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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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April 27, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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April 27, 1922
 

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rHUMDAY, APRIL 1if, llU -  L i Hi I i II i II fLU , HI in 1 i Tie 00TOHYILL[ IHD[P[HD[HT L. A. Ks,rotifer Mana#ng Editet Olhdld PaPer of Big Ste Cmty. NerlEwemm Advt. lrelmtative, MINNESOTA SE LIST. 709 Exchange Bank - St. Paml 215 S. 6th St. - MinneapoLis BEATING TRAINS. With the great increase in the num- ber of vehicles using the public high- way, there has been an increase in the number of accidents at railroad cross- ings thruout the country in spite of the best efforts of railroad men to hold these accidents down to a minimttm. It may surprise most people to lealm that the rilroad train is not always the aggressor in these cases but is frequently "attacked" by automobiles with consequent damage to both par- ties. It is noticeable that the smaller cars are the most pugnacious and anxious to force their way across the tracks regardless of the obstacle of- fered by a standing or moving train. A large number of such cases occur- red on the Milwaukee last year. In one instance a freight train was stand- ing at a South Dakota Station taking water when an auto ran into the side of the car near the rear of the train, injuring one of the occupants of the automobile. In another case, a way freight was standing at a "station in Iowa when an auto was driven into it at a fast clip, damaging the car and injuring the occupants, who, of course, brought suit against the company. In Wisconsin, a freight train slowly pull- ing out of a station was struck by an auto near the rear end of the train, damaging the car and injuring the oc- cupants. In still another instance, a freight train was pulling slowly out of an Indiana depot when an auto- mobile was driven into the sixth car from the caboose with sufficient force to kill the driver and injure several others. It will be noticed that in such acci- dents as these there was no rou for doubt on the part of the drivers of the ahtomobiles as to which would reach the crossing first as the train was already there in each case. In most of the other accidents, how- ever, the train was struck near the head end, indicating that the occu- pants of the automobitesthought they had a chance to "beat the trains across," which is still a popular out- door sport. The foregoing illustrates what the railroads have to face in their en- deavors to protect the lives and prop- erty of those who travel on the high- ways, and while naturally it has not been possible to avoid an increase in crossing accidents, as they are almost entirely due to causes beyond control of the railroads, much progress is be- ing made in reducing fatalities as a whole,-including employes, trespass- ers and others, in and about shops, stations, trains and crossings. This is attested by the fact that even the crossing fatalities alone showed a large increase, on the Mil- waukee Railroad, for example, the to- tal fatalities in 1921 were but 153 as compared with 423 in 1913, a decrease of about 64 per cent. There should be the largest possi- ble economy in the conduct of public business, whether city, county, state or nation, but we protest tha the chiet items that contribute to the increase in taxes is beyond the power of either city or county officials to remedy. The people are being given what they want in the way of beVter roads, better schools and better living conditions if they are willing to go back to the con- ditions of 20 to 30 years ago, some re- lief might be afforded but we will venture to say that the city that takes any such step will soon be depopula- ted.Redwood Falls Gazette. BATTLE WILL BE OVER BOOZE. When this pplitical campaign gets to going, it will be found that the real battle wilt not be between the Repub- licans-amt the Democrats, or between the radicals and consmwatives, buI between the wets and drys. Democrats are going to criticise and Republicans are going to praise the record of the present administra- tion, radicals are going to capitalize the present dicontentmen in farm of some hair-brained project while conservatives vrffe that this is the worst time possible to rock the heat. But all the time the question of light wines and beer and the return of the saloon will obtrude itself into ever:," campaign. Very little will be said about thi? issue in the party platforms, but the issue will be forced by the various wet organizations of the country, fi- nanced by the brewers and distillers. The challenge will be accepted by the dry organizations, and the battle will be on, I I I illll Illll m OIRfSqM.Ii ' I. II I 1111 - II II I I I I Illll SUCCESS It's doing your job the best you can And being just to your fellow-man; It's making money, but holding friends, And staying true to your alms and ends; It's figuring how and learning why, And looking forward and thinking high, And dreaming a little and thinking much. It's keeping always in closest touch With what is finest in word md deed; It'l being thorough, yet making speed; It's daring blithely the field of chance While making labor a brave romance; It's going onward despite defeat And fighting staunchly, but keeping sweet; It's being clean and it's playing fair; It's laughing lightly at Dame Despair; It's looking up at thestars above And drinking deeply of life and love; It's struggling on with the will to win, But taking loss with a cheerful grin; It's sharing sorrow and work and mirth, And making better this good old earth; It's It's serving, striving through strain and stress, doing your noblest--that's Success. --The Rambler. There will be much crossing of par-! ty lines, and the wets will support 1 wet candidate whether he be