Newspaper Archive of
The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
Lyft
April 29, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
PAGE 2     (2 of 34 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 2     (2 of 34 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
April 29, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of The Ortonville Independent produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Some small worlder news today from a distant relative, Dan Kaercher, out of Iowa, who is editor-in-chief of "Midwest Living" magazine: "As you recall, you began sending me the Ortonviile Independent some years ago, when you discovered we both shared the same unusual last name, the source of many mis-spellings over the years for us both, I'm sure. Your sister, Barbara, and I never were able to establish a direct family link, but I've enjoyed your paper as a way of staying in touch with life in the reat smaller communities of the pper Midwest. I do hope I get to visit Ortonville in person one day. When you started sending me the paper, I was Health and Education Editor for Better Homes and Gardens magazine, which is published by Meredith Corporations here in Des Moines. Now, I am Editor-in-Chief and Founding Editor of Midwest Living magazine, published by the same company since 1987. Somehow, it came up in a conversa- tion after church several years ago that a friend of ours, Joan Strentz of Des Moines, hails from Ortonville. I have shared your paper with her occasionally since then. Now, Joan's mother, Marie Pflueger, has recently relocated to Des Moines as well, and your paper is circulated and read with interest. Joan's husband is Herb Strentz, a former dean of the journal- ism school at Drake University. Joan indicated she moved to California from Ortonville when she was in high school. Joan's mother and father, now deceased, returned to visit Ortonville regularly from California. Small world, isn't it? Makes you wonder if some things are just meant to happen. I'm sure Marie would love to hear from any of her Ortonville friends at this time. Her address is: Marie Pflueger, 3801 GrandAve., Apt. 310, Des Moiries, IA 50312. Have a great day." Hey...we goofed! On the front page of our. issue last week, S]Qta a w esther oddity of the stacks at Northern Lights Ethanol Plant and the Big Stone Power Plant, we made an error in saying that it was "smoke" rising from the stacks. Blaine Gomer, Northern Lights Plant Manager, has kindly called to our attention that it's water vapor steam, not smoke, ris- ing from the stacks. Thanks Blaine. We stand corrected! News today from a life-long read- er-friend JR Parker of Big Stone City, SD: "I see by the Independent that the county commissioners have Suspended Doug Tomchin for 30 days. I know not why, nor do I care. But I do know that Doug is the best service officer the county has ever had - if not the best in the state. He knows all the rules and veterans rights and has dug up pertaining facts to substantiate claims the V.A. had denied many times. He is a great guy - and i hope some of the many veter- ans he has helped will write to the Independent and county commis- Sioners," Reader Maurice Hoffman brought in the latest issue of a publication called "Music & Dance," published out of St. Joseph, MN. Right on the front page is a splendid arti- cle about Ortonville's Sioux Historic PavHion...including a photo of owners Dan and Michele Wilson, showing the Pavilion in background. Nice publicity for our area. tSSS Reader friend and former resident Alice Bjarrum, now of Luverne writes: "Thanks for the subscription to the Ortonville Independent, I was feeling sad that my year was u.p and then I had the great surprise m my mail i0X. l e-njoy reading about all my friends and neighbors. You have a great paper. Luverne is twice the size of Ortonville and the paper is a weekly that is half the size of yours. Keep up the good work!!! Many, many thanks. We are doing great. Bud has had a couple hospital visits but each time he seems to jump right back and continues to get better. Me, I am too ornery tO slow