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nd of the First Sun' The following by former resi- daughter of " Potter and , now of Sun City The article a recent issue of Post. Lori is a a law firm in article was sub- McCallum of PRADESH, In times past, map stared back at traveler and called Those days are ,? still stirs the modem-day reality is to be the first through or the first to comb the the chance to join to trek last spring, I to organized ng "land is one of the last It is sur- and Burma, separating it from and the vast delta between it 'Arunachai is both its richness.SCenerYit isanda land its and technologi- the 20th century foothills, men to keep the Women wear .stretches theirJewelrYears, s° Ight hats are hand- as is almost every baskets to carry to fish traps left in 31ding extend- the government of open Arunachal and cultural n a selective, per- pioneered for almost route laid out by hero of Peter "The Snow trek, we were the to set foot in these of other states in Arunachal with- which my me is virtually obtain. uisites for this to live in denial of to get home in a are of Arunachal's traveled 30 at the out- hard days from and boat. trekking, heavy tree, blocking tJep tOwasgetto ° bigin to the road crew ex[ to be pieces. organized just only and made from Boston; OWner from the me. Toni's Tibetan and his members of the their cultural and Lons with Tibet theme for our served to and sub- net and culturally Own dialect and clan-based and tribes and took cap- as recently as 50 COmmunication g into the ances- a tribe religion. To gods, the Adi and erect structures art. Our the meaning were intended feud; others SUn and moon, homes of farenW;s walked'or rela- guides who , and others were of our eiderry up ed tea from a s left bum- two large the women family, adult men. The talk about the "love mar- arranged mar- offered us the or mil- the Eastern encounters, AUTHOR LORI POTTER is shown here in the Himalayan foothills. TONI, A MEMBER of the trek group, crosses the Himalayas river on a rickety, cable suspension bridge typical of the region. the people were at least as curious about us as we were about them. Many of the conversations revolved around our respective philosophies about walking. For them, a 10-hour round-trip walk was a necessity to visit a major marketplace or to get emergency medical help. Few could believe that we had freely chosen to spend our vacations walking through their world, and questioned us closely about that. And why didn't we drink more beer, they always asked? When the people heard that we had a special interest in items of Tibetan origin, they eagerly brought out their ceremonial and decorative objects. These are passed through the genera- tions at marriage and at death. Tibetan dowry objects, such as swords, bronze bowls and trays, are usually the most valuable items a household owns. Because of their value the heads of households hide these objects from outsiders, their off-spring and even from each other. i 100 mil The Denver Post / Thomas McKay We attended a Buddist wedding when we passed into the territory of the Memba tribe near the Tibet border. More accurately, we went to a half- day's worth of a multi-day affair. The bride was heavily veiled and swad- dled in garlands, with only a hint of her eyes showing. Much cash, in very small denominations, was passed to a table at the front of a room where the wedding party and a Buddist priest sat and drank. The assembled family and friends also drank steadily, talked and laughed through the ceremony. The event meandered from danc- ing to offerings to bestowing garlands to chanting. Our glasses were never allowed to empty, replenished from a bottomless pitcher of millet beer. One of the most curious parts of the cere- mony was a dance and chant with a straw doll topped with a felt fedora, meant to symbolize a baby boy. This improved the young couple's chances of having male offspring and was taken very seriously. Our destination each day was usu- ally an "Inspection Bungalow." The British set up a system of these crude shelters spaced about 8 miles apart to allow territorial administrators a place to stop as they worked their way from village to village. The Brits thought that 8 miles was a reasonable distance to walk in a Himalayan day. So did we. When we felt pleased at our espe- cially brisk progress on one such day, our pride was punctured by meeting a family with young children walking four times as far in less time, and while carrying heavy loads of goods to trade. The jungle and mountains prevent- ed the British from ever establishing a presence in Arunachal, however. In the lowland rain forests, leeches and tropical diseases deterred the Brits; at higher elevations, the bitter cold and impenetrable terrain discouraged them. They soon hired local Indians to perform administrative functions. To this day, the village elder called the "head man" is known by his govern- ment-supplied red cardigan, a tradi- tion dating to British days. The head man resolves most local disputes and presides as a sort of mayor-judge. Aside from the four of us trekkers, the size of our party would have impressed the Raj. We had three native guides who spoke the local dialects of the areas we walked through and knew the paths we walked. We also had an expedition cook who bused in from Nepal a II I PRIESTS OF THE DONYI POLO religion sit together at a rally in Manigong, Arunachal Pradesh. The priests wear medallions, signifying their status and wear watertight, hand-woven bamboo cane hats. Wellington boots or bare feet are customary footwear in muddy spring weather. changing cast of 10-12 porters to carry the kitchen, the food our gear and the guides' gear, and someone to hire and organize the porters. The logistics of so exploratory a trip called for painstaking planning. We had no laptop to download our digital photos, so we had to carry all the memory we would need. We had no electricity to recharge the camera battery, or any others, so