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Ortonville, Minnesota
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May 4, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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May 4, 1922
 

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THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1922 i lll00 Oi00IONVitL[ I00I)[PtNI)[I00I PUtLISHED EVERY THURSDA5 by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. L. A. Kaereher Managing Editor Orificial Paper of Big Stone County. Entered as second-class matter May 18, 1920, at the postoffice at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of March 3, 1879. ,SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR  Advertising Rates on Application [ Foreign Advertising ReDreaentative 1 THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION Northwestern Advt. Representative. MINNESOTA SELECT LIST. 709 Exchange Bank - St. Paul 215 S. 6th St. - Minneapolis OUR SECOND ANNIVERSARY. This issue of The Independent marks the second anniversary of its founding. Since its first publication the paper has steadily met with the approval of the news readers over this section, as is evidenced by the rap.idly growing subscription list, and today this paper maintains, as it has in the past, the largest list of paid- up subscribers of any paper published in Big Stone County. To its success the board of directors, editor and shop force owe a debt of gratitude to you as a subscriber and also to the adver- tisers, for without the good will of the community as a whole our success would have been but partial. The policy of this paper from its origin has been held as closely as pos- sible to taking a strictly Independent stand on the various controversies as they arise in the cammunity thereby giving you, as a reader, the facts and leaving you to use your own good +judgment to pick the merit or demerit of the particular subject dealt with. Public opinion is a powerful force and in the long run it is what the major- ity want that really decides an issue irrespective of what any editor might believe personally. It is with a sense of great pride that we review the past policy of this pa- per, for not since the day it was start- ed has there been any clique or fac- tional group thai has in any way ap- proached its officers with a desire or request that the paper "take a shot" at this man or that for personal glori- fication or petty satisfaction. Our policy is to chronicle the news in a fair-minded manner, believing as we do, that our readers are mlffieiently possessed with a mind to do their own thinking when given the facts. We see in the future a brighter prospect for the community as a -whole. We believe that the country is coming gradually to its own. One of the best indications of which is perhaps the sudden clamor of the farm moatgage loan companies for busi- ness, when as a matter of fact they have been for the past two years tied hand and foot financially while the interest rates advanced to seven and eight per cent and money for fanm loans and other purposes in fact could not be obtained at even 10 per cent. This condition has passed. Today the farm loan situation has taken on a new aspect. Practically every loan company in the country is solicit- ing through its a ten cies for new business thru its agencies for new business at a 6 per cent rate for long- time loans. This, together with the steadily improved market conditions of farm products, factory and retail business, can be taken as an indica- tion of renewed prosperity and if ev- ery one profits by his or her past x- perience and bears  mind that "t pays to sm, e for a aihy day," the country will in te course of a short time be back to normal. SAVE ROADS AND SCHOOLS. In the general and insistent demand for lower taxet now being given ex- pression, good roads and schools, it is gratifying to note, are positive and ++ almost universal exceptions, These reservations in the cry for deductions in federal, state and local taxation are made for quite obvious reasons. + Adequate highways and educational facilities in America are essential to public welfare and advancement They are closely related. The modern con- solidated or community school is de- pendent[ to d considerable degree up- on improved roads. They are the pride of every good citizen, whether he is of the country or city, and enjoy his liberal support. The farmer of today regards good roads as necessary as good soil, warm barns, improved machinery and other modem aids to agriculture. He will not long waste time attempting to reach, a trading place over a bad road while his neighbor speeds to market over a good road which also carries his children by bus. to the graded community school. The town man has learned that the progress of a com- rnunity is vitally affected by its ac- cessibility by highway. Many other reasons are advanced for the opposition to retrenchments which would adversely affect roads and schools. Government figures show that because of cheap construc- tion costs, highway and school facili- ties may be obtained now with bor-+ rowed money and their use enjoyed without additional cost over that'pre- i i i,iii THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ii i ii i i ii II iiii ii ii iiiii I i I ii dicted for a few years in the future. Minnesota is a nv,m.bered among the progressive states standing for better cads and schools aside from any tax- reducing policy. It alwavs has been a leader for good schools and has vast ermanent school funds to lighten the .chool taxes. Its highway develop- uent plan, the envy of many otheY tates, is written into the constitution. Fhe arterial highways are being im- rove(t and maintained with the pro- ceeds of taxes of motor vehicles, a large percentage of which is contri- 5uted by large city users, and the lo- cal taxes are left for use exclusively on the local roads. In this situation Minnesota has assumed and is certain to .maintain the leadership for good :cads and good schools.