down and visit a hospital room!!! Would like to find a p time job just to meet peo- ple but so far haven't done that. I am a Hospice volunteer so that does help!!!" Page 2 Extension report Kim Asche County Extension Educator Kandiyohi County Ext. Office Willmar, MN 56201 320/231-7890 PEOPLE IN SMALL COMMUNITIES MUST COOPERATE TO SOLVE SEWAGE PROBLEMS Everyone generates wastewater, but we don't usually talk about it around the dinner table or when we get together with friends. Most of us aren't very concerned about wastewater treatment until the problem hits home: bacteria in the drinking water, lakes turning green in summer or the smell of sewage on warm days. The typical home uses 75 to 100 gallons of water per person per day. When people "use" water it doesn't go away; it becomes dirty and is wastewater or sewage. Wastewater contains pathogens (disease organisms), nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, etc.), solids (organic, inorganic), chemicals (from cleaners, disinfectants, medications) and water. Wastewater must be cleaned up before it is returned to the environment to be recycled for future generations. As individuals and members of a larger community, everyone must take responsibility for wastewater generated in their community. Water is not "used up." When we're through with it, it becomes wastewater - commonly called sewage-that must be cleaned up before it's returned to the environment for reuse. In one way or another, all water is recycled. Wastewater treatment protects human and environmental health. There has been much debate over the best way to treat wastewater. Only in the last few years has the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) acknowledged that decentralized systems (individual and small multiple-household wastewater treatment systems, sometimes called on-site septic systems) are as successful as municipal or centralized systems in treating wastewater to meet water quality standards in a cost- effective manner. Thousands of small communities face serious wastewater treatment challenges, says Ken Olson, an educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service who specializes in on site sewage treatment. Olson says when a community faces wastewater treatment issues, a successful outcome often depends more on the communication process the community follows than on the treatment technologies available. Finding the appropriate technical solutions to a community's wastewater problems is the easy part. Working together as a community is the challenge. When a community faces wastewater treatment issues, a successful outcome is often more dependent on the process the community follows to address the issue than it is on the wastewater treatment technologies available to them. Engaging all of the members of the Community early in the decision- making process leads to the best solutions and encourages responsibility. Communities that are successful in finding a technically effective, economical and socially acceptable solution have several distinguishing characteristics. People in these communities: • Clearly and completely understand their current situation before they start looking for solutions. • Realize that only they can make the best decisions for their community. • Take responsibility for and ownership of the problem. • Have or develop strong leadership from within. • Have a clearly defired vision and mission, which leads to setting appropriate goals. • Take the time and energy to identify and examine all options before making decisions. • Gather information from as many sources as possible before taking action. • Keep all affected parties involved and informed all along the way. • Identify and use a set of criteria. Before studying wastewater treatment options, communities must work with local units of government, agencies and organizations to assemble data to help them understand the present situation. Once the data is gathered, steering committee members, officials, experts and key members of the community need to carefully interpret the data to determine what it means. This provides a clear