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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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April 27, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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April 27, 1922
 

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APRIL 27. 1922 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE T FARMERS PAGE DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE FARMERS AND FARMERS&apos; ORGANIZATIONS. Your Daughter A Farmers' Wife g Majority of Farm Mothers Want Girls to Marry Real Farmers. farm mothers believe in farm- they enough faith in farming want their daughters to marry ? have, according to the results a nationwide contest just concluded. farm magazine, the Farmer's Wife, the contest. More than farm women wrote letters ans- the question, "Do You Want Daughter to Marry a Farmer ?" T-four per cent of them answer- "Yes!" Two of the 68 prize-win- letters were written by Minne- women. One of them follows. Jrize winning letters will be later. This is what Mrs. Oliver wrote from her farm near Onamia: going to sop a bit, dear farm in the ,midst of my work, for daughter is having her nap and a good opportunity to tell you I wish the best of all good things our pride and hope and joy. is becase I have known the hap- which comes of service, that I my daughter to know i, too. Is any greater joy, I wonder, than of a hard task well done ? When hurried with my work that I do something extra outside, until I felt old and cross and and the best man in all the has said, "I certainly couldn't without you,' oh, how I've thrill- It becomes a little song in my and lightens my work for days. even if he weren't the best man, I could be quite happy with thought: 'i've earned my wage I'm helping with the most es- job on earth; I'm working for future." there's the beauty of family on the farm. Instead of seeing son rushing off with the fellows, daughter going out for a good that I'll know nothing about, the younger children coaxing to to the movies, we'll be spending evening together with our music, or mutual friends, or going to amusement TOGETHER. last but not least, of the good I desire for this daughter-o'- peace, a love of nature, and for quiet, happy thoughts. Can be gotten by any other class of people as easily as by the on the farm? She doesn't to finish her work that she may a day bargain-hunting--a day hurry, Worry and 'me-first' of spending money she spend and gazing at things wants and can't have. No; she sit on the front porch a bit while sews or mends or reads. She will and feel and hear the beauty of orld--her world-- and with an spirit she wilt go in and get for her hungry brood. "And so, folks, I want my daugh- to marry a farmer, a good man, steadfast and true, with vis- of the farm-life-to-be in his Then, hand in hand, they can their dreams come true, she will know the happiness I known. I could not ask for lnOl"e." IMMUNE FROM PALE WESTERN CUTWORM pale western cutworm cannot where the rainfall is more than inches annually. Minnesota there- appears to be immune from in- are the conclwsions of Dr. W. Cook, who resigned some time ago the Minnesota Experiment Sta- staff to accept appointment as specialist in the division of of the Montana college of Dr. Cook has devoted a in MonCana fields and at the Montana station, to study of this pest. The pale western is the most viciou: of all cutworm, it works almost en- tirely underground. In semi-arid (/i.- tricts of Montana and Alberta it has caused tremendous damage to small grain crops and to other vegetation, Western North and South Dakota and some parts of Saskatchewan have al- so been invaded to some extent. SAWTOOTH BEETLE AT WORK IN SEED CORN Entomologists of the University of Minnesota are advised that the saw- tooth beetle, Otherwise known as the bran bug which caused such loss to owners of stored wheat and other small grain in southwestern Minne. sota last fall, is working in corn which has been stored for feeding and planting. Samples received by Dr. R. N. Chapman, specialist on stored food and grain insects, show that the beetle eats the embryo or germ of the corn kernel. Corn so attacked is valueless for planting. "The only safe Way is to test all seed corn before planting," says Dr. Chapman. "Any of the com- mon methods of testing will aid ma- terially in getting a good stand. To plant without testing is to invite crop failure." Farm Bureau Asks Wool Freight m State Federation Charges Injustice To Minnesota Farmers In Rate Classification. The Minnesota Famn. Bureau Fed- eration has protested against what it declares is an unjust freight classifi- cation, injurious to Minnesota far- mers. It has requested a hearing be- fore the railroads' Western Classifi- cation committee, to apply for a rate reduction. The Minnesota federation also has urged the Farm Bureaus of the Da- kotas, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri and Nebraska to join in the effgrt to cut rates on wool. West of Chicago, the