--Carlos Avery in Hutchinson Leader. HEAVY TOURIST TRAVEL IN 1922 Tourist travel to Minnesota is ex- pected to begin much earlier than t usual this season, and summer tour- ist railroad fares will be put into' effect May 15, two weeks earlier than usual, to accommodate travelers, ac- cording to announcement of the Ten Thousand Lakes of Minnesota Asso- ciation. The special fare and one-half rate will prevail from May 15 to Sep- tember 30, carrying stopover privi- leges and return limit up to October 31st. Inquiries that are being received daily at the headquarters of the Ten Thousand Lakes Of Minnesota Asso- ciation indicate that the interest in fishing and in the take resorts will be unprecedented this year. More in- quiries have been answered than in any other previots season, up to this time and resort keepers report their reservations are far in excess of thq nunber usually on hand at this time of the year. Preparations are being made for the largest season in the history of the Ten Thousand Lakes Association. Minnesotans will be particularly in- terested in a special week-end rail- road rate for trips from the principal railroad points to various lake re- sorts. This rate wilt be on the basis of one and one-tenth fare for the round trip, or approximately the old one-way fare with war tax. This schedule of rates will go into effect May 19 and will continue thruout the summer. Week-end rate tickets may be purchased Friday and Saturday and will be honored on the return trip until .midnight of the following Mon- day. It is believed this schedule will stimulate intrastate travel during the summer vacation season, and will at- tract many more thousands of city dwellers+ to the lake resorts in all parts of the state. Many new hotels and cottages have been built thruout the state and the communities are getting their camp- mg grounds in shape to take care of the visitors. It is the object of the Ten Thousand Lakes of Minnesota As- sociation to make the tourists' visit to Minnesota so enjoyable that they not only will come again but will bring other tourists with them. WOULD YOU LIKE IT? If you were a telephone girl and stood at a switchboard in a rush hour, and if some one took the telephone off the hook when there were forty other people doing the same thing within a minute, and if that person having waited ten seconds should ask I you if you were asleep how would you I like it ? t If you were a telephone girl and I you had eighteen telephone wires with plugs at the ends inserted in eighteen connections and there were seven of these close together and a couple of people hung up their phones and you / pulied out of the 'maze the wrong wire, and cut two people off from talking, would you think it fair if either of the victims swore a little and asked if you were out late last night ? If you were at the switchboard and some one asked for a connection and the person desired did not answer the telephone, and if the party calling rttled the receiver rapidly instead of slowly, as he should, and the rattling of the phone hook did not register in the office, and if after a while he did t get into communication with you, would you like him to ask you if you thought you were enjoying a" pink tea ? + It would, no doubt, do us all good to put ourselves in the other per- son's place whenever we are inclined to find fault with public service, such as telephone, electric light, etc. The Employees generally do their work as well as they can. UNFAIR COMPARISON. VOne thing the farmer gains is 1 most of the food necessary to sustain! life. Many a farmer gets from his l farm and hi own efforts food that l costs the city family from $300 a year up." This is true, and the write," quoted is lot a,n,pting an invidious com- parison. His mistake is. in the at- tempt to class the farmer as a wage earner, when he is an employer. The farm hand may well be placed in a class with the mechanic, but the far- mer himself should be placed with the employer to make a fair test of his income. First of all he has his investment, the interest on which would make a large hole in his income. The risk in crop success, even when agriculture is well repaid, is a matter that re- quires consideration. His own work must be figured at going wages as a business proposition, if not as high as managerial position in a business involving the same capitalization. He has the advantage of being his own employer, and that is all. It is worth while, however, and in the end the' farmer is the happiest of the various business classes. But the at- tempt to show him his returns are adequate, or in keeping with those in other lines with which a just compari- son may be made, is a dismal failure. --Dearborn Independent. i i Chickens Belong on the Home Lot. Complaints that chickens owned by Montevideo people get off the home lot and destroy the neighbors' vege- table and flower gaTdens have been lodged with Mayor Vandinburg in! large numbers the past week. At this season the damage (lone is reported to be considerable. The Mayor ad- Irises owners to keep their flocks i i fenced in otherwise action by the city! t will become necessary.--Montevideo I News. MICKIE SAYS t4 N. tt40 PKC,AX%xObt, Dt., K'fVflJL%.D, o W: %4.g ItOt WlxxTtt tA. WA  -- I III III  ,m I II I IIIIII I 66 S9 cigarettes They are Good! Buy this Cigarette and Save Money I III " l I I I1 ' "  Good News in Every Bank Book Small though the Bank Book is, if you practice Thrift, it will always hold more good news for you than even the daily news. It will always bring a smile and strengthen your hopes of a prosperous future. If you want an incentive, just take what few dollars you can spae this week, bring them to us and start a Savings Account. We will-add interest. ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. C. L Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke. Ain't. Cashier. i , i ,, , , , , ,, Furs Remodeled, Relined, Repaired, Cleaned ,+ and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will pay express one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street - Minneapolis, Minnesota PAGE I I III m II ] Claim to Have Discovered Lead. Bob Malloy, who has been conduct- ing the prospecting operations for the Sauk Centre Company, informs The Leader that on Friday last their drill now in operation on the Otto Drevlow farm in Round Prairie struck a ledge of silver-lead. Mr. Malloy was in Long Prairie the first of the week exhibiting samples of the ore which he said he had assayed and found to contain 84 per cent lead and the balance silver and sulphur. The com- pany is putting down other holes with the idea of locating wih more def- initeness the size of the ledge.--Long Prairie Leader. Carnivals Will Be Barred. At the request of the Woman's Community Council, the city council went on record Tuesday as opposed to street carnivals in Northfleld and in' strueted city officials to efuse++l+icen- ses to such shows. The motion to bar carnivals from Northfield was passed unanimously, altho two councilmen stated that they were not opposed ta carnivals that provided clean shows and eliminated some of the objection- able gambling features.