we had to use them with extreme care. There were to be a couple of opportunities to use a phone over the three weeks. That assumed the phone station was open, the generator was working, the wait for the phone was not too long, and the international line was not busy. If those challenges could be met, one still had to overcome the 12- hour time difference and find some- one at home to pick up the phone. Traversing the lower Himalayas, our itinerary was akin to going lateral- ly across the fjords of Norway. We walked the trading paths used by the tribals then and now, going across the sheer, glacially carved drainages that carried a winter's worth of Himalayan snowmelt. These valleys were steeper than anything I'd ever hiked. (The trek brochure described the terrain as "deep ravines and sudden plateaus, flanked by 6,000-7,000-meter peaks.") The setting jolted the joints, and the senses, in every way, whether gazing at the green and gray granite cut by impossible blue water, or dip- ping bare skin into a stream so cold it burned, or tiptoeing across suspension bridges that gave new meaning to the word suspense. Despite its "land that time for got" quality, Arunachal Pradesh neverthe- less teeters on the brink of modernity. China and India are in the process of building road from their respective sides of the mountains to meet at their common border. Satellite dishes and DVD players in the most remote and unlikely places are the way local entrepreneurs are introducing the MTV generation to some of the world's most primitive populations. The same men who were capable of weaving 25 bush rat traps from bam- boo cane in half an hour and setting them to catch their dinner could iden- tify the image of J Lo on the screen. This encroaching change made for jarring contrasts, like the poster of a scantily clad woman on the wall of a traditional bamboo house, mounted next to the horns of a wild ox or the traditional Buddhist priest surrounded by his sacraments and wearing a saf- fron cap --with a Nike logo. On the one hand, it seemed on most days as if we had gone to the end of the earth and the beginning of time. On the other hand, we were never far from where we began. Lori Potter is a partner in the law- firm of Kelly Haglund Gamsey & Kahn in Denver). CLASSIRED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS / ....... ::" 7 TOR ASH & REEDSTROM ATTORNEYS. R. D. Schreiner "of Counsel," at left, has relocated his practice to the new location. Mark Reedstrom, center, and Craig Ash, at right, maintain offices in Milbank, SD as well as Ortonville. The law office is open and ready for business, operating as a general' law practice, offering a wide range of legal services including the following: • REAL ESTATE • ESTATE PLANNING AND PROBATE • • FAMILY LAW • BUSINESS LAW • PERSONAL INJURY • • INSURANCE DISPUTES • Linda Hofhenke is serving as the firm's legal secretary. Ash Reedstrom 25 Second Street NW Ortonville, MN 56278 Phone _° A Professional Partnership Licensed in Minnesota and South Dakota nd of the First Sun' The following by former resi- daughter of " Potter and , now of Sun City The article a recent issue of Post. Lori is a a law firm in article was sub- McCallum of PRADESH, In times past, map stared back at traveler and called Those days are ,? still stirs the modem-day reality is to be the first through or the first to comb the the chance to join to trek last spring, I to organized ng "land is one of the last It is sur- and Burma, separating it from and the vast delta between it 'Arunachai is both its richness.SCenerYit isanda land its and technologi- the 20th century foothills, men to keep the Women wear .stretches theirJewelrYears, s° Ight hats are hand- as is almost every baskets to carry to fish traps left in 31ding extend- the government of open Arunachal and cultural n a selective, per- pioneered for almost route laid out by hero of Peter "The Snow trek, we were the to set foot in these of other states in Arunachal with- which my me is virtually obtain. uisites for this to live in denial of to get home in a are of Arunachal's traveled 30 at the out- hard days from and boat. trekking, heavy tree, blocking tJep tOwasgetto ° bigin to the road crew ex[ to be pieces. organized just only and made from Boston; OWner from the me. Toni's Tibetan and his members of the their cultural and Lons with Tibet theme for our served to and sub- net and culturally Own dialect and clan-based and tribes and took cap- as recently as 50 COmmunication g into the ances- a tribe religion. To gods, the Adi and erect structures art. Our the meaning were intended feud; others SUn and moon, homes of farenW;s walked'or rela- guides who , and others were of our eiderry up ed tea from a s left bum- two large the women family, adult men. The talk about the "love mar- arranged mar- offered us the or mil- the Eastern encounters, AUTHOR LORI POTTER is shown here in the Himalayan foothills. TONI, A MEMBER of the trek group, crosses the Himalayas river on a rickety, cable suspension bridge typical of the region. the people were at least as curious about us as we were about them. Many of the conversations revolved around our respective philosophies about walking. For them, a 10-hour round-trip walk was a necessity to visit a major marketplace or to get emergency medical help. Few could believe that we had freely chosen to spend our vacations walking through their world, and questioned us closely about that. And why didn't we drink more beer, they always asked? When the people heard that we had a special interest in items of Tibetan origin, they eagerly brought out their ceremonial and decorative objects. These are passed through the genera- tions at marriage and at death. Tibetan dowry objects, such as swords, bronze bowls and trays, are usually the most valuable items a household owns. Because of their value the heads of households hide these objects from outsiders, their off-spring and even from each other. i 100 mil The Denver Post / Thomas