mimimum charge for shipping wool is the rate on 24,000 pounds in a 60 ton capacity car. It is impossible, the Farm Bu- reau maintains, to load more than 18,- 000 pounds of wool in such a car, so I that farmers are forced to pay freight on 6,000 pounds of wool that does not exist. East of Chicago, it is under- stood, the minimum rate is based on 16,000 pounds. The Farm Bureau asks that this 16,000 pound minimum be applied in Minnesota to save mon- ey for the farmers. * i,m. LUMBgR I$ THE TIME --HAVE "fOU I:.. Springtime is the season of the year when birds build nests, sweethearts build plans for the future and grown up men and women build homes. We have every lumber for every building purpose and it is priced at a figure that should start your building at once. Geier Lumber Co. 0rt0nville Minn. Seeds! Seeds! Seeds! The largest shipment ever shipped to Ortonville including all kinds of grass and forrage seeds, lawn grass and white clover, to be sold at the lowest pos- sible figure. It is an established fact that grass and stock must take the place of wheat on high priced land, lind this spring is going to be an ideal spring for seeding grass plenty of moisture and the outlook for business is fine. Everybody knows that our Seed Corn gives satisfaction. "Be Wise--Buy Shult's Seed Corn." i i i i i ii Lake View Feed & Mill Co. Ortonville Feed Store. (Will sell at wholesale) Li k R I T vest0c uns EGG MARKETING " Sh G dGi Adairyproducts,marketingscho01 o 0w oo a ns w,,, hehl the old state capitol, St. Paul, April 28 and 29. All im- t,ortmt phases of the business of mar- j i sO ranks fifth among the states in NOTICE. quantity of eggs shipped to distant To all parties in any manner inter- eastern markets. He does not concede!ested. that any state leads Minnesota in! Notice is hereby given that the quality of eggs shipped, partnership heretofore existing be- tween J. Arthur Matthews and Her- A telephone subscriber called a bert I,. McDowell has in all hing Increased Receipts Fail to Cause Ma- terial Loss In Prices--Cattle Mostly St (;.dy. keting eggs and poultry products thru number several times but in each case been ,lisolve(1 by mutual consent and co-operative creameries will be con-I it. was busy. Ite toht of his di:pleas- i contract of dissolution duly signed. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Beef steers weak to slightly lower, other killing classes aml su)ckers and feeders steady to .,trong. Calves ;,000, mostly steady. ............. I'racmm packer top on best lights $6.50. lIogs 7,500. Market steady to around 10c lower. Bulk better grades $9:75 to $10.15, packing sows mostly $8.75 to $9.00, good pigs largely $11. Sheep 600. Market strong. South St. Paul, Minn., April 25, 1922.--The general ,marketward move- ment of livestock, as is usual during the last week of April, is showing a substantial increase this week, receipts in the aggTegate at seven principal central points for two days being about 97,500 cattle, 16,200 calves, 181,- 000 hogs and 91,500 sheep compared with 82,700 cattle, 15,700 calves, 142,- 800 hogs and 45,000 sheep the same period last week. These increases which are probably due in part to the desire of farmers to liquidate before the assessor's annual May 1 call, have failed to cause any material price de- clines. Beef steers sold mostly steady with spots around 25c lower on opening days, with other killing classes and stockers and feeders mostly steady to strong. A few small lots of good and choice fat yearlings brought $8.0 to $8.75 with best in load lots selling at $7.50 to $7.75, and bulk of beef steers at $6.50 to $7.25. Better of- ferings of butcher cows and heifers brought $6.50 to $7.50 or better, with bulk at $4.50 to $6.50. Canners and cutters sold frcm $2.75 to $3.75, bol- ogna bulls largely $3.75 to $4.00. Best light veal calves sold to packers at $6.00 to $6.50 for the most part with some on up to $7.00 or over. Seconds sold from $3.00 to $5.00. Bulk of stockers and feeders sold from $5.50 to $6.50, with most desirable offerings $6.75 to $7.25. Hogs were about steady to 1c low- er on the average today, bulk better grades $9.75 to $10.15, packing sows largely $8.75 to $9.00. coarse stags $7.00, good pigs mostly $11.00. Sheep and lambs are selling on a strong basis, best wooled lambs here today being bid $15.50, with good and l choice 100 to 130 wooled ewes $9.00i to $9.50, heavier ewes of good grade $7.00 to $8.50. htered the first day. Standardiza. i tire and the operator said: "I'll give The business being continued by J. Ar- tion of butter wilt be the keynote for you tlle supervisor, one moment, t thur Matthews alone at the regular the second clay. Co-operative shipping i please." i Flace heretofore occupied at Orton- of ea'.