--Norhfleld News. Some eels coil themselves and strike like a snake. .,,i  ,m. i iii i i Old Age Proctection I III I I When you are young and your earn- ing power is at a maximum is the time to save your money. Then as it accumu- lates invest it in standard Bonds that will yield you a substantial income when you have passed the producing stage of life. This entire institution is at your com- mand to help you to decide upon a savings plan suited to your needs and we will also be glad to tell you about the different Bond Issues which make good invest- ments. First National Bank Ortonville, Minn. , i| i Great Leaders William Penn HE leader of the Pennsylvania Quakers was noted for the fidelity with which he kept his word in his famous treaty of 1682 with the Indians, although that treaty was not made under oath. Seventy-ix years of fair dealing and keeph faith with the public have gained for Brunswick product the confep.ce of the buying public in everything-which bearu the name of Brunswick. Let your next tire be a Brm wick. Watch it clouely. Keep its record. Note its riliency and how the tread withtand the Wear d tear of the road. In the Brunswick you buy tlm best that money and can produ Ortonville Tire Shop Ortonville. THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1922 i lll00 Oi00IONVitL[ I00I)[PtNI)[I00I PUtLISHED EVERY THURSDA5 by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. L. A. Kaereher Managing Editor Orificial Paper of Big Stone County. Entered as second-class matter May 18, 1920, at the postoffice at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of March 3, 1879. ,SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR  Advertising Rates on Application [ Foreign Advertising ReDreaentative 1 THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION Northwestern Advt. Representative. MINNESOTA SELECT LIST. 709 Exchange Bank - St. Paul 215 S. 6th St. - Minneapolis OUR SECOND ANNIVERSARY. This issue of The Independent marks the second anniversary of its founding. Since its first publication the paper has steadily met with the approval of the news readers over this section, as is evidenced by the rap.idly growing subscription list, and today this paper maintains, as it has in the past, the largest list of paid- up subscribers of any paper published in Big Stone County. To its success the board of directors, editor and shop force owe a debt of gratitude to you as a subscriber and also to the adver- tisers, for without the good will of the community as a whole our success would have been but partial. The policy of this paper from its origin has been held as closely as pos- sible to taking a strictly Independent stand on the various controversies as they arise in the cammunity thereby giving you, as a reader, the facts and leaving you to use your own good +judgment to pick the merit or demerit of the particular subject dealt with. Public opinion is a powerful force and in the long run it is what the major- ity want that really decides an issue irrespective of what any editor might believe personally. It is with a sense of great pride that we review the past policy of this pa- per, for not since the day it was start- ed has there been any clique or fac- tional group thai has in any way ap- proached its officers with a desire or request that the paper "take a shot" at this man or that for personal glori- fication or petty satisfaction. Our policy is to chronicle the news in a fair-minded manner, believing as we do, that our readers are mlffieiently possessed with a mind to do their own thinking when given the facts. We see in the future a brighter prospect for the community as a -whole. We believe that the country is coming gradually to its own. One of the best indications of which is perhaps the sudden clamor of the farm moatgage loan companies for busi- ness, when as a matter of fact they have been for the past two years tied hand and foot financially while the interest rates advanced to seven and eight per cent and money for fanm loans and other purposes in fact could not be obtained at even 10 per cent. This condition has passed. Today the farm loan situation has taken on a new aspect. Practically every loan company in the country is solicit- ing through its a ten cies for new business thru its agencies for new business at a 6 per cent rate for long- time loans. This, together with the steadily improved market conditions of farm products, factory and retail business, can be taken as an indica- tion of renewed prosperity and if ev- ery one profits by his or her past x- perience and bears  mind that "t pays to sm, e for a aihy day," the country will in te course of a short time be back to normal. SAVE ROADS AND SCHOOLS. In the general and insistent demand for lower taxet now being given ex- pression, good roads and schools, it is gratifying to note, are positive and ++ almost universal exceptions, These reservations in the cry for deductions in federal, state and local taxation are made for quite obvious reasons. + Adequate highways and educational facilities in America are essential to public welfare and advancement They are closely related. The modern con- solidated or community school is de- pendent[ to d considerable degree up- on improved roads. They are the pride of every good citizen, whether he is of the country or city, and enjoy his liberal support. The farmer of today regards good roads as necessary as good soil, warm barns, improved machinery and other modem aids to agriculture. He will not long waste time attempting to reach, a trading place over a bad road while his neighbor speeds to market over a good road which also carries his children by bus. to the graded community school. The town man has learned that the progress of a com- rnunity is vitally affected by its ac- cessibility by highway. Many other reasons are advanced for the opposition to retrenchments which would adversely affect roads and schools. Government figures show that because of cheap construc- tion costs, highway and school facili- ties may be obtained now with bor-+ rowed money and their use enjoyed without additional cost over that'pre- i i i,iii THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ii i ii i i ii II iiii ii ii iiiii I i I ii dicted for a few years in the future. Minnesota is a nv,m.bered among the progressive states standing for better cads and schools aside from any tax- reducing policy. It alwavs has been a leader for good schools and has vast ermanent school funds to lighten the .chool taxes. Its highway develop- uent plan, the envy of many otheY tates, is written into the constitution. Fhe arterial highways are being im- rove(t and maintained with the pro- ceeds of taxes of motor vehicles, a large percentage of which is contri- 5uted by large city users, and the lo- cal taxes are left for use exclusively on the local roads. In this situation Minnesota has assumed and is certain to .maintain the leadership for good :cads and good schools.