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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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May 4, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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May 4, 1922
 

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THE ORTONI/-ILLE INI00I.00PENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1922 NUMBER 52 FLOWER SHOW PLANNED. DISTRICT LAND BANK PROPOSED BY N.W FARMERS One Million Dollar Corpora- tion Scheme to Lower In. terest Rates On Farm Mortgages__ Tenative plans were made at a 1 meeeting held at Marshall, Minnesota,1 last Saturday, at which county agents, t farners, business men and bankers, were in attendarce from a wide circle, for the organization of a Farmers' Joint Stock Land Bank, with a pro- posed capital of $1,000,000.00. The hank as planned would be composed of farmers and bankers of the Sev- enth Congressional District and ac- cording to the laws granting such an organization the bank would be per- mitted to loan up to fifteen times: the amount of its capital stock, or $15,- O00,000.00.. "Such an organization would be just the finest kind for the farmers, who would hold the capital stock them- selves and thus be saved approxi- mately half of one per cent in inter- est rates," said W. H. Gold, president of the Southern Minnesota Bankers' Joint Stock Land Bank, who was call- ed upon to express his views. "I be- lieve that you will have no difficulty in perfecting such an organization for bankers are wide awake to the seriousness of the farmer's problems and when we speak of the farmer's problem we speak of our own, for up- on his prosperity depends that of all other industry," Mr. Gold stated. With such an organization owned and operated by the farmers them- selves together with the assistance of the bankers over the seventh district, who would Subscribe to the capital stock, the one per cent commissoin charge as allowed by law would be returned to the stockholders in the form of dividends, less operating :ex- penses. R was pointed out that the first year of operating would cost consid- erable and the stockholders would do well to break even, but looking at it from;a period of years it was held that dividends up to 8 per cent on the cap- ital stock were possible by efficient management and a careful placing of mortgage loans. When asked what percentage of the :farm mortgages were endorsed from proceeds of farm products, Mr. Gold said that in the experience of their bank, he believed that it was less than I out of 5 and that but 1 out of 10 were ever fully paid from money so obtained. He warned the men who are backing the organization to be care- :ful in the amount of heir loans, stating that he had always had a ten- dency to place amounts in excess of ether companies, believing that farm loans would make the necessary re- turn, but that the last two years he was of a different opinion. That as the result Of a survey made among the farmers of Red Wood County, it was shon that there were only a "'hand furl" of farmers who were able to Fay 6 per cent interest on land alued at $150.00 per acre. ":Either the interest rate m, ust come down or the value of farm products come up or the country will go bank- ruptf' said S. B. Duea, former state  bank examiner, who called the meet- ing, adding, "that at the present rate the farmer cannot come from under the load." The plan has the hearty co-opera- tion of the Minnesota Farm Bureau. Others who addressed the meeting were Victor Anderson, of Wheaten, secretary of the Minnesota Farm Bu- reau Federation, and Senator Hall, of Marshall. Win Class Honors. Mr. Palmer announced Tuesday morning that the valedictorian of the class of 2 was Edwin Carlson and the Salutatorian, Ragna Hjelmeland. Their averages were 94 and 15-100 per cent and 92 and 83-100 per cent, respectivgly. Lylyan Block had the third highest average with 92 and 27- 100 per cent, and. Irene Warlord, fourth, with 91 and 45-100 per cent. Women's Club Offers Prizes to Spur Interest In Shrubbery Planting. To promote the interest of the growing of shrubbery and plants for the purpose of beautifying the city of Ortonville in general, the Civic Department of the Women's Club is aranging for several contests. The first contest will be a Flower Show. For this contest, citizens, children in particular, are asked to plant flowers and shrubbery in any place they can find, either on their own grounds or on big plots. A committee of judges will be appointed to inspect the flower beds in the summer, and later, in the early fall, a Flower Show of cut flowers will be held. Prizes will be awarded. Anyone wishing to enter this contest should send in their name and the place they will plant their flowers, to'Mrs. Mullica or Mrs. Sarvis. This will facilitate the work of the judges. The details of the prizes to be given will be announced later, but the children may begin to plant their seeds now-. The seeds must be furished by the contestants themselves, and can be pl)cured at the Greenhouse frovn Mr. Osen, if de- sired. In the second contest the Civic De- partment asks that the Boy Scouts and Camp Fire Girls enter a contest for the beautifying of the public Park Grounds. A prize will be given to the organization showing the best work here. Details as to the prize will be announced later. The seeds for this will be furnished by the Civic Department. These prizes must not be confused with the prizes offered by the Clean- up Committee. Catholics Will Hold Mission. A Mission will be conducted by the Redemptorist Fathers, of Denver, Colorado, at St. John's Catholic church here beginning Sunday, May 7. Mis- sion will be opened by Father Geier- mann, C. S. S. l"Mass Will be held next Sunday at 8 to 10. F_,dith Carlson, Reid Tomlin. and Emma Rose have all been obliged to drop school  because of inflamatory rheumatism. May Gloege also has been a victim of this disease but for- tately has recovered and is now back in school. Ki00ht Found Guilty Of Grand Larceny Five Women On Jury That Convicted Him. Will Be Sentenced On Saturday. S. C. Kight of this city was found guilty of grand larceny in the second degree by a jury in district court of Traverse County, at Wheaten, on Wednesday. The conviction carries with it a openalty of imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 5 years or by imprisonment in the coun- ty jail for no exceeding one year or by fine of not more than $500.00. Sen- tence will be pronounced on Saturday by Judge S. A. Faherty, before whom the case was tried. Kight, together with George Fos- ter were charged with grand larceny, following complaint by Adolph Lech- ner, living 6 miles east of Ortonville, for stealing 23 chickens on May 21, 1921, after a shooting affair, in which George Foster received from. thirty- five "to forty pellets from Lechner's shot gun. The case against ]Light was sched- uled for trial at the district court in this county last March but a change of venue was granted Kight's attorney's and the case was transferred to Tra- verse county. Kight's attorneys re- quested the change on the grounds] that defendant would not receive an impartial trial in this county. The case of State vs. Foster will come on for trial at the next regular term of court in this county next fall, it was stated today by R. G. Farrington, county attorney, who was the prose- cuting attorney in the Kight case. Kight was represented by attorneys Murphy and Anderson of Wheaten. On the jury that convicted Kight were five women with ages varying from 21 years and up. Their verdict was reached after a deliberation of five hours. Packed House Greets Singei's At Cantata By Community Chorus o "Rose Maiden" Is Well Presented. thrnout the performance. Miss Mary Shumaker, director of Singers Are Given En- thusiastic Applause. A packed house greeted the local singers last Friday evening at the Or- pheum theatre in their presentation of 'rhe Rose Maiden," a cantata given by the Ortonville Community Chorus of 150 voices. When the curtain was raised the audience burst forth in spontaneous applause at the sight of 150 singers seated upon the stage, representing a community spirit that bespoke of he combined efforts and training of various" organizations for many , months. Appreciation of the audi- ence was disptayel again ,and agai the choi'us, and soprano soloist, is de- serving of much credit for the efficient manner in which she directed the chorus and for her ability as a solo- ist. Much credit s also due Miss Francis Irgens, High School music director, in training the school Glee Club, which formed a part of the chorus, and to the individual members of the chorus, ani soloists, Helene Michell, Rev. Paul J. Boekoven, H. W. Kollitz and E. W. Miller. May frra Milbank, Appleton, Graceville and other neighboring towns who were in attendance were favorably impressed. The proceeds, amounting to approximately $240.00, will be used to defray expenses. WILL DAM RIVER TO HOLD WATER NORMAL DEPTH Ross Pledges Support to Se- cure Aid from Legislature to Turn Whetstone Into Lake. With a view of holding the water in Big Stone Lake to its present normal level agreements have been reached between the city of Ortonville and some of the objectors living and own- ing lands along the river bottoms, to construct a temporary dam at the outlet of the lake. Construction o the same will begin at an early dae. This action was held imperative to the general welfare of the citizens of Ortonville, summer residents and all persons interested in keeping the pres- tige which Big Stone Lake has won for itself in the hearts of hundreds of tourists who have been habitual ad- mirers of it. To construct the dam it is estimated that the cost will not exceed $250.00, and this amount is now being subscribed by parties most] vitally interested. ] Rather than await the action of the / state in putting into working order / its project involving the entire Minne- sota River Valley, with a proposed dyke at the foot of the lake, Repre-I sentative J. D. Ross of this city, took I it upon himself to come to an under-] standing with F. W. Doughitt, who as the owner of the Big Stone Canning Company, which represents an invest- FISHIN' GOOD IN BIG STONE. Most Everyone Lands Limit On First Day, In Spite of High Wind. Altho a srong south wind was blow- ing on Monday, the opening day of the fishing season in Big Stone Lake waers, tereby keeping fishers con- fined to the lower end of the lake, nearly everyone that went out came back with a good sized string of crap- pies, pike, and silver bass, and results were pronounced most xeeltent by ohl-time fishermen. Several pike were caught off the dock at the Eahtonka pavilion just a few feet from shore. Among the rod and reel enthusiasts from out-of-town who cast their line in Big Stone Lake were two railroad employees from the shops of the Milwaukee in Minnea- polis. They came out on No. 17 which arrives here at 3:20 a. m., and re- turned with the limit on No. 18 which leaves here about 9 o'clock a. m. "We're coming back again," was the remark one of them made just before leaving. "This is our first 'try' in this lake and believe me it is worth our early morning ride, too." Fishing this year at this season at the lower end of the lake is said to be better than it has been in many years. Usually nearly every experienced fisherman takes to the waters near the islands, about four miles up, or els ,ORTONVILLE'S FIRST DIES AT ADVANCED ment of something like a half million dollars, with lands subject to