<s to eastern markets has been "No," quickly replied the man "l'ml ville. gaining steadily until, says N. E. Imarried and lmve a suIlwisor at --J. ARTHUR MATTI[EWS, Lhamnan, poultry . peemlkt, Mmne- I home. ! H.L. McDOWEI3. V A Sign of Interest Y o u r individual efforts at everyday work should show a s t e a d y profit. If they don't, then you are not operating your personal business at a Profit. Saving means profit. Profit means Prosperity. Better take stock and the start. make ii ii I i if Hill lili I i , i i ill First to establish the $109_2 price-usco"'" " E makers of U. S. res made this nnouncement last ovember-- aHereafter the price of the 30x3 'Usco' is $10.90." The lowest price ever quoted on a tire of quality reputat/on and standard performance. And now, with the opening d Spring, there seem to be quite a number of aNew and Special tires" coming into the mark in the $10.90 price range. Perhaps you are wondering just what there can be either "new' or "special" about these It can't be the $10.90 price--- aUsco" established that five months ago. Nor quality reputation and standard performance--for it takes more than one full season for any new tire to demonstrate where it stands in quality and value $ $ $ With so manytires rush- ing into this $10.90 price field (now that the season prom. ises business from the American car.owner), it is worth remember- ing that "Usco" showed tts good faith by announcing this price fall The same intent to serve that h made"Usco" a standard value r years. The "Use.o n Tire was never better than it is today-- with its established time-tested and its United States Tir00s United States Rubber gompany i ill i l Where You Can Buy U. S. Tires: The Park Garage Ortonville, Minn. Alex Semrau Odessa, Minn. I I I i Sherman & Spalin00er . Clinton, Minn. I APRIL 27. 1922 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE T FARMERS PAGE DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. Your Daughter A Farmers' Wife g Majority of Farm Mothers Want Girls to Marry Real Farmers. farm mothers believe in farm- they enough faith in farming want their daughters to marry ? have, according to the results a nationwide contest just concluded. farm magazine, the Farmer's Wife, the contest. More than farm women wrote letters ans- the question, "Do You Want Daughter to Marry a Farmer ?" T-four per cent of them answer- "Yes!" Two of the 68 prize-win- letters were written by Minne- women. One of them follows. Jrize winning letters will be later. This is what Mrs. Oliver wrote from her farm near Onamia: going to sop a bit, dear farm in the ,midst of my work, for daughter is having her nap and a good opportunity to tell you I wish the best of all good things our pride and hope and joy. is becase I have known the hap- which comes of service, that I my daughter to know i, too. Is any greater joy, I wonder, than of a hard task well done ? When hurried with my work that I do something extra outside, until I felt old and cross and and the best man in all the has said, "I certainly couldn't without you,' oh, how I've thrill- It becomes a little song in my and lightens my work for days. even if he weren't the best man, I could be quite happy with thought: 'i've earned my wage I'm helping with the most es- job on earth; I'm working for future." there's the beauty of family on the farm. Instead of seeing son rushing off with the fellows, daughter going out for a good that I'll know nothing about, the younger children coaxing to to the movies, we'll be spending evening together with our music, or mutual friends, or going to amusement TOGETHER. last but not least, of the good I desire for this daughter-o'- peace, a love of nature, and for quiet, happy thoughts. Can be gotten by any other class of people as easily as by the on the farm? She doesn't to finish her work that she may a day bargain-hunting--a day hurry, Worry and 'me-first' of spending money she spend and gazing at things wants and can't have. No; she sit on the front porch a bit while sews or mends or reads. She will and feel and hear the beauty of orld--her world-- and with an spirit she wilt go in and get for her hungry brood. "And so, folks, I want my daugh- to marry a farmer, a good man, steadfast and true, with vis- of the farm-life-to-be in his Then, hand in hand, they can their dreams come true, she will know the happiness I known. I could not ask for lnOl"e." IMMUNE FROM PALE WESTERN CUTWORM pale western cutworm cannot where the rainfall is more than inches annually. Minnesota there- appears to be immune from in- are the conclwsions of Dr. W. Cook, who resigned some time ago the Minnesota Experiment Sta- staff to accept appointment as specialist in the division of of the Montana college of Dr. Cook has devoted a in MonCana fields and at the Montana station, to study of this pest. The pale western is the most viciou: of all cutworm, it works almost en- tirely underground. In semi-arid (/i.