understanding of the current situation and gives a sense of direction. Once the community understands its situation and resources, it must be prepared to examine options for treatment, legal structure and f'mancing available to them. To do this the community team will need to work with a variety of professionals to find the solutions that best fit the community's needs. The University of Minnesota Extension service offers a "Waste Water Education program" which provides education for individuals and communities to design, construct and maintain viable wastewater solutions that are effective protection of human and environmental health, economically feasible and socially acceptable. Check the program out at www.septic.coafes.umn.edu! To help small communities, two new publications have been developed. One is titled "A Quick Guide to Small Community Wastewater Treatment Decisions," which you can read on the Internet at www.bae.umn.edu/septic. The other is a more detailed, 140-page version called "Small Community Wastewater Solutions: A Guide to Making Treatment, Management and Financial Decisions." Either publication can be purchased with a credit card by calling (800) 876-8636. Ask for item 07734 (Complete Guidebook) or 07735 (Quick Guide). You can also find more information on wastewater treifment ........... at http://septic.coafes.umn.edu Kimberly Asche is a County Extension Director for the University of Minnesota Extension Service serving the West Central District which includes Big Stone County. Bellingham s, tool news Calendar Friday, 5-2 swimming lesson forms need to be returned to the school Breakfast Tuesday--grape juice, french toast, breakfast links, and milk. Wednesday--apple juice, grilled cheese, strawberry yogurt and milk. Thursday--Cook's choice Friday--Cook's choice Lunch Tuesday--cheese pizza, lettuce l Extension report John Cunningham County Extension Educator 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518 DATES TO REMEMBER: April 29 - Babysitting Clinic, Clinton (4:00 p.m.) May 1 - Last day to re-enroll in 4- H or to add or drop projects May 1 4-H 6th grade Conservation Day at Big Stone Lake State Park (8:00 a.m.) May 5 - Babysitting Clinic, Clinton (3:30 p.m.) May 6 - Safety Day Camp at Morris (8:00 a.m.) May 6 - Safety Day Camp at Morris (8:00 a.m.) May 10 - 4-H Sheep Weigh-In at Knutson Farm (8:30 a.m.) May 13 - Afterschool Cloverbuds at Clinton School (3:30 p.m.) May 15 - Afterschool Cloverbuds at Ortonville Elementary School (3:15 p.m.) May 15 - 4-H Animal I.D. forms due at Extension Office May 21 - All District Extension Staff meeting at Morris (9:30 a.m.) May 26 Courthouse and Extension Office closed in observance of Memorial Day. Lost wrist watch Bill Knowles of Ortonville lost a gold Swiss wrist watch in Big Stone City, SD or Ortonville, Monday. • The watch has sentimental value to Knowles. If found please call Bill at 320-839-3019. salad, sliced pears, cookie salad, PBJ and milk. Wednesday--chicken nuggets, oven fries, veggie sticks with dip, grapes, PBJ and k ........  ;, ,.,, Friday--Cook's choice II I " I I'1 1 Will be constructing state highway projects in the area. CALL BITUMINOUS PAVING, INC• for asphalt and seal coating services. Free estimates for driveways, parking lots, roads, etc. 1-800-827-1637 I ORTONVILLE Government Program now offers 100% financing for the homes in small towns and rural areas of Minnesota Moderate income families living in rural areas the home of their dreams - affordably. Valid only in towns of population, outside large metro areas- or in the country on • New Homes • Existing The home you choose can be of any size or design - income, credit worthiness and the appraised value of the home. 100% financing now available • You must have adequate and dependable income . You must have reasonably good credit. , After purchase, you must occupy the dwelling. FREE 12 page report- "Secrets of Smart If you're interested in owning your own home call now - fun#S, Fast, easy and free pre.qualification over the phone. Jamie Lt Call Today Midstate Mortgage Ortonville www.midstatemortgage.net School