Repub- lican or Democric and the drys will do the same. There will be a larger vote cast by the women than they cast in the last campaign because an overwhelming ,majority of the women are against a return of the saloon in any form. This "wet and dry" contest will be a determining factor not only in" the congressional elections, but also will extend to the selection of state and counW officials, especially those hav- ing to do with the enforcement of the prohibition law.Morris Tribune. How do you expect the Postal Clerk to know whether you mean Trtnhlad, California. or Trinidad. Colorado? ALWAYS SPbL OUT THE NAM] OF THE STATE IN FULL IN TIlE AI)DRItS. "MORE BUSINESS IN GOVERNMENT  Thls apt phrase was used in PrUl- dent Harding's first message to Con- gress and applies particularly In postal management where, postmasters are bring impressed with the fact that they are managers of local branches el' the biggest business In the world. I,et's make our post office look neat. Mr. Postmaster. Straighten up the rural letter box, Mr. Farmer. Tidy up some, Mr. Rural Oarrler. First impressions are lasting Maybe Mr. Stranger, taking notice of these Im- provements, will come back, bringing you benefits. Start these with "PL- TAL IMIROV1MENT WEEK" May 1-6. HUMANIZING THE POSTAL SERVICE "There Is no unimportant person o part ef our service. It Is a total o Imnmn units and their co-operutlon II the key to Its success. In its la analysis, postal duties are accommo- dations performed for our nelghbot and frlends and should be so regardL. rather than as a hlred service per- formed for an absentee employer." Postmaster General Hubert Work. Furs R Calls 0ad Paving PAl $ ....... I| I I l l illUU i nl[nlllln i i iiiiiiii ................................................ t : !i, "' ........... :' : ':::' !: rt to reJ@ot a.r- di' tion. There is just one small brtmk,[ Notice is hereby given that all al- ] or all hidmNahs Pearson, town elsa4g near Elk RiVer, where the road bed i le.ys, premises and vacant lots in the[ of Otmy Townah/p, Ortonvill,, Mfun, was washed out, under the paving, but | city of Oxonville must be cleaned up [ Route 8. 48-8 this has been repaired, and it would I and put in sanitary, clean and health-I take the mot eareful scrutiny to locate it. .Tlie shoulders along the paving laid last Fear in a few plaes were gulled by the heavy snow, when melt- ing, but there was no damage to the paving, and caretaker have remedied this slight damag l j "Considering the heavy traflle, by ] trucks, busses and automobiles, during most of the winter months, the lV- ing shows most gratifying staying qualities. The first year is the hard- est, and in the light of this experi- ence reinforced concrete well made can be pronounced a 100 per cent success" Spring thaws are softening the dirt and gravel surfaced sections of the trunk route system, the highway de- partment reported this week, but the have been out opening cul- verts and ditches to get the routes ..... into good condition as fast as possible. The most complaints are about sec- tions worked during the winter to help the jobless, the officials said, and these will show steady improvement under special maintenance. House Cleaning Time Is Here Send us your RUGS, DRAP. Complete Successl CURTAINS. ETC. We use the Famous French St. Cloud Newspaper Finds On In- Shampoo process in cleaning vestigation that Rumors of Paving rugs. No beating, to destroy Failures Are Entirely False. fabric, no gasoline, no chem- icals, to harm the rugs in any Investigation of the St. Cloud Joux- way, nal Press this week disclosed that PRICES--- rumors of failure of dew paving on 9x12 .................. $3.00 state trunk highways are wholly with- 8x10 .................. $2.50 out foundation on fact, in spite of Other rugs priced accordingly the wide circulation given such re- ports over the state. Alvah Eastman, editor of the Join-- 0RTONVILLE nal Press, makes this comment: "There have been reports that the Dry Cleanin00 C0 paving on the Jefferson Highway be- tween Elk River and St. Cloud did not stand up well during the winter, QUALITY FIRST and is filled with cracks and breaks. THEN SERVICE "A close inspection of this highway disproves these rumors. As a matter of fact the reinforced concrete came ...... Mr. Motorist Roads are getting back into a respectable condition and the weather-man has promised us fairly decent weather. Both of these mean that YOU naturally are going to do more traveling from now on. Have you looked over your tires? Ifyou haven't you had better take precaution anddo it now. Perhaps there is one that has a cut or bruise on it or one that is almost worn out. When you find tires in that condition, that is the time to bring them to us for repair, so that the next time you take that pleasure ride or business trip you will be saved much trouble and worry. We not only repair tires, but we sell them --The Brunswick--which means Strength, Endurance, Safety and Comfort. Ortonville Tire Shop GLENN HARRIS, Proprietor. Located diagonally across street from Odd  Fellows Building. ] I i IMII III I Remodeled, Relined, Repaired, Cleaned and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will pay express one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street - Minneapolis, Minnesota I ful condition by owners or tenants be-J Lots of movie stars who get thous- fore MAY 8TH, 1922. lands a week only work one week a Premises not properly attended to year. before that time will be attended to[ .....  ..................... by the Health authorities and expense assessed against the property. BOARD OF HEALTH City of Ortonville. NOTICE TO TRACTOR OWNERS. The Town Board of Otrey Town- ship, Big Stone Count, will meelve bids from Tractor owners for the pull- ing of an 8-foot road grader for grad- ing roads by the hour, th will re- quire no less than 20 b. p. on the draw bar. Bids will be reeetved until 2:00 o'eleek p. n Saturday, May 6, 1922. Md mt be sealed and sent to Town Clerk before said tim The fill ,,I,,,,I L iii , , I ,I,I,, !,,, , ,I, I I i I ! I I l!m twouart Aluminum Pudding Pan We are making Regular Price $I.10 this offer solely for fordn you an o.p. portumty to gtve "Wear.Ever" a real service test in Coer only 19 nce and KNOW the difference between "Wea r- Ever" aluminum cooking utensils and utensils of less thick metal urown kitchen. (Rg-/arcegc) which, onse. want you to SEE the uendy,  offered at a difference, FEEL the differ, cheaper price. TYLER'S Variety Store Ortonville, Minnesota ilmlz?- . ..... H r# Tou RI N G CAR 00efore AVaiue Lii00e This Why should you buy any ear but a Ford ? Pricca lowest, parts lowest, operating and up- keep expense lowest, yet a Ford ear will take ycu any place any car will go. These are sensible, not extravagant, times, and a Ford is the most sensible car for anyone to own. Terms if desired. J. ARTHUR MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. rHUMDAY, APRIL 1if, llU -  L i Hi I i II i II fLU , HI in 1 i Tie 00TOHYILL[ IHD[P[HD[HT L. A. Ks,rotifer Mana#ng Editet Olhdld PaPer of Big Ste Cmty. NerlEwemm Advt. lrelmtative, MINNESOTA SE LIST. 709 Exchange Bank - St. Paml 215 S. 6th St. - MinneapoLis BEATING TRAINS. With the great increase in the num- ber of vehicles using the public high- way, there has been an increase in the number of accidents at railroad cross- ings thruout the country in spite of the best efforts of railroad men to hold these accidents down to a minimttm. It may surprise most people to lealm that the rilroad train is not always the aggressor in these cases but is frequently "attacked" by automobiles with consequent damage to both par- ties. It is noticeable that the smaller cars are the most pugnacious and anxious to force their way across the tracks regardless of the obstacle of- fered by a standing or moving train. A large number of such cases occur- red on the Milwaukee last year. In one instance a freight train was stand- ing at a South Dakota Station taking water when an auto ran into the side of the car near the rear of the train, injuring one of the occupants of the automobile. In another case, a way freight was standing at a "station in Iowa when an auto was driven into it at a fast clip, damaging the car and injuring the occupants, who, of course, brought suit against the company. In Wisconsin, a freight train slowly pull- ing out of a station was struck by an auto near the rear end of the train, damaging the car and injuring the oc- cupants. In still another instance, a freight train was pulling slowly out of an Indiana depot when an auto- mobile was driven into the sixth car from the caboose with sufficient force to kill the driver and injure several others. It will be noticed that in such acci- dents as these there was no rou for doubt on the part of the drivers of the ahtomobiles as to which would reach the crossing first as the train was already there in each case. In most of the other accidents, how- ever, the train was struck near the head end, indicating that the occu- pants of the automobitesthought they had a chance to "beat the trains across," which is still a popular out- door sport. The foregoing illustrates what the railroads have to face in their en- deavors to protect the lives and prop- erty of those who travel on the high- ways, and while naturally it has not been possible to avoid an increase in crossing accidents, as they are almost entirely due to causes beyond control of the railroads, much progress is be- ing made in reducing fatalities as a whole,-including employes, trespass- ers and others, in and about shops, stations, trains and crossings. This is attested by the fact that even the crossing fatalities alone showed a large increase, on the Mil- waukee Railroad, for example, the to- tal fatalities in 1921 were but 153 as compared with 423 in 1913, a decrease of about 64 per cent. There should be the largest possi- ble economy in the conduct of public business, whether city, county, state or nation, but we protest tha the chiet items that contribute to the increase in taxes is beyond the power of either city or county officials to remedy. The people are being given what they want in the way of beVter roads, better schools and better living conditions if they are willing to go back to the con- ditions of 20 to 30 years ago, some re- lief might be afforded but we will venture to say that the city that takes any such step will soon be depopula- ted.Redwood Falls Gazette. BATTLE WILL BE OVER BOOZE. When this pplitical campaign gets to going, it will be found that the real battle wilt not be between the Repub- licans-amt the Democrats, or between the radicals and consmwatives, buI between the wets and drys. Democrats are going to criticise and Republicans are going to praise the record of the present administra- tion, radicals are going to capitalize the present dicontentmen in farm of some hair-brained project while conservatives vrffe that this is the worst time possible to rock the heat. But all the time the question of light wines and beer and the return of the saloon will obtrude itself into ever:," campaign. Very little will be said about thi? issue in the party platforms, but the issue will be forced by the various wet organizations of the country, fi- nanced by the brewers and distillers. The challenge will be accepted by the dry organizations, and the battle will be on, I I I illll Illll m OIRfSqM.Ii ' I. II I 1111 - II II I I I I Illll SUCCESS It's doing your job the best you can And being just to your fellow-man; It's making money, but holding friends, And staying true to your alms and ends; It's figuring how and learning why, And looking forward and thinking high, And dreaming a little and thinking much. It's keeping always in closest touch With what is finest in word md deed; It'l being thorough, yet making speed; It's daring blithely