- tricts of Montana and Alberta it has caused tremendous damage to small grain crops and to other vegetation, Western North and South Dakota and some parts of Saskatchewan have al- so been invaded to some extent. SAWTOOTH BEETLE AT WORK IN SEED CORN Entomologists of the University of Minnesota are advised that the saw- tooth beetle, Otherwise known as the bran bug which caused such loss to owners of stored wheat and other small grain in southwestern Minne. sota last fall, is working in corn which has been stored for feeding and planting. Samples received by Dr. R. N. Chapman, specialist on stored food and grain insects, show that the beetle eats the embryo or germ of the corn kernel. Corn so attacked is valueless for planting. "The only safe Way is to test all seed corn before planting," says Dr. Chapman. "Any of the com- mon methods of testing will aid ma- terially in getting a good stand. To plant without testing is to invite crop failure." Farm Bureau Asks Wool Freight m State Federation Charges Injustice To Minnesota Farmers In Rate Classification. The Minnesota Famn. Bureau Fed- eration has protested against what it declares is an unjust freight classifi- cation, injurious to Minnesota far- mers. It has requested a hearing be- fore the railroads' Western Classifi- cation committee, to apply for a rate reduction. The Minnesota federation also has urged the Farm Bureaus of the Da- kotas, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri and Nebraska to join in the effgrt to cut rates on wool. West of Chicago, the mimimum charge for shipping wool is the rate on 24,000 pounds in a 60 ton capacity car. It is impossible, the Farm Bu- reau maintains, to load more than 18,- 000 pounds of wool in such a car, so I that farmers are forced to pay freight on 6,000 pounds of wool that does not exist. East of Chicago, it is under- stood, the minimum rate is based on 16,000 pounds. The Farm Bureau asks that this 16,000 pound minimum be applied in Minnesota to save mon- ey for the farmers. * i,m. LUMBgR I$ THE TIME --HAVE "fOU I:.. Springtime is the season of the year when birds build nests, sweethearts build plans for the future and grown up men and women build homes. We have every lumber for every building purpose and it is priced at a figure that should start your building at once. Geier Lumber Co. 0rt0nville Minn. Seeds! Seeds! Seeds! The largest shipment ever shipped to Ortonville including all kinds of grass and forrage seeds, lawn grass and white clover, to be sold at the lowest pos- sible figure. It is an established fact that grass and stock must take the place of wheat on high priced land, lind this spring is going to be an ideal spring for seeding grass plenty of moisture and the outlook for business is fine. Everybody knows that our Seed Corn gives satisfaction. "Be Wise--Buy Shult's Seed Corn." i i i i i ii Lake View Feed & Mill Co. Ortonville Feed Store. (Will sell at wholesale) Li k R I T vest0c uns EGG MARKETING " Sh G dGi Adairyproducts,marketingscho01 o 0w oo a ns w,,, hehl the old state capitol, St. Paul, April 28 and 29. All im- t,ortmt phases of the business of mar- j i sO ranks fifth among the states in NOTICE. quantity of eggs shipped to distant To all parties in any manner inter- eastern markets. He does not concede!ested. that any state leads Minnesota in! Notice is hereby given that the quality of eggs shipped, partnership heretofore existing be- tween J. Arthur Matthews and Her- A telephone subscriber called a bert I,. McDowell has in all hing Increased Receipts Fail to Cause Ma- terial Loss In Prices--Cattle Mostly St (;.dy. keting eggs and poultry products thru number several times but in each case been ,lisolve(1 by mutual consent and co-operative creameries will be con-I it. was busy. Ite toht of his di:pleas- i contract of dissolution duly signed. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Beef steers weak to slightly lower, other killing classes aml su)ckers and feeders steady to .,trong. Calves ;,000, mostly steady. ............. I'racmm packer top on best lights $6.50. lIogs 7,500. Market steady to around 10c lower. Bulk better grades $9:75 to $10.15, packing sows mostly $8.75 to $9.00, good pigs largely $11. Sheep 600. Market strong. South St. Paul, Minn., April 25, 1922.--The general ,marketward move- ment of livestock, as is usual during the last week of April, is showing a substantial increase this week, receipts in the aggTegate at seven principal central points for two days being about 97,500 cattle, 16,200 calves, 181,- 000 hogs and 91,500 sheep compared with 82,700 cattle, 15,700 calves, 142,- 800 hogs and 45,000 sheep the same period last week. These increases which are probably due in part to the desire of farmers to liquidate before the assessor's annual May 1 call, have failed to cause any material price de- clines. Beef steers sold mostly steady with spots around 25c lower on opening days, with other killing classes and stockers and feeders mostly steady to strong. A few small lots of good and choice fat yearlings brought $8.0 to $8.75 with best in load lots selling at $7.50 to $7.75, and bulk of beef steers at $6.50 to $7.25. Better of- ferings of butcher cows and heifers brought $6.50 to $7.50 or better, with bulk at $4.50 to $6.50. Canners and cutters sold frcm $2.75 to $3.75, bol- ogna bulls largely $3.75 to $4.00. Best light veal calves sold to packers at $6.00 to $6.50 for the most part with some on up to $7.00 or over. Seconds