rates above average in skills test The Ortonville School District has recently received its results from the state basic skills tests. In the state writing test, Ortonville had 92.7% passing compared to 90.79% for the state of Minnesota. In the basic skills test in reading, Ortonville students passed at a rate of 77.97. This compares to 81.01% for the state. In mathematics, Ortonville students passed at a rate of 76.67%, compared to 71.73% for the state of Minnesota. Individual results will be mailed out to parents in the along with sign ups whether to offer those who did not prepare for another • Bridal Shower *In Home Parties • Hostess Gift • Fundraisers • Career Opportunity • Lifetime Guarantee • Monthly Specials Call 800-939-5105 or 328-839-3454 Ask for Lany era ftsgifLandmore@yahoo.cOm We'll help keep boat afloat. ;. boating is enjoyed on the .., e boat isn't even in the water - it's in storage. Contact us today about boat insurance from Auto-Owners. Ids designed to protect your boat in the water and out, and everywhere in between- all year long! ,A'uto-00 Life Home Car Business Tom Kindt 113 NW First Street • Ortonville, MN • Phone Located fn the CenBank building SENIOR CENTER MAY 2003 HOURS: 8:30-4:30 I I Are you or someone you know a victim of Domestic Violence? The abuse can be SUNDAY MONDAY MONDAY, MAY 12: Music and Ice Cream--a GREAT_combinatlonl Come up-- at 1:30 to enjoy Evern Danlelson and his magical keyboard, and TUESDAy WEbNESDAY__THURS_bA00 ........ FRIDAY ARE YOU A CLOSET POOL SHARK?? [ Z . 30IN THE OTHER "SHARKS" THAT ):15 Morning CotTee 9:15 Morning Collie - k.IKETOg-I-₯POOt.-EVERY 10am Exerdse 0am Exercise MORNII, STARTIN6 AT I2N DINNER 2N DINNER ABOUT 9AMI COME UP FOR 6OOb Ipm Pinochle 2:50pro Bridge PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL, SEXUAL. If you need help or just want to talk, call THE WOMEN'S ADVOCACY RESOURCE CENTER 320-839-2331 or 800-974-3359 All services are free and stay for Ice cream and your choice of toppings. 9ran Quilt Group Morning Coffee IOmn Exercise 12N DINNER 12:30-1pm BP Check lpm Cards FUN AND FRIENDLY COMPETnONI HAM SOUP/SANDWICH I ] 9:15 00orni,,gco00r= 00:005-M;mi.g-Co00eG-'C ................ -3 -9 ;i s--Mo00nq;;gCo00-G 'li0 10ran Exercise ll0am Exercise 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise I 12N DINNEI ,II2N I)INNER 10am Exercise 12N DINNER I! 12N Kiwanis Dimer/Mtg.i2N Kiwanis Board Mtg. 12N DINNER 12:50 Bridge ! 1:15 ProgressiveWhisl :15 MOVIE: "Maid in lpm Pinochle ! q30 Alanotd 8pm AA Mmhattan" MOTHER'S DAY [ . . confidential, l I QUALITY CLOCK REPAIR Antique * Mantle 400 Day • Anniversary Striking • Chiming CRAIG RANDLEMAN ORIONVILLE, kin 320-839-2357 5. ’l00kmkor- 11 HAPPY 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise L2N DINNER h30PM MOTHER S I)AY MUSIC & ICE CREAM S(KTIAI, BAKED FISH 9am Quilt (;roup 1:15 Morning Coffee II)aln Exercise Ipm Cards GLAZED HAM Z6 MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY. HER'S DAYI CUBE STEAK BAKED TURKEY 91ma Quill 13 9:1 Momil|gCoff©e -I 1 B’ltone Rep,@ SC 10am Exercise 12N DINNER 12N Kiwanis l)itmer/Meeti, 1:30 BINGO 6:30 AlanotV 8pro AA SALMON LOAF 14 ):15 Morning Coffe loam Exercise 12N DINNt'R I:I 5 t'ards--'500' BAKED CHICKEN 15 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise 12N DINNER lpm Cards-Pinochle CREAMED CHICKEN SALAD LUNCHEON ii 7 16 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise L2N I)INNER 1250 Bridge PORK ROAST ', MEATLOAF  Wl BP BISCUIT [ ................ II)am Exercise Iltlam F, xercise " 9:15 MomingCofle 12N I)INNH !I2N DINNER II0am Exercise 12N KiwanisDinner/Mtg 1:15 Cards'500" [12N DINNER 1:15 Progressive Whist 1:30 Senior Club Meetingllpm Cards--Pinochle 6:30 Alanon/ 8pro AA CHICKEN BREAST BAKED PIZZA HOTDISH W/DIJON SAUCE PORK CHOP 27 9:15 Morning Coffee Z8 29 10am Exercise 9:15 Morning Coffee ): 15 Morning Coffee 12N DINNER 10am Exercise 10am Exercise BBQ RIBS 3 .... 9:15 Morning Cot1'e 10am Exercise 12N DINNER L2:50 Bridge ROAST BEEF 3O 9:15 Morning Cofl:e 10am Exercise Watchmaker Call After 6 p.m. for Estimates Senior Center closed, and the Transit Bus does not run today. 