the field of chance While making labor a brave romance; It's going onward despite defeat And fighting staunchly, but keeping sweet; It's being clean and it's playing fair; It's laughing lightly at Dame Despair; It's looking up at thestars above And drinking deeply of life and love; It's struggling on with the will to win, But taking loss with a cheerful grin; It's sharing sorrow and work and mirth, And making better this good old earth; It's It's serving, striving through strain and stress, doing your noblest--that's Success. --The Rambler. There will be much crossing of par-! ty lines, and the wets will support 1 wet candidate whether he be Repub- lican or Democric and the drys will do the same. There will be a larger vote cast by the women than they cast in the last campaign because an overwhelming ,majority of the women are against a return of the saloon in any form. This "wet and dry" contest will be a determining factor not only in" the congressional elections, but also will extend to the selection of state and counW officials, especially those hav- ing to do with the enforcement of the prohibition law.Morris Tribune. How do you expect the Postal Clerk to know whether you mean Trtnhlad, California. or Trinidad. Colorado? ALWAYS SPbL OUT THE NAM] OF THE STATE IN FULL IN TIlE AI)DRItS. "MORE BUSINESS IN GOVERNMENT  Thls apt phrase was used in PrUl- dent Harding's first message to Con- gress and applies particularly In postal management where, postmasters are bring impressed with the fact that they are managers of local branches el' the biggest business In the world. I,et's make our post office look neat. Mr. Postmaster. Straighten up the rural letter box, Mr. Farmer. Tidy up some, Mr. Rural Oarrler. First impressions are lasting Maybe Mr. Stranger, taking notice of these Im- provements, will come back, bringing you benefits. Start these with "PL- TAL IMIROV1MENT WEEK" May 1-6. HUMANIZING THE POSTAL SERVICE "There Is no unimportant person o part ef our service. It Is a total o Imnmn units and their co-operutlon II the key to Its success. In its la analysis, postal duties are accommo- dations performed for our nelghbot and frlends and should be so regardL. rather than as a hlred service per- formed for an absentee employer." Postmaster General Hubert Work. Furs R Calls 0ad Paving PAl $ ....... I| I I l l illUU i nl[nlllln i i iiiiiiii ................................................ t : !i, "' ........... :' : ':::' !: rt to reJ@ot a.r- di' tion. There is just one small brtmk,[ Notice is hereby given that all al- ] or all hidmNahs Pearson, town elsa4g near Elk RiVer, where the road bed i le.ys, premises and vacant lots in the[ of Otmy Townah/p, Ortonvill,, Mfun, was washed out, under the paving, but | city of Oxonville must be cleaned up [ Route 8. 48-8 this has been repaired, and it would I and put in sanitary, clean and health-I take the mot eareful scrutiny to locate it. .Tlie shoulders along the paving laid last Fear in a few plaes were gulled by the heavy snow, when melt- ing, but there was no damage to the paving, and caretaker have remedied this slight damag l j "Considering the heavy traflle, by ] trucks, busses and automobiles, during most of the winter months, the lV- ing shows most gratifying staying qualities. The first year is the hard- est, and in the light of this experi- ence reinforced concrete well made can be pronounced a 100 per cent success" Spring thaws are softening the dirt and gravel surfaced sections of the trunk route system, the highway de- partment reported this week, but the have been out opening cul- verts and ditches to get the routes ..... into good condition as fast as possible. The most complaints are about sec- tions worked during the winter to help the jobless, the officials said, and these will show steady improvement under special maintenance. House Cleaning Time Is Here Send us your RUGS, DRAP. Complete Successl CURTAINS. ETC. We use the Famous French St. Cloud Newspaper Finds On In- Shampoo process in cleaning vestigation that Rumors of Paving rugs. No beating, to destroy Failures Are Entirely False. fabric, no gasoline, no chem- icals, to harm the rugs in any Investigation of the St. Cloud Joux- way, nal Press this week disclosed that PRICES--- rumors of failure of dew paving on 9x12 .................. $3.00 state trunk highways are wholly with- 8x10 .................. $2.50 out foundation on fact, in spite of Other rugs priced accordingly the wide circulation given such re- ports over the state. Alvah Eastman, editor of the Join-- 0RTONVILLE nal Press, makes this comment: "There have been reports that the Dry Cleanin00 C0 paving on the Jefferson Highway be- tween Elk River and St. Cloud did not stand up well during the winter, QUALITY FIRST and is filled with cracks and breaks. THEN SERVICE "A close inspection of this highway disproves these rumors. As a matter of fact the reinforced concrete came ...... Mr. Motorist Roads are getting back into a respectable condition and the weather-man has promised us fairly decent weather. Both of these mean that YOU naturally are going to do more traveling from now on. Have you looked over your tires? Ifyou haven't you had better take precaution anddo it now. Perhaps there is one that has a cut or bruise on it or one that is almost worn out. When you find tires in that condition, that is the time to bring them to us for repair, so that the next time you take that pleasure ride or business trip you will be saved much trouble and worry. We not only repair tires, but we sell them --The Brunswick--which means Strength, Endurance, Safety and Comfort. Ortonville Tire Shop GLENN HARRIS, Proprietor. Located diagonally across street from Odd  Fellows Building. ] I i IMII III I Remodeled, Relined, Repaired, Cleaned and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will pay express one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street - Minneapolis, Minnesota I ful condition by owners or tenants be-J Lots of movie stars who get thous- fore MAY 8TH, 1922. lands a week only work one week a Premises not properly attended to year. before that time will be attended to[ .....  ..................... by the Health authorities and expense assessed against the property. BOARD OF HEALTH City of Ortonville. NOTICE TO TRACTOR OWNERS. The Town Board of Otrey Town- ship, Big Stone Count, will meelve bids from Tractor owners for the pull- ing of an 8-foot road grader for grad- ing roads by the hour, th will re- quire no less than 20 b. p. on the draw bar. Bids will be reeetved until 2:00 o'eleek p. n Saturday, May 6, 1922. Md mt be sealed and sent to Town Clerk before said tim The fill ,,I,,,,I L iii , , I ,I,I,, !,,, , ,I, I I i I ! I I l!m twouart Aluminum Pudding Pan We are making Regular Price $I.10 this offer solely for fordn you an o.p. portumty to gtve "Wear.Ever" a real service test in Coer only 19 nce and KNOW the difference between "Wea r- Ever" aluminum cooking utensils and utensils of less thick metal urown kitchen. (Rg-/arcegc) which, onse. want you to SEE the uendy,  offered at a difference, FEEL the differ, cheaper price. TYLER'S Variety Store Ortonville, Minnesota ilmlz?- . ..... H r# Tou RI N G CAR 00efore AVaiue Lii00e This Why should you buy any ear but a Ford ? Pricca lowest, parts lowest, operating and up- keep expense lowest, yet a Ford ear will take ycu any place any car will go. These are sensible, not extravagant, times, and a Ford is the most sensible car for anyone to own. Terms if desired. J. ARTHUR MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. CPBIL gq', 1 m mmvlm mm+mi+:+:;; =+=+:=::::== ...... ++mann +++ ,+ =D* 1 -..-- ,..  SUCCESS L. A. KamTbr - MII  i It's doing your lob ths best you And lng Just to your fenow-wt; lt+s making money, b holdLng friends, An4 stang true to Tour v d edm; BKATING TRAINS. With the great l.ea in the num- ber of vehicles ing the pub io gb- way, there has bee  inc t. the number of accJden at raroa exos ings thruout the country in splbe  the best efforts of rallad men to hdd these ldents d to a irdm It may surprise most pple to Im that the rlad rsin is not alwa the aggressor in th eases but fqntly "ataeked" by auomobtle with nseqnt dage to bth Par+ te I is nocezle that the smallel rs are the most pugnadous an dous to fo their way ass t tks garaless of the obtle ?f. feted by a s*nding or mong tram A large nher of such ses occur red on the Milwaukee It ye+ Inl one ns nce a freight t*dn was stand- ! lug at a South Dakota StJo takingl water when an auto n into the side cf the ear near the r of the train. njing one of the eupauts of the automol+ In other e. a way reight as standing at  "tton in Iowa when an auto was dn i.to it I at a fast cue. damaging t&e ear , Jr0mng the occupants, wo+ of eerie, bught suJt ague.st the company, h Winsin, s fegt trmin slowly pun i.g ut of a mon was stk b auto near the r end of the tralu &tm%4n8 the ear ad inuing the eupants. In sIt another imtare, a reigt trea w pung lowy out of an Indiaua depot wh  auto+ mobile was driven into the she r rom the b dth sumeut force to Idl t drr and xture eral others. It will be notie that i. su6q ace,- dents  th,em there w  rooy r duubt on te prt of the dr of the tomobe* a to which uld reach the eros,lug flt as the train was elready the in eeh se. In must of the other idents, how- ever, the train was sk near the head end, in'eating tt the lmts of th nut omobi]es thought they had a shce to "beat the trains eross,  whleh is still a poptflar oat- dr spork The foregoing lltustmtoa what the Tailroeds have to fa in thetr e.+ deavo to preteen the liven and prop- erty of those who travel o the high- ways nd wMle namraliy t has ot been possible to avoid  nerese I. stoning eidts,  they  almo e.tlre due to ues beyond eonol ef the raflroad, much progress la be+ ln m.de in seducing fataBee  a wheleling emploea, treas eas and othe.  end about *huFa, stevens, trains d crodngs, - TMS  attod by the fact that even o csing fatalies alone showed lart inns, on the Mil- ukee ltad, for em#e, the to- tel fatadlies in 1921 r but tO: a mpel with 42 in 19ts, a det of about 64 per ee There should he the largest poll- be nomy in th eondue of public basmess, whether city. county, sta or ttou, but we ptost th the hlef items that contribute to the irnae in ax is beyund e powe of either city ur ty om+ to remedy. The te way of e0ter chls and batter Living on+i f ey  wtlhn  dltto of 2O to 0 lie* rmght oe afforded n u  y that the city that takes any ue step wl on be depopuia- te.--Rewood FaUs Gatte. BATTLE WILL BE OVER BOOZE. When this olitleal campmtm gets pattie will nt b between the Repub- the als and nseative.. bew L wets d dry. Democrats a mr m and Rpuhicas  go,,g o pise  rrd of the present ruisra tio. radicals a going tu pittze ne pn of omc har-bralned pjct while oe-atv ur that this is the wer time possibl to k the Bt 1 th nm rne uesr4on of light satn wll! erde itsl into ever eampa Very little will be sand e in the psry ptfo, but  1 wll be foed by *he vari . we orgiat0ns of the / wneed by the hwe Ta ehleuge v11 be aeptod b:/ the ;, *4ry organizations, e b* on. And drPa a llttae ad tanking mue. It's keeping alwayl ta oeut toeh With what II fist in word im6 dNd; , It' blg th pet makl.g speed; r It*s dlg bHthaly tim field of a Vle making h,bor brW ; :  It'+ got.g ward desp+t+ def+mt A Ahting stgtmebly, but heaping mwmt; It's beh el,n and it's playing fr; It's hugM.g ghtl at De Isldr; It's lldng up at the sta abo And dr/nldg depl of life d 1o; It's +tug#lug on with the will to win, But taking Los with x ehsrfl gr+a; It's +hmng rrow d rk tad wrth. And mng better tld  old egrth; It's rv, tdving through trldn d res, lVs doing your btostt' SucCess. --Te Razler. ,, , , . ' thit tim wlntm- In almo ,f et- diti Thw la at  mall brak near Elk Itr, when the read bed wu waabed out, under tim paving, but thin