, and Al Jacobson will represent this city at the meeting. Towns that have signified their in- tention of becoming members of such a league as proposed are, Madison, Granite Falls, Boyd, Montevideo, Mi- lan, Appleton and Ortonville. Arrangements were made for the use of Kaercher's pasture near the depot for a dianond, no charge for which was ,made. UP, PAINT UP, KEEP City to Join Hands In Work * That Means for Better I Johnsons To St. Cloud. Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Johnson, who conducted the M. M. Johnson Furni- ture Company o this city until a short time ago, when the business was taken over by the Schoen- Swen- son Company, have purchased an exclusive undertaking parlor at St. Cloud, Minnesota, and will leave for there the latter part of this week. Both Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, during their residence in 0rtonville, have made many acquaintances who re- gret their departure. McLeods Return via NewYork The C. J. McLeod family returned to this city the latter part of the week, after spending the winter in Florida. They made the trip from Maimi, Fla., to New York City by boat, and report a very enjoyable journey. They have now opened UP their cottage on the peninsula, and will remain for the summer. Mrs. H. W. Palm Succumbs Suddenly Paralysis of Brain Causes Death Sun- day Morning After Illness of But A Few Days. The whole community was sad- dened by the death of Mrs. H. W. Palm early Sunday morning, April 23yd. She had been ill only a few days, so the news of her death is an additional blow to her many friends: At her bedside when death came were her husband and daughter, Marguer- ite, and a sister, Mrs. Leers La Grange, of Polo Alto, California, Death was caused by paralysis of the brain. Louise Pressly Palm was born on November 28, 1865 at Shereton, In. She wa married to H. Willard Palm at Webbter City, Iowa, on January 26, 1891. In 1892 they moved to Browns Valley, where they lived until March, 1914, when they came to Or- tonville. Mrs. Palm was an active member of the Congregational Church of this city and a member also of the Eastern Star Lodge. Short services were held at the home here on Tuesday morning and the remains taken to St. Paul where the burial was made in Oakland Cemetery, on Tuesday afternoon. Relatives and friends from out-of- town who attended the services at the home were: Mrs. Leota La Grange, a sister, Polo Al- to, Calif., Mrs. Roy Buchanan, a neice, and Mr. Buchanan, Sisseton, S. Dak., Earl Bletcher, Sioux Falls, S. D., Mr. and Mrs. E. Paul, J. L. Paul, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Barrett, George Schley, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Collins Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Bailey and Mrs. H. C. LaClaire, all of Browns Valley, and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ludke and Ed O'Neill, of Grace- ville. DAY IN CLEAN IT UP, CAMPAIGN Health, and A Spic and Span Town. To aid in making "Ortonville--the City Beautiful" is the end to which virtually every man, woman and child will work during the week of May 1 to 6, which has been designated as "clean up and paint up week." With a full realization of the bene- fits to be derived, not only to the city as a whole but to the individual prop- erty owners themselves as well, the spirit behind this movement this year has gained much prominence over that of former years and by the close of the campaign Ortonville will have taken on an entirely new dress from head to foot. At an enthusiastic meeting of mem- bers of the clean up committees held Saturday evening, at the A. L. Moore office, captains of the clean up squads were assigned different sections of the city, and all arrangements were made for a careful and systematic carabing and brushing campaign. On Friday, the fifth day, everyone will be treated to a dinner at the courthouse. Mrs. Win. Mullica, wh is in charge of the big "feed" issuei the statement that there will be plen- ty of free eats for all--so don't spare bearing down on the handle of your rake. The movement has the hearty endorsement and co-operation of both the city council and the health board. The division or section of the city showing the most noted improvement will be awarded a $10.00 prize, On this committee are Mrs. J. A. Bailey, Mrs. H. J. Shelver, and Earl Miller, who will ,act as judges. Last year this prize was won by "cash town," of which M. J. Hausauer was captain. In addition .to the prize mentioned a com- mittee is working on a plan to offer a prize to the owner or tenant who has shown the most interest in im- proving his or her individual resi- dence property. Details of this plan were not announced. Creation of a fund by poIular sub- criptlon for the purpose of defray- understood, for the work as it of- PROCLAMATION. Clean Up and Paint Up and Keep It Upl Know all Men, Women and Children by These Presents: That, whereas the National Cean Up and Paint Up C&m- paign has resulted in many ad- vantages to community life thruout the United States in re- lieving Unemployment; in safe- guarding Health; in promoting Thrift; in furthering Fire Pre- vention; in stimulating Civic Pride; and in making the "Home and City