12N Kiwanis 1)inner/MIg 12N DINNER 1:30 BINGO 1:15 Cards--'500' 5:30 Alanon/8pro AA I BBQ BAKED FISH MEATBALLS 12N DINNER lpm Cards---Pinochle COUNTRY STYLE RIBS 12N DINNER 12:50 Bridge BAKED TURKEY 24 31 ................. 00iNDEPENDENT Tuesday, •[ )i Some small worlder news today from a distant relative, Dan Kaercher, out of Iowa, who is editor-in-chief of "Midwest Living" magazine: "As you recall, you began sending me the Ortonviile Independent some years ago, when you discovered we both shared the same unusual last name, the source of many mis-spellings over the years for us both, I'm sure. Your sister, Barbara, and I never were able to establish a direct family link, but I've enjoyed your paper as a way of staying in touch with life in the reat smaller communities of the pper Midwest. I do hope I get to visit Ortonville in person one day. When you started sending me the paper, I was Health and Education Editor for Better Homes and Gardens magazine, which is published by Meredith Corporations here in Des Moines. Now, I am Editor-in-Chief and Founding Editor of Midwest Living magazine, published by the same company since 1987. Somehow, it came up in a conversa- tion after church several years ago that a friend of ours, Joan Strentz of Des Moines, hails from Ortonville. I have shared your paper with her occasionally since then. Now, Joan's mother, Marie Pflueger, has recently relocated to Des Moines as well, and your paper is circulated and read with interest. Joan's husband is Herb Strentz, a former dean of the journal- ism school at Drake University. Joan indicated she moved to California from Ortonville when she was in high school. Joan's mother and father, now deceased, returned to visit Ortonville regularly from California. Small world, isn't it? Makes you wonder if some things are just meant to happen. I'm sure Marie would love to hear from any of her Ortonville friends at this time. Her address is: Marie Pflueger, 3801 GrandAve., Apt. 310, Des Moiries, IA 50312. Have a great day." Hey...we goofed! On the front page of our. issue last week, S]Qta a w esther oddity of the stacks at Northern Lights Ethanol Plant and the Big Stone Power Plant, we made an error in saying that it was "smoke" rising from the stacks. Blaine Gomer, Northern Lights Plant Manager, has kindly called to our attention that it's water vapor steam, not smoke, ris- ing from the stacks. Thanks Blaine. We stand corrected! News today from a life-long read- er-friend JR Parker of Big Stone City, SD: "I see by the Independent that the county commissioners have Suspended Doug Tomchin for 30 days. I know not why, nor do I care. But I do know that Doug is the best service officer the county has ever had - if not the best in the state. He knows all the rules and veterans rights and has dug up pertaining facts to substantiate claims the V.A. had denied many times. He is a great guy - and i hope some of the many veter- ans he has helped will write to the Independent and county commis- Sioners," Reader Maurice Hoffman brought in the latest issue of a publication called "Music & Dance," published out of St. Joseph, MN. Right on the front page is a splendid arti- cle about Ortonville's Sioux Historic PavHion...including a photo of owners Dan and Michele Wilson, showing the Pavilion in background. Nice publicity for our area. tSSS Reader friend and former resident Alice Bjarrum, now of Luverne writes: "Thanks for the subscription to the Ortonville Independent, I was feeling sad that my year was u.p and then I had the great surprise m my mail i0X. l e-njoy reading about all my friends and neighbors. You have a great paper. Luverne is twice the size of Ortonville and the paper is a weekly that is half the size of yours. Keep up the good work!!! Many, many thanks. We are doing great. Bud has had a couple hospital visits but each time he seems to jump right back and continues to get better. Me, I am too ornery tO slow down and visit a hospital room!!! Would like to find a p time job just to meet peo- ple but so far haven't done that. I am a Hospice volunteer so that does help!!!" Page 2 