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April 29, 2003     The Ortonville Independent
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April 29, 2003
 

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Editorial comment Local serviceman stationed in Texas, awaiting deployment David Reid, Jr., a 2002 OHS grad- uate, is currently stationed in Ft, Hood, TX as a mechanic in the 1st Calvary Division. According to David's mother, Paula Ditty, David entered the Army immediately after graduating from high school. He trained in Ft. Knox, KY, and is now a Private 2nd class in the Army. The division David belongs to was supposed to travel to Kuwait recently, however as the fighting has slowed, they are still waiting in Ft. Hood on standby. Ditty claims David has been excit- ed, anxious and scared while he is fac- ing the possibility of heading to Kuwait. "He loves to fight for his country and family," says Ditty, "but he is also sad for the families that have lost loved ones as a result of the war." David's sister, Carrie Reid was also enrolled in the Army for a short time. She was released because of hearing loss. Ditty claims Carrie is worried about her brother, but also understands the importance of sup- porting American troops fighting overseas. "I am worried about my son and all of the troops," says Ditty, "I just hope the war comes to a close quickly and favorably." Ditty has been to the Twin Cities metro area to view the Minnesota Wall Troop display, and has also seen many of the troop sup- port displays in Ortonville. She and David's family appreciate the show of support. David is the son of Paula and Bruce Ditty of Ortonville, and a brother to Carrie Reid. Ditty says David would love to n.li i 14 15 i 17 18 PROPANE MAKES YOU FEEL MORE AT HOME WITH YOUR HOME. • Comfortable • Water heaters • Reliable • Furnaces • Efficient • Fireplaces • Clean • Barbecue • Gas walkway lamps • Versatile • Affordable • Dryers • Cooktops 3 24 27 t2 33 34 37 Z8 15 _-IIIII 3 ) I1 ,, s, . " -- I "--7--- -- --- s7  ----- / i 33 64 Clues ACROSS 63. Line formed by 30. A passing grade on 1. Launched Apollo joining two pieces an exam 5. Engulf 64. The top one of two 31. June 6, 1944 10. Weeps 65. Between white and 32. Mineral 14. Highest point of black 33. Algonquian something Clue= DOWN 34. Strikes 15. Cowboy's contest 1. Influential person 35. One of the six noble 16. Humble request for 2. Keep up gases help 3. Enclosed automobile 38. Increase 17. Offered 4. A way to hack 39. Holly 18. University covered 5. Author 41. Opaque gem halls 6. Fly or be suspended 42. Propagative part of 19. Alphabetic characters above a plant 20. S. American wood 7. Copyread 44. A way to ski sorrel 8. Shelter 45. Killer 21. Remain as is 9. _ Squad 47. Immobilized 22. Bargains 10. Maker of bathing 48. Mammary gland of 23. Member of Parliament suits cows 25. Was indebted to 11. Earthen pot 49. Cylindrical larva 27. Paddle 12. Push button 50. Dark olive black 51. Heap 28. Frozen solid 13. Cheek 32. African nation 52. Double-reed 21. Herring-like food fish instrument 35. A highly skilled person 22. Something that is 53. Formal close (musicl 36. Type of spur owed 54. Shows position of a 37. Plant part 24, Char reflecting surface 38. Big 25. A very large body of 57. A Dalton (Physics) 39. Hip bones water 58. Covers the thighs 40. Lease 26. Cried when seated 41. Keyboard instrument 28. Excellent and 59. Heat unit 42. Mischievously delightful  ' " "  '   ' 1" , v   ,%- 43. A covered cistern 29. Ill-favored ,  I.  [z , !, , o co i 45. Run across o , o 1. , ,o  , i.  o , i " 47.46" Acreasefield of cultivated, mowed grass Ill ° 51. Grown or originating in a particular ,l l i  "---  place -- ' '- I T ,,- 54. Small nail ;, ,,, , ,i,  , ,i, 55. Youngwoman ;O , /. ,I, o =: vol 56. Ancient Greek coin  7- .... , ,---- T - 59. Root of taro plant --  e , T -..  