over- flow, was the principal objector. Mr. Doughitt. according to eport, has agreed to permit the construc- tion of a temporary dam at the mouth of the river providing the same is so constructed as to permit the water to again escape when the spring freshets come next year. His reason for haw ing objected to this dam is given in a brief summary of past history as it affects the flood waters of the Whet- stone River, which it is a known fact, flow or back-up into the lake, there- by relieving the bottom, lands of a large volume of water that otherwise would devastate a larger portimu of the acreage.,, Diversion of the Whetstone River waer into the lake, as planned by the state engineer, and backed by the Minnesota River Conservancy Board, would be of great help in relieving the river bottoms from excessive over- flow and the project has the hearty support of Representative Ross. Mr. Ross has pledged himself to do his utmost in securing an appropriation from the state at the next ession of the Legislature to effect the plan which is estimated will cost $25,000. The work would, of course, come un- der the supervision of the state drain- age engineer and would "eventually be- come a part of the district project as surveyed and approved by both state and federal engineers. The construction of the temporary dam at this time is a move that will mean much to restrt owners along the lake as many of the summer resi- dents had intimated their intention of leaving here unless something was done t( prevent the lake from becom- ing a veritable swamp. And this is what has resulted of late .when the! water was permitted to escape, t L. W. Shumaker arrived Tuesttay 1 from New York City, to attend the I funeral of his father, Ferdinand Shu- maker. Holman Sells Drug Store To Alsaker-Schoen-Olson I The Ortonville Drug Company, a corporation composed of Manley A1- sacker, Robert Schoen and Chester Olson, all of this city, completed a deal on Wednesday whereby the corporation became the owner of. The Rexall Drug Store, former'Iy owned by K. A. Holman. Possession took. place immediately and invoicing of the stock is now in process. Operation of the store will be un- der the direct supervision of Manley Alsacker, assisted by G. W. Miller of Big Stone Cily. Mr. Alsacker, who is a graduate of the Minnesota School of Pharmacy, of Minneapolis, was employed by the Gunderson Drug Company until his resignation last weel Mr. Miller also is a registered pharmacist, and for several years prior to his attendance at a pharma- cist school was employed at Ctute's Drug Store at Big Stone City. Neith- er Mr. Schoen nor Mr. Olson expect to devote their exclusive te to the store. K. A. Holman, former owner, made near the Peninsula. But so far it has been found that to go farther than no statement as to his future plans the "bottoms" is not necessary, for l other than that he was undecided. even here large strings of crappies have been caught, which are claimed to be frequenters only of rock bot- tom beds, while the lake bottom near the rushes where they are biting with a "snap" is nothing more or less than pure black mud. The fact that the lake is almost three feet higher than it was last year is given as the rea- son for such splendid fishing. Guard Officers Expected Here Saturday, May 6th Officers of the National Guard of Madison, Minnesota, aloe expected here on'Saturday evening, May 6, to ex- amine applicants for the local com- pany who have applied since the initial number of recruits were sworn in two weeks ago, it was stated today by R. C. Schoen, member of the company. Word has been received from Col. Luce that a conpany would be desig- nated here some time within the next few days and plans are to get as large a number as possible enlisted before the annual encampment of the Na- tional Guard which is to be held at Camp Lakeview, at Lake City, early ire July. Uniforms and supplies are now on the way for the local unit. Rothi Granted-00 New Trial By Hi t Evidence Admitted by District Judge Held As "Hearsay" By Supreme Court. .The Supreme Court of Minnesota, in an order dated April 28tb, handed down an opinion in the case of State vs. Gust Rothi, granting the defendant a new tidal, because of the trial judge having permitted "hearsay" evidence to be admitted. Trial of the case came before dis- trict court here in March, 1921, with Judge S. A. Faherty on the bench. The case was brought by the state. representec] by R. 'G. Farringtonl county attorney, and the charge was for an alleged statutory offense against the person of Regna Haugen. Defendant was found guilty and sere tenced by Judge Flaherty to two and one half years in the State Peniten tiary.: An order was made by A. B. Kaercher and Howard Babcock, de- fendant's attorneys, asking for a new trial, but the same was denied and an appeal was then made to the Supreme Court, with the result that the trial court was reversed and a new trial granted. The fact t.at Regna Haugen was not placed upon the witness stand be- cause of her mental status, the state depended wholly upon the evidence of Dr. Bergan, of Clinton, and Myrtle 'and Mrs. Haugen, sister and mother of the girl, who testified only as to what was claimed to have been told them by Regna. This testimony was held by the Supreme Court as "hear- say" and as not fair to the defendant, Rothi. As the State used all of its wit- nesses at the time of the trial in dis- trict court here further attempts to- ward prosecution are not expected to be made. M. N. Pratt Files for Auditor. M. N. Pratt, of the Farmers' Ele- vator and Fuel Company of this city, which position he has held for the past four years, filed for the office of coun- ty auditor Wednesday morning, ac- cording to the records. His filing is the second one to date, Charles H. Bolsta having filed last week for the office of county attorney. Mr. Pratt, who is a veteran of the Spanish-American War, was born in Blue Earth county, Minnesota, in 1875, and before taking up his residence in Ortonville was manager for several years of the Farmers' Elevator at Ber- lin, N. D. During the Spanish-Amer- ican War he served with the 12th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. Big Annual Encampment Arranged by Boy Scouts "Adopt a Boy Scout for ,the Camp- ing Period," is the slogan ,business men of Ortonville are using in an ef- fort to raise the necessary funds to enable the scouts to carry out' their plans for the annual camping out pro-I gram which is to be held some time early in June. That the Boy Scouts are enrolled in a worthy organization is a recog- nized faet and inasmuch as the indi- vidual members of th troop are call- ed upon tme and again to finance their own organization, it has been decided that the Boys shall be treat- ed to an encampment thisyear by the citizens. Figures submitted by the Scout Masters place the expense of caring for one scout at $3.00. Vol- unteer gifts of $3.00 may be made to any of the following, who are scout masters and members: W. E. Steg- ner, T. D. Fitzsimmons, Rev. Beck- oven, Dr. E. N. Schoen, . A. Zwie- her, R. F. Walker, Jas. A. Bailey, John Gowan, J. J. Dann, John E. Palmer, A. V. Randall. MERCHANT AGE OF 92 YEARS Ferdinand Shumaker was Storekeeper Here for 35 Years. Freighted Goods Overland from Morris. Ferdinand Shumaker, first store- keeper in Ortonviile, who for nearly three years freighted merchandise and lumber overland by oxen and team from Morris, Minnesota, a distance of close to 50 miles, a veteran of the CAvil War, and a participant in the Indian Massacre at New Ulm and oth- er uprisings along the lower Minne- sota River Valley, died at his home here on Sunday afternoon, April 30 at three o'clock, at the age of 92 years, 6 months. His health had been remarkably good until about ten days ago when he was obliged to remain in bed and his condition gradually be- came weaker, due to advanced age. Mr. Shumaker, who was born Wortemburg, Germany, on October 18, 1829, came to the United States when 19 years old, and settled at Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1856 where he was em- ployed as a miller, which trade he learned in Germany. In the same year he was married to Christina Katter- john, at Red Wing, and together they made the trip overland to Morris, Min- nesota, in the spring of 1876. There they remained until in the fall of the same year when they came o Orton- ville which at that time had been plat- ted but three years, and on which site there were but a few white settlers. Before winter was at hand Mr. Shu- maker had erected a building on the present site of the J. Arthur Matthews garage, in which he conducted a gen- eral merchandising businessthe first store of any kind in Ortonville. Bu.i- ness depended largely upon the Indian trade from the Sisseton reservation. His business grew and a few years later he erected the building which is at present standing and is the south part of the Lakeside hotel. He also erected the building in which the" Ja- cobsen Billiard Parlor is located. Mr. Shumaker suffered adverse con- ditions in 1879, when his store was consumed along with other buildings when a-prairie fire swept over eke townsite` Later as his business grew he met his needs .by constructing larger quarters and before his retire- Photographs of the Military fun-1 eral of Ralph M. Spink, held here re- centiy, at which hundreds gathered from every part of the county with representatives of Legion Posts from neighboring towns to pay tribute to his memory and the cause for which he gave his life. ment from active business he had built the three story brick building with full basement which is at present rented by the Pioneer Store Co-opera- tive Company, and which will stand as a monument to his activities toward the building up of Ortonvillle, in which he had served the people as a mer- chant for more than 35 years. Goads for his store he freighted overland from Mdrris for three years or until the railroad was built thru here. He was making trips at the rate of two each week when the railroad came. Mr. Shumaker was mayor of Orton- ville in 1884 and for several years was Commander of Frank P. Blair Post of the G. A. R., here. He enlisted in the army at Red Wing in 1862 and served as a private in Company F, 6th Min- nesota Regiment, until 1869 when he was discharged from the service. Duro ing his residence in the southern part of the state he saw much service in fighting the Indians during their up- risings. He was the father of a family of eleven children, seven of whom sur- vive bes/des his aged wife, They are Mrs. F. E. Randall, Ludden,'N. D., A. L., George C., and Edna Shumaker of this city, and L. W. and F. W. Shu- maker of New York City, and Mrs. F. I V. Meske, Island, Illinois. He is also survived by eleven graM-children and four great-grand-children. Funeral services were held from the residence Wednesday afternoon, with. Rev. Bockovn officiating. 