Extension report Kim Asche County Extension Educator Kandiyohi County Ext. Office Willmar, MN 56201 320/231-7890 PEOPLE IN SMALL COMMUNITIES MUST COOPERATE TO SOLVE SEWAGE PROBLEMS Everyone generates wastewater, but we don't usually talk about it around the dinner table or when we get together with friends. Most of us aren't very concerned about wastewater treatment until the problem hits home: bacteria in the drinking water, lakes turning green in summer or the smell of sewage on warm days. The typical home uses 75 to 100 gallons of water per person per day. When people "use" water it doesn't go away; it becomes dirty and is wastewater or sewage. Wastewater contains pathogens (disease organisms), nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, etc.), solids (organic, inorganic), chemicals (from cleaners, disinfectants, medications) and water. Wastewater must be cleaned up before it is returned to the environment to be recycled for future generations. As individuals and members of a larger community, everyone must take responsibility for wastewater generated in their community. Water is not "used up." When we're through with it, it becomes wastewater - commonly called sewage-that must be cleaned up before it's returned to the environment for reuse. In one way or another, all water is recycled. Wastewater treatment protects human and environmental health. There has been much debate over the best way to treat wastewater. Only in the last few years has the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) acknowledged that decentralized systems (individual and small multiple-household wastewater treatment systems, sometimes called on-site septic systems) are as successful as municipal or centralized systems in treating wastewater to meet water quality standards in a cost- effective manner. Thousands of small communities face serious wastewater treatment challenges, says Ken Olson, an educator with the University of Minnesota Extension Service who specializes in on site sewage treatment. Olson says when a community faces wastewater treatment issues, a successful outcome often depends more on the communication process the community follows than on the treatment technologies available. Finding the appropriate technical solutions to a community's wastewater problems is the easy part. Working together as a community is the challenge. When a community faces wastewater treatment issues, a successful outcome is often more dependent on the process the community follows to address the issue than it is on the wastewater treatment technologies available to them. Engaging all of the members of the Community early in the decision- making process leads to the best solutions and encourages responsibility. Communities that are successful in finding a technically effective, economical and socially acceptable solution have several distinguishing characteristics. People in these communities: • Clearly and completely understand their current situation before they start looking for solutions. • Realize that only they can make the best decisions for their community. • Take responsibility for and ownership of the problem. • Have or develop strong leadership from within. • Have a clearly defired vision and mission, which leads to setting appropriate goals. • Take the time and energy to identify and examine all options before making decisions. • Gather information from as many sources as possible before taking action. • Keep all affected parties involved and informed all along the way. • Identify and use a set of criteria. Before studying wastewater treatment options, communities must work with local units of government, agencies and organizations to assemble data to help them understand the present situation. Once the data is gathered, steering committee members, officials, experts and key members of the community need to carefully interpret the data to determine what it means. This provides a clear understanding of the current situation and gives a sense of direction. Once the community understands its situation and resources, it must be prepared to examine options for