sold from $3.00 to $5.00. Bulk of stockers and feeders sold from $5.50 to $6.50, with most desirable offerings $6.75 to $7.25. Hogs were about steady to 1c low- er on the average today, bulk better grades $9.75 to $10.15, packing sows largely $8.75 to $9.00. coarse stags $7.00, good pigs mostly $11.00. Sheep and lambs are selling on a strong basis, best wooled lambs here today being bid $15.50, with good and l choice 100 to 130 wooled ewes $9.00i to $9.50, heavier ewes of good grade $7.00 to $8.50. htered the first day. Standardiza. i tire and the operator said: "I'll give The business being continued by J. Ar- tion of butter wilt be the keynote for you tlle supervisor, one moment, t thur Matthews alone at the regular the second clay. Co-operative shipping i please." i Flace heretofore occupied at Orton- of ea'.<s to eastern markets has been "No," quickly replied the man "l'ml ville. gaining steadily until, says N. E. Imarried and lmve a suIlwisor at --J. ARTHUR MATTI[EWS, Lhamnan, poultry . peemlkt, Mmne- I home. ! H.L. McDOWEI3. V A Sign of Interest Y o u r individual efforts at everyday work should show a s t e a d y profit. If they don't, then you are not operating your personal business at a Profit. Saving means profit. Profit means Prosperity. Better take stock and the start. make ii ii I i if Hill lili I i , i i ill First to establish the $109_2 price-usco"'" " E makers of U. S. res made this nnouncement last ovember-- aHereafter the price of the 30x3 'Usco' is $10.90." The lowest price ever quoted on a tire of quality reputat/on and standard performance. And now, with the opening d Spring, there seem to be quite a number of aNew and Special tires" coming into the mark in the $10.90 price range. Perhaps you are wondering just what there can be either "new' or "special" about these It can't be the $10.90 price--- aUsco" established that five months ago. Nor quality reputation and standard performance--for it takes more than one full season for any new tire to demonstrate where it stands in quality and value $ $ $ With so manytires rush- ing into this $10.90 price field (now that the season prom. ises business from the American car.owner), it is worth remember- ing that "Usco" showed tts good faith by announcing this price fall The same intent to serve that h made"Usco" a standard value r years. The "Use.o n Tire was never better than it is today-- with its established time-tested and its United States Tir00s United States Rubber gompany i ill i l Where You Can Buy U. S. Tires: The Park Garage Ortonville, Minn. Alex Semrau Odessa, Minn. I I I i Sherman & Spalin00er . Clinton, Minn. I APRIL 3% Ig ?he FARMERS PAGE ORTONVILLE INDF, NDmqT PAGE I , r "SCHOOL" CALLED TO iota ranks fifth g the tcs in NOTICE. hvest0ck Runs [ sT .... G AR,[ ..........  ..... I o.. ............. I -- / easte markets. He does not eoncmde [ ested. on0W  UaIll/n/rh" held  the old state egp],[quality f eggs shipped, psrtnersid p heretofo m esiing be_ -- I Paul, April 28 and 29. AH ira- i I nvn J. Arthur Mtths and He . . JporLtphasof%heb/ginesofm A telephone sub.tiber I]ed a Irt L. MeDowel] h in all thing, Ineased Receipts Fa!l to Cause Ma-ket ng eggs an pou ry produ h number severn t rues ut ia eh ee beon d;ssolv by mutI mnsent d toria] Loss In Prl?eatll t to.operative eamerfes will be n- i was b.sy He o of h s p  - ntrt of dissolution dxfly Sig'ned ]|oMly Steady. slded the rst day. Staudardiza. ure d the operator said: "I'll gvelThe b ne [ ng n n.ed by J At. l isday  CiOslug-- the ecood day. Co-operative shipping please." I Iace herete[o oupied at OrCon- r. , -- thin 0 hUte[ WI[ be e k>no or 3ou th8 Ruor on moment r   hws a on8  he * Cattle 2,500. Beef stee weak o of egs to easten markets has been] "No ,, qulek]y replied be man "I'm' v e sockers and feeders teady to Chapman, pouitry specialist, Minne- home." I  D0WEL l DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE I FARMER AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. A Farmers' Wife MaiorRy of Far. i; t Gir to Marry Real Farme fm mothers believe in fa enough faith in farmln[ their dught  mm ave, rdLg to the utts ntet. mte letrs v "Do You Want TWO of the 68 prlze-win- letters w written by Mie- wom One of them fo!low$. letters lt he This is what M. her f a bt. dr fa mdst of my work, for it having her nap and & good opportunity to tell you 1 h the best of I good things pride d hope and joy. bw.u e I have k'nown the ha-  which oms of servia, th I ; my daughter to knew t, too. Is any gter Joy. I woter, th When hurried th my WOrk that I something extra outside, old d s d d t man in dt the hid, "I *rtaLM7 couldn't hew I've thrilb ng in m'na my with the mo Fm rn for int f lnstdofNeJml: f w.h tt ftow r dmtthter oiva o.t fr good that I'll know thing about. I the unger eMtdrsn exing to tim movlm, w'lI be trpending frhmd.b or g.g to a love of attmre, ad thouht be I  other cls of ple ss ey u by the She b4rll.kting-- hurry, ore  haw nd feel and her e beaut o fl-her world-- Monna station, to study of this The p f all cutworms. tily udergund. damage