4nterment was in Mound cemetery, Mr. Shu- maker was a member of the Congre- gational church. Mr. Shumaker had expressed hi_m- .elf on several occasions that flowers should be sent the sick and not th dead and his last request was that there be no flowers at his funeral Poppies for Decoration Day will be on sale again this year by members of the Legion Auxiliary. Mrs. Peter Oleson Billed For Big Norwegian Picnic At Bonanza Park Democratic Candidate for U. S. Sen-1 tin at'' San Francisco, was endorsed ate Will Deliver Address In at the recent state Democratic convert- County on May 17. tion at Minneapolis for the office of United States Senator. Her appear- ance at the reunion at BonanZa Min- Mrs. Peter OlesSn, Democratic can- oral Springs is sure to be a big draw didate for the United States Senate ing card for the occasion. Hmutreds in opposition to Senator Frank B. i from every township in the two court- Kellogg, will dehver an add ...... " " rss at lties will meet on that day to renew zne om ettlers Reunion of farmers] acquaintances and celebrate-=i) that of Big Stone and TraVerse counties,] is the day in Norway that is synony- at Bonanza Mineral ran s on B  . ' , " Fp " g , "g mous of Fourth of Jlily in this coun- vpper picture shows the caisson re- Stone aze, on Wednesday, May 17. i try. ceiving the body in front of the court- [ In a telephone conversation today with I Those in this county who are on house with 175 former service friends] Mrs. Oleson, who resides at Cloquet, the zzaittee for arrm gments are: and comrades dragm to attention. she said, "I shall be on hand. Only t K. G. Knudson, John Sk rg, Oscar Lower view shows funeral cortegel serious illness or accident would pro-} Hrrison, and tL G. Fa ington.  The passing in front of the Odd Fellows vent my coming." " 1 complete proem,am for t day will be building on its way to M o u n d Mrm Oleson, who was a candidate! announced in the next i.of cemetery. [to he National Democratic Conven- paper. i THE ORTONI/-ILLE INI00I.00PENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1922 NUMBER 52 FLOWER SHOW PLANNED. DISTRICT LAND BANK PROPOSED BY N.W FARMERS One Million Dollar Corpora- tion Scheme to Lower In. terest Rates On Farm Mortgages__ Tenative plans were made at a 1 meeeting held at Marshall, Minnesota,1 last Saturday, at which county agents, t farners, business men and bankers, were in attendarce from a wide circle, for the organization of a Farmers' Joint Stock Land Bank, with a pro- posed capital of $1,000,000.00. The hank as planned would be composed of farmers and bankers of the Sev- enth Congressional District and ac- cording to the laws granting such an organization the bank would be per- mitted to loan up to fifteen times: the amount of its capital stock, or $15,- O00,000.00.. "Such an organization would be just the finest kind for the farmers, who would hold the capital stock them- selves and thus be saved approxi- mately half of one per cent in inter- est rates," said W. H. Gold, president of the Southern Minnesota Bankers' Joint Stock Land Bank, who was call- ed upon to express his views. "I be- lieve that you will have no difficulty in perfecting such an organization for bankers are wide awake to the seriousness of the farmer's problems and when we speak of the farmer's problem we speak of our own, for up- on his prosperity depends that of all other industry," Mr. Gold stated. With such an organization owned and operated by the farmers them- selves together with the assistance of the bankers over the seventh district, who would Subscribe to the capital stock, the one per cent commissoin charge as allowed by law would be returned to the stockholders in the form of dividends, less operating :ex- penses. R was pointed out that the first year of operating would cost consid- erable and the stockholders would do well to break even, but looking at it from;a period of years it was held that dividends up to 8 per cent on the cap- ital stock were possible by efficient management and a careful placing of mortgage loans. When asked what percentage of the :farm mortgages were endorsed from proceeds of farm products, Mr. Gold said that in the experience of their bank, he believed that it was less than I out of 5 and that but 1 out of 10 were ever fully paid from money so obtained. He warned the men who are backing the organization to be care- :ful in the amount of heir loans, stating that he had always had a ten- dency to place amounts in excess of ether companies, believing that farm loans would make the necessary re- turn, but that the last two years he was of a different opinion. That as the result Of a survey made among the farmers of Red Wood County, it was shon that there were only a "'hand furl" of farmers who were able to Fay 6 per cent interest on land alued at $150.00 per acre. ":Either the interest rate m, ust come down or the value of farm products come up or the country will go bank- ruptf' said S. B. Duea, former state  bank examiner, who called the meet- ing, adding, "that at the present rate the farmer cannot come from under the load." The plan has the hearty co-opera- tion of the Minnesota Farm Bureau. Others who addressed the meeting were Victor Anderson, of Wheaten, secretary of the Minnesota Farm Bu- reau Federation, and Senator Hall, of Marshall. Win Class Honors. Mr. Palmer announced Tuesday morning that the valedictorian of the class of 2 was Edwin Carlson and the Salutatorian, Ragna Hjelmeland. Their averages were 94 and 15-100 per cent and 92 and 83-100 per cent, respectivgly. Lylyan Block had the third highest average with 92 and 27- 100 per cent, and. Irene Warlord, fourth, with 91 and 45-100 per cent. Women's Club Offers Prizes to Spur Interest In Shrubbery Planting. To promote the interest of the growing of shrubbery and plants for the purpose of beautifying the city of Ortonville in general, the Civic Department of the Women's Club is aranging for several contests. The first contest will be a Flower Show. For this contest, citizens, children in particular, are asked to plant flowers and shrubbery in any place they can find, either on their own grounds or on big plots. A committee of judges will be appointed to inspect the flower beds in the summer, and later, in the early fall, a Flower Show of cut flowers will be held. Prizes will be awarded. Anyone wishing to enter this contest should send in their name and the place they will plant their flowers, to'Mrs. Mullica or Mrs. Sarvis. This will facilitate the work of the judges. The details of the prizes to be given will be announced later, but the children may begin to plant their seeds now-. The seeds must be furished by the contestants themselves, and can be pl)cured at the Greenhouse frovn Mr. Osen, if de- sired. In the second contest the Civic De- partment asks that the Boy Scouts and Camp Fire Girls enter a contest for the beautifying of the public Park Grounds. A prize will be given to the organization showing the best work here. Details as to the prize will be announced later. The seeds for this will be furnished by the Civic Department. These prizes must not be confused with the prizes offered by the Clean- up Committee. Catholics Will Hold Mission. A Mission will be conducted by the Redemptorist Fathers, of Denver, Colorado, at St. John's Catholic church here beginning Sunday, May 7. Mis- sion will be opened by Father Geier- mann, C. S. S. l"Mass Will be held next Sunday at 8 to 10. F_,dith Carlson, Reid Tomlin. and Emma Rose have all been obliged to drop school  because of inflamatory rheumatism. May Gloege also has been a victim of this disease but for- tately has recovered and is now back in school. Ki00ht Found Guilty Of Grand Larceny Five Women On Jury That Convicted Him. Will Be Sentenced On Saturday. S. C. Kight of this city was found guilty of grand larceny in the second degree by a jury in district court of Traverse County, at Wheaten, on Wednesday. The conviction carries with it a openalty of imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 5 years or by imprisonment in the coun- ty jail for no exceeding one year or by fine of not more than $500.00. Sen- tence will be pronounced on Saturday by Judge S. A. Faherty, before whom the case was tried. Kight, together with George Fos- ter were charged with grand larceny, following complaint by Adolph Lech- ner, living 6 miles east of Ortonville, for stealing 23 chickens on May 21, 1921, after a shooting affair, in which George Foster received from. thirty- five "to forty pellets from Lechner's shot gun. The case against ]Light was sched- uled for trial at the district court in this county last March but a change of venue was granted Kight's attorney's and the case was transferred to Tra- verse county. Kight's attorneys re- quested the change on the grounds] that defendant would not receive an impartial trial in this county. The case of State vs. Foster will come on for trial at the next regular term of court in this county next fall, it was stated today by R. G. Farrington, county attorney, who was the prose- cuting attorney in the Kight case. Kight was represented by attorneys Murphy and Anderson of Wheaten. On the jury that convicted Kight were five women with ages varying from 21 years and up. Their verdict was reached after a deliberation of five hours. Packed House Greets Singei's At Cantata By Community Chorus o "Rose Maiden" Is Well Presented. thrnout the performance. Miss Mary Shumaker, director of Singers Are Given En- thusiastic Applause. A packed house greeted the local singers last Friday evening at the Or- pheum theatre in their presentation of 'rhe Rose Maiden," a cantata given by the Ortonville Community Chorus of 150 voices. When the curtain was raised the audience burst forth in spontaneous applause at the sight of 150 singers seated upon the stage, representing a community spirit that bespoke of he combined efforts and training of various" organizations for many , months. Appreciation of the audi- ence was disptayel again ,and agai the choi'us, and soprano soloist, is de- serving of much credit for the efficient manner in which she directed the chorus and for her ability as a solo- ist. Much credit s also due Miss Francis Irgens, High School music director, in training the school Glee Club, which formed a part of the chorus, and to the individual members of the chorus, ani soloists, Helene Michell, Rev. Paul J. Boekoven, H. W. Kollitz and E. W. Miller. May frra Milbank, Appleton, Graceville and other neighboring towns who were in attendance were favorably impressed. The proceeds, amounting to approximately $240.00, will be used to defray expenses. WILL DAM RIVER TO HOLD WATER NORMAL DEPTH Ross Pledges Support to Se- cure Aid from Legislature to Turn Whetstone Into Lake. With a view of holding the water in Big Stone Lake to its present normal level agreements have been reached between the city of Ortonville and some of the objectors living and own- ing lands along the river bottoms, to construct a temporary dam at the outlet of the lake. Construction o the same will begin at an early dae. This action was held imperative to the general welfare of the citizens of Ortonville, summer residents and all persons interested in keeping the pres- tige which Big Stone Lake has won for itself in the hearts of hundreds of tourists who have been habitual ad- mirers of it. To construct the dam it is estimated that the cost will not exceed $250.00, and this amount is now being subscribed by parties most] vitally interested. ] Rather than await the action of the / state in putting into working order / its project involving the entire Minne- sota River Valley, with a proposed dyke at the foot of the lake, Repre-I sentative J. D. Ross of this city, took I it upon himself to come to an under-] standing with F. W. Doughitt, who as the owner of the Big Stone Canning Company, which represents an invest- FISHIN' GOOD IN BIG STONE. Most Everyone Lands Limit On First Day, In Spite of High Wind. Altho a srong south wind was blow- ing on Monday, the opening day of the fishing season in Big Stone Lake waers, tereby keeping fishers con- fined to the lower end of the lake, nearly everyone that went out came back with a good sized string of crap- pies, pike, and