treatment, legal structure and f'mancing available to them. To do this the community team will need to work with a variety of professionals to find the solutions that best fit the community's needs. The University of Minnesota Extension service offers a "Waste Water Education program" which provides education for individuals and communities to design, construct and maintain viable wastewater solutions that are effective protection of human and environmental health, economically feasible and socially acceptable. Check the program out at www.septic.coafes.umn.edu! To help small communities, two new publications have been developed. One is titled "A Quick Guide to Small Community Wastewater Treatment Decisions," which you can read on the Internet at www.bae.umn.edu/septic. The other is a more detailed, 140-page version called "Small Community Wastewater Solutions: A Guide to Making Treatment, Management and Financial Decisions." Either publication can be purchased with a credit card by calling (800) 876-8636. Ask for item 07734 (Complete Guidebook) or 07735 (Quick Guide). You can also find more information on wastewater treifment ........... at http://septic.coafes.umn.edu Kimberly Asche is a County Extension Director for the University of Minnesota Extension Service serving the West Central District which includes Big Stone County. Bellingham s, tool news Calendar Friday, 5-2 swimming lesson forms need to be returned to the school Breakfast Tuesday--grape juice, french toast, breakfast links, and milk. Wednesday--apple juice, grilled cheese, strawberry yogurt and milk. Thursday--Cook's choice Friday--Cook's choice Lunch Tuesday--cheese pizza, lettuce l Extension report John Cunningham County Extension Educator 839-2518 or 1-800-279-2518 DATES TO REMEMBER: April 29 - Babysitting Clinic, Clinton (4:00 p.m.) May 1 - Last day to re-enroll in 4- H or to add or drop projects May 1 4-H 6th grade Conservation Day at Big Stone Lake State Park (8:00 a.m.) May 5 - Babysitting Clinic, Clinton (3:30 p.m.) May 6 - Safety Day Camp at Morris (8:00 a.m.) May 6 - Safety Day Camp at Morris (8:00 a.m.) May 10 - 4-H Sheep Weigh-In at Knutson Farm (8:30 a.m.) May 13 - Afterschool Cloverbuds at Clinton School (3:30 p.m.) May 15 - Afterschool Cloverbuds at Ortonville Elementary School (3:15 p.m.) May 15 - 4-H Animal I.D. forms due at Extension Office May 21 - All District Extension Staff meeting at Morris (9:30 a.m.) May 26 Courthouse and Extension Office closed in observance of Memorial Day. Lost wrist watch Bill Knowles of Ortonville lost a gold Swiss wrist watch in Big Stone City, SD or Ortonville, Monday. • The watch has sentimental value to Knowles. If found please call Bill at 320-839-3019. salad, sliced pears, cookie salad, PBJ and milk. Wednesday--chicken nuggets, oven fries, veggie sticks with dip, grapes, PBJ and k ........  ;, ,.,, Friday--Cook's choice II I " I I'1 1 Will be constructing state highway projects in the area. CALL BITUMINOUS PAVING, INC• for asphalt and seal coating services. Free estimates for driveways, parking lots, roads, etc. 1-800-827-1637 I ORTONVILLE Government Program now offers 100% financing for the homes in small towns and rural areas of Minnesota Moderate income families living in rural areas the home of their dreams - affordably. Valid only in towns of population, outside large metro areas- or in the country on • New Homes • Existing The home you choose can be of any size or design - income, credit worthiness and the appraised value of the home. 100% financing now available • You must have adequate and dependable income . You must have reasonably good credit. , After purchase, you must occupy the dwelling. FREE 12 page report- "Secrets of Smart If you're interested in owning your own home call now - fun#S, Fast, easy and free pre.qualification over the phone. Jamie Lt Call Today Midstate Mortgage Ortonville www.midstatemortgage.net School rates above average in skills test The Ortonville School District has recently received its results from the state basic skills tests. In the state writing test, Ortonville had 92.7% passing compared to 90.79% for