60. Commotion I,, o i  o  i,, x i  , 61. Type of corn i, oi, ,l l, ,i,, ,i, "["_i 62. The removal of constraints hear from friends back home, and his address is: David Reid, Jr. HHB 2-82 FA leD Ft. Hood, TX 76544 Understanding OCD Submitted by Local Advisory Council on Mental Health. Based on Allina Hospitals and Clinics, Behavioral Health Facts, "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)" and Uncovering Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder: Learning to Recognize the Signs and Symptoms of OCD. Steven A. Rasmussen, MD. Traits like orderliness and cleanliness are valued. In most people they don't become excessive. If they become excessive and interfere with daily life and cause distress the person has obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD). Men and women both may have OCD. 1.5% of the population in America has it. An example is a woman who feels germs are in her house (obsession) and unless she cleans the floor people in the house will become sick. Even though the floor is already clean she spends many hours cleaning the floor. (compulsion). The woman may realize the floor is clean but feel unable to stop. One must not be ashamed of OCD; it is a illness like diabetes and can be treated. OCD is made up of obsessions which are unpleasant thoughts that recur over and over. Compulsions are repeated behaviors. Some symptoms of obsessions are fear of illness, fear of losing important people, doubt whether one has done something like lock doors and windows, and fear of germs. Some common compulsions are cleaning, washing, checking, and ordering of objects strictly. The obsessions and compulsions take more than an hour a day. Treatment for OCD is behavior therapy, medicine, and support groups. If you want further information or ":clinical referrals call Family Social Services at 839-2555. Fuhrman DWI charges reduced Kayla Mae Fuhrman, of Graceville pleaded guilty in Big Stone County Court to three counts of driving while intoxicated. According to court documents, the first two counts of DWI were dis- missed, which dropped the charges from felony to gross misdemeanor. She pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 120 days in jail, 90 days stayed, six of which must be served in two-day increments. She was court ordered to ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Ken Kolb Nancy Sparrow Awilda Taylor Don Frederick Bud Brandt Sandy Moser Cheryl Kaiser Dave Taylor Mrs. Marvin Mueller Delores Karels Diane Carlson S. Bogenrief Kent Stotesbery Angie Stotesbery Donald Johnson Mrs. Lowell Hay Edna M. Paffrath JoAnne Meyer Peggy Freiberg Avonne Anderson Barbara Sorlien Evelyn Pendergast Elsa Canterbury Richard Fish Shirley Reiffenberger Charlotte Brandt Merle Kilvington Jeff Nornes Marvin Bergseth Pete Holme Chester Carl Jr. Dorothy Brown Bonnie Layton Allen Pearson Jerry Everson David Weber Jan Heidtke Thelma Oswood Megan Bowling Leslie Jane McCailum Clarence Stolpman Mrs. Mavis Henderson Wayde Fraasch Robert Winger Matt Drobny -- 1 L Letters to E//ssa ] @   =,. George P. Werner D.D. I (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an l Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, I living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. Ihno lanssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the I memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the I island of Sumatra. Rev. Werner,passed away late in the year 2000. I I Tales from Odessa... ed of the pulpit and piano on a slight- "YELLOWBANK" ly raised platform. I In the earlier days of the Each Sunday morning we cranked | Evangelical Association which my up the old Model T and dad chugged " father joined in 1898 as an ordained along the ravel roads, crossing the lit- ] minister, most "servants of the Lord" tie narrow iron bridge over the served "multiple point charges" Minnesota River (only six miles from I meaning they had several churches in its source at the south end of Big which they preached. In the course of Stone Lake) to his out out appoint- ] dad's ministry he had three such ment at Yellowbank. (That term is | charges during my lifetime: Blue like the designation Off Off [ Earth and East Blue Earth, Odessa Broadway plays.)Of course dad also I and Yellowbank, and Worthington preached the morning service in the and a small church east of town Odessa church. where he preached in the evening. I did not go with my father to the Dad's "out appointment" which morning service but each Sunday stands out in my mind wit the most night I went along with him to the ! clarity was the Yellowbank church evening service at Yellowbank. which stood on a lonely hill with a There was not even the vestige of a .I forlorn cemetery flanking its western town there but I suspect the church I side. This little country church had took its name from the nearby I no electricity so gas lamps were low- Yellowbank River and the ] ered from the ceiling before the