silver bass, and results were pronounced most xeeltent by ohl-time fishermen. Several pike were caught off the dock at the Eahtonka pavilion just a few feet from shore. Among the rod and reel enthusiasts from out-of-town who cast their line in Big Stone Lake were two railroad employees from the shops of the Milwaukee in Minnea- polis. They came out on No. 17 which arrives here at 3:20 a. m., and re- turned with the limit on No. 18 which leaves here about 9 o'clock a. m. "We're coming back again," was the remark one of them made just before leaving. "This is our first 'try' in this lake and believe me it is worth our early morning ride, too." Fishing this year at this season at the lower end of the lake is said to be better than it has been in many years. Usually nearly every experienced fisherman takes to the waters near the islands, about four miles up, or els ,ORTONVILLE'S FIRST DIES AT ADVANCED ment of something like a half million dollars, with lands subject to over- flow, was the principal objector. Mr. Doughitt. according to eport, has agreed to permit the construc- tion of a temporary dam at the mouth of the river providing the same is so constructed as to permit the water to again escape when the spring freshets come next year. His reason for haw ing objected to this dam is given in a brief summary of past history as it affects the flood waters of the Whet- stone River, which it is a known fact, flow or back-up into the lake, there- by relieving the bottom, lands of a large volume of water that otherwise would devastate a larger portimu of the acreage.,, Diversion of the Whetstone River waer into the lake, as planned by the state engineer, and backed by the Minnesota River Conservancy Board, would be of great help in relieving the river bottoms from excessive over- flow and the project has the hearty support of Representative Ross. Mr. Ross has pledged himself to do his utmost in securing an appropriation from the state at the next ession of the Legislature to effect the plan which is estimated will cost $25,000. The work would, of course, come un- der the supervision of the state drain- age engineer and would "eventually be- come a part of the district project as surveyed and approved by both state and federal engineers. The construction of the temporary dam at this time is a move that will mean much to restrt owners along the lake as many of the summer resi- dents had intimated their intention of leaving here unless something was done t( prevent the lake from becom- ing a veritable swamp. And this is what has resulted of late .when the! water was permitted to escape, t L. W. Shumaker arrived Tuesttay 1 from New York City, to attend the I funeral of his father, Ferdinand Shu- maker. Holman Sells Drug Store To Alsaker-Schoen-Olson I The Ortonville Drug Company, a corporation composed of Manley A1- sacker, Robert Schoen and Chester Olson, all of this city, completed a deal on Wednesday whereby the corporation became the owner of. The Rexall Drug Store, former'Iy owned by K. A. Holman. Possession took. place immediately and invoicing of the stock is now in process. Operation of the store will be un- der the direct supervision of Manley Alsacker, assisted by G. W. Miller of Big Stone Cily. Mr. Alsacker, who is a graduate of the Minnesota School of Pharmacy, of Minneapolis, was employed by the Gunderson Drug Company until his resignation last weel Mr. Miller also is a registered pharmacist, and for several years prior to his attendance at a pharma- cist school was employed at Ctute's Drug Store at Big Stone City. Neith- er Mr. Schoen nor Mr. Olson expect to devote their exclusive te to the store. K. A. Holman, former owner, made near the Peninsula. But so far it has been found that to go farther than no statement as to his future plans the "bottoms" is not necessary, for l other than that he was undecided. even here large strings of crappies have been caught, which are claimed to be frequenters only of rock bot- tom beds, while the lake bottom near the rushes where they are biting with a "snap" is nothing more or less than pure black mud. The fact that the lake is almost three feet higher than it was last year is given as the rea- son for such splendid fishing. Guard Officers Expected Here Saturday, May 6th Officers of the National Guard of Madison, Minnesota, aloe expected here on'Saturday evening, May 6, to ex- amine applicants for the local com- pany who have applied since the initial number of recruits were sworn in two weeks ago, it was stated today by R. C. Schoen, member of the company. Word has been received from Col. Luce that a conpany would be desig- nated here some time within the next few days and plans are to get as large a number as possible enlisted before the annual encampment of the Na- tional Guard which is to be held at Camp Lakeview, at Lake City, early ire July. Uniforms and supplies are now on the way for the local unit. Rothi Granted-00 New Trial By Hi t Evidence Admitted by District Judge Held As "Hearsay" By Supreme Court. .The Supreme Court of Minnesota, in an order dated April 28tb, handed down an opinion in the case of State vs. Gust Rothi, granting the defendant a new tidal, because of the trial judge having permitted "hearsay" evidence to be admitted. Trial of the case came before dis- trict court here in March, 1921, with Judge S. A. Faherty on the bench. The case was brought by the state. representec] by R. 'G. Farringtonl county attorney, and the charge was for an alleged statutory offense against the person of Regna Haugen. Defendant was found guilty and sere tenced by Judge Flaherty to two and one half years in the State Peniten tiary.: An order was made by A. B. Kaercher and Howard Babcock, de- fendant's attorneys, asking for a new trial, but the same was denied and an appeal was then made to the Supreme Court, with the result that the trial court was reversed and a new trial granted. The fact t.at Regna Haugen was not placed upon the witness stand be- cause of her mental status, the state depended wholly upon the evidence of Dr. Bergan, of Clinton, and Myrtle 'and Mrs. Haugen, sister and mother of the girl, who testified only as to what was claimed to have been told them by Regna. This testimony was held by the Supreme Court as "hear- say" and as not fair to the defendant, Rothi. As the State used all of its wit- nesses at the time of the trial in dis- trict court here further attempts to- ward prosecution are not expected to be made. M. N. Pratt Files for Auditor. M. N. Pratt, of the Farmers' Ele- vator and Fuel Company of this city, which position he has held for the past four years, filed for the office of coun- ty auditor Wednesday morning, ac- cording to the records. His filing is the second one to date, Charles H. Bolsta having filed last week for the office of county attorney. Mr. Pratt, who is a veteran of the Spanish-American War, was born in Blue Earth county, Minnesota, in 1875, and before taking up his residence in Ortonville was manager for several years of the Farmers' Elevator at Ber- lin, N. D. During the Spanish-Amer- ican War he served with the 12th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. Big Annual Encampment Arranged by Boy Scouts "Adopt a Boy Scout for ,the Camp- ing Period," is the slogan ,business men of Ortonville are using in an ef- fort to raise the necessary funds to enable the scouts to carry out' their plans for the annual camping out pro-I gram which is to be held some time early in June. That the Boy Scouts are enrolled in a worthy organization is a recog- nized faet and inasmuch as the indi- vidual members of th troop are call- ed upon tme and again to finance their own organization, it has been decided that the Boys shall be treat- ed to an encampment thisyear by the citizens. Figures submitted by the Scout Masters place the expense of caring for one scout at $3.00. Vol- unteer gifts of $3.00 may be made to any of the following, who are scout masters and members: W. E. Steg- ner, T. D. Fitzsimmons, Rev. Beck- oven, Dr. E. N. Schoen, . A. Zwie- her, R. F. Walker, Jas. A. Bailey, John Gowan, J. J. Dann, John E. Palmer, A. V. Randall. MERCHANT AGE OF 92 YEARS Ferdinand Shumaker was Storekeeper Here for 35 Years. Freighted Goods Overland from Morris. Ferdinand Shumaker, first store- keeper in Ortonviile, who for nearly three years freighted merchandise and lumber overland by oxen and team from Morris, Minnesota, a distance of close to 50 miles, a veteran of the CAvil War, and a participant in the Indian Massacre at New Ulm and oth- er uprisings along the lower Minne- sota River Valley, died at his home here on Sunday afternoon, April 30 at three o'clock, at the age of 92 years, 6 months. His health had been remarkably good until about ten days ago when he was obliged to remain in bed and his condition gradually be- came weaker, due to advanced age. Mr. Shumaker, who was born Wortemburg, Germany, on October 18, 1829, came to the United States when 19 years old, and settled at Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1856 where he was em- ployed as a miller, which trade he learned in Germany. In the same year he was married to Christina Katter- john, at Red Wing, and together they made the trip overland to Morris, Min- nesota, in the spring of 1876. There they remained until in the fall of the same year when they came o Orton- ville which at that time had been plat- ted but three years, and on which site there were but a few white settlers. Before winter was at hand Mr. Shu- maker had erected a building on the present site of the J. Arthur Matthews garage, in which he conducted a gen- eral merchandising businessthe first store of any kind in Ortonville. Bu.i- ness depended largely upon the Indian trade from the Sisseton reservation. His business grew and a few years later he erected the building which is at present standing and is the south part of the Lakeside hotel. He also erected the building in which the" Ja- cobsen Billiard Parlor is located. Mr. Shumaker suffered adverse con- ditions in 1879, when his store was consumed along with other buildings when a-prairie fire swept over eke townsite` Later as his business grew he met his needs .by constructing larger quarters and before his retire- Photographs of the Military fun-1 eral of Ralph M. Spink, held here re- centiy, at which hundreds gathered from every part of the county with representatives of Legion Posts from neighboring towns to pay tribute to his memory and the cause for which he gave his life. ment from active business he had built the three story brick building with full basement which is at present rented by the Pioneer Store Co-opera- tive Company, and which will stand as a monument to his activities toward the building up of Ortonvillle, in which he had served the people as a mer- chant for more than 35 years. Goads for his store he freighted overland from Mdrris for three years or until the railroad was built thru here. He was making trips at the rate of two each week when the railroad came. Mr. Shumaker was mayor of Orton- ville in 1884 and for several years was Commander of Frank P. Blair Post of the G. A. R., here. He enlisted in the army at Red Wing in 1862 and served as a private in Company F, 6th Min- nesota Regiment, until 1869 when he was discharged from the service. Duro ing his residence in the southern part of the state he saw much service in fighting the Indians during their up- risings. He was the father of a family of eleven children, seven of whom sur- vive bes/des his aged wife, They are Mrs. F. E. Randall, Ludden,'N. D., A. L., George C., and Edna Shumaker of this city, and L. W. and F. W. Shu- maker of New York City, and Mrs. F. I V. Meske, Island, Illinois. He is also survived by eleven graM-children and four great-grand-children. Funeral services were held from the residence Wednesday afternoon, with. Rev. Bockovn officiating. 