Beautiful." Now, therefore, be it known that plans have been perfected for a thoro Clean Up and Paint Up campaign in Ortonville, be, ginning May I, and continuing and constructive effort in clean- ing up and keeping it up. In this worthy movement we urge eech citizen to do his or her part to make our community clean, healthy, thrifty, safe and beauti- ' ful.. (Signed)--City Council Woman's Club Board of Health. fects public property. The comndttee in charge of the campaign is composed of A. L. Moore and George Fosburgh. family in the city for this purpose. Mrs. H. Cornelisen has been appoint- ed as chairman of this committee. This fund will be used exclusively, it is ing expens in carrying on the work of cleaning up the city park and oth- er public grounds is under way at this time, A donation of 50 cents is being asked from the head of each Little Ahead of Iowa. Clarke Orton drove up from A1- gona, IoWa, Monday to transact busi- ness here. He was accompanied by W. M. Brophy. According to Mr. Or- ion's report, farming operations in this section are as far along as those in Iowa. In fact he believes them a little in advance of those of that sec- tion of the country. CHARGES AGAINST BUREAU ANSWERED BY MATTHEWS Val. Cowles and Matthews Have Heat. ed Discussion at Farm Club in Prior Township. Charging that the Farm Bureau Federation endorsed the Esch-Cum- mens Law, and that after the bill was passed that officers of the Bureau were among the members of the com- mittee that called upon the President to check a threatening veto, Val. Cowles, editor of the Ortonville Star, started a heated discussion that lasted for more than an hour at a meeting of the Sunnyside Farmers Club in Prior township recently. Cowles also charged that Howard, president of the Farm Bureau, in 1919, endorsed the sale of government owned merchant marine, which was built at a cost of approximately 4 bil- lion dollars during the war. That thru this sale the government would have lost about one million dollars. He also charged that the Farm Bureau Federation in collusion with attorneys for the packers, drafted the Packer Control Bill, in which it was provided that the packers should not be pun- ished for proven violation of law until the second offense. Cowles charged further, that the president of the Board of Trade of Chicago, admitted that that body had contributed the sum of $100,000 to the Farm Bureau movement when it was initiated or very soon thereafter. Answering these charges, Charles Matthews of Prior township, presi- dent of the Big Stone County Farm Bureau, presented the following sta- tistics, emphatically denying each and every charge as made by Cowles, and throwing light upon the accomphsh - ments of the Farm Bureau movement since its inception a few years ago. I.--(a) The Farm Bureau bitterly opposed the 6 per cent guarantee to operative marketing bill conceded the country over as a great victory for the farmers, which legalizes coopera- tive marketing on a large scale. III.(a) Started National co-oper- ative marketing associations, as fol- lows: U. S. Grain Growers', already largest sales agency for grain in the United States, now controlling 150, 000,000 bushels of grain from over ]-100 elevators and 56,500 members. (b) National wool pool to store and sell wool. (c) National co-operative livestock marketing association with firms in all principal markets of the country. IV.Accomplishment o state fed- eration, include: (a) A co-operative marketing bill giving farmers one of the best co-operative laws of any state in the union, protecting co-operative enterprises. (b) Open market bill, compelling grain and livestock ex- changes to admit co-operative associa- tions to membership. (c) Grain gam- bling bill, a step in the right direc- tion toward eliminating grain gam- bling. Co-operative enterprises as ac- complished by the state federation in- clude: (a) Livestock marketing. Pro- motion of Central Co-operative Com- mission Company at South St. Paul market, uniting 350 local associations in selling livestock. This saved 50 per cent of previous commission chargeS. (b) Supportel organization of U. S. Grain Growers which rmw has contracts with 2304 growers in Minnesota and 50 elevators. (c) Sup- ported Dairy Marketing organization which has over 300 creameries united in buying supplies and selling pro- ducts. At the close of the discussion per- mission was asked by Cowles that time be granted him that he might seoars documentary evidence from Washing- ton in support of his charges, the pro- 't FINANCE MEETING CALLED. --'7 Invitation Extended To County Citi- zens to Meet at Marshall. i An invitation has been extended to farmers, bankers, livestock men and merchants of Big Stone County to be nt at a meeting at Marshall, Minnesota, on Saturday, April 29th, for the purpose of forming a district credit association thru which funds may be secured from the War Fi- nance Corporation. "It is obvious that an organiza- tion of the kind proposed be effected in this district, whereby money may be secured from the War Finance Corporation at a low rate of inter- est," said Senator James R. Hall, of Marshall, in his communication by telephone on Tuesday. "This is not a matter of