to small ain crops and to other vegetation.! : Western Nozth d South Dakota andl ,ome parts of 8askahewan have M- so Ien invaded to me extent. SAWTOOTH BEETLE AT WORK IN SEED Entsmol0sts of the Univeity of Minnesota a advised tth btle, bran bug oers of stored wheat wMe h been stored for feeding d plasma. Samples ived by Dr. R. N. Chapman, Sleialist on stol fd a grain insets, how that eats the embryo or  of the corn kernel Corn  ked is vlueless for plantlng "The only se wsy is to test 11 t eo before planting," says Dr, Chapman. "Any of the m- men methods of testing will aid ma- terially in ttlng  good teM, To Farm ----au Asks W001 Freight Cut State Fedation Clrg Inj ti To ML, meta Farmers In Rate fion, lhrious to reefs. It has rcqtc a hearing be- fore the lads' Western ,  apply The Mlnaosot fedetlon d h u the Fa Buul of the Ds- Iow, Wiscomdn, Mlouri and Nebraska to Join in the eff to cut rtes on 1. West of Cbicsgo, the charge for slpping on 24,00 ponds in s 6O ton paetty . It is impossible, the Farm Bu-  mintln e, to lead mo th 18,- 00 pounds of frCzaht eeL East of Chi, it stud, 16,000 ponds. The Fa Beu : that thls 16,000 pound n sppu , for tho farnr fana-ufe-to-be in hls hand in hand, they l I Id not IMMUNE FBOM the Llln{d] Is more then be Dr. Cook h devot Springtime Is the son f the  when birds build n ee*.hel build plans f the  nd grown o me md e bld homes- We hl evsr 1 f eve building pmpom and ss rieed a a fl t ebold   bulldog at oe Geier Danber C Ortonville Mhm. Seedsl Seeds! Seeds! Ths lprn ever shipped to Oonville lncYading all kinds of grate trod fnre seeds, lza grue and white clo. to be eold at the lowest pot- I s sn eab ished  that mdk mwt zeke the phme of wheat  1, knd tb aprtag is goimz to bo  for dlr.z gmu plenty of moi* aid tSe ouu foz mloy ws that O Sd Cra . - wt,.- m, s Lake View Feed & }/511 COs Otonvtlh Fe, SterL (Will tell st whtmmlO Calves 8,000, mostly steady, packer top on best lights /.0. Hegs 7,5OO. Market steady to around 10 lower. Bulk better gdes $9:5 to $I0.15, packing sows tly $8.7 to $9.0O, good pix largely $1L Sheep 6O0. Mket strong. .%uth S Paul, Minn. April the lt wk of April. aubstantal nase this week, ipts [n the aggregate at points for two about 97.5OO cattle, 1600 eIv 0OO begs d with 8Z,?OO tUe, 15,7OO calve, 142: 8OO hogs and 4,000 sheep the sune period lt wmk. which ere probably due m part to the fers to quidate befo the ssor's ul May I I, have falled to eau ay material price de- cline Beef steers sold mostly steady with spots d 25 }ower on opning dys. with other 1fining ela d feede mtly steady to strong. A few II lots of good and ohcce fat yerngs bright $8.OO to $8.75 with best n load lots selling at $7.5O to $7,75. d buLk of hf steera at $6.5O to $7.25. fengs of butcher bUght $8.5O to $7.5O or better, ]th bulk at $4.5O to $6.6O. Cne d 2.5 to $8.7, bol- ogna bulls lgey $3.76 to $#00. Best lighc veal lvee Id to paeke $6.0 for the most fm $8.OO to $80. Bdk of 50 $7 to $7.25. Ho, er on the aver today. grades $9.7 to $10.15, pe]dng  lrgly $8.75 to $9.0O. r atags $7.O0. good plgs mostly $11.00. and lambs are selling on a strong bda. bes wooled lambs here toda F being bld $1&50, dth good and P.OO to $9.5O, hver s of eood grade $7.OO to $9.50. A Sign of Interest Y o u r individual efforts at everyday work should show a steady profit. If they don't, then you are ant operating your personal business at a Profit. Saving means profit. Profit means Presperity. Better take stock and make the start. First to establish the pr00ce-"Usco" IE makuta of U. 8. .Id Oaow that the stmmn trtom- Tires made this ItImalne.MmthAtam'h:an ear-own ,art vamh rem _ .tlut l dmt t, owd lt  Novemb--- t,b I   P "HE the pr & the /alL 30x3 "Uo' is $190.  The m Intent to ss've that Th low vrievomd tlamlt  dav--wlth thee em to I  a namStt of "New aml Sp-ti " min into d mm In t SI0SO ptt rat tfm "sco" established ShZ ftv Nor lity reputllUoll and Widuo mv'tis ruh- APRIL 27. 1922 THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT PAGE T FARMERS PAGE DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. Your Daughter A Farmers' Wife g Majority of Farm Mothers Want Girls to Marry Real Farmers. farm mothers believe in farm- they enough faith in farming want their daughters to marry ? have, according to the results a nationwide contest just concluded. farm magazine, the Farmer's Wife, the contest. More than farm women wrote letters ans- the question, "Do You Want Daughter to Marry a Farmer ?" T-four per cent of them answer- "Yes!" Two of the 68 prize-win- letters were written by Minne- women. One of them follows. Jrize winning letters will be later. This is what Mrs. Oliver wrote from her farm near Onamia: going to sop a bit, dear farm in the ,midst of my work, for daughter is having her nap and a good opportunity to tell you I wish the best of all good things our pride and hope and joy. is becase I have known the hap- which comes of service, that I my daughter to know i, too. Is any greater joy, I wonder, than of a hard task well done ? When hurried with my work that I