4nterment was in Mound cemetery, Mr. Shu- maker was a member of the Congre- gational church. Mr. Shumaker had expressed hi_m- .elf on several occasions that flowers should be sent the sick and not th dead and his last request was that there be no flowers at his funeral Poppies for Decoration Day will be on sale again this year by members of the Legion Auxiliary. Mrs. Peter Oleson Billed For Big Norwegian Picnic At Bonanza Park Democratic Candidate for U. S. Sen-1 tin at'' San Francisco, was endorsed ate Will Deliver Address In at the recent state Democratic convert- County on May 17. tion at Minneapolis for the office of United States Senator. Her appear- ance at the reunion at BonanZa Min- Mrs. Peter OlesSn, Democratic can- oral Springs is sure to be a big draw didate for the United States Senate ing card for the occasion. Hmutreds in opposition to Senator Frank B. i from every township in the two court- Kellogg, will dehver an add ...... " " rss at lties will meet on that day to renew zne om ettlers Reunion of farmers] acquaintances and celebrate-=i) that of Big Stone and TraVerse counties,] is the day in Norway that is synony- at Bonanza Mineral ran s on B  . ' , " Fp " g , "g mous of Fourth of Jlily in this coun- vpper picture shows the caisson re- Stone aze, on Wednesday, May 17. i try. ceiving the body in front of the court- [ In a telephone conversation today with I Those in this county who are on house with 175 former service friends] Mrs. Oleson, who resides at Cloquet, the zzaittee for arrm gments are: and comrades dragm to attention. she said, "I shall be on hand. Only t K. G. Knudson, John Sk rg, Oscar Lower view shows funeral cortegel serious illness or accident would pro-} Hrrison, and tL G. Fa ington.  The passing in front of the Odd Fellows vent my coming." " 1 complete proem,am for t day will be building on its way to M o u n d Mrm Oleson, who was a candidate! announced in the next i.of cemetery. [to he National Democratic Conven- paper. i THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1922 NUMBER 2 ]]7;[ICT I.ANI} i .........  ........ finn Scheme to Lower In.! Fo this coat.st, citizens, ehi/dn in tereet D fn   ] partilar, are asked to plant flowers .a8  11 arltl and shrubbery in any pla they can Mortgages find, either n their n grounds or ' on big plots. A committee of Judges lt Saturday at which county agents n the early fall. a Flower Show of Tenative plans were made at a will be appointed to impect the mefing held at MahalI, Minnesota, flower beds in the summer, and later, farmes, business man and bankers,' cut flowers Will be held. pris will we in atendadce from a wide cile, i be awa ded. Anyone wishlng to entel /or the organition of a Farmers' this contest should nd in their Joint Stk Land Bank, with a 9ro-lna and the place they will plant pd capital of $1,0,0OO;OO, eJ their flowe, to Ms. Mullion or Ms, b k s 1 d ould be e mpo l Sa'is, This will facilitate the work a panne w o t of fe and bankers of the Soy- of.the Judges. The dermis of the enth CongmssionaI District d ae prizes to be given walt be announred 0  o th I ti eh a later but the children may begin to ng e aws gran ng su n , . rga''mz mn the bank would be per- plant their .seeds now. The sds dtbsd to Io u to fifteen times the mt be furfilshed by the contotrtnts an p amount of its spiral stock, or $15- themselves, d can be plad at 00,ooo.oo the Glnhou f Mr. Osen, if ale- "Sack an organization woad be $1d. 1 the o d contest the c' ' D Just he finest kind for the famere n n ivle whowou d he dthecap t stk them- partment asks that the Boy Scouts I nd thu be  ed xl and Cp Fire Girls enter a contest eat rate " said W H Gold, psident ar roun . pm will be gven to the ga - alien h "rig the bt of the Southe Mlaneta Bankers' or mz s owl . work he D t "1 t o the pr Jon Stock mn Bank, whowasl" ii be "no nedS]   .... h Wl ate The ee I ed p n to exp h s v ews I e- an an .  s u o ii h o dffieult fur this ll be famished by the lieve that you wl ave n t y Ci i De artm in perfti g su h organization v c p . eat. n c d an ake to ha These prizes must not he eonfd or bankers a w e aw with the r ff aerloueness of the faer's pblems l s o ered by the Clan- and when we speak of the faer's uP Commlttep. prob] we speak of our own, for up Calholies Will Hold Mission. on hie. Psperlty depends that of all A Mi'ol n will be con( bsd hy the other, lndt r Y," Mr. Gold. gated. Redmptor'stl Fathers, of Denve With such an ogamtioa owned Colorado, at St. John's Catholio ehh and operated by the faes them. here beginning RLmday, May 7. M- lves together with the assistance t ainu will be opned by Father Geier- the banke or the nSh district mann, C. S. S. ]gass Will be held who would subribe to the capita] atk, the one per cent eommi$tz charge as allowed by law would b tumed to the stokholdelts in th form of dividends, t*ss operates e. R was pointed out %hat the firsl year of operating wd cot ceased. rable and the stkholders would d( well to break even, 5ut IookSng at ii fa peod of years it B held thal dividds up to 8 pc cent on the c Ital stock were peible y effient l magemens and a fd plating of: mortgage loans When ked what pentage of the  rtgages we endod from eeds of faun products, Mr. Cold d that in the expeence of their bank. he hollered that it was l than I out of 5 d that but i out of i0 were ver fully pald from moy sn obtnmed He waed the men who a bacl.g the nrgartion to he ea ul in the amot c helr loana, stating that be had always had a ten- den to place amounts i. execs of th mpanies. belieng that fa Ins wnuld make the nssary - t, but that the last two years he w of a fferenS opirdon. That the revolt Of a suey made ong the farme of Red Wd County, it as shomwn that ,them were only a "hand  of faers who were able to pay 6 per nt interest on land ' valued at $15COO per acre. "ither the intense men must come o or the value of ram praduets o up  the try ll go bank. p" said S. B. De for state bk examiner who eled the meet- lag, adding "that at the present rate he fr ear, not me from under the ion&" The plan has the hearty opera. " tlon of the Mlnnota Farm Buau - Obes who addressed the mting were Vor Anderson, of Wheaten, ecetary of the bn.esota Fa Bu- u Federaon, and Senator Hall, el Mbell. Win Clm Io. Mr. Palmer noee Tuesday ,moing tha the valedictox of the la ef 2 was Edwln Cla nnd the 8alutatorla, P.aaa Ijelraelw& Their avenges  94 sad I-i00 per t d 92 and 834OO per cent, peedy. Lylyan Block bad the Odrd hlght average with 92 and 27- 100 per nt, a& Ine Wm4ord, fourth, with 9t and 46"100 per et ex Sunday at 8 to i0. Edith Cl,on, Reid Tom,in. ad Emma Re hays aU been obliged t amp heol bcau of turn--tory rhetism. May Gloege aloe ha bn a vctlm of ths dl but for- tately has ved d s now back in hobl Kight Found Guilty WILL DAM RIVER I=o::s:.:'..:::iTo:,, T. H/l I WTID. ] ..y. In Simile of High Wind ll l   J[ ll ] Altho a st rolls soth wind WaS LoW. img on Monday, the opening flay of NORMAL DEPTHI .................  ...... wars, thereby keeping fishers con- __ i fined to the lower end of the lake, TO Alsaker-Schoen-Olson 'nemlyl everyone that went out e Ross Pledges Support to Se- I back with a good sid string of erap- The Ortonvilie Dg Company, a cure Aid from Legislature Cos, pike, and silver b, an d ults corporatio n eomposed of Manlev AI. wc ponounced most exllent by aeker, Robert Sshoen and Chester to 2ran Whetstone Int old.time sheen. Olson, all of thi city, complete d a Lake. Sever pk e we caught off the deal on Wednasday whereby the -- . douk at the Eahtonka pavilion just a corporation beee the oer of. The With a view Of holding the ware ir few feet fm sho, Among the rod Rell Dg Store, foer]y oed Big Stone lke to its present noal and reel enthsite from out-of to by K. A. Holman. Possession took level agreements have been hec who east their line in Big Stone Lake pla lmr*d.tely and invoicing of bewn the city of Ortenville ant we two raildd employees from the the stack is now in p. so of the objectors living and own- ships of the Milwauk in Mina Operation of the store will be un- ins lands along the river bottoms, te P s. They came out on NO. 17 which der the dit pervision of Mantey arves here a 320  m and  Asaeker asisted by G W Miller onstct a tempo ary d at h t d th th " ., , , s . . , e [im't oa No 18 wh eh of Big Stoke City Mr Alker wh nntlet of the ake Cons e on une  1 . . . , o . teav he abou 9 o'elk a m ls a gradte of the Minnesota Sehoo the se w begn at   ,,We, .  mmg bk again- w the of Phauy, of Mineapolt% w ". . . rnark one of th mad e just befo employed by the Gunderson Dg a we ns lake and believe me it is worth oul wlL Mr. Miller also is a giste d Ortonlle, suer sidents and a] ea me.in 'd ,, r Y g m e, to. phaIst, and for sveal years Peg e w h enht erBeg toekePX eg  Pwr: ........................... ,rrs:hl ................ the lower end of the lake is said to be cm w employed at Clare for itself in e h of hundds of D 's betr h thsbeeninm  g Sto tBgSto eC't.v N 'th tauris s who have bn habitual ad- Y Y  a i n i . 1 exceed $2fi000, and this ntns islands, abeuS four miles up. o ete sre. mir s of k To n trae t he dam Usttslly nearly every xpeNend er Mr. Schp nor My. Ol expect "s esamated that he st w flshe takes to the waters nr tN to devote their exelumv te t the w bein b e "b b rt2 near the Peninsula. But so far it hm . A. Holm, foyer oe made no g su s  ed y p e nlot n te ' tally ntested been found that to go farther that n sta t  to NS ft plans vl the "btt ms., i not n f ether than that he wa deeided Rathe than awa t the actmn of the o l' s sary, m stae n put ng ate workng orde even he argo strings of crappi , ,, .. have been caugh which are claime Gard Oflcer EX ted its pralt lnvowulg Ne @tl lnne. to be f ' I sots Rive r Valley , with a propos.d . Vqa?ppT, o?i of .p,k  Here Saturday May 6th to.m os wmse me  oormm nea dyke at the foot of the lake, Rope- , __ ,t upon hlmIf to come to an der- u P k g MacUaon Mnnesota  expected he n agw'hF W Dtht hn pro  mud. The fact tit the on-Satlrda etin Ma 6 to ex as h ....... f heBgSoneCannng lake Is Mmost three feet highe th am,n e applYts fffr' theYoc; e" . was last year is given as the - . . . : (2ompany, which pnts an rarest- pany who have applied sln the ml "a ment of something like a half million son for h sp endi d fishing, number of ruJ we oml n tw * dolla, with ]ds subject to over- -------- wks age wae stated today by R flow, was the principal objector M, N. Pratt Fil for Auditor. C Sehoen member o the epanr M, N. Pratt, ef the Farmere' EI valor and Fuel Comy of this city, which positiou he has held for the st fnur rs, filed for the omee of court- Mr. Doughier. aling to report, has agreed to permit the constc- lion of a temporary dam aS the mnuth of the rive pro,riding the same is sn constted as to pemit the water to ty audlter Wednesday morning, - gmn escape when the spring fshet cording to the ors. His fimg come new year His ason fur v- the snd one to dat Charles 8. ins nbject*d to rids d is Wen in Bolsta havqng filed It week for the a hnef smary ef past hatory as it em of u.ty attome affects the flood watere of the Wf Mr, Ptt. who is a veteran of the stone River, which it is a kwn fact, Spamh-Amen. War, w bo in flow or bk-up in the lake, the Blue Earth ty, Minntn, in 1876. by mlieng the bott lands nf and befo tang up hi redd in large voIume of ware that othese: Ortonville was manger for ser 9d devtte a Iar lwrtimx af ya nf tha Fer! Elavar at Ber- Of G L  ................ Durihg th ........... rand _arccn. ...........  ............ w ............. *th waer into the lake, as planed by Mirmta Vokluteer Infantry. Five Wom On Jury That Convlete th state engineer, d backed by thel Him Will t n MinD.s o$ River Consene B Be S e c,a ......... ']Blg Annual Encampment On 8turda ou,a ve ot gt tp m reuewng -- Y' he river bottoms from ssive eve.4 Arranged by Boy Scouts s C.K ht of thseit was foam Sow and the pmt has the he.sty ' -- gdtfSy of -rd ]any i the sond Support O P.pnf.ive Ros Mr.[. PAd0pt a Y SCOUt for ,he C.- de b a 'u n d riot court of Ro h pledged himself to do his mg sd,. i the s]og bmn W d sd The onvlcti n ai fm the state at the new asien of ] frt to se the nary fund o .e n my. . . o . the les a u o t the plan able the uts o ry out the th tapenatyofpmonmen n .  ^ ] f th -- the state pmn" for not mo th  which is estimated will cost $2n,0ou. i P s orhiehe ,aunut pmgl out p- ear r b ri s t ha The work won d of  m un gram s be he I some tlm y so ymp onmen m oun ,. , .'[ w  o , y j.a[ for no t exceed ng o yea r or der the .supest of the stabs dram- ealy In Je. by fine 0 f ant mo than $500.on. Sen age eaganr and would "entxally be- That the Boy Scouts ae enlIed ten will  cod  t me a part of the district pject in a worthy orgardtton is a reeog. be p oun on a urday - . . b Jud S A Fahert befnr as sved and appved by both m d ft and mueh as the ncU. ,.Y " ge, h r .,,Y' r Ige wh.,. d__ at this' time i ..... " *at .'ill theid ..... nization it has b, th " state d federal engmr  1 mbers of th troop a eJl- e ea w tred " d  t " gJ ht the th Gee F The nstmet on of the tempory pen one and aam to fimmce ......  ...... - lake as many of the summer re-Ied to aa encampment tblsyear by ner, v ng. te e el zonne, t th Fi . M 21 den ha I ntimated their *nte mn of: e etlzens, gus sub.trod by [21s ng o:thkeffar n naw] .............  ......... I ....................... . a .g , done to pxt the lake from bom. of caring for one scout t $3 OOVol George Foster cmved from thirty- . . . . a . . v - rt ell Ss fm Leehner's mg a veritable swamp. And this s anteer gtRs of $8.0O may be made tc fie to fo y P e what has sulted of ate when he any of the fo owng who are scout moS ga. K. h water w pefitbsd to eape. I mtem and members: W. E. Steg- The ee against g t w ached. D . uLd for triaL at the district nrt in -- e fla ] nor, T. . gttzmmmous, Roy. Beck. L w. Shaker amvI Tu s y, oven Dr, g N Sehoen . A. Zwx thlstylMazhbutachngeof y t S d th l l ' . , from N ork Cl y to a ten e nor R. F. Wa ker J. A. Barley Johv ue  granted Kght s attey's t - t ' rdi d Sh ] , , , and the se was tmusfel to Tra- fne of his fa her Fe n u- i Go w J. J. Dann John E. Palmer maker I A. V, Randall, vere oounty. Kight'$ attomeys quested the change on the gnds that defendant would not ive an impmrthd tlsd in hie unty. The se of State vs. Foster wilI me on for trial at the next regular term of in this unty neg fl, it w stated ay by R, G Fardngton, uaty abtoey who w the pr tlng attorney in the Kight Kight w preted by a%toeys Murphy nd Andern of Wheatan. On the Jury that convicted Ight were five women with ages varying from gl yea and up. Their verdict w mad after a de4ibetien of five hour 0RTONVILLE'S FIRST MERCHANT DIES AT ADVANCED AGE OF 92 YEARS Holman Sells Drug Store Ferdinand Shumaker was Word h been ived from COL Lace that a ecenpany wnuld be desig- nated he some tme within the next few days and pla at* to get as large a number  possible nlisted befo the nual enpment of the Na- tional Guard wbah  to be held at Camp Lakevlew, at Lake City, early ir Juy. Unifoms and suppllee a mow on the way for the Icd urAt. R0thi Granted4qew Trial By Hurt vide Admitted by District Judge Hed As "]eanmy" By Supme Cer t. ,The Supme Court of Minnesota, in an ord dated April 28th handed do an opinion in the ease of State vs. Gust Rothi, granting the defendant a new trial, because of the trla] judge hvlng permitted "heaay" evde to be admitted. Trial of the  came lYefam di trlet eour he in Meh, 121. with Judge S. A. Faherty on the bench. The ea w hught by the state, psente by R G Farrington, county ttoey, and the eJge was for an alleged statutary offen against tim parson of negus Hanson Defendant was found llsy d - bsnved by JUdge Flahevty to two and one half yea in She State Penten tiary., An ordvr wa made by A. B. Kaeber and Howard Babcock, de- fendant's attorney*, akiag for a n trial, but the same was denied and a appeal w then made to the Supme Court. with the st that the trial court w reveni apd a ew trial granted. Tim fact teat Regaa Haugen was not plotd upo the witness stand be. ue of her ntl statu the state depended wholby pon the eviden of Dr. Bexgan, of Clinto., and Myrtle and M. Haugen, sster ar mothe of the girl, who tetifled only as to whaS was eJalmed to ha been told them by Regnm This testimony was held by the Supreme Court as ,'he_ say" and  not fair to the defendt RothL As the State used 11 of its wib nes at the time of the tri in d- taler urt he further attempts to. ward pmtien ae not exFected to be made. Storekeeper Here for 35 Years. Freighted Goods Overland from Morris. Ferdid Shumaker. first sto keeper in Ortonvil, who for ar th years fJghbsd mehandise an lber overld hy oxeu and teamm fm Me.is, Minneta a ditn of eo to 5O miles, a ter of th CAtl War, d a parpt in the Indi Massan at New UIm d oth. er uprising alerts the Inwer Mi sots River Valley, died ag kis ho he o Sda aften, April 0 a th o'lk ' at the age of 9 F, 6 months. His hlth had b rkably gee4 un+Al about ten daa ago when he w obHg t remain i bed d his condlti gradlly be. ee weaker, due to adv d age. Mr. Shumaker, who w born ha Wortmbg, Germy, on Otober 15. 1829, cue to the United Sta whe 19 Ye n]d. d settled at Red Wln Mtsota, i. 185 whe he  e Iplnyed as a miller, which tde he leaed in Gemy In the same yar he w med to Chsna Kattev- jnha, at Pd Wing,  togethar they made the trip over]d to Morris, Mln. nesota, in the aping of 1876. 7h ] they maini antil iu the fall of the se yr when thay e to Orton- villc which at that time hl been plat- ted bt three .s, d on wh[.h slt]$ tho were but a few white ttie Befo nter w at ha.d Mr. Shu- make had ertod a banding on *.he ] pnt site of the J. Arthur Matthewl gauge, in which he nducted a gen raI merehandislng buine-the rst ! sto of y hind in O onville. Bual. mess depended largely apon the Indian trade from the SJton ai His busins grew and a f years later he e the bdlding which ia at pnt stanng d is the uth part of the Lakeside hotel He al eeted the building in which the'$a. bson Bfl]i-d Parlor is ]ate& Mr Sh ker suffexi adverse o- dltions in 1879, when his ste w coud along with other ildinff$ when a prv.ixi flrv wept over t townsite.- Later  Ms tmas grew he met his needs by ns ruetln larger qrters md hore hi s lt- . meat f tlve kamim he nad befit the th story brk building wit h fl bt wch is at pt nted by the Pionr Sto Cope. tire Company. and which Will stand as a monumens te hi act v2ti a toward the braiding up of Otto.vitae, m wMeh he had ed the ]people as a me or hls sto he freighted overlar from Morris for three yea or t the miLd was huilt thru h. He was maidng trips as the rote of two eh week wh th rlrd Me. Shtk wa ynr of O- [[e in 1884 and for vrl y w Corridor of Frank p. Blair post el the G A. R., here. He enlisted in the mny at Red Wing in 186 and rvd a pvabs in Company F, 6th Min* nests Reglmen until t869 when h y disehged from tha rrlee. DUe. of the state he ,w much ree  fighting the I.dians during thdr up snge. He w the father of a family of eleven elJldn, n of whom rive bed Ms aged f They at* L, erge C.,  n Sh mr of N Yek C, d Ma. P. L v. Meak, Ialand, Illinois He i aso sutured by ellen grand -children and four great-grandhEdr rede Wedmsda aten. it was in Mound tery. Mr. Shu- mvker w a mem of the gationai ehuh lf on ral  t fl shouM be nt the dek and not th dead d his Iat request s that l%ppl for raon Iy MlI  of the Legl Auxiliary. Packed House Greets Singe At Cantata By Community Chorus "R Maiden*' Is Well pre,ent thruout the perfoanee Mi Mary Shumaker, director of Sin Ar Given En- the choirs, ad soprano loist, is d thiati Appla servn of much eret for the emeicnf nner in which she directed th A packed hou greeted te Io ehe d for h ability as a solo. slngtrlatFidaFeverdngat tO is Much cee?dt Js also d Mie ph theatre in their prentauon o Frauds Irge*m, I-gh School mi 'ls Mideu," a tat gir aitor, in *raining the hool Gl the Ortonville CoJty Cho When the eurtaln was rated th, adien bt forth in spontaneous sght of 1o siuge teated un the stage, represeatg a emmtw apifl that hespoka of ae eemblned efforts and training of cation/ orglons for many : month. Aprlatton of he audi- C]nb, which formed a part of th zhos, and to tl indi dl memben of the eho, an loists, Helen MlsheII, Rev. paul J. Bekov, H. W Kollitz and E W. lr. May from Milbank, Appleton GraeeMlle and uther rtghlrla toe who were in attnd6 we. favorabIy impressed. The preeeds smelting to appximatly $24O.OO, will be  to dftav n. Mrs. Peter Oleson Billed For Big Norwegian Picnic At Bonanza Park lmcrati Caadlda'-' for U S. Sen qon at Sam Fransso,  endord ate Will DeLiver Addr In at thereent stateDratnve- Cnty  May 17. ton at Mnupolis for tAe affm United Stet SenatOr. H --  a% the reion at Bomma Min. Mrs. Peter Olesf, Dmocto n- el springs it  to be big draw- didata for the Uvited States Sate ing card for the oeaom Hdred gad' I dehver an address al teswi meet or that da to rmtr of Big Stone and Traverse ntis is the day [u Nrwy ttt Is vmoy- . at Bon Mineral Kpflug% on B I m of Fourth cff J in  anna- Photographs of the Military fun-I Upper picture shows the caisn, re- 8tone Lake, on Wedrsday, May 17 try. el of Ralph M. Splnk, held here  [ eeiving the body iu front of the cottct- Ia a telephone nvmsatlon today with I n In thle ountlv who m tly, at which hund1de gathered hou wlth 175 former serv* friends Mrs ()ln, who ide at Cloquet, a eeealttes   are= [ ery part of tb ty th and comrades dra to attento she d, I shall be on had. 0nly'K.G. Kauds,ffehn,.Ol represon.fi's of Legion Posts from Lower view shows funeral rtege rioue illness or aodt would p]Ibl.n and P- k  The tghbrlng ts to pay tribute to pasmg in nt of the Odd Fellows vent my coming." . cmplete p for  T will hisraordtheeause forwldeh]building on its y t Mound Mrs. O]eon, whowas ad*date!armouneelia th ramt .d thla his lff etery. to ne National Democratic con- paper. THE ORTONI/-ILLE INI00I.00PENDENT VOLUME 2 ORTONVILLE, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1922 NUMBER 52 FLOWER SHOW PLANNED. DISTRICT LAND BANK PROPOSED BY N.W FARMERS One Million Dollar Corpora- tion Scheme to Lower In. terest Rates On Farm Mortgages__ Tenative plans were made at a 1 meeeting held at Marshall, Minnesota,1 last Saturday, at which county agents, t farners, business men and bankers, were in attendarce from a wide circle, for the organization of a Farmers' Joint Stock Land Bank, with a pro- posed capital of $1,000,000.00. The hank as planned would be composed of farmers and bankers of the Sev- enth Congressional District and ac- cording to the laws granting such an organization the bank would be per- mitted to loan up to fifteen times: the amount of its capital stock, or $15,- O00,000.00.. "Such an organization would be just the finest kind for the farmers, who would hold the capital stock them- selves and thus be saved approxi- mately