Yellowbank Campground which was evening service began and someone the focal point of the community's I lit the mantle and returned the lamps religious life for several weeks in the ] to their high position above the con- summer. gregation. Frequently these lamps Yellowbank was within a mile of I i required pumping air into the cham- the South Dakota border and at this bets to create a sustained pressure, distant point in Minnesota one As this mellow light filtered down already could anticipate the wide on the earnest faces of the farmers open spaces of the vast high plains of • and their wives, I could not help hut North and South Dakota, After the think of the hymn we often sang in Santee Sioux "Uprising" of 1772 the ] that church, "Let the lower lights be Indians, as they then were known, I burning; send a gleam across the were subdued and after hanging 33 of - wave." The light of God's love the instigators, the rest were herded enlightened their drab and colorless off to South Dakota. Here at lives with a glow they otherwise Wounded Knee near the Badlands would have missed in this life. and the Black Hills they were defeat- The church was a simple building ed in one of the last battles to keep of white clapboard exterior with a the "redskins" on their reservations. brave little steeple that lifted its cross "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" skyward. Inside there was a center recounted this tragic episode in aisle with unforgivingly hard pews American history from the Native on either side. The "chancel" consist- American point of view. roll (continued next week) r ! II serve 24 days on electronic monitor- ing. Fuhrman also received a $3000 fine, $2500 was stayed, and will have three years of supervised probation. i Your Minneso I Propane Dealers E 877-252-os71 EXCEP'nONAL ENERGY" www.MNne.com ORTONVILLE, MN 00ii!!iiiiiiiiii!!!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii0000iikii:iiiii!i !ii! iii ! ii00iiiiiiii 8AM-5:3OPM; Sat. 8AM-5PM PHONE (320) 839-2653 Pioneer's Own - Per Lb, [ LOCALLY GROWN BEEF - Per Lb. SUMMER • ] QUARTERS SAUSAGE ............... $2.79 OR SIDES ............... S 1.49 LOCALLY GROWN PORK - Per Lb  LOCALLY GROWN PORK - Par HALF A HOG ................. 79’ DELl TURKEY ......... 82.9! YOUR GRADUATION HEADQUARTERS! Plan now and order your roast beef, pork or ham, fruit salad & assorted salads. BUFFALO AVAILABLE - WE ACCEPT EBT CARDS The Inde (U.S.P.S. @.ee@ JAMES D. PuN e SUZETrE Editor and Office KATHIE Computer and BETH BILL Camera Collate/ Tues., April 29, 2003 Continuing Published $30.00 per year m Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South Dakota. counties in Minnesota All others, $38.00 per Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, NEW RATE ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac qul Swift Counties in Grant and Roberts Februa ........... 30.00 March ................ 27.50 Apdl .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 Apdl .................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19,88 ALL AREA February ........... 38,00 March ................ 34.87 Apdl .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................... 22.19 ges or The omissions in the advertisement issue or the refund the advertisement. Church notes Display Correspondence Pictures 5 News - Classified ads - (Any ad brought to classify.) OFFICE A Wednesday: A Thursday: 8 A Friday: 8 AM-5 A Holidays Letters to the =unity issues are writers should be Independent and/or condense iper also reserves letters that are it might be held Letters should printed or address and Addresses and not be published. Letter writers are selves to one letter keep letter brief, words, and to the AD vs. The Ortonville determining what is. is news is based on If an individual zation char for an item or sidered advertising. you charge, Advertising is paper. Without cease to exist. receives for paper sales is paper used in no longer does increases. It still and a small crops and to the and plows and dealer. Without particular business ness. We reserve the advertising without our decision. News: Our goal fully and staff's opinions w opinion A rage, whether om other late and readers. of other staff expressed in tions may be own views. eral interest. 