--Carlos Avery in Hutchinson Leader. HEAVY TOURIST TRAVEL IN 1922 Tourist travel to Minnesota is ex- pected to begin much earlier than t usual this season, and summer tour- ist railroad fares will be put into' effect May 15, two weeks earlier than usual, to accommodate travelers, ac- cording to announcement of the Ten Thousand Lakes of Minnesota Asso- ciation. The special fare and one-half rate will prevail from May 15 to Sep- tember 30, carrying stopover privi- leges and return limit up to October 31st. Inquiries that are being received daily at the headquarters of the Ten Thousand Lakes Of Minnesota Asso- ciation indicate that the interest in fishing and in the take resorts will be unprecedented this year. More in- quiries have been answered than in any other previots season, up to this time and resort keepers report their reservations are far in excess of thq nunber usually on hand at this time of the year. Preparations are being made for the largest season in the history of the Ten Thousand Lakes Association. Minnesotans will be particularly in- terested in a special week-end rail- road rate for trips from the principal railroad points to various lake re- sorts. This rate wilt be on the basis of one and one-tenth fare for the round trip, or approximately the old one-way fare with war tax. This schedule of rates will go into effect May 19 and will continue thruout the summer. Week-end rate tickets may be purchased Friday and Saturday and will be honored on the return trip until .midnight of the following Mon- day. It is believed this schedule will stimulate intrastate travel during the summer vacation season, and will at- tract many more thousands of city dwellers+ to the lake resorts in all parts of the state. Many new hotels and cottages have been built thruout the state and the communities are getting their camp- mg grounds in shape to take care of the visitors. It is the object of the Ten Thousand Lakes of Minnesota As- sociation to make the tourists' visit to Minnesota so enjoyable that they not only will come again but will bring other tourists with them. WOULD YOU LIKE IT? If you were a telephone girl and stood at a switchboard in a rush hour, and if some one took the telephone off the hook when there were forty other people doing the same thing within a minute, and if that person having waited ten seconds should ask I you if you were asleep how would you I like it ? t If you were a telephone girl and I you had eighteen telephone wires with plugs at the ends inserted in eighteen connections and there were seven of these close together and a couple of people hung up their phones and you / pulied out of the 'maze the wrong wire, and cut two people off from talking, would you think it fair if either of the victims swore a little and asked if you were out late last night ? If you were at the switchboard and some one asked for a connection and the person desired did not answer the telephone, and if the party calling rttled the receiver rapidly instead of slowly, as he should, and the rattling of the phone hook did not register in the office, and if after a while he did t get into communication with you, would you like him to ask you if you thought you were enjoying a" pink tea ? + It would, no doubt, do us all good to put ourselves in the other per- son's place whenever we are inclined to find fault with public service, such as telephone, electric light, etc. The Employees generally do their work as well as they can. UNFAIR COMPARISON. VOne thing the farmer gains is 1 most of the food necessary to sustain! life. Many a farmer gets from his l farm and hi own efforts food that l costs the city family from $300 a year up." This is true, and the write," quoted is lot a,n,pting an invidious com- parison. His mistake is. in the at- tempt to class the farmer as a wage earner, when he is an employer. The farm hand may well be placed in a class with the mechanic, but the far- mer himself should be placed with the employer to make a fair test of his income. First of all he has his investment, the interest on which would make a large hole in his income. The risk in crop success, even when agriculture is well repaid, is a matter that re- quires consideration. His own work must be figured at going wages as a business proposition, if not as high as managerial position in a business involving the same capitalization. He has the advantage of being his own employer, and that is all. It is worth while, however, and in the end the' farmer is the happiest of the various business classes. But the at- tempt to show him his returns are adequate, or in keeping with those in other lines with which a just compari- son may be made, is a dismal failure. --Dearborn Independent. i i Chickens Belong on the Home Lot. Complaints that chickens owned by Montevideo people get off the home lot and destroy the neighbors' vege- table and flower gaTdens have been lodged with Mayor Vandinburg in! large numbers the past week. At this season the damage (lone is reported to be considerable. The Mayor ad- Irises owners to keep their flocks i i fenced in otherwise action by the city! t will become necessary.--Montevideo I News. MICKIE SAYS t4 N. tt40 PKC,AX%xObt, Dt., K'fVflJL%.D, o W: %4.g ItOt WlxxTtt tA. WA  -- I III III  ,m I II I IIIIII I 66 S9 cigarettes They are Good! Buy this Cigarette and Save Money I III " l I I I1 ' "  Good News in Every Bank Book Small though the Bank Book is, if you practice Thrift, it will always hold more good news for you than even the daily news. It will always bring a smile and strengthen your hopes of a prosperous future. If you want an incentive, just take what few dollars you can spae this week, bring them to us and start a Savings Account. We will-add interest. ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. C. L Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke. Ain't. Cashier. i , i ,, , , , , ,, Furs Remodeled, Relined, Repaired, Cleaned ,+ and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will pay express one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street - Minneapolis, Minnesota PAGE I I III m II ] Claim to Have Discovered Lead. Bob Malloy, who has been conduct- ing the prospecting operations for the Sauk Centre Company, informs The Leader that on Friday last their drill now in operation on the Otto Drevlow farm in Round Prairie struck a ledge of silver-lead. Mr. Malloy was in Long Prairie the first of the week exhibiting samples of the ore which he said he had assayed and found to contain 84 per cent lead and the balance silver and sulphur. The com- pany is putting down other holes with the idea of locating wih more def- initeness the size of the ledge.