do something extra outside, until I felt old and cross and and the best man in all the has said, "I certainly couldn't without you,' oh, how I've thrill- It becomes a little song in my and lightens my work for days. even if he weren't the best man, I could be quite happy with thought: 'i've earned my wage I'm helping with the most es- job on earth; I'm working for future." there's the beauty of family on the farm. Instead of seeing son rushing off with the fellows, daughter going out for a good that I'll know nothing about, the younger children coaxing to to the movies, we'll be spending evening together with our music, or mutual friends, or going to amusement TOGETHER. last but not least, of the good I desire for this daughter-o'- peace, a love of nature, and for quiet, happy thoughts. Can be gotten by any other class of people as easily as by the on the farm? She doesn't to finish her work that she may a day bargain-hunting--a day hurry, Worry and 'me-first' of spending money she spend and gazing at things wants and can't have. No; she sit on the front porch a bit while sews or mends or reads. She will and feel and hear the beauty of orld--her world-- and with an spirit she wilt go in and get for her hungry brood. "And so, folks, I want my daugh- to marry a farmer, a good man, steadfast and true, with vis- of the farm-life-to-be in his Then, hand in hand, they can their dreams come true, she will know the happiness I known. I could not ask for lnOl"e." IMMUNE FROM PALE WESTERN CUTWORM pale western cutworm cannot where the rainfall is more than inches annually. Minnesota there- appears to be immune from in- are the conclwsions of Dr. W. Cook, who resigned some time ago the Minnesota Experiment Sta- staff to accept appointment as specialist in the division of of the Montana college of Dr. Cook has devoted a in MonCana fields and at the Montana station, to study of this pest. The pale western is the most viciou: of all cutworm, it works almost en- tirely underground. In semi-arid (/i.- tricts of Montana and Alberta it has caused tremendous damage to small grain crops and to other vegetation, Western North and South Dakota and some parts of Saskatchewan have al- so been invaded to some extent. SAWTOOTH BEETLE AT WORK IN SEED CORN Entomologists of the University of Minnesota are advised that the saw- tooth beetle, Otherwise known as the bran bug which caused such loss to owners of stored wheat and other small grain in southwestern Minne. sota last fall, is working in corn which has been stored for feeding and planting. Samples received by Dr. R. N. Chapman, specialist on stored food and grain insects, show that the beetle eats the embryo or germ of the corn kernel. Corn so attacked is valueless for planting. "The only safe Way is to test all seed corn before planting," says Dr. Chapman. "Any of the com- mon methods of testing will aid ma- terially in getting a good stand. To plant without testing is to invite crop failure." Farm Bureau Asks Wool Freight m State Federation Charges Injustice To Minnesota Farmers In Rate Classification. The Minnesota Famn. Bureau Fed- eration has protested against what it declares is an unjust freight classifi- cation, injurious to Minnesota far- mers. It has requested a hearing be- fore the railroads' Western Classifi- cation committee, to apply for a rate reduction. The Minnesota federation also has urged the Farm Bureaus of the Da- kotas, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri and Nebraska to join in the effgrt to cut rates on wool. West of Chicago, the mimimum charge for shipping wool is the rate on 24,000 pounds in a 60 ton capacity car. It is impossible, the Farm Bu- reau maintains, to load more than 18,- 000 pounds of wool in such a car, so I that farmers are forced to pay freight on 6,000 pounds of wool that does not exist. East of Chicago, it is under- stood, the minimum rate is based on 16,000 pounds. The Farm Bureau asks that this 16,000 pound minimum be applied in Minnesota to save mon- ey for the farmers. * i,m. LUMBgR I$ THE TIME --HAVE "fOU I:.. Springtime is the season of the year when birds build nests, sweethearts build plans for the future and grown up men and women build homes. We have every lumber for every building purpose and it is priced at a figure that should start your building at once. Geier Lumber Co. 0rt0nville Minn. Seeds! Seeds! Seeds! The largest shipment ever shipped to Ortonville including all kinds of grass and forrage seeds, lawn grass and white clover, to be sold at the lowest pos- sible figure. It is an established fact that grass and stock must take the place of wheat on high priced land, lind this spring is going to be an ideal spring for seeding grass plenty of moisture and the outlook for business is fine. Everybody knows that our Seed Corn gives satisfaction. "Be Wise--Buy Shult's Seed Corn." i i i i i ii Lake View Feed & Mill Co. Ortonville Feed Store. (Will sell at wholesale) Li k R I T vest0c uns EGG MARKETING " Sh G dGi Adairyproducts,marketingscho01 o 0w oo a ns w,,, hehl the old state