839-3761 to sified Ortonville mail{ Page 4  INDEPENDENT Editorial comment Local serviceman stationed in Texas, awaiting deployment David Reid, Jr., a 2002 OHS grad- uate, is currently stationed in Ft, Hood, TX as a mechanic in the 1st Calvary Division. According to David's mother, Paula Ditty, David entered the Army immediately after graduating from high school. He trained in Ft. Knox, KY, and is now a Private 2nd class in the Army. The division David belongs to was supposed to travel to Kuwait recently, however as the fighting has slowed, they are still waiting in Ft. Hood on standby. Ditty claims David has been excit- ed, anxious and scared while he is fac- ing the possibility of heading to Kuwait. "He loves to fight for his country and family," says Ditty, "but he is also sad for the families that have lost loved ones as a result of the war." David's sister, Carrie Reid was also enrolled in the Army for a short time. She was released because of hearing loss. Ditty claims Carrie is worried about her brother, but also understands the importance of sup- porting American troops fighting overseas. "I am worried about my son and all of the troops," says Ditty, "I just hope the war comes to a close quickly and favorably." Ditty has been to the Twin Cities metro area to view the Minnesota Wall Troop display, and has also seen many of the troop sup- port displays in Ortonville. She and David's family appreciate the show of support. David is the son of Paula and Bruce Ditty of Ortonville, and a brother to Carrie Reid. Ditty says David would love to n.li i 14 15 i 17 18 PROPANE MAKES YOU FEEL MORE AT HOME WITH YOUR HOME. • Comfortable • Water heaters • Reliable • Furnaces • Efficient • Fireplaces • Clean • Barbecue • Gas walkway lamps • Versatile • Affordable • Dryers • Cooktops 3 24 27 t2 33 34 37 Z8 15 _-IIIII 3 ) I1 ,, s, . " -- I "--7--- -- --- s7  ----- / i 33 64 Clues ACROSS 63. Line formed by 30. A passing grade on 1. Launched Apollo joining two pieces an exam 5. Engulf 64. The top one of two 31. June 6, 1944 10. Weeps 65. Between white and 32. Mineral 14. Highest point of black 33. Algonquian something Clue= DOWN 34. Strikes 15. Cowboy's contest 1. Influential person 35. One of the six noble 16. Humble request for 2. Keep up gases help 3. Enclosed automobile 38. Increase 17. Offered 4. A way to hack 39. Holly 18. University covered 5. Author 41. Opaque gem halls 6. Fly or be suspended 42. Propagative part of 19. Alphabetic characters above a plant 20. S. American wood 7. Copyread 44. A way to ski sorrel 8. Shelter 45. Killer 21. Remain as is 9. _ Squad 47. Immobilized 22. Bargains 10. Maker of bathing 48. Mammary gland of 23. Member of Parliament suits cows 25. Was indebted to 11. Earthen pot 49. Cylindrical larva 27. Paddle 12. Push button 50. Dark olive black 51. Heap 28. Frozen solid 13. Cheek 32. African nation 52. Double-reed 21. Herring-like food fish instrument 35. A highly skilled person 22. Something that is 53. Formal close (musicl 36. Type of spur owed 54. Shows position of a 37. Plant part 24, Char reflecting surface 38. Big 25. A very large body of 57. A Dalton (Physics) 39. Hip bones water 58. Covers the thighs 40. Lease 26. Cried when seated 41. Keyboard instrument 28. Excellent and 59. Heat unit 42. Mischievously delightful  ' " "  '   ' 1" , v   ,%- 43. A covered cistern 29. Ill-favored ,  I.  [z , !, , o co i 45. Run across o , o 1. , ,o  , i.  o , i " 47.46" Acreasefield of cultivated, mowed grass Ill ° 51. Grown or originating in a particular ,l l i  "---  place -- ' '- I T ,,- 54. Small nail ;, ,,, , ,i,  , ,i, 55. Youngwoman ;O , /. ,I, o =: vol 56. Ancient Greek coin  7- .... , ,---- T - 59. Root of taro plant --  e , T -..  60. Commotion I,, o i  o  i,, x i  , 61. Type of corn i, oi, ,l l, ,i,, ,i, "["_i 62. The removal of constraints hear from friends back home, and his address is: David Reid, Jr. HHB 2-82 FA leD Ft. Hood, TX 76544 Understanding OCD Submitted by Local Advisory Council on Mental Health. Based on Allina Hospitals and Clinics, Behavioral Health Facts, "Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)" and Uncovering Obsessive- Compulsive Disorder: Learning to Recognize the Signs and Symptoms of OCD. Steven A. Rasmussen, MD. Traits like orderliness and cleanliness are valued. In most people they don't become excessive. If they become excessive and interfere with daily life and cause distress the person has obsessive- compulsive disorder (OCD). Men and women both may have OCD. 1.5% of the population in America has it. An example is