--Long Prairie Leader. Carnivals Will Be Barred. At the request of the Woman's Community Council, the city council went on record Tuesday as opposed to street carnivals in Northfleld and in' strueted city officials to efuse++l+icen- ses to such shows. The motion to bar carnivals from Northfield was passed unanimously, altho two councilmen stated that they were not opposed ta carnivals that provided clean shows and eliminated some of the objection- able gambling features.--Norhfleld News. Some eels coil themselves and strike like a snake. .,,i  ,m. i iii i i Old Age Proctection I III I I When you are young and your earn- ing power is at a maximum is the time to save your money. Then as it accumu- lates invest it in standard Bonds that will yield you a substantial income when you have passed the producing stage of life. This entire institution is at your com- mand to help you to decide upon a savings plan suited to your needs and we will also be glad to tell you about the different Bond Issues which make good invest- ments. First National Bank Ortonville, Minn. , i| i Great Leaders William Penn HE leader of the Pennsylvania Quakers was noted for the fidelity with which he kept his word in his famous treaty of 1682 with the Indians, although that treaty was not made under oath. Seventy-ix years of fair dealing and keeph faith with the public have gained for Brunswick product the confep.ce of the buying public in everything-which bearu the name of Brunswick. Let your next tire be a Brm wick. Watch it clouely. Keep its record. Note its riliency and how the tread withtand the Wear d tear of the road. In the Brunswick you buy tlm best that money and can produ Ortonville Tire Shop Ortonville. THURSDAY, MAY 4. 1922 , 'tHE OR'PONVIIJE INDEI'I4DENT PAGII dieted for a few ye i the futu ] get into mmuaJcatton with you, I Chicka Belo, nn the Home Lot. Claim to HRVe Dh+eevered Lead. I Clivats WIll Be rre ---- gsve sac andng for bets thoughL you we enjoying  gizlk Montevideo people get off the home mPttnY, infnrrns The]went on record Tty  opposed to pUBL SHED EVERY T URSDA oads ad schools a+idc fom any tax- tea? lot and desty the neighbors' vega- ng the psp ng opera]o fur the Cmnmlty On.oil, the oily neit b h e uc ng o c ways ha s con It would, no doubt do us all ood table and Cower gardens have been Friday lst thei r dril I strut caivl in Noafie] d d in" Y  C a leads f " "d h i +d h" .a t to put on.elves in the other per-lodgod with Mayor Vandlnburg in now in optJon on the Otto Dvlnw sttted ty omeials to refuse i+ Frehant Priing C+ E . annn s g on  o g e the son' pla whenever we are inclined[large numbers the pt wek. At this -- nent p[an, the envv of many otlc as telephone, electric hght, etc. The to be const , yoc - fa in ound prairie struck a ]edgelsioik show  'Fttemotiontob  Ing Prairie the first of the week animously, altho two ouneilm tats, is wi]tten int the constitution. mplo-ees enerall, do their work as vises omer to keep their fIceks he said he had asnyed d found aivl that pvided ]e shows [" e a ter a h g  aY s a e behg ira- we I as hey can fenced Jn be'ise action bY the city exhibiting mples of the o hich stated that tley were ant opposed to roved aml maintained with tile pz -- ! will bome neeessary.--Montedeo to ntaln 84 per nt lead and the[ d elhninatd me of the ob ecti. ceeds of taxes of 1net% vehicles, t UNFAIR COMPARISON. i News" -- balce silver d sulphur. The corn able gmbling feat.--Norbhfleld puny is putting do other holwith News. alge pe, ce.ta of ,,h,oh ,s e.tr,- "0 n be a er an is IC IE A tie  ske. ,uted b large etty use, mid the In food uecessary  sustain, M K S  the idea of Inca ng with more def- -- initess the size of the ledg.--Long Some eels coil themselves d strlq omd*t Paper of Big Stone County* Entered as eond-cIs May 18, 1920, at the poetoffiee Oronville, Minn., under the Ant Mah 3,1879. UBSCRIPTION $2.OO PRR Adversing Rates on Applltion TH aMamc Northwt MINNESOTA SELB LIST. 709 Exchange Bk - - SL Pa are left for use exc}ush,e]y if M , ................. ,on = I ha asmedand scetain coststhn'cit famil / fm 00a ear' 'atOxO, in the Idership for good ",:  Y $ Y X XJ-t4OV4 E ,ends and good schools.--Carl Avery[ up.. , #ae WOAJ in Hutchinson l,eader. [ Th e an the wter luotol n.' WXJX.  t 4 o a mn so. IS ex. earner when he is an employer. The *AOkf 5"i%.t %*t.*A ed to I.gm much zrher tha farm hd may well be pled in a  , GC*::k '+ usual the* season, md * ,miner tour- ca s wth he mhame bt he f- - ist railroad fas will be put into mar hlmlf should be placed with efft May 15, the employer to make a fair test oi Old Age OUR SECOND ANNIVERSARy. Ths issue of The Indepeedt mark* the sond anniversary of its founding. Sin its first publlcaon the paper h steaduy approval ot the ns this section, as is evidenc+d rapidly gwing subcpon lis and tody this paper malntns as it has n the past, the largest lit of pard- up ub+crbers of y paper publishl in Big Stone County. To its fores owe a debt of ratitude to tiers, for thout the good the eommumty as a whole n sues would ha been but partial. The policy of this paper fm t origin has been held as closely as pos ible to taking a mctly Independenl stand on the vannus controveies a they ar+e n the community thereb giving you, Us a ader, the facts an, leaving u to use your own gem judgment to pick the merle or demeril of the partilar subjt dealt with Public opinion s a pewerfu for an, in the long n it is what the major ity w that lly dides au isle irspecOve of what any editor ghl believe personally. It s with a sense of gret pride tha, we review the past policy of this pa per for not n the day it was sart- ed has there bn uy elue or f= tonal group that ha in any way ap- omcers with n desi or quest that the paper "take a shot" at this man or that for personal giort- tton nr petty stisfon Our policy is to chronicle the news in a fair-minded manner, believin as we do, thinking when gtve the fats We see in the futu  brlghter prospect for the community a a whole. We believe that the eountr is eomlng gradlly to its n. One ct the best indications of wdch is perhaps the sudden clamor of the fa run.gage loa