half of one per cent in inter- est rates," said W. H. Gold, president of the Southern Minnesota Bankers' Joint Stock Land Bank, who was call- ed upon to express his views. "I be- lieve that you will have no difficulty in perfecting such an organization for bankers are wide awake to the seriousness of the farmer's problems and when we speak of the farmer's problem we speak of our own, for up- on his prosperity depends that of all other industry," Mr. Gold stated. With such an organization owned and operated by the farmers them- selves together with the assistance of the bankers over the seventh district, who would Subscribe to the capital stock, the one per cent commissoin charge as allowed by law would be returned to the stockholders in the form of dividends, less operating :ex- penses. R was pointed out that the first year of operating would cost consid- erable and the stockholders would do well to break even, but looking at it from;a period of years it was held that dividends up to 8 per cent on the cap- ital stock were possible by efficient management and a careful placing of mortgage loans. When asked what percentage of the :farm mortgages were endorsed from proceeds of farm products, Mr. Gold said that in the experience of their bank, he believed that it was less than I out of 5 and that but 1 out of 10 were ever fully paid from money so obtained. He warned the men who are backing the organization to be care- :ful in the amount of heir loans, stating that he had always had a ten- dency to place amounts in excess of ether companies, believing that farm loans would make the necessary re- turn, but that the last two years he was of a different opinion. That as the result Of a survey made among the farmers of Red Wood County, it was shon that there were only a "'hand furl" of farmers who were able to Fay 6 per cent interest on land alued at $150.00 per acre. ":Either the interest rate m, ust come down or the value of farm products come up or the country will go bank- ruptf' said S. B. Duea, former state  bank examiner, who called the meet- ing, adding, "that at the present rate the farmer cannot come from under the load." The plan has the hearty co-opera- tion of the Minnesota Farm Bureau. Others who addressed the meeting were Victor Anderson, of Wheaten, secretary of the Minnesota Farm Bu- reau Federation, and Senator Hall, of Marshall. Win Class Honors. Mr. Palmer announced Tuesday morning that the valedictorian of the class of 2 was Edwin Carlson and the Salutatorian, Ragna Hjelmeland. Their averages were 94 and 15-100 per cent and 92 and 83-100 per cent, respectivgly. Lylyan Block had the third highest average with 92 and 27- 100 per cent, and. Irene Warlord, fourth, with 91 and 45-100 per cent. Women's Club Offers Prizes to Spur Interest In Shrubbery Planting. To promote the interest of the growing of shrubbery and plants for the purpose of beautifying the city of Ortonville in general, the Civic Department of the Women's Club is aranging for several contests. The first contest will be a Flower Show. For this contest, citizens, children in particular, are asked to plant flowers and shrubbery in any place they can find, either on their own grounds or on big plots. A committee of judges will be appointed to inspect the flower beds in the summer, and later, in the early fall, a Flower Show of cut flowers will be held. Prizes will be awarded. Anyone wishing to enter this contest should send in their name and the place they will plant their flowers, to'Mrs. Mullica or Mrs. Sarvis. This will facilitate the work of the judges. The details of the prizes to be given will be announced later, but the children may begin to plant their seeds now-. The seeds must be furished by the contestants themselves, and can be pl)cured at the Greenhouse frovn Mr. Osen, if de- sired. In the second contest the Civic De- partment asks that the Boy Scouts and Camp Fire Girls enter a contest for the beautifying of the public Park Grounds. A prize will be given to the organization showing the best work here. Details as to the prize will be announced later. The seeds for this will be furnished by the Civic Department. These prizes must not be confused with the prizes offered by the Clean- up Committee. Catholics Will Hold Mission. A Mission will be conducted by the Redemptorist Fathers, of Denver, Colorado, at St. John's Catholic church here beginning Sunday, May 7. Mis- sion will be opened by Father Geier- mann, C. S. S. l"Mass Will be held next Sunday at 8 to 10. F_,dith Carlson, Reid Tomlin. and Emma Rose have all been obliged to drop school  because of inflamatory rheumatism. May Gloege also has been a victim of this disease but for- tately has recovered and is now back in school. Ki00ht Found Guilty Of Grand Larceny Five Women On Jury That Convicted Him. Will Be Sentenced On Saturday. S. C. Kight of this city was found guilty of grand larceny in the second degree by a jury in district court of Traverse County, at Wheaten, on Wednesday. The conviction carries with it a openalty of imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 5 years or by imprisonment in the coun- ty jail for no exceeding one year or by fine of not more than $500.00. Sen- tence will be pronounced on Saturday by Judge S. A. Faherty, before whom the case was tried. Kight, together with George Fos- ter were charged with grand larceny, following complaint by Adolph Lech- ner, living 6 miles east of Ortonville, for stealing 23 chickens on May 21, 1921, after a shooting affair, in which George Foster received from. thirty- five "to forty pellets from Lechner's shot gun. The case against ]Light was sched- uled for trial at the district court in this county last March but a change of venue was granted Kight's attorney's and the case was transferred to Tra- verse county. Kight's attorneys re- quested the change on the grounds] that defendant would not receive an impartial trial in this county. The case of State vs. Foster will come on for trial at the next regular term of court in this county next fall, it was stated today by R. G. Farrington, county attorney, who was the prose- cuting attorney in the Kight case. Kight was represented by attorneys Murphy and Anderson of Wheaten. On the jury that convicted Kight were five women with ages varying from 21 years and up. Their verdict was reached after a deliberation of five hours. Packed House Greets Singei's At Cantata By Community Chorus o "Rose Maiden" Is Well Presented. thrnout the performance. Miss Mary Shumaker, director of Singers Are Given En- thusiastic Applause. A packed house greeted the local singers last Friday evening at the Or- pheum theatre in their presentation of 'rhe Rose Maiden," a cantata given by the Ortonville Community Chorus of 150 voices. When the curtain was raised the audience burst forth in spontaneous applause at the sight of 150 singers seated upon the stage, representing a community spirit that bespoke of he combined efforts and training of various" organizations for many , months. Appreciation of the audi- ence was disptayel again ,and agai the choi'us, and soprano soloist, is de- serving of much credit for the efficient manner in which she directed the chorus and for her ability as a solo- ist. Much credit s also due Miss Francis Irgens, High School music director, in training the school Glee Club, which formed a part of the chorus, and to the individual members of the chorus, ani soloists, Helene Michell, Rev. Paul J. Boekoven, H. W. Kollitz and E. W. Miller. May frra Milbank, Appleton, Graceville and other neighboring towns who were in attendance were favorably impressed. The proceeds, amounting to approximately $240.00, will be used to defray expenses. WILL DAM RIVER TO HOLD WATER NORMAL DEPTH Ross Pledges Support to Se- cure Aid from Legislature to Turn Whetstone Into Lake. With a view of holding the water in Big Stone Lake to its present normal level agreements have been reached between the city of Ortonville and some of the objectors living and own- ing lands along the river bottoms, to construct a temporary dam at the outlet of the lake. Construction o the same will begin at an early dae. This action was held imperative to the general welfare of the citizens of Ortonville, summer residents and all persons interested in keeping the pres- tige which Big Stone Lake has won for itself in the hearts of hundreds of tourists who have been habitual ad- mirers of it. To construct the dam it is estimated that the cost will not exceed $250.00, and this amount is now being subscribed by parties most] vitally interested. ] Rather than await the action of the / state in putting into working order / its project involving the entire Minne- sota River Valley, with a proposed dyke at the foot of the lake, Repre-I sentative J. D. Ross of this city, took I it upon himself to come to an under-] standing with F. W. Doughitt, who as the owner of the Big Stone Canning Company, which represents an invest- FISHIN' GOOD IN BIG STONE. Most Everyone Lands Limit On First Day, In Spite of High Wind. Altho a srong south wind was blow- ing on Monday, the opening day of the fishing season in Big Stone Lake waers, tereby keeping fishers con- fined to the lower end of the lake, nearly everyone that went out came back with a good sized string of crap- pies, pike, and silver bass, and results were pronounced most xeeltent by ohl-time fishermen. Several pike were caught off the dock at the Eahtonka pavilion just a few feet from shore. Among the rod and reel enthusiasts from out-of-town who cast their line in Big Stone Lake were two railroad employees from the shops of the Milwaukee in Minnea- polis. They came out on No. 17 which arrives here at 3:20 a. m., and re- turned with the limit on No. 18 which leaves here about 9 o'clock a. m. "We're coming back again," was the remark one of them made just before leaving. "This is our first 'try' in this lake and believe me it is worth our early morning ride, too." Fishing this year at this season at the lower end of the lake is said to be better than it has been in many years. Usually nearly every experienced fisherman takes to the waters near the islands, about four miles up, or els ,ORTONVILLE'S FIRST DIES AT ADVANCED ment of something like a half million dollars, with lands subject to over- flow, was the principal objector. Mr. Doughitt. according to eport, has agreed to permit the construc- tion of a temporary dam at the mouth of the river providing the same is so constructed as to permit the water to again escape when the spring freshets come next year. His reason for haw ing objected to this dam is given in a brief summary of past history as it affects the flood waters of the Whet- stone River, which it is a known fact, flow or back-up into the lake, there- by relieving the bottom, lands of a large volume of water that otherwise would devastate a larger portimu of the acreage.,, Diversion of the Whetstone River waer into the lake, as planned by the state engineer, and backed by the Minnesota River Conservancy Board, would be of great help in relieving the river bottoms from excessive over- flow and the project has the hearty support of Representative Ross. Mr. Ross has pledged himself to do his utmost in securing an appropriation from the state at the next ession of the Legislature to effect the plan which is estimated will cost $25,000. The work would, of course, come un- der the supervision of the state drain- age engineer and would "eventually be- come a part of the district project as surveyed and approved by both state and federal engineers. The