a woman who feels germs are in her house (obsession) and unless she cleans the floor people in the house will become sick. Even though the floor is already clean she spends many hours cleaning the floor. (compulsion). The woman may realize the floor is clean but feel unable to stop. One must not be ashamed of OCD; it is a illness like diabetes and can be treated. OCD is made up of obsessions which are unpleasant thoughts that recur over and over. Compulsions are repeated behaviors. Some symptoms of obsessions are fear of illness, fear of losing important people, doubt whether one has done something like lock doors and windows, and fear of germs. Some common compulsions are cleaning, washing, checking, and ordering of objects strictly. The obsessions and compulsions take more than an hour a day. Treatment for OCD is behavior therapy, medicine, and support groups. If you want further information or ":clinical referrals call Family Social Services at 839-2555. Fuhrman DWI charges reduced Kayla Mae Fuhrman, of Graceville pleaded guilty in Big Stone County Court to three counts of driving while intoxicated. According to court documents, the first two counts of DWI were dis- missed, which dropped the charges from felony to gross misdemeanor. She pleaded guilty, and was sentenced to 120 days in jail, 90 days stayed, six of which must be served in two-day increments. She was court ordered to ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Ken Kolb Nancy Sparrow Awilda Taylor Don Frederick Bud Brandt Sandy Moser Cheryl Kaiser Dave Taylor Mrs. Marvin Mueller Delores Karels Diane Carlson S. Bogenrief Kent Stotesbery Angie Stotesbery Donald Johnson Mrs. Lowell Hay Edna M. Paffrath JoAnne Meyer Peggy Freiberg Avonne Anderson Barbara Sorlien Evelyn Pendergast Elsa Canterbury Richard Fish Shirley Reiffenberger Charlotte Brandt Merle Kilvington Jeff Nornes Marvin Bergseth Pete Holme Chester Carl Jr. Dorothy Brown Bonnie Layton Allen Pearson Jerry Everson David Weber Jan Heidtke Thelma Oswood Megan Bowling Leslie Jane McCailum Clarence Stolpman Mrs. Mavis Henderson Wayde Fraasch Robert Winger Matt Drobny -- 1 L Letters to E//ssa ] @   =,. George P. Werner D.D. I (Edi. note: Following is one of a series of articles by the late son of an l Evangelical minister who moved his family to Odessa from Minneapolis, I living there from 1931 to 1934. Your're reading his memories of life in a small Minnesota town as written to his granddaughter Elissa Kiskaddon. The author was born in 1917 in Sleepy Eye and lived in Blue Earth and Minneapolis before moving to Odessa. One of his classmates in Odessa was Rev. Dr. Ihno lanssen, now retired in Walnut Creek, Cal. Some of the I memories are from when the author was a volunteer in mission on the I island of Sumatra. Rev. Werner,passed away late in the year 2000. I I Tales from Odessa... ed of the pulpit and piano on a slight- "YELLOWBANK" ly raised platform. I In the earlier days of the Each Sunday morning we cranked | Evangelical Association which my up the old Model T and dad chugged " father joined in 1898 as an ordained along the ravel roads, crossing the lit- ] minister, most "servants of the Lord" tie narrow iron bridge over the served "multiple point charges" Minnesota River (only six miles from I meaning they had several churches in its source at the south end of Big which they preached. In the course of Stone Lake) to his out out appoint- ] dad's ministry he had three such ment at Yellowbank. (That term is | charges during my lifetime: Blue like the designation Off Off [ Earth and East Blue Earth, Odessa Broadway plays.)Of course dad also I and Yellowbank, and Worthington preached the morning service in the and a small church east of town Odessa church. where he preached in the evening. I did not go with my father to the Dad's "out appointment" which morning service but each Sunday stands out in my mind wit the most night I went along with him to the ! clarity was the Yellowbank church evening service at Yellowbank. which stood on a lonely hill with a There was not even the vestige of a .I forlorn cemetery flanking its western town there but I suspect the church I side. This little country church had took its name from the nearby I no electricity so gas lamps were low- Yellowbank River and the ] ered from the ceiling before the Yellowbank Campground which was evening service began and someone the focal point of the