companies for bus- me, when as a matter of fact thev have been for the past 'o ysar tic hand and foot finandallv while the intest ttes advand t seven and eigi,t per cent and money for fa loans aml other purposes in fact could not be obtained at en I0 per nt. This condition h passed. Today the fa lena situaon has taken on n new aspect. Practically every Inan company n the unry iv snt- InS through its aenies for new busnes th its agencies for new business at  6 per cent rate for long- time loans. Thls, together with the teadily impved raarket eondltions of f products, ftory nd tail busine, . be taken  an indi- finn of hewed psperlty and ff ev cry one pfits by his or hr past x- perienee and be  mind that "it pays to 'e for a raihy day," the country ll n t rse of a hn time be baek t noal. SAVE ROADS AND SCHOOLS. for lower txeq now bring Wen . graifylng to note, a positive almost setions in in federal, +tats d II a merle for qite obo sons: ual, to eommodate tvelers, . rng to announment of the Ten First of al he has his nvestment, oP e at ]ose]y lated, The de aolidated or eounity school is de + penden t g eondderable degree u cn impved reads. They de ot every good eltin, whether he is ot the untry or dry, aud eujoy t liberal suppor The farmer of today grds good ads as neeemry as gd soil warm bs, improved mhtner and ether mode aids t e,euitu. t long wuste time attemptLg to ha tadlng ple ever a bad road while his neighbor bs b0 the gzaded mupity la t+dly sslbUity by hghwa. My other pease,s ate cr the opposition to wbeh wod dversely emd edcls. Gomt show that bme f heap nstmo- on costs. Mghway d hool fadli- xv+d memeq and their use ejoed rate will prevail fm May 15 to Sep- tember 30, carrying stopover prlv. les and turn lira : up to October lt. Inqnhies that a bekng ived of Minneso Asso- eafinn indicate that the in,rest n flhing ad be unpreeentl this year. qumes m any eth pvio0s seassn, u are far in usually on hand at this time year. PtJons a being the largest seon in the history of the Ten Thousand Lakes Minnetans witl be partilarly iu- tsted in a Sllal weknd il ad t for trips fm the principal railroad points to varo lake - rtm This rate wll be on the basis of one d one-tenth ram for the round trip, or approximately the old one-way fa with war tax. T+s schedule of rates will go into efft May 19 and vdlZ continue thout the summer. Week-end te ckets may pchased Friday and SatUrday ad will be honored nn the return trlp ntil idnight of the oll,,wing Me,- day. It is believed tis schedule will +timul intrastate travel dung the smmer vacation season, and will at- tract many mo thousands of city dwelle. W the take nrts in atl parts o the state. Many new hotel+ d cottages have bu built thout the state and the communltes at getting their camp- ing grounds in hope to tke  o the visitors. It is the nbjt of the Ten Thousand Lakes nf Minneta As- sociatinn to make the tourists' visil tc Minnesota so eneble tat they no1 onl will come again but will brin other tours with them. WOULD YOU LIKE IT? If you were a telephone girl stood at a switehboard in  rush hour, and if some one tok the telephone off the hook when there we forty ether people doing the same thing thu a minute, and if that person having waited ten ods should ask you if you we asleep how wold you like it ? If you we a telephone girl and you had ghteen telephone wis with plugs at the ends nserted in eighteen eonntlons d there were rn of the cle together and a ebuple o peole hung up their phones aud you pulled cut n the mze the wng wire, d cut two people nff from talking, would you think it fmr if either nf the ,ctlms swn a litue nnd ked ff you we out late last night 7 If you were at the swtehboard and +me erie aked for eonnfion and the peon desid did not answer the telephone, and if the party lllng rttled the ver rpidly istead of lnwly, a he she'd, ad the rttling nf the phone book dhl not gister in the ofre, and if after a while he did ] large hole in his income. ep sus even when agriep]tu is well repaid, is n matter that 1 quires conalderaon, l o work: must be figud at ging wages  business proportion, t ot  M He has the advantage of b*ing hi own employe, and that is all, It i worth while, however, d in the an( the faer is the haplest vaous business classe. tempt to show him his adequate, or in kging with those U other lines with brh a just mpa- son may be made, --Dearborn Independent. The are Good! Buy this Cigarette and Save Money Good News in Every Bank Book Small though the Bank Book is if y pti Thrift L will always hold more gOod news or you than even the daily news, it will always bdl & smile d stngthen your hopes nf a prospeus futu. If you wat an inntive, just take what few dollars you can spa thi wk, br/ng them to us d start a Savings Aount. We will.add intelst ORTONVILLE STATE BANK JoZa Crl Predent, $ Stark, . H. St. 8tuek* Aim*t, Cachet. Furs Remodeled, Relined, Repaired, Cleaned and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will pay express one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street Minneapolis, Minnesota Proctection When you are young and your earn- ing power is at a maximum is the time to save your money. Then as it accumu- lates hwest it in standard Bends that will yield you a substantial income when you have passed the producing stage of life. This entire institution is at your com- mand to help you to decide upona savings plan suited to your needs and we will also be glad to tell you about the different Bond Issues which make good invest- ments. First National Bank Or tonville, Minn. Great Leaders HE leader of the Pennsylvania Quakent was noted fox the fidelity With which he kept his word in his famous treaty el r 1882, with the Indias, although that treaty was not THURSDAY, MAY 4, 1922 i lll00 Oi00IONVitL[ I00I)[PtNI)[I00I PUtLISHED EVERY THURSDA5 by the Farmers & Merchants Printing Co. L. A. Kaereher Managing Editor Orificial Paper of Big Stone County. Entered as second-class matter May 18, 1920, at the postoffice at Ortonville, Minn., under the Act of March 3, 1879. ,SUBSCRIPTION $2.00 PER YEAR  Advertising Rates on Application [ Foreign Advertising ReDreaentative 1 THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION Northwestern Advt. Representative. MINNESOTA SELECT LIST. 709 Exchange Bank - St. Paul 215 S. 6th St. - Minneapolis OUR SECOND ANNIVERSARY. This issue of The Independent marks the second anniversary of its founding. Since its first publication the paper has steadily met with the approval of the news readers over this section, as is evidenced by the rap.idly growing subscription list, and today this