slight importance, but on the contrary one that will mean the savings of hundreds of thousands of dollars to the farmers of this section of the state in the form of lowering interest rates. It is not a 'pipe dream'it is feasible and workable and it remains only for the men in- terested in their own welfare to take hold of their problem and put the plan into working order." The meeting was called by the Farm Bureau leaders in several of the southwestern Minnesota counties and it is believed that large delega- tions from practically every t0wn- ship in the district will be present. With the district organization a planned the Big Stone County IAve- stock Association, organized last Jan- uary will in all probability be merged into the larger organization, in the opinion of L. J. Keating, of Graceville, president of the association. Expressions from various county agents of the western and southern part of the state indicate a strong de- mand for such an organization. L.J. Keating, L. A. and Grace F. Kaecher will attend from here. Farm Loan Association Meets. A meeting of the Big Stone County National Farm Loan Association was called yesterday" by Grace F. Kaer- cher, secretary. At this meeting the loan committee approved 5 loans, making a total of 10 applications sent to the Federal Bank this spring. The committee expects a call for 5"htore in Jtme or July. Alfred Mathison was elected president of the Associa- tion, to succeed the late Aaron B. Kaercher, for the remainder of the year. Eahtonka Opens May 2nd Montevideo's Novelty Orchestra has been engaged to play for the opening dance at the Eahtonka Dancing Pavil- ion, which will be Tuesday evening, May 2. Announcement is made by Edgar Orton, manager, that several changes have been made at the pavilion. It is expected that many will be in atten- dance from the surrounding towns, as well as from this vicinity. Land Bank Stock Offered To Public G01d Bros. Security Compmhv An- nounce Sale of Capital Stock In' Southern Minn. Land Bank. Due to a very strong demand for its bonds in the eastern market, and a good demand for its kind of loans in the corn belt of South Dakota and Minnesota, th Southern Minnesota Joint Stock Land Bank, with offices at Redwood Falls, Minnesota, and Big Stone City, S. D., has decided to in- crease its capital stock and are offer- ing for the first time in its history, the sale of stock to local investors. This announcement was made today by J. A. Gold, of Big Stone City, who is vice-president of.the banFL Under its charter from the govern- ment, the Southern Minnesota Joint Stock Land Bank, with a paid in cap- ital of $250,000.00 are permitted to is- sue $3,750500.00 in bonds, Mr. Gold stated,--the money to be loaned to the farmers in Minnesota and South Da- kota. This amount has practically been loaned by the bank. At the present time all the stock is owned by individual members of tle Gold Bros. Security Co., of Big Stone City, S. D., and the Gold-Cooper Se- curities Co., of Redwood Falls, Minne- sota. These two concerns themselves have about $14,000,000.00 of HUNDREDS OUT TO HONOR CITY'S WAR HERO DEAD mounted by three riders, drew up in front of the building to receive the body. A company of 175 men in ar- my uniform, representing the Ameri- can Legion in command of William Engdah! stood at attention and hun- dreds stood with heads bare as the flag-draped casket was carried from the courthouse rotunda. Lead by the color bearers and es- corted by pall bearer representing the army, navy, marine corps and air service the caisson, followed in order by the flower bearers, mourners, Am- erican Legion and foreseer World War Veterans, the Red Cross nurses, Le- gion Auxiliary, Boy Scouts and mem- bers of the Grand Army of the Re- public, in autoes, proceeded to' the Methodist church. Short services were held there by Rev. G. L. Haggans, pastor, after which the procession continued to the cemetery. All along the line of march flags flew at half mast in a strong south wind. Hundreds of people joined the procession, either on foot, in autoes or by team, disregarding a threaten- ing sky." Services at the cemetery, under the auspices of the American Legion, were very impressive. The regular mili- tary services were used. Three salutes were fired over the grave by the firing squad, after which aps were sounded by Buglers Leonard Kollitz of Odessa and John Mogran of Graceville. Roy. Paul J. Bockoven officiated. Relatives in attendance from out-of- town were: Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Mar- ler and family, of Corretl; Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Spink and Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Spink, of Kingsley, Iowa; Mr. J. S. Spink, of Bronson, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Gilfillan, of Montgomery, Iowa; and Mr. R. M. Spink and family of Milbank, S. D. Taps Sounded as Remains of Ralph M. Spink are Low- ered to the Final Resting Place. Just two weeks and three days af- ter the fifth anniversary of the ap- proval by Congress of the President's war proclamation, that drew the flower of the northwest's manhood in- to the great world conflict, Big Stone County patriotic and civic organiza- tions assembled