community's I lit the mantle and returned the lamps religious life for several weeks in the ] to their high position above the con- summer. gregation. Frequently these lamps Yellowbank was within a mile of I i required pumping air into the cham- the South Dakota border and at this bets to create a sustained pressure, distant point in Minnesota one As this mellow light filtered down already could anticipate the wide on the earnest faces of the farmers open spaces of the vast high plains of • and their wives, I could not help hut North and South Dakota, After the think of the hymn we often sang in Santee Sioux "Uprising" of 1772 the ] that church, "Let the lower lights be Indians, as they then were known, I burning; send a gleam across the were subdued and after hanging 33 of - wave." The light of God's love the instigators, the rest were herded enlightened their drab and colorless off to South Dakota. Here at lives with a glow they otherwise Wounded Knee near the Badlands would have missed in this life. and the Black Hills they were defeat- The church was a simple building ed in one of the last battles to keep of white clapboard exterior with a the "redskins" on their reservations. brave little steeple that lifted its cross "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" skyward. Inside there was a center recounted this tragic episode in aisle with unforgivingly hard pews American history from the Native on either side. The "chancel" consist- American point of view. roll (continued next week) r ! II serve 24 days on electronic monitor- ing. Fuhrman also received a $3000 fine, $2500 was stayed, and will have three years of supervised probation. i Your Minneso I Propane Dealers E 877-252-os71 EXCEP'nONAL ENERGY" www.MNne.com ORTONVILLE, MN 00ii!!iiiiiiiiii!!!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii0000iikii:iiiii!i !ii! iii ! ii00iiiiiiii 8AM-5:3OPM; Sat. 8AM-5PM PHONE (320) 839-2653 Pioneer's Own - Per Lb, [ LOCALLY GROWN BEEF - Per Lb. SUMMER • ] QUARTERS SAUSAGE ............... $2.79 OR SIDES ............... S 1.49 LOCALLY GROWN PORK - Per Lb  LOCALLY GROWN PORK - Par HALF A HOG ................. 79’ DELl TURKEY ......... 82.9! YOUR GRADUATION HEADQUARTERS! Plan now and order your roast beef, pork or ham, fruit salad & assorted salads. BUFFALO AVAILABLE - WE ACCEPT EBT CARDS The Inde (U.S.P.S. @.ee@ JAMES D. PuN e SUZETrE Editor and Office KATHIE Computer and BETH BILL Camera Collate/ Tues., April 29, 2003 Continuing Published $30.00 per year m Parle, Traverse Minnesota, Grant in South Dakota. counties in Minnesota All others, $38.00 per Postmaster: Send The Ortonville Ortonville, NEW RATE ALL SUBSCRIPTIONS A FEBRUARY Big Stone, Lac qul Swift Counties in Grant and Roberts Februa ........... 30.00 March ................ 27.50 Apdl .................. 25.00 May ................... 22.50 June .................. 20.00 July ................... 17.50 ALL OTHERS February ........... 34.00 March ................ 31.24 Apdl .................. 28.40 May ................... 25.56 June .................. 22.72 July ................... 19,88 ALL AREA February ........... 38,00 March ................ 34.87 Apdl .................. 31.70 May ................... 28.53 June .................. 25.36 July ................... 22.19 ges or The omissions in the advertisement issue or the refund the advertisement. Church notes Display Correspondence Pictures 5 News - Classified ads - (Any ad brought to classify.) OFFICE A Wednesday: A Thursday: 8 A Friday: 8 AM-5 A Holidays Letters to the =unity issues are writers should be Independent and/or condense iper also reserves letters that are it might be held Letters should printed or address and Addresses and not be published. Letter writers are selves to one letter keep letter brief, words, and to the AD vs. The Ortonville determining what is. is news is based on If an individual zation char for an item or sidered advertising. you charge, Advertising is paper. Without cease to exist. receives for paper sales is paper used in no longer does increases. It still and a small crops and to the and plows and dealer. Without particular business ness. We reserve the advertising without our decision. News: Our goal fully and staff's opinions w opinion A rage, whether om other late and readers. of other staff expressed in tions may be own views. eral interest. 839-3761 to sified Ortonville mail{ Page 4  INDEPENDENT