the state of Minnesota. In the basic skills test in reading, Ortonville students passed at a rate of 77.97. This compares to 81.01% for the state. In mathematics, Ortonville students passed at a rate of 76.67%, compared to 71.73% for the state of Minnesota. Individual results will be mailed out to parents in the along with sign ups whether to offer those who did not prepare for another • Bridal Shower *In Home Parties • Hostess Gift • Fundraisers • Career Opportunity • Lifetime Guarantee • Monthly Specials Call 800-939-5105 or 328-839-3454 Ask for Lany era ftsgifLandmore@yahoo.cOm We'll help keep boat afloat. ;. boating is enjoyed on the .., e boat isn't even in the water - it's in storage. Contact us today about boat insurance from Auto-Owners. Ids designed to protect your boat in the water and out, and everywhere in between- all year long! ,A'uto-00 Life Home Car Business Tom Kindt 113 NW First Street • Ortonville, MN • Phone Located fn the CenBank building SENIOR CENTER MAY 2003 HOURS: 8:30-4:30 I I Are you or someone you know a victim of Domestic Violence? The abuse can be SUNDAY MONDAY MONDAY, MAY 12: Music and Ice Cream--a GREAT_combinatlonl Come up-- at 1:30 to enjoy Evern Danlelson and his magical keyboard, and TUESDAy WEbNESDAY__THURS_bA00 ........ FRIDAY ARE YOU A CLOSET POOL SHARK?? [ Z . 30IN THE OTHER "SHARKS" THAT ):15 Morning CotTee 9:15 Morning Collie - k.IKETOg-I-₯POOt.-EVERY 10am Exerdse 0am Exercise MORNII, STARTIN6 AT I2N DINNER 2N DINNER ABOUT 9AMI COME UP FOR 6OOb Ipm Pinochle 2:50pro Bridge PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL, SEXUAL. If you need help or just want to talk, call THE WOMEN'S ADVOCACY RESOURCE CENTER 320-839-2331 or 800-974-3359 All services are free and stay for Ice cream and your choice of toppings. 9ran Quilt Group Morning Coffee IOmn Exercise 12N DINNER 12:30-1pm BP Check lpm Cards FUN AND FRIENDLY COMPETnONI HAM SOUP/SANDWICH I ] 9:15 00orni,,gco00r= 00:005-M;mi.g-Co00eG-'C ................ -3 -9 ;i s--Mo00nq;;gCo00-G 'li0 10ran Exercise ll0am Exercise 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise I 12N DINNEI ,II2N I)INNH; 10am Exercise 12N DINNER I! 12N Kiwanis Dimer/Mtg.i2N Kiwanis Board Mtg. 12N DINNER 12:50 Bridge ! 1:15 ProgressiveWhisl :15 MOVIE: "Maid in lpm Pinochle ! q30 Alanotd 8pm AA Mmhattan" MOTHER'S DAY [ . . confidential, l I QUALITY CLOCK REPAIR Antique * Mantle 400 Day • Anniversary Striking • Chiming CRAIG RANDLEMAN ORIONVILLE, kin 320-839-2357 5. ’l00kmkor- 11 HAPPY 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise L2N DINNER h30PM MOTHER S I)AY MUSIC & ICE CREAM S(KTIAI, BAKED FISH 9am Quilt (;roup 1:15 Morning Coffee II)aln Exercise Ipm Cards GLAZED HAM Z6 MEMORIAL DAY HOLIDAY. HER'S DAYI CUBE STEAK BAKED TURKEY 91ma Quill 13 9:1 Momil|gCoff©e -I 1 B’ltone Rep,@ SC 10am Exercise 12N DINNER 12N Kiwanis l)itmer/Meeti, 1:30 BINGO 6:30 AlanotV 8pro AA SALMON LOAF 14 ):15 Morning Coffe loam Exercise 12N DINNt'R I:I 5 t'ards--'500' BAKED CHICKEN 15 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise 12N DINNER lpm Cards-Pinochle CREAMED CHICKEN SALAD LUNCHEON ii 7 16 9:15 Morning Coffee 10am Exercise L2N I)INNER 1250 Bridge PORK ROAST ', MEATLOAF  Wl BP BISCUIT [ ................ II)am Exercise Iltlam F, xercise " 9:15 MomingCofle 12N I)INNI".I !I2N DINNER II0am Exercise 12N KiwanisDinner/Mtg 1:15 Cards'500" [12N DINNER 1:15 Progressive Whist 1:30 Senior Club Meetingllpm Cards--Pinochle 6:30 Alanon/ 8pro AA CHICKEN BREAST BAKED PIZZA HOTDISH W/DIJON SAUCE PORK CHOP 27 9:15 Morning Coffee Z8 29 10am Exercise 9:15 Morning Coffee ): 15 Morning Coffee 12N DINNER 10am Exercise 10am Exercise BBQ RIBS 3 .... 9:15 Morning Cot1'e 10am Exercise 12N DINNER L2:50 Bridge ROAST BEEF 3O 9:15 Morning Cofl:e 10am Exercise Watchmaker Call After 6 p.m. for Estimates Senior Center closed, and the Transit Bus does not run today. 12N Kiwanis 1)inner/MIg 12N DINNER 1:30 BINGO 1:15 Cards--'500' 5:30 Alanon/8pro AA I BBQ BAKED FISH MEATBALLS 12N DINNER lpm Cards---Pinochle COUNTRY STYLE RIBS 12N DINNER 12:50 Bridge BAKED TURKEY 24 31 ................. 00iNDEPENDENT Tuesday, •[ )i