with hundreds f town and country folk around the flag draped caisson bearing the bod of Ralph M. Spink, Ortonville's War Hero Dead, Sunday afternoon, to Pay trbue to b_is memory and that of all who made the Supreme Sacrifice in defense of their country in that con- fiict. Spink was killed in action in the battle of Marchville, when marching against machine gun fire, on Novem- ber 10, 1918, the day before the Ar- mistice was signed. The courthouse grounds were cov- ered with people from every section of the country at one o'clock, an hour before the specially constructed eels- sou drawn by six black horses, and Will Leave For Wisconsin. Arne Langvid of Odessa townslil left the first of the week for Monddvi WisconSin, where he will teach th BOY ATTACKED BY COLLIE. Norwegian language, to the younger members of Rev. G. A. Westberg's conKgation for a two nonth's period, which is an annual event Mr. Lang- red taught school in Norway prior to his emigration to this count. Face Badly Torn When Dog Spurns Affection; Animal Killed. "I only wanted to pet him," was the laconic explanation uttered by Glen Vandeventer, four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs, G. E. Vandeventer living north of this city after he was attacked and bitten by a scotch col- lie dog Sunday afternoon while play- ing in the yard on the O. E. Fosher farm in Malta township. Because of his display of affoctin toward the animal Glen suffers a badly mutilated face. He received a bite about two and one-half inches long over his left ear, another over his right eye and several claw marks. Only the presence of the older folks who were visiting a few rods away saved the boy's life. Two large sticks were broken over the vicious canine before it was beaten off and finally shot. The lad was rushed to the office of Dr. Bergan at Clinton where the wounds were dressed. It is said his far-m condition is not serious, and unless symptoms of rabies or blood flroa under th Esch-Curn- sentatmn of whmh would be some time n pomon the re" ds, e ] .. " _ " loans outstanding and have bee umk- . _  .. " ..   i . mens Railroad bill and secured a sta- in me near future, at a meeting to ing farm loans in this immediate vi- m g aeveop ,ms recory wflI .be za__d. tute of limitation of 2 years. (b) Se-I be agreed upon. cinity for the past thirty years, t' e4o mlcauon was eve y cured a reduction of $1700,000.00 in/ ___. _ ..... The new stock will be offered for ne aog snowing a. llsliim for elll- ter CHA It BOLTA r'lh.;. lren, lr r'osner sine , the valuation of ratlroadSerstat orndmeet t " " the first time to the local investors, mned by the Int te t .... .... and Subscriptions are now being taken ] ___. _ . . commission, which saved the shippers/eexs ,uounty Attorney mce; unly at their office in Big Stone City. The[ First uampetw Arrive. of the United States $200,000,000 ' Candidate Thus Far. stock was offered to local people atl A party of tous enrmte to east- yearly. (c) Obtained a reduction on But one filing foryounty offices has Redwood Falls the past few days and] ern points, cped in the city park freight rates of 17 to 23 per cent on been made to date and that was on has met with much favor among the one night last wee, being the first to hay,grain and grain products and a Monday afternoon, April 24, when, friends and acquaintances of the peo- 1 remain there over night this season. 10 per cent cut on all other farm pro- Chas. H. Bolsta filed for the office of] ple who run the bank. A large amount They stated that they came tu ducts, county attorney for Big Stone County. I of stock was subscribed for, indicative Aberdeen, and while there were rob- II[ (a) Organized the Farm Bloc "Herb," who is associated in the I of the confidence of the home people bed of their tent and other belongings. in Congress which obtained passage practise of law with R. G. Farting-/in the management of the bank. : - of the following bill: (b) $25,000,000 ton, present county attorney, will in I The bank, it is known, has had some New Pharmasist Arrive. appropriation to take ever the Feder I all liklihood have the field to himself,[ very attractive propositions offered, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Petersoa ! al Land Bank Bonds and enable far-[unless some one should file from to transfer their headquarters to the arrive the latter part of the week .reefs to get loans at a lower rate.[ another part of the county, and this[ twin cities, but the Officers decided that Minneapolis, and will make their =la. (c) Secured passage of Packer Con- I is not held  probable.  this vicinity is entitled to just this ture home in this city, Mr. Petean trol bill, and a bill curbing gambling I Insofar as attorneys in Ortonville[ kind of an institution, and that the io- having accepted a position as Phar- and admitting co-opeative marketing] are concern.ed all have indicated that| cal investing public is entitled to a macist at the Gundm Drug Stre. organizations to membership in grain / there would be no filing on their part safe, conservative investment such as Mrs. Peterson is e sister of Hn,y exchanges. (d) The passage of theco- for this office, its capital stock offers, and Ralph Gunderson. : ..... .j x