construction of the temporary dam at this time is a move that will mean much to restrt owners along the lake as many of the summer resi- dents had intimated their intention of leaving here unless something was done t( prevent the lake from becom- ing a veritable swamp. And this is what has resulted of late .when the! water was permitted to escape, t L. W. Shumaker arrived Tuesttay 1 from New York City, to attend the I funeral of his father, Ferdinand Shu- maker. Holman Sells Drug Store To Alsaker-Schoen-Olson I The Ortonville Drug Company, a corporation composed of Manley A1- sacker, Robert Schoen and Chester Olson, all of this city, completed a deal on Wednesday whereby the corporation became the owner of. The Rexall Drug Store, former'Iy owned by K. A. Holman. Possession took. place immediately and invoicing of the stock is now in process. Operation of the store will be un- der the direct supervision of Manley Alsacker, assisted by G. W. Miller of Big Stone Cily. Mr. Alsacker, who is a graduate of the Minnesota School of Pharmacy, of Minneapolis, was employed by the Gunderson Drug Company until his resignation last weel Mr. Miller also is a registered pharmacist, and for several years prior to his attendance at a pharma- cist school was employed at Ctute's Drug Store at Big Stone City. Neith- er Mr. Schoen nor Mr. Olson expect to devote their exclusive te to the store. K. A. Holman, former owner, made near the Peninsula. But so far it has been found that to go farther than no statement as to his future plans the "bottoms" is not necessary, for l other than that he was undecided. even here large strings of crappies have been caught, which are claimed to be frequenters only of rock bot- tom beds, while the lake bottom near the rushes where they are biting with a "snap" is nothing more or less than pure black mud. The fact that the lake is almost three feet higher than it was last year is given as the rea- son for such splendid fishing. Guard Officers Expected Here Saturday, May 6th Officers of the National Guard of Madison, Minnesota, aloe expected here on'Saturday evening, May 6, to ex- amine applicants for the local com- pany who have applied since the initial number of recruits were sworn in two weeks ago, it was stated today by R. C. Schoen, member of the company. Word has been received from Col. Luce that a conpany would be desig- nated here some time within the next few days and plans are to get as large a number as possible enlisted before the annual encampment of the Na- tional Guard which is to be held at Camp Lakeview, at Lake City, early ire July. Uniforms and supplies are now on the way for the local unit. Rothi Granted-00 New Trial By Hi t Evidence Admitted by District Judge Held As "Hearsay" By Supreme Court. .The Supreme Court of Minnesota, in an order dated April 28tb, handed down an opinion in the case of State vs. Gust Rothi, granting the defendant a new tidal, because of the trial judge having permitted "hearsay" evidence to be admitted. Trial of the case came before dis- trict court here in March, 1921, with Judge S. A. Faherty on the bench. The case was brought by the state. representec] by R. 'G. Farringtonl county attorney, and the charge was for an alleged statutory offense against the person of Regna Haugen. Defendant was found guilty and sere tenced by Judge Flaherty to two and one half years in the State Peniten tiary.: An order was made by A. B. Kaercher and Howard Babcock, de- fendant's attorneys, asking for a new trial, but the same was denied and an appeal was then made to the Supreme Court, with the result that the trial court was reversed and a new trial granted. The fact t.at Regna Haugen was not placed upon the witness stand be- cause of her mental status, the state depended wholly upon the evidence of Dr. Bergan, of Clinton, and Myrtle 'and Mrs. Haugen, sister and mother of the girl, who testified only as to what was claimed to have been told them by Regna. This testimony was held by the Supreme Court as "hear- say" and as not fair to the defendant, Rothi. As the State used all of its wit- nesses at the time of the trial in dis- trict court here further attempts to- ward prosecution are not expected to be made. M. N. Pratt Files for Auditor. M. N. Pratt, of the Farmers' Ele- vator and Fuel Company of this city, which position he has held for the past four years, filed for the office of coun- ty auditor Wednesday morning, ac- cording to the records. His filing is the second one to date, Charles H. Bolsta having filed last week for the office of county attorney. Mr. Pratt, who is a veteran of the Spanish-American War, was born in Blue Earth county, Minnesota, in 1875, and before taking up his residence in Ortonville was manager for several years of the Farmers' Elevator at Ber- lin, N. D. During the Spanish-Amer- ican War he served with the 12th Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. Big Annual Encampment Arranged by Boy Scouts "Adopt a Boy Scout for ,the Camp- ing Period," is the slogan ,business men of Ortonville are using in an ef- fort to raise the necessary funds to enable the scouts to carry out' their plans for the annual camping out pro-I gram which is to be held some time early in June. That the Boy Scouts are enrolled in a worthy organization is a recog- nized faet and inasmuch as the indi- vidual members of th troop are call- ed upon tme and again to finance their own organization, it has been decided that the Boys shall be treat- ed to an encampment thisyear by the citizens. Figures submitted by the Scout Masters place the expense of caring for one scout at $3.00. Vol- unteer gifts of $3.00 may be made to any of the following, who are scout masters and members: W. E. Steg- ner, T. D. Fitzsimmons, Rev. Beck- oven, Dr. E. N. Schoen, . A. Zwie- her, R. F. Walker, Jas. A. Bailey, John Gowan, J. J. Dann, John E. Palmer, A. V. Randall. MERCHANT AGE OF 92 YEARS Ferdinand Shumaker was Storekeeper Here for 35 Years. Freighted Goods Overland from Morris. Ferdinand Shumaker, first store- keeper in Ortonviile, who for nearly three years freighted merchandise and lumber overland by oxen and team from Morris, Minnesota, a distance of close to 50 miles, a veteran of the CAvil War, and a participant in the Indian Massacre at New Ulm and oth- er uprisings along the lower Minne- sota River Valley, died at his home here on Sunday afternoon, April 30 at three o'clock, at the age of 92 years, 6 months. His health had been remarkably good until about ten days ago when he was obliged to remain in bed and his condition gradually be- came weaker, due to advanced age. Mr. Shumaker, who was born Wortemburg, Germany, on October 18, 1829, came to the United States when 19 years old, and settled at Red Wing, Minnesota, in 1856 where he was em- ployed as a miller, which trade he learned in Germany. In the same year he was married to Christina Katter- john, at Red Wing, and together they made the trip overland to Morris, Min- nesota, in the spring of 1876. There they remained until in the fall of the same year when they came o Orton- ville which at that time had been plat- ted but three years, and on which site there were but a few white settlers. Before winter was at hand Mr. Shu- maker had erected a building on the present site of the J. Arthur Matthews garage, in which he conducted a gen- eral merchandising businessthe first store of any kind in Ortonville. Bu.i- ness depended largely upon the Indian trade from the Sisseton reservation. His business grew and a few years later he erected the building which is at present standing and is the south part of the Lakeside hotel. He also erected the building in which the" Ja- cobsen Billiard Parlor is located. Mr. Shumaker suffered adverse con- ditions in 1879, when his store was consumed along with other buildings when a-prairie fire swept over eke townsite` Later as his business grew he met his needs .by constructing larger quarters and before his retire- Photographs of the Military fun-1 eral of Ralph M. Spink, held here re- centiy, at which hundreds gathered from every part of the county with representatives of Legion Posts from neighboring towns to pay tribute to his memory and the cause for which he gave his life. ment from active business he had built the three story brick building with full basement which is at present rented by the Pioneer Store Co-opera- tive Company, and which will stand as a monument to his activities toward the building up of Ortonvillle, in which he had served the people as a mer- chant for more than 35 years. Goads for his store he freighted overland from Mdrris for three years or until the railroad was built thru here. He was making trips at the rate of two each week when the railroad came. Mr. Shumaker was mayor of Orton- ville in 1884 and for several years was Commander of Frank P. Blair Post of the G. A. R., here. He enlisted in the army at Red Wing in 1862 and served as a private in Company F, 6th Min- nesota Regiment, until 1869 when he was discharged from the service. Duro ing his residence in the southern part of the state he saw much service in fighting the Indians during their up- risings. He was the father of a family of eleven children, seven of whom sur- vive bes/des his aged wife, They are Mrs. F. E. Randall, Ludden,'N. D., A. L., George C., and Edna Shumaker of this city, and L. W. and F. W. Shu- maker of New York City, and Mrs. F. I V. Meske, Island, Illinois. He is also survived by eleven graM-children and four great-grand-children. Funeral services were held from the residence Wednesday afternoon, with. Rev. Bockovn officiating. 4nterment was in Mound cemetery, Mr. Shu- maker was a member of the Congre- gational church. Mr. Shumaker had expressed hi_m- .elf on several occasions that flowers should be sent the sick and not th dead and his last request was that there be no flowers at his funeral Poppies for Decoration Day will be on sale again this year by members of the Legion Auxiliary. Mrs. Peter Oleson Billed For Big Norwegian Picnic At Bonanza Park Democratic Candidate for U. S. Sen-1 tin at'' San Francisco, was endorsed ate Will Deliver Address In at the recent state Democratic convert- County on May 17. tion at Minneapolis for the office of United States Senator. Her appear- ance at the reunion at BonanZa Min- Mrs. Peter OlesSn, Democratic can- oral Springs is sure to be a big draw didate for the United States Senate ing card for the occasion. Hmutreds in opposition to Senator Frank B. i from every township in the two court- Kellogg, will dehver an add ...... " " rss at lties will meet on that day to renew zne om ettlers Reunion of farmers] acquaintances and celebrate-=i) that of Big Stone and TraVerse counties,] is the day in Norway that is synony- at Bonanza Mineral ran s on B  . ' , " Fp " g , "g mous of Fourth of Jlily in this coun- vpper picture shows the caisson re- Stone aze, on Wednesday, May 17. i try. ceiving the body in front of the court- [ In a telephone conversation today with I Those in this county who are on house with 175 former service friends] Mrs. Oleson, who resides at Cloquet, the zzaittee for arrm gments are: and comrades dragm to attention. she said, "I shall be on hand. Only t K. G. Knudson, John Sk rg, Oscar Lower view shows funeral cortegel serious illness or accident would pro-} Hrrison, and tL G. Fa ington.  The passing in front of the Odd Fellows vent my coming." " 1 complete proem,am for t day will be building on its way to M o u n d Mrm Oleson, who was a candidate! announced in the next i.of cemetery. [to he National Democratic Conven- paper. i