capitol, St. Paul, April 28 and 29. All im- t,ortmt phases of the business of mar- j i sO ranks fifth among the states in NOTICE. quantity of eggs shipped to distant To all parties in any manner inter- eastern markets. He does not concede!ested. that any state leads Minnesota in! Notice is hereby given that the quality of eggs shipped, partnership heretofore existing be- tween J. Arthur Matthews and Her- A telephone subscriber called a bert I,. McDowell has in all hing Increased Receipts Fail to Cause Ma- terial Loss In Prices--Cattle Mostly St (;.dy. keting eggs and poultry products thru number several times but in each case been ,lisolve(1 by mutual consent and co-operative creameries will be con-I it. was busy. Ite toht of his di:pleas- i contract of dissolution duly signed. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Beef steers weak to slightly lower, other killing classes aml su)ckers and feeders steady to .,trong. Calves ;,000, mostly steady. ............. I'racmm packer top on best lights $6.50. lIogs 7,500. Market steady to around 10c lower. Bulk better grades $9:75 to $10.15, packing sows mostly $8.75 to $9.00, good pigs largely $11. Sheep 600. Market strong. South St. Paul, Minn., April 25, 1922.--The general ,marketward move- ment of livestock, as is usual during the last week of April, is showing a substantial increase this week, receipts in the aggTegate at seven principal central points for two days being about 97,500 cattle, 16,200 calves, 181,- 000 hogs and 91,500 sheep compared with 82,700 cattle, 15,700 calves, 142,- 800 hogs and 45,000 sheep the same period last week. These increases which are probably due in part to the desire of farmers to liquidate before the assessor's annual May 1 call, have failed to cause any material price de- clines. Beef steers sold mostly steady with spots around 25c lower on opening days, with other killing classes and stockers and feeders mostly steady to strong. A few small lots of good and choice fat yearlings brought $8.0 to $8.75 with best in load lots selling at $7.50 to $7.75, and bulk of beef steers at $6.50 to $7.25. Better of- ferings of butcher cows and heifers brought $6.50 to $7.50 or better, with bulk at $4.50 to $6.50. Canners and cutters sold frcm $2.75 to $3.75, bol- ogna bulls largely $3.75 to $4.00. Best light veal calves sold to packers at $6.00 to $6.50 for the most part with some on up to $7.00 or over. Seconds sold from $3.00 to $5.00. Bulk of stockers and feeders sold from $5.50 to $6.50, with most desirable offerings $6.75 to $7.25. Hogs were about steady to 1c low- er on the average today, bulk better grades $9.75 to $10.15, packing sows largely $8.75 to $9.00. coarse stags $7.00, good pigs mostly $11.00. Sheep and lambs are selling on a strong basis, best wooled lambs here today being bid $15.50, with good and l choice 100 to 130 wooled ewes $9.00i to $9.50, heavier ewes of good grade $7.00 to $8.50. htered the first day. Standardiza. i tire and the operator said: "I'll give The business being continued by J. Ar- tion of butter wilt be the keynote for you tlle supervisor, one moment, t thur Matthews alone at the regular the second clay. Co-operative shipping i please." i Flace heretofore occupied at Orton- of ea'.<s to eastern markets has been "No," quickly replied the man "l'ml ville. gaining steadily until, says N. E. Imarried and lmve a suIlwisor at --J. ARTHUR MATTI[EWS, Lhamnan, poultry . peemlkt, Mmne- I home. ! H.L. McDOWEI3. V A Sign of Interest Y o u r individual efforts at everyday work should show a s t e a d y profit. If they don't, then you are not operating your personal business at a Profit. Saving means profit. Profit means Prosperity. Better take stock and the start. make ii ii I i if Hill lili I i , i i ill First to establish the $109_2 price-usco"'" " E makers of U. S. res made this nnouncement last ovember-- aHereafter the price of the 30x3 'Usco' is $10.90." The lowest price ever quoted on a tire of quality reputat/on and standard performance. And now, with the opening d Spring, there seem to be quite a number of aNew and Special tires" coming into the mark in the $10.90 price range. Perhaps you are wondering just what there can be either "new' or "special" about these It can't be the $10.90 price--- aUsco" established that five months ago. Nor quality reputation and standard performance--for it takes more than one full season for any new tire to demonstrate where it stands in quality and value $ $ $ With so manytires rush- ing into this $10.90 price field (now that the season prom. ises business from the American car.owner), it is worth remember- ing that "Usco" showed tts good faith by announcing this price fall The same intent to serve that h made"Usco" a standard value r years. The "Use.o n Tire was never better than it is today-- with its established time-tested and its United States Tir00s United States Rubber gompany i ill i l Where You Can Buy U. S. Tires: The Park Garage Ortonville, Minn. Alex Semrau Odessa, Minn. I I I i Sherman & Spalin00er . Clinton, Minn. I