paper maintains, as it has in the past, the largest list of paid- up subscribers of any paper published in Big Stone County. To its success the board of directors, editor and shop force owe a debt of gratitude to you as a subscriber and also to the adver- tisers, for without the good will of the community as a whole our success would have been but partial. The policy of this paper from its origin has been held as closely as pos- sible to taking a strictly Independent stand on the various controversies as they arise in the cammunity thereby giving you, as a reader, the facts and leaving you to use your own good +judgment to pick the merit or demerit of the particular subject dealt with. Public opinion is a powerful force and in the long run it is what the major- ity want that really decides an issue irrespective of what any editor might believe personally. It is with a sense of great pride that we review the past policy of this pa- per, for not since the day it was start- ed has there been any clique or fac- tional group thai has in any way ap- proached its officers with a desire or request that the paper "take a shot" at this man or that for personal glori- fication or petty satisfaction. Our policy is to chronicle the news in a fair-minded manner, believing as we do, that our readers are mlffieiently possessed with a mind to do their own thinking when given the facts. We see in the future a brighter prospect for the community as a -whole. We believe that the country is coming gradually to its own. One of the best indications of which is perhaps the sudden clamor of the farm moatgage loan companies for busi- ness, when as a matter of fact they have been for the past two years tied hand and foot financially while the interest rates advanced to seven and eight per cent and money for fanm loans and other purposes in fact could not be obtained at even 10 per cent. This condition has passed. Today the farm loan situation has taken on a new aspect. Practically every loan company in the country is solicit- ing through its a ten cies for new business thru its agencies for new business at a 6 per cent rate for long- time loans. This, together with the steadily improved market conditions of farm products, factory and retail business, can be taken as an indica- tion of renewed prosperity and if ev- ery one profits by his or her past x- perience and bears  mind that "t pays to sm, e for a aihy day," the country will in te course of a short time be back to normal. SAVE ROADS AND SCHOOLS. In the general and insistent demand for lower taxet now being given ex- pression, good roads and schools, it is gratifying to note, are positive and ++ almost universal exceptions, These reservations in the cry for deductions in federal, state and local taxation are made for quite obvious reasons. + Adequate highways and educational facilities in America are essential to public welfare and advancement They are closely related. The modern con- solidated or community school is de- pendent[ to d considerable degree up- on improved roads. They are the pride of every good citizen, whether he is of the country or city, and enjoy his liberal support. The farmer of today regards good roads as necessary as good soil, warm barns, improved machinery and other modem aids to agriculture. He will not long waste time attempting to reach, a trading place over a bad road while his neighbor speeds to market over a good road which also carries his children by bus. to the graded community school. The town man has learned that the progress of a com- rnunity is vitally affected by its ac- cessibility by highway. Many other reasons are advanced for the opposition to retrenchments which would adversely affect roads and schools. Government figures show that because of cheap construc- tion costs, highway and school facili- ties may be obtained now with bor-+ rowed money and their use enjoyed without additional cost over that'pre- i i i,iii THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT ii i ii i i ii II iiii ii ii iiiii I i I ii dicted for a few years in the future. Minnesota is a nv,m.bered among the progressive states standing for better cads and schools aside from any tax- reducing policy. It alwavs has been a leader for good schools and has vast ermanent school funds to lighten the .chool taxes. Its highway develop- uent plan, the envy of many otheY tates, is written into the constitution. Fhe arterial highways are being im- rove(t and maintained with the pro- ceeds of taxes of motor vehicles, a large percentage of which is contri- 5uted by large city users, and the lo- cal taxes are left for use exclusively on the local roads. In this situation Minnesota has assumed and is certain to .maintain the leadership for good :cads and good schools.--Carlos Avery in Hutchinson Leader. HEAVY TOURIST TRAVEL IN 1922 Tourist travel to Minnesota is ex- pected to begin much earlier than t usual this season, and summer tour- ist railroad fares will be put into' effect May 15, two weeks earlier than usual, to accommodate travelers, ac- cording to announcement of the Ten Thousand Lakes of Minnesota Asso- ciation. The special fare and one-half rate will prevail from May 15 to Sep- tember 30, carrying stopover privi- leges and return limit up to October 31st. Inquiries that are being received daily at the headquarters of the Ten Thousand Lakes Of Minnesota Asso- ciation indicate that the interest in fishing and in the take resorts will be unprecedented this year. More in- quiries have been answered than in any other previots season, up to this time and resort keepers report their reservations are far in excess of thq nunber usually on hand at this time of the year. Preparations are being made for the largest season in the history of the Ten Thousand Lakes Association. Minnesotans will be particularly in- terested in a special week-end rail- road rate for trips from the principal railroad points to various lake re- sorts. This rate wilt be on the basis of one and one-tenth fare for the round trip, or approximately the old one-way fare with war tax. This schedule of rates will go into effect May 19 and will continue thruout the summer. Week-end rate tickets may be purchased Friday and Saturday and will be honored on the return trip until .midnight of the following Mon- day. It is believed this schedule will stimulate intrastate travel during the summer vacation season, and will at- tract many more thousands of city dwellers+ to the lake resorts in all parts of the state. Many new hotels and cottages have been built thruout the state and the communities are getting