ham been x'ed, mi It would The e, kouldtrs ale,.g  pavL,ll laid llt pmr In a  #sol+ galled by the h t whm llb lug. bet them wm no damag to the pang, and mtaker ha emeed this llght dmf truek, bumu and autonbilelb dut mt of the wint*r month& t v- lhowt st gratifying *trying qua, Th t year l th* Itd- t ned in the light of  mt!'l- rlnfereed eoaemte well made n be pronoured a 10o p t macmsa" +rod grail sttrfaeed iitlor of the trnnk route eystama, the highway mrtmeat reported thin  trot tim mh'lrma htve been out olMng cul- verts trod dlthes to fret ths Into good nditlon u  I poul Thv most omplalnt mrs about tto worked dxring te winter to bp the lle, the eft* old.  will ahow st lmperutt ur ltl mttntea, The will be mth cussing of peer+ ty Lines, and the wets will support inan or Demurrals d the ds will wet cddate whether he be Repub- do the name. The ll be a lrger vote ct byl the women than they ct in the ]t ampdga bee  eYe.he ng aoity of the women a gg.ainst a; ret uf tbe saloon in say fo. This "wet d dry" contest will be determining ftor net only in the ngsioaal eeetios, but also wll extend to the lectio. of state d :uunty amcials, espeeially thee hay Lg to do with the enfoment of the rohib ion aw rMorris Tibune. How do you ext the P+ta[ Clerk o kn0W whether yo, mean Trlrdosd. O.llfom[i. or rlatdad. Coorado? At.WAYS SPm+L OUT TIm t+AM OP TOm TE IN PULl. IN I'VI Jd>DRSS. "MO[ BUS[tIES: IN GOV[RNMSN'P" IS pt rsse WSa .P In - dt ,p(g'm. nrst meSe to Coa- gretl lld sllea partleearly I. ttl man.gltoent we.postmasters ire blug Impressed wlth the fact that te re nage of local branchel ut the bggt bs.s In the worta,, HERE COMES A STRAHOERIJ Calls Road Pavin Complete Sucee St. Cloud Newlmlmr Fl.ds o. ]n- vetigatio that Rumors of Paving Fsilur Are Entily FaI, Investigation of the St. Cloud Jour+ hal Pss this week dilosed that mo of failure of new paving on state tnk hlghwsys  wholly with- out foundation on fact in spite of the wide cilaIon given such + ports ove the state. Alvah Etrnan, editor of the Jo- hal Press, makes this comment: "The have been pots that he paving on the 3efforts Highway be- tween Elk mr d Sk Cloud did not stud up well during the Winter, and is filled with ks and breaks. "A elo iaspectloh of this highway disproves these o. As a tter fac the reinforee e.onezete ettme leers make our post olee Ik teat, Mr. PoltsteP. Strashten up the rl letter bu Pgr. s. Tld7 nO me, Mr. llrs O, rrtee. Fr ImpPmm]ous a LiSting Mare M. Stranger, caking uott or teea Im- vemeats, vmt es bck, bUglnl ua usueOtL Slurs the with "poP+ HUMANIZING THE POSTAL SERVICE "Tere tt  ummorrant pe mrt of our ge,. It i retal 4t4 ,un until a.d their rt:on It the k m tt suee*sL I st, late aHltt t,l dmt a ,rrom lati 9effused for or neighb nd faeads anti should b So resrttt rather th s a hlred rv rond for sn smee emplor'-- Postmnter Ueo Hubert Work. House Cleaning Time Is Here Send  your RUGS, DRAP. EBIES, CURTAINS, ETC. We use the Famou Fnch Shampoo pr, In cleaning rugs. No htiag, to dty fbr no galling.  chem- ists, to harm the  in any pRICES--- 9xl ................ t$.oo 8x10 ................ $250 Other rug price ordingly ORTONVILLE Dry Cleanin Co. QUALIT FIRf-- THEN SERVICE Mr. Motorist Roads are getting back into a respectable condition and the weather-man has promised us fairly decent weather. Both of these mean that YOU naturally are going to do more traveling from now on. Have you looked over your tires? Ifyou haven't you had better take precaution anddo it now. Perhaps there is one that has . cut or bruise on it or one that is almost worn out+ When you find tires in that condition, that the time to bring them to us for repair, so that the next time you take that pleasure ride or . business trip you will be saved much trouble and worry. We not only repair tires, but we sell them --The Brunswick--which means Strength, Endurance, Safety and Comfort. Ortonville Tire Shop GLENN HARRIS, Proprietor. Lvcated diagonally across street from Odd Fellows Building. Furs Remodeled, Relined, Repaired. Cleaned and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will payexpress one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street Minneapolis. Minnesota CIdN UF NOTICe, Noee is hreby wm that all tl- ey& preml av vamt tts /n tin of O'tenvllle robust be oleo/ted 7 m,d pet in em.y+ em and heath. ful dtin keg orn*pl or tlm b- rums MAY :TII, 1. Plmtes net proper attded to be+on that  will be and:i to by the//th attthotttm   us*ned egalnt tim property. BOARD OF HEALTR t ef OrtowdlI NOTICE TO TRACTOR O q['a Ten Be e Ottey Tew ap, Bits sto Cet. will rsea tIs from Tttet ewaer or tlm iI. [al of M 8-feet d  for grad- ing toads by ths hour, th wa tw qlm no lmtt slum lo . p. a t.ba dew . Bid wl be teeIv*d md st00 e'ehek p. a 4tterday, MV , 19. All Mck mt b Naled aml st to fM  01/k bm* es/d Um er O bid-Nm Pue bw dwk P& 494 ms a wk only woek  wk a  ant  *tmd tm mtm A4m* Wet,sac. The 0rtmvek lmd W. IL MULLICA. Pelt. Ptmu m I lw+++ + " ear-Everq two/uatt Aluminum  Pudding Pan We are making  P,e SZ.lO oe wad if.lO thi off soldy for the difference ....... ++ '+w'v+"  Se," .l.m cmking utnmih and utensilt of teal m tt ia +  19 less thick metal ownkiw.hen. (pJ) which, coast. TYLER'S Variety Store Ortvilh M.et a I I I TOURING CAR I00fore AValue This rHUMDAY, APRIL 1if, llU -  L i Hi I i II i II fLU , HI in 1 i Tie 00TOHYILL[ IHD[P[HD[HT L. A. Ks,rotifer Mana#ng Editet Olhdld PaPer of Big Ste Cmty. NerlEwemm Advt. lrelmtative, MINNESOTA SE LIST. 709 Exchange Bank - St. Paml 215 S. 6th St. - MinneapoLis BEATING TRAINS. With the great increase in the num- ber of vehicles using the public high- way, there has been an increase in the number of accidents at railroad cross- ings thruout the country in spite of the best efforts of railroad men to hold these accidents down to a minimttm. It may surprise most people to lealm that the rilroad train is not always the aggressor in these cases but is