McKay We attended a Buddist wedding when we passed into the territory of the Memba tribe near the Tibet border. More accurately, we went to a half- day's worth of a multi-day affair. The bride was heavily veiled and swad- dled in garlands, with only a hint of her eyes showing. Much cash, in very small denominations, was passed to a table at the front of a room where the wedding party and a Buddist priest sat and drank. The assembled family and friends also drank steadily, talked and laughed through the ceremony. The event meandered from danc- ing to offerings to bestowing garlands to chanting. Our glasses were never allowed to empty, replenished from a bottomless pitcher of millet beer. One of the most curious parts of the cere- mony was a dance and chant with a straw doll topped with a felt fedora, meant to symbolize a baby boy. This improved the young couple's chances of having male offspring and was taken very seriously. Our destination each day was usu- ally an "Inspection Bungalow." The British set up a system of these crude shelters spaced about 8 miles apart to allow territorial administrators a place to stop as they worked their way from village to village. The Brits thought that 8 miles was a reasonable distance to walk in a Himalayan day. So did we. When we felt pleased at our espe- cially brisk progress on one such day, our pride was punctured by meeting a family with young children walking four times as far in less time, and while carrying heavy loads of goods to trade. The jungle and mountains prevent- ed the British from ever establishing a presence in Arunachal, however. In the lowland rain forests, leeches and tropical diseases deterred the Brits; at higher elevations, the bitter cold and impenetrable terrain discouraged them. They soon hired local Indians to perform administrative functions. To this day, the village elder called the "head man" is known by his govern- ment-supplied red cardigan, a tradi- tion dating to British days. The head man resolves most local disputes and presides as a sort of mayor-judge. Aside from the four of us trekkers, the size of our party would have impressed the Raj. We had three native guides who spoke the local dialects of the areas we walked through and knew the paths we walked. We also had an expedition cook who bused in from Nepal a II I PRIESTS OF THE DONYI POLO religion sit together at a rally in Manigong, Arunachal Pradesh. The priests wear medallions, signifying their status and wear watertight, hand-woven bamboo cane hats. Wellington boots or bare feet are customary footwear in muddy spring weather. changing cast of 10-12 porters to carry the kitchen, the food our gear and the guides' gear, and someone to hire and organize the porters. The logistics of so exploratory a trip called for painstaking planning. We had no laptop to download our digital photos, so we had to carry all the memory we would need. We had no electricity to recharge the camera battery, or any others, so we had to use them with extreme care. There were to be a couple of opportunities to use a phone over the three weeks. That assumed the phone station was open, the generator was working, the wait for the phone was not too long, and the international line was not busy. If those challenges could be met, one still had to overcome the 12- hour time difference and find some- one at home to pick up the phone. Traversing the lower Himalayas, our itinerary was akin to going lateral- ly across the fjords of Norway. We walked the trading paths used by the tribals then and now, going across the sheer, glacially carved drainages that carried a winter's worth of Himalayan snowmelt. These valleys were steeper than anything I'd ever hiked. (The trek brochure described the terrain as "deep ravines and sudden plateaus, flanked by 6,000-7,000-meter peaks.") The setting jolted the joints, and the senses, in every way, whether gazing at the green and gray granite cut by impossible blue water, or dip- ping bare skin into a stream so cold it burned, or tiptoeing across suspension bridges that gave new meaning to the word suspense. Despite its "land that time for got" quality, Arunachal Pradesh neverthe- less teeters on the brink of modernity. China and India are in the process of building road from their respective sides of the mountains to meet at their common border. Satellite dishes and DVD players in the most remote and unlikely places are the way local entrepreneurs are introducing the MTV generation to some of the world's most primitive populations. The same men who were capable of weaving 25 bush rat traps from bam- boo cane in half an hour and setting them to catch their dinner could iden- tify the image of J Lo on the screen. This encroaching change made for jarring contrasts, like the poster of a scantily clad woman on the wall of a traditional bamboo house, mounted next to the horns of a wild ox or the traditional Buddhist priest surrounded by his sacraments and wearing a saf- fron cap --with a Nike logo. On the one hand, it seemed on most days as if we had gone to the end of the earth and the beginning of time. On the other hand, we were never far from where we began. Lori Potter is a partner in the law- firm of Kelly Haglund Gamsey & Kahn in Denver). CLASSIRED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS / ....... ::" 7 TOR ASH & REEDSTROM ATTORNEYS. R. D. Schreiner "of Counsel," at left, has relocated his practice to the new location. Mark Reedstrom, center, and Craig Ash, at right, maintain offices in Milbank, SD as well as Ortonville. The law office is open and ready for business, operating as a general' law practice, offering a wide range of legal services including the following: • REAL ESTATE • ESTATE PLANNING AND PROBATE • • FAMILY LAW • BUSINESS LAW • PERSONAL INJURY • • INSURANCE DISPUTES • Linda Hofhenke is serving as the firm's legal secretary. Ash Reedstrom 25 Second Street NW Ortonville, MN 56278 Phone _° A Professional Partnership Licensed in Minnesota and South Dakota