their camp- mg grounds in shape to take care of the visitors. It is the object of the Ten Thousand Lakes of Minnesota As- sociation to make the tourists' visit to Minnesota so enjoyable that they not only will come again but will bring other tourists with them. WOULD YOU LIKE IT? If you were a telephone girl and stood at a switchboard in a rush hour, and if some one took the telephone off the hook when there were forty other people doing the same thing within a minute, and if that person having waited ten seconds should ask I you if you were asleep how would you I like it ? t If you were a telephone girl and I you had eighteen telephone wires with plugs at the ends inserted in eighteen connections and there were seven of these close together and a couple of people hung up their phones and you / pulied out of the 'maze the wrong wire, and cut two people off from talking, would you think it fair if either of the victims swore a little and asked if you were out late last night ? If you were at the switchboard and some one asked for a connection and the person desired did not answer the telephone, and if the party calling rttled the receiver rapidly instead of slowly, as he should, and the rattling of the phone hook did not register in the office, and if after a while he did t get into communication with you, would you like him to ask you if you thought you were enjoying a" pink tea ? + It would, no doubt, do us all good to put ourselves in the other per- son's place whenever we are inclined to find fault with public service, such as telephone, electric light, etc. The Employees generally do their work as well as they can. UNFAIR COMPARISON. VOne thing the farmer gains is 1 most of the food necessary to sustain! life. Many a farmer gets from his l farm and hi own efforts food that l costs the city family from $300 a year up." This is true, and the write," quoted is lot a,n,pting an invidious com- parison. His mistake is. in the at- tempt to class the farmer as a wage earner, when he is an employer. The farm hand may well be placed in a class with the mechanic, but the far- mer himself should be placed with the employer to make a fair test of his income. First of all he has his investment, the interest on which would make a large hole in his income. The risk in crop success, even when agriculture is well repaid, is a matter that re- quires consideration. His own work must be figured at going wages as a business proposition, if not as high as managerial position in a business involving the same capitalization. He has the advantage of being his own employer, and that is all. It is worth while, however, and in the end the' farmer is the happiest of the various business classes. But the at- tempt to show him his returns are adequate, or in keeping with those in other lines with which a just compari- son may be made, is a dismal failure. --Dearborn Independent. i i Chickens Belong on the Home Lot. Complaints that chickens owned by Montevideo people get off the home lot and destroy the neighbors' vege- table and flower gaTdens have been lodged with Mayor Vandinburg in! large numbers the past week. At this season the damage (lone is reported to be considerable. The Mayor ad- Irises owners to keep their flocks i i fenced in otherwise action by the city! t will become necessary.--Montevideo I News. MICKIE SAYS t4 N. tt40 PKC,AX%xObt, Dt., K'fVflJL%.D, o W: %4.g ItOt WlxxTtt tA. WA  -- I III III  ,m I II I IIIIII I 66 S9 cigarettes They are Good! Buy this Cigarette and Save Money I III " l I I I1 ' "  Good News in Every Bank Book Small though the Bank Book is, if you practice Thrift, it will always hold more good news for you than even the daily news. It will always bring a smile and strengthen your hopes of a prosperous future. If you want an incentive, just take what few dollars you can spae this week, bring them to us and start a Savings Account. We will-add interest. ORTONVILLE STATE BANK John Carlson, President. C. L Stark, Cashier. H.A. Stucke. Ain't. Cashier. i , i ,, , , , , ,, Furs Remodeled, Relined, Repaired, Cleaned ,+ and Stored at summer prices. Will give estimate on all furs sent to us. If prices are not satisfactory will pay express one way. Send furs early. BROWN BROS. MERC. CO. Furriers and Tailors 21 South 6th Street - Minneapolis, Minnesota PAGE I I III m II ] Claim to Have Discovered Lead. Bob Malloy, who has been conduct- ing the prospecting operations for the Sauk Centre Company, informs The Leader that on Friday last their drill now in operation on the Otto Drevlow farm in Round Prairie struck a ledge of silver-lead. Mr. Malloy was in Long Prairie the first of the week exhibiting samples of the ore which he said he had assayed and found to contain 84 per cent lead and the balance silver and sulphur. The com- pany is putting down other holes with the idea of locating wih more def- initeness the size of the ledge.--Long Prairie Leader. Carnivals Will Be Barred. At the request of the Woman's Community Council, the city council went on record Tuesday as opposed to street carnivals in Northfleld and in' strueted city officials to efuse++l+icen- ses to such shows. The motion to bar carnivals from Northfield was passed unanimously, altho two councilmen stated that they were not opposed ta carnivals that provided clean shows and eliminated some of the objection- able gambling features.--Norhfleld News. Some eels coil themselves and strike like a snake. .,,i  ,m. i iii i i Old Age Proctection I III I I When you are young and your earn- ing power is at a maximum is the time to save your money. Then as it accumu- lates invest it in standard Bonds that will yield you a substantial income when you have passed the producing stage of life. This entire institution is at your com- mand to help you to decide upon a savings plan suited to your needs and we will also be glad to tell you about the different Bond Issues which make good invest- ments. First National Bank Ortonville, Minn. , i| i Great Leaders William Penn HE leader of the Pennsylvania Quakers was noted for the fidelity with which he kept his word in his famous treaty of 1682 with the Indians, although that treaty was not made under oath. Seventy-ix years of fair dealing and keeph faith with the public have gained for Brunswick product the confep.ce of the buying public in everything-which bearu the name of Brunswick. Let your next tire be a Brm wick. Watch it clouely. Keep its record. Note its riliency and how the tread withtand the Wear d tear of the road. In the Brunswick you buy tlm best that money and can produ Ortonville Tire Shop Ortonville.