frequently "attacked" by automobiles with consequent damage to both par- ties. It is noticeable that the smaller cars are the most pugnacious and anxious to force their way across the tracks regardless of the obstacle of- fered by a standing or moving train. A large number of such cases occur- red on the Milwaukee last year. In one instance a freight train was stand- ing at a South Dakota Station taking water when an auto ran into the side of the car near the rear of the train, injuring one of the occupants of the automobile. In another case, a way freight was standing at a "station in Iowa when an auto was driven into it at a fast clip, damaging the car and injuring the occupants, who, of course, brought suit against the company. In Wisconsin, a freight train slowly pull- ing out of a station was struck by an auto near the rear end of the train, damaging the car and injuring the oc- cupants. In still another instance, a freight train was pulling slowly out of an Indiana depot when an auto- mobile was driven into the sixth car from the caboose with sufficient force to kill the driver and injure several others. It will be noticed that in such acci- dents as these there was no rou for doubt on the part of the drivers of the ahtomobiles as to which would reach the crossing first as the train was already there in each case. In most of the other accidents, how- ever, the train was struck near the head end, indicating that the occu- pants of the automobitesthought they had a chance to "beat the trains across," which is still a popular out- door sport. The foregoing illustrates what the railroads have to face in their en- deavors to protect the lives and prop- erty of those who travel on the high- ways, and while naturally it has not been possible to avoid an increase in crossing accidents, as they are almost entirely due to causes beyond control of the railroads, much progress is be- ing made in reducing fatalities as a whole,-including employes, trespass- ers and others, in and about shops, stations, trains and crossings. This is attested by the fact that even the crossing fatalities alone showed a large increase, on the Mil- waukee Railroad, for example, the to- tal fatalities in 1921 were but 153 as compared with 423 in 1913, a decrease of about 64 per cent. There should be the largest possi- ble economy in the conduct of public business, whether city, county, state or nation, but we protest tha the chiet items that contribute to the increase in taxes is beyond the power of either city or county officials to remedy. The people are being given what they want in the way of beVter roads, better schools and better living conditions if they are willing to go back to the con- ditions of 20 to 30 years ago, some re- lief might be afforded but we will venture to say that the city that takes any such step will soon be depopula- ted.Redwood Falls Gazette. BATTLE WILL BE OVER BOOZE. When this pplitical campaign gets to going, it will be found that the real battle wilt not be between the Repub- licans-amt the Democrats, or between the radicals and consmwatives, buI between the wets and drys. Democrats are going to criticise and Republicans are going to praise the record of the present administra- tion, radicals are going to capitalize the present dicontentmen in farm of some hair-brained project while conservatives vrffe that this is the worst time possible to rock the heat. But all the time the question of light wines and beer and the return of the saloon will obtrude itself into ever:," campaign. Very little will be said about thi? issue in the party platforms, but the issue will be forced by the various wet organizations of the country, fi- nanced by the brewers and distillers. The challenge will be accepted by the dry organizations, and the battle will be on, I I I illll Illll m OIRfSqM.Ii ' I. II I 1111 - II II I I I I Illll SUCCESS It's doing your job the best you can And being just to your fellow-man; It's making money, but holding friends, And staying true to your alms and ends; It's figuring how and learning why, And looking forward and thinking high, And dreaming a little and thinking much. It's keeping always in closest touch With what is finest in word md deed; It'l being thorough, yet making speed; It's daring blithely the field of chance While making labor a brave romance; It's going onward despite defeat And fighting staunchly, but keeping sweet; It's being clean and it's playing fair; It's laughing lightly at Dame Despair; It's looking up at thestars above And drinking deeply of life and love; It's struggling on with the will to win, But taking loss with a cheerful grin; It's sharing sorrow and work and mirth, And making better this good old earth; It's It's serving, striving through strain and stress, doing your noblest--that's Success. --The Rambler. There will be much crossing of par-! ty lines, and the wets will support 1 wet candidate whether he be Repub- lican or Democric and the drys will do the same. There will be a larger vote cast by the women than they cast in the last campaign because an overwhelming ,majority of the women are against a return of the saloon in any form. This "wet and dry" contest will be a determining factor not only in" the congressional elections, but also will extend to the selection of state and counW officials, especially those hav- ing to do with the enforcement of the prohibition law.Morris Tribune. How do you expect the Postal Clerk to know whether you mean Trtnhlad, California. or Trinidad. Colorado? ALWAYS SPbL OUT THE NAM] OF THE STATE IN FULL IN TIlE AI)DRItS. "MORE BUSINESS IN GOVERNMENT  Thls apt phrase was used in PrUl- dent Harding's first message to Con- gress and applies particularly In postal management where, postmasters are bring impressed with the fact that they are managers of local branches el' the biggest business In the world. I,et's make our post office look neat. Mr. Postmaster. Straighten up the rural letter box, Mr. Farmer. Tidy up some, Mr. Rural Oarrler. First impressions are lasting Maybe Mr. Stranger, taking notice of these Im- provements, will come back, bringing you benefits. Start these with "PL- TAL IMIROV1MENT WEEK" May 1-6. HUMANIZING THE POSTAL SERVICE "There Is no unimportant person o part ef our service. It Is a total o Imnmn units and their co-operutlon II the key to Its success. In its la analysis, postal duties are accommo- dations performed for our nelghbot and frlends and should be so regardL. rather than as a hlred service per- formed for an absentee employer." Postmaster General Hubert Work. Furs R Calls 0ad Paving PAl $ ....... I| I I l l illUU i nl[nlllln i i iiiiiiii ................................................ t : !i, "' ........... :' : ':::' !: rt to reJ@ot a.r- di' tion. There is just one small brtmk,[ Notice is hereby given that all al- ] or all hidmNahs Pearson, town elsa4g near Elk RiVer, where the road bed i le.ys, premises and vacant lots in the[ of Otmy Townah/p, Ortonvill,, Mfun, was washed out, under the paving, but | city of Oxonville must be cleaned up [ Route 8. 48-8 this has been repaired, and it would I and put in sanitary, clean and health-I take the mot eareful scrutiny to locate it. .Tlie shoulders along the paving laid last Fear in a few plaes were gulled by the heavy snow, when melt- ing, but there was no damage to the paving, and caretaker have remedied this slight damag l j "Considering the heavy traflle, by ] trucks, busses and automobiles, during most of the winter months, the lV- ing shows most gratifying staying qualities. The first year is the hard- est, and in the light of this experi- ence reinforced concrete well made can be pronounced a 100 per cent success" Spring thaws are softening the dirt and gravel surfaced sections of the trunk route system, the highway de- partment reported this week, but the have been out opening cul- verts and ditches to get the routes ..... into good condition as fast as possible. The most complaints are about sec- tions worked during the winter to help the jobless, the officials said, and these will show steady improvement under special maintenance. House Cleaning Time Is Here Send us your RUGS, DRAP. Complete Successl CURTAINS. ETC. We use the Famous French St. Cloud Newspaper Finds On In- Shampoo process in cleaning vestigation that Rumors of Paving rugs. No beating, to destroy Failures Are Entirely False. fabric, no gasoline, no chem- icals, to harm the rugs in any Investigation of the St. Cloud Joux- way, nal Press this week disclosed that PRICES--- rumors of failure of dew paving on 9x12 .................. $3.00 state trunk highways are wholly with- 8x10 .................. $2.50 out foundation on fact, in spite of Other rugs priced accordingly the wide circulation given such re- ports over the state. Alvah Eastman, editor of the Join-- 0RTONVILLE nal Press, makes this comment: "There have been reports that the Dry Cleanin00 C0 paving on the Jefferson Highway be- tween Elk River and St. Cloud did not stand up well during the winter, QUALITY FIRST and is filled with cracks and breaks. THEN SERVICE "A close inspection of this highway disproves these rumors. As a matter of fact the reinforced concrete came ...... Mr. Motorist Roads are getting back into a respectable condition and the weather-man has promised us fairly decent weather. Both of these mean that YOU naturally are going to do more traveling from now on. Have you looked over your tires? Ifyou haven't you had better take precaution anddo it now. Perhaps there is one that has a cut or bruise on it or one that is almost worn out. When you find tires in that condition, that is the time to bring them to us for repair, so that the next time you take that pleasure ride or business trip you will be saved much trouble and worry. We not only repair tires, but we sell them --The Brunswick--which means Strength, Endurance, Safety and Comfort. Ortonville Tire Shop GLENN HARRIS, Proprietor. Located diagonally across street from Odd  Fellows Building. ] I i IMII III I Remodeled, Relined, Repaired, Cleaned and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will pay express one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street - Minneapolis, Minnesota I ful condition by owners or tenants be-J Lots of movie stars who get thous- fore MAY 8TH, 1922. lands a week only work one week a Premises not properly attended to year. before that time will be attended to[ .....  ..................... by the Health authorities and expense assessed against the property. BOARD OF HEALTH City of Ortonville. NOTICE TO TRACTOR OWNERS. The Town Board of Otrey Town- ship, Big Stone Count, will meelve bids from Tractor owners for the pull- ing of an 8-foot road grader for grad- ing roads by the hour, th will re- quire no less than 20 b. p. on the draw bar. Bids will be reeetved until 2:00 o'eleek p. n Saturday, May 6, 1922. Md mt be sealed and sent to Town Clerk before said tim The fill ,,I,,,,I L iii , , I ,I,I,, !,,, , ,I, I I i I ! I I l!m twouart Aluminum Pudding Pan We are making Regular Price $I.10 this offer solely for fordn you an o.p. portumty to gtve "Wear.Ever" a real service test in Coer only 19 nce and KNOW the difference between "Wea r- Ever" aluminum cooking utensils and utensils of less thick metal urown kitchen. (Rg-/arcegc) which, onse. want you to SEE the uendy,  offered at a difference, FEEL the differ, cheaper price. TYLER'S Variety Store Ortonville, Minnesota ilmlz?- . ..... H r# Tou RI N G CAR 00efore AVaiue Lii00e This Why should you buy any ear but a Ford ? Pricca lowest, parts lowest, operating and up- keep expense lowest, yet a Ford ear will take ycu any place any car will go. These are sensible, not extravagant, times, and a Ford is the most sensible car for anyone to own. Terms if desired. J. ARTHUR MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn.