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May 4, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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MAY 4, 1922 FARMERS PAGE i DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE FARMERS AND FARMERS&apos; ORGANIZATIONS. Own Firm. Will Market Eggs Creameries Association Conference On Cheaper Distribution, Better Price. J thousands of Minnesota Farm who raise chickens will be ca- interested in a co-operative conference taking place in on April 28 and 29. conference wilt make plans for co-operative marketing of eggs! the Minnesota Co-Operative association, Inc. The di- of the creamery association and expert fiehl ,men employed in marketing ,districts, will part in the meeting, which will in the Old Capitol. will be outlined bs; a special on co-operative egg mar- made up o William Harpel John Brandt of Litehfield Arena of Jordan and C. L..Mc- Dodge Center. N. E. Chap. poultry specialist of the Uni- extension service, will lead consignments mark" '"  eastern markets rates with a considerable The creameries association have the co-operation and" back- f the MinneSota Farm Bureau and the county ,Farm Bu- in egg marketing. SHORT COURSF-. -" OFFERED EEKIEpERS instrtictlon give timing and Homemakers' week at Farm in the sdaee of is to be reinforced by a course which will emphasize phases of the industry. This course is to be held at Univer- May 2 o z  -ancls (the division of bee cul- of the university, and members staff, assisted by Charles D. Minnesota state bee inspector, be the instructors in charge. courses within the course have so arranged that special work offered beginners ahd ;s. Forenoon sessions will be all classes of beekeepers. Practical in the laboratory and bee yard provided every forenoon. Bee mgement, foul brood diseases, hives and frames, methods of of swarming, and the han- of colonie. for the production extracted and comb honey will be beekeepers cannot al- to miss this great course. Com- as it does in the spring it offers opportunities for study demonstration. Anyone interest- beekeeping may attend by pay- the registration fee of $2, H usEFuL  NOW; HERE'S RECIPE the annual clean up time at good use can be made of a good of whitewash. A standard re- for such, as recommended by: Farrn. people, is as fol- one-half bushel of fresh lime boiling wter, covering the re- to keep in the steam. Strain liquid thru a fine sieve, and add of fine salt, previously dis- in warm water; 3 pounds of rice, boiled to a thin paste and in; 1 pound of white glue, first in cold water until swol- then carefully melted over fire. this mixture add five gallons of water and let it stand covered for  before using. WHICH WILL MAKE THE CALF GROW are two things to remember feeding dairy calves," says E. A. dairy specialist with the agri- extension division of the Uni-i of Minnesota. "The feed must them grow and must supply building material so they will be condition." Growing feeds, he says, consists of clover hy, oats, bran and The fattening feeds are corn and oilmeal. For calves under months old in good condition and a soft,, mellow hide a mixture 80 pounds ground corn, 80 pounds oats, 30 pounds bran and 10 oilmeal, fed three to five daily is recommended by Mr. A mixture of thirty ground corn, 20 pounds ground 40 pounds ground oats and 10 "oilmeal, also fed at the rate three to five pounds a day, is for calv in poor condition. improves the calf's appetite, i keep a box with clean salt in a abel- place where the calf may eat of Mr. Hanson advises. "Pro- all the good clover or alfalfa hay calf will: eat up clean. Never al- the calves or yearlings to ran the herd." Chicago will export failed to make own will before he dial. KELLOGG WINS ANOTHER FIGHT FOR FARMERS A victory for the wheat growers was won in the Senate recently by Senator Frank B. Kellogg of Minne- sota, when he obtained an increase to $500,000 in the agricultural appro- priation bill for the fund to eradicate the barberry bush in the war on black rust. Senator Kellogg, who fiever speaks unless he is thoroly informed upon hi subject, made one of his customary vigorous and able fights in the senate for a bill which is of great benefit to the Northwest in general, and the far- mers in particular. Over the protests of the appropri- ations committee, the Senate, after listening to a speech by Senator Kel- logg, voted 37 to 16, to raise the fund from $200,000 to $500,000. The Sen- ate com,mittee already had added $52,800 to the sum provided in the measure as it passed the House. Spring Wheat Imperiled." In his speech, Senator Kellogg warned that the spring wheat imtus- try will be wiped out in a few years war is not made against bush. Chai:cman McNary, Senator Lenroot of WSsconsin, and other otponents of admitted Gm ravages from the barberry bush, but insisted the states shovld provide funds for eradication. They contend- ed the states have not done their share. Senator Kellogg met tbis arg- ument by saying the people only re- cently had become fully aware of the i danger of the barberry bush. In the futurg sta*, legi-!:tu,.   of the North- west will spend fully as much money as the Federal government is asked to provide, he said. Money for Education. Senator Kellogg explained that the Federal fund is to be used for educa- tional purposes, not to employ men to dig up the barberry hush. FARMERS ADVISED TO RAISE MORE COLTS Difficulty is being experienced by many fa]:mers in obtaining work horses needed this spring. This fact has been made clear to W. H. Peters, chief of the animal husbandry division of the University of Minnesota, by the number of inquiries coming co the division and also by inquiries made by him and members of his staff a to i the available supply of far, work horses. I "There isn't any doubt that for the l last two years the number of colts] raised in Minnesota has been less than the number of horses that have died,"i says professor Peters. "Is the inevit- able result of this condition already making itself evident? If this condi- tion is maintained an acute shortage of work horses is bound to result. "Farmers who have good sound mares will find it profitable to breed them. This will be particularly true !if the mares can be mated to a good sound stallion of desirable draft type. In communities where such a stallion is not available any farmer with half a dozen or more fares will tirol it prof- itable to purchase and keep such a horse." THE INDEPENDENT IS $2.00 A YEAR--AND WORTH IT. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Good Demm3.d For [Farm Bureaus Vote Feedm00 Cattlei On Stockyards Law Light Supply and Good Demand for Feeding Cattle Boost Prices Mostly 25 Cents. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Closing strong to 25c higher. B:st feeder steers $7.50, bulk $5.75 to $6.75. Best fat steers $7.75 to $8.75. Calves 3,000. Steady. Best lights largely $6.50 to $7.00, few $7.50. Hogs 10,000. Steady to 25c lower bulk better grades $9.50 to $10.00 few 160 to 170 pound hogs $10.10, packing sows mostly $8.75. Good pigs $11.00. Sheep 100. Steady. South St. Paul, Minn., May 2, 1922. -- with the supply of stockers and feeders continuing light, with some improvement in the demand from the country for these classes prices 'came in for a boost of mostly 25c. Fat cat- te prices were also strong to 25e high- er, being helped by the demand for stockcrs and feeders. A few small lots of good and choice yearling beeves brought $8.25 to $8.75, with the best in load lots selling at $7.75 and $8.00. Bulk of fed steers sold from $6.75 to $7.50, very few as low as $6.50. A few of the best light amt handi- weight young cows on the heifer or- der and heifers sold at $7.00 to $8.00, with bulk of the butcher she stock bringing $4.50 to $6.75. Canners and I cutters soht largely from $3.00 to : $4.00, bologna bulls largely $4.00 to $4.50. The market for veal calves held steady, best lights practically all selling from $6.50 to $7.00, a few up to $7.50. Seconds brought mostly $4. and $4.50. Good and choice stockers and feed- ers sohl from $6.75 to $7.50, with the bulk at $5.75 to $6.75, very few un- der $5.50, and nothing under the $5.00 mark. Statewide Referendum Launched On Bill To Prevent Abolitio. of Public Weighing. PAGB The Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed- eration, which last year polled the largest number of farmer votes in the American Farm Bureaus referendum on proposed legislation, is takingl another refendum. 1 It has asked the presidents, secre-I taries and state directors of all county I Farm Bureaus to express their opin-! ion about a bill recently introduced i in congress to amend the new federal act regulating packers and stockyards. The bill has been drawn up to prevent the abolition of public weighing of livestock at the South St. Paul market under the supervision of the State Railroad and Warehouse commission. The federal act supersedes all state regulation. Under the state law, weighing of livestock has been done by the state cmmnission, and commission com- panies have been bonded to protect the shippers. An amendment to the federal law now has been introduced in congress to guarantee the continu- ance of this supervision by the state government, and hearings on the amendment have been scheduled. q he " state farm bureau has  asked the elected officials of county Farm Bureaus to ascertain the opinion of heir member} as quickly as possible, and report to their state organiza- tion. The resu of this referendum will be laid before congress when hearings on the proposed amendment begin. Don't expect anyone to do it as well as you think you can do it yourself, not even yourself. With a fairly li,beral supply of 10,- " 000 hogs on sale, the market sagged ll[ll ' ......... ' again today, being weak to 25c lower I:)|NTII |$ TH "I'IM | on medium and heavy butchers and (|i'O ,U|LD-'HA VI= ._? | about steady on light hogs and pack- ]|| I-IIp_I-OIDI,__|LD | ing sows. Bulk of better grades sold from $9.50 to $10.00, a few $10.10, packing sows largely $8.75, rough stags $7.00, good pigs mostly $11.00. Sheep and lambs are coming in ex-llf'- " " "" j b), lq trernely light supply and little change is noted in the market e0hapared with I| last week. [J again last night. GOOD CARE WOULD SAVE PIGS NOW LOST In commenting upon the results of a survey showing that 44 per cent of the pigs on 62 Indiana farms were lost between farrowing and weaning time, E. F. Ferrin of the animal husbandry division of the University of Minne- sota says: "Possibly such losses do not occur in this state, but the figures are no doubt reasonably close to the truth in Min- nesota. Why should there be such heavy losses, and what percentage of them are preventable? "One of the principal causes for loing young pigs is lack" of good shelter. Too many sows farrow in dirty, (lusty sheds and where the small 1921Old Jenks left home drunk last night. Last night you were full of liquor; where did you get it? At the filling station, yea' honor. MasterI bet you've been at whiskey, James! ButlerBeg pardon, sir, but I never bet. We Highest Prices for Pd Iron, Copper, Heavy Brass, Rags, Rubbers, Tires. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 ,i I i ii i iii i1,,i i IDYA 74578 Salesmenl Earn More SIRE--Coco 60171 and traces back to the Great Picador belonging to the French Government. DAM--Rigolette 49958 Home now ready for service and will be stood at the C. W: Merchant farm and also the W. G. Von- Eschen farm in Yellowbank Township. Horse will be traveled and further stands made to accommodate those in the vicinity. TERMS----To insure standing colt, $15.00. In case mare is sold following, fee becomes due and payable. C. W. Merchant, Owner Handled by W. G. VON ESCHEN Ortonville, Minnesota. Thousands of salesmen now using Ford Runabouts have in- creased their earning capacity up to 35%--and more. A point well worth your serious consid- eration. The entire expense Springtime is the season of the year when bixxts build nests, sweethearts build plans for the future and grown up men and women build homes. We have every lumber for every buikling purpose and St is priced at a figure that should start your building at once. Geier Lumber Co. Ortonville Minn. including operation and main- tenance rarely exceeds railroad fares. Let us prove how a Ford Runabout will help you earn more money. Terms if desired. J. ARTHUR MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. T the base of our good relations with our .de- positors are the frankness and competence of our officers each of whom is endeavoring to make the Citizens National Bank the most helpful institution in Ortonville. MAY 4, 1922 FARMERS PAGE i DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. Own Firm. Will Market Eggs Creameries Association Conference On Cheaper Distribution, Better Price. J thousands of Minnesota Farm who raise chickens will be ca- interested in a co-operative conference taking place in on April 28 and 29. conference wilt make plans for co-operative marketing of eggs! the Minnesota Co-Operative association, Inc. The di- of the creamery association and expert fiehl ,men employed in marketing ,districts, will part in the meeting, which will in the Old Capitol. will be outlined bs; a special on co-operative egg mar- made up o William Harpel John Brandt of Litehfield Arena of Jordan and C. L..Mc- Dodge Center. N. E. Chap. poultry specialist of the Uni- extension service, will lead consignments mark" '"  eastern markets rates with a considerable The creameries association have the co-operation and" back- f the MinneSota Farm Bureau and the county ,Farm Bu- in egg marketing. SHORT COURSF-. -" OFFERED EEKIEpERS instrtictlon give timing and Homemakers' week at Farm in the sdaee of is to be reinforced by a course which will emphasize phases of the industry. This course is to be held at Univer- May 2 o z  -ancls (the division of bee cul- of the university, and members staff, assisted by Charles D. Minnesota state bee inspector, be the instructors in charge. courses within the course have so arranged that special work offered beginners ahd ;s. Forenoon sessions will be all classes of beekeepers. Practical in the laboratory and bee yard provided every forenoon. Bee mgement, foul brood diseases, hives and frames, methods of of swarming, and the han- of colonie. for the production extracted and comb honey will be beekeepers cannot al- to miss this great course. Com- as it does in the spring it offers opportunities for study demonstration. Anyone interest- beekeeping may attend by pay- the registration fee of $2, H usEFuL  NOW; HERE'S RECIPE the annual clean up time at good use can be made of a good of whitewash. A standard re- for such, as recommended by: Farrn. people, is as fol- one-half bushel of fresh lime boiling wter, covering the re- to keep in the steam. Strain liquid thru a fine sieve, and add of fine salt, previously dis- in warm water; 3 pounds of rice, boiled to a thin paste and in; 1 pound of white glue, first in cold water until swol- then carefully melted over fire. this mixture add five gallons of water and let it stand covered for  before using. WHICH WILL MAKE THE CALF GROW are two things to remember feeding dairy calves," says E. A. dairy specialist with the agri- extension division of the Uni-i of Minnesota. "The feed must them grow and must supply building material so they will be condition." Growing feeds, he says, consists of clover hy, oats, bran and The fattening feeds are corn and oilmeal. For calves under months old in good condition and a soft,, mellow hide a mixture 80 pounds ground corn, 80 pounds oats, 30 pounds bran and 10 oilmeal, fed three to five daily is recommended by Mr. A mixture of thirty ground corn, 20 pounds ground 40 pounds ground oats and 10 "oilmeal, also fed at the rate three to five pounds a day, is for calv in poor condition. improves the calf's appetite, i keep a box with clean salt in a abel- place where the calf may eat of Mr. Hanson advises. "Pro- all the good clover or alfalfa hay calf will: eat up clean. Never al- the calves or yearlings to ran the herd." Chicago will export failed to make own will before he dial. KELLOGG WINS ANOTHER FIGHT FOR FARMERS A victory for the wheat growers was won in the Senate recently by Senator Frank B. Kellogg of Minne- sota, when he obtained an increase to $500,000 in the agricultural appro- priation bill for the fund to eradicate the barberry bush in the war on black rust. Senator Kellogg, who fiever speaks unless he is thoroly informed upon hi subject, made one of his customary vigorous and able fights in the senate for a bill which is of great benefit to the Northwest in general, and the far- mers in particular. Over the protests of the appropri- ations committee, the Senate, after listening to a speech by Senator Kel- logg, voted 37 to 16, to raise the fund from $200,000 to $500,000. The Sen- ate com,mittee already had added $52,800 to the sum provided in the measure as it passed the House. Spring Wheat Imperiled." In his speech, Senator Kellogg warned that the spring wheat imtus- try will be wiped out in a few years war is not made against bush. Chai:cman McNary, Senator Lenroot of WSsconsin, and other otponents of admitted Gm ravages from the barberry bush, but insisted the states shovld provide funds for eradication. They contend- ed the states have not done their share. Senator Kellogg met tbis arg- ument by saying the people only re- cently had become fully aware of the i danger of the barberry bush. In the futurg sta*, legi-!:tu,.   of the North- west will spend fully as much money as the Federal government is asked to provide, he said. Money for Education. Senator Kellogg explained that the Federal fund is to be used for educa- tional purposes, not to employ men to dig up the barberry hush. FARMERS ADVISED TO RAISE MORE COLTS Difficulty is being experienced by many fa]:mers in obtaining work horses needed this spring. This fact has been made clear to W. H. Peters, chief of the animal husbandry division of the University of Minnesota, by the number of inquiries coming co the division and also by inquiries made by him and members of his staff a to i the available supply of far, work horses. I "There isn't any doubt that for the l last two years the number of colts] raised in Minnesota has been less than the number of horses that have died,"i says professor Peters. "Is the inevit- able result of this condition already making itself evident? If this condi- tion is maintained an acute shortage of work horses is bound to result. "Farmers who have good sound mares will find it profitable to breed them. This will be particularly true !if the mares can be mated to a good sound stallion of desirable draft type. In communities where such a stallion is not available any farmer with half a dozen or more fares will tirol it prof- itable to purchase and keep such a horse." THE INDEPENDENT IS $2.00 A YEAR--AND WORTH IT. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Good Demm3.d For [Farm Bureaus Vote Feedm00 Cattlei On Stockyards Law Light Supply and Good Demand for Feeding Cattle Boost Prices Mostly 25 Cents. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Closing strong to 25c higher. B:st feeder steers $7.50, bulk $5.75 to $6.75. Best fat steers $7.75 to $8.75. Calves 3,000. Steady. Best lights largely $6.50 to $7.00, few $7.50. Hogs 10,000. Steady to 25c lower bulk better grades $9.50 to $10.00 few 160 to 170 pound hogs $10.10, packing sows mostly $8.75. Good pigs $11.00. Sheep 100. Steady. South St. Paul, Minn., May 2, 1922. -- with the supply of stockers and feeders continuing light, with some improvement in the demand from the country for these classes prices 'came in for a boost of mostly 25c. Fat cat- te prices were also strong to 25e high- er, being helped by the demand for stockcrs and feeders. A few small lots of good and choice yearling beeves brought $8.25 to $8.75, with the best in load lots selling at $7.75 and $8.00. Bulk of fed steers sold from $6.75 to $7.50, very few as low as $6.50. A few of the best light amt handi- weight young cows on the heifer or- der and heifers sold at $7.00 to $8.00, with bulk of the butcher she stock bringing $4.50 to $6.75. Canners and I cutters soht largely from $3.00 to : $4.00, bologna bulls largely $4.00 to $4.50. The market for veal calves held steady, best lights practically all selling from $6.50 to $7.00, a few up to $7.50. Seconds brought mostly $4. and $4.50. Good and choice stockers and feed- ers sohl from $6.75 to $7.50, with the bulk at $5.75 to $6.75, very few un- der $5.50, and nothing under the $5.00 mark. Statewide Referendum Launched On Bill To Prevent Abolitio. of Public Weighing. PAGB The Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed- eration, which last year polled the largest number of farmer votes in the American Farm Bureaus referendum on proposed legislation, is takingl another refendum. 1 It has asked the presidents, secre-I taries and state directors of all county I Farm Bureaus to express their opin-! ion about a bill recently introduced i in congress to amend the new federal act regulating packers and stockyards. The bill has been drawn up to prevent the abolition of public weighing of livestock at the South St. Paul market under the supervision of the State Railroad and Warehouse commission. The federal act supersedes all state regulation. Under the state law, weighing of livestock has been done by the state cmmnission, and commission com- panies have been bonded to protect the shippers. An amendment to the federal law now has been introduced in congress to guarantee the continu- ance of this supervision by the state government, and hearings on the amendment have been scheduled. q he " state farm bureau has  asked the elected officials of county Farm Bureaus to ascertain the opinion of heir member} as quickly as possible, and report to their state organiza- tion. The resu of this referendum will be laid before congress when hearings on the proposed amendment begin. Don't expect anyone to do it as well as you think you can do it yourself, not even yourself. With a fairly li,beral supply of 10,- " 000 hogs on sale, the market sagged ll[ll ' ......... ' again today, being weak to 25c lower I:)|NTII |$ TH "I'IM | on medium and heavy butchers and (|i'O ,U|LD-'HA VI= ._? | about steady on light hogs and pack- ]|| I-IIp_I-OIDI,__|LD | ing sows. Bulk of better grades sold from $9.50 to $10.00, a few $10.10, packing sows largely $8.75, rough stags $7.00, good pigs mostly $11.00. Sheep and lambs are coming in ex-llf'- " " "" j b), lq trernely light supply and little change is noted in the market e0hapared with I| last week. [J again last night. GOOD CARE WOULD SAVE PIGS NOW LOST In commenting upon the results of a survey showing that 44 per cent of the pigs on 62 Indiana farms were lost between farrowing and weaning time, E. F. Ferrin of the animal husbandry division of the University of Minne- sota says: "Possibly such losses do not occur in this state, but the figures are no doubt reasonably close to the truth in Min- nesota. Why should there be such heavy losses, and what percentage of them are preventable? "One of the principal causes for loing young pigs is lack" of good shelter. Too many sows farrow in dirty, (lusty sheds and where the small 1921Old Jenks left home drunk last night. Last night you were full of liquor; where did you get it? At the filling station, yea' honor. MasterI bet you've been at whiskey, James! ButlerBeg pardon, sir, but I never bet. We Highest Prices for Pd Iron, Copper, Heavy Brass, Rags, Rubbers, Tires. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 ,i I i ii i iii i1,,i i IDYA 74578 Salesmenl Earn More SIRE--Coco 60171 and traces back to the Great Picador belonging to the French Government. DAM--Rigolette 49958 Home now ready for service and will be stood at the C. W: Merchant farm and also the W. G. Von- Eschen farm in Yellowbank Township. Horse will be traveled and further stands made to accommodate those in the vicinity. TERMS----To insure standing colt, $15.00. In case mare is sold following, fee becomes due and payable. C. W. Merchant, Owner Handled by W. G. VON ESCHEN Ortonville, Minnesota. Thousands of salesmen now using Ford Runabouts have in- creased their earning capacity up to 35%--and more. A point well worth your serious consid- eration. The entire expense Springtime is the season of the year when bixxts build nests, sweethearts build plans for the future and grown up men and women build homes. We have every lumber for every buikling purpose and St is priced at a figure that should start your building at once. Geier Lumber Co. Ortonville Minn. including operation and main- tenance rarely exceeds railroad fares. Let us prove how a Ford Runabout will help you earn more money. Terms if desired. J. ARTHUR MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. T the base of our good relations with our .de- positors are the frankness and competence of our officers each of whom is endeavoring to make the Citizens National Bank the most helpful institution in Ortonville. THE ORTONTILLE INDEPF*NDEN'r P | Good Demand For FARMERS PAGE Feeding Cat& DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE [ Light Spply and Go Demand for FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS.  Feeding Caltie Boost Pris Mostly 25 Cents. Tuesday's Closing-- Firm F . ' + G T FOR I, ARMERS higher. Best feeder steexs $7,b0, bulk i -- [ $fi 75 o $6 75 FOe t f c $7 75 i Will Market Eggs ......... .................... era: o+ ..................... ,vas on in the Senate recentry byillghts largely $*;50 to $7.O0, few $7.50. e xatthFx:k btaiKelgg ........ .............................. [0{00 n o n ! an mca:* to; bulk better gi'ades $9.50 to $10.00, (, 0 m the agricultural apple, few 160 to j';0 pound hogs $10.10, ......... piat2rnb+ii, fr the ................. .................. $ .............. Distribution, Better Price. e rry us in he war on black $11.00 Smep 100 Stea ] rust. S< u h st. Pau, M nn, May 2, 1922. thound of Minnesota Fa Senator Kellogg, WhO flever speaks __ with the supply of toekets and he is thoroly intoned upon feders continuing light, with sonic in a -operatiee his subject, made one of his customary improvemen t in the demand from the ple in fight s in the senate country for thege classes prices me April 28 and 29. for a bill which is of gteat benefit to in for a boost of mostly 25c, Fat caL. plans tel the NorthweBt in general, and the far. tie ptlees were also st,+ng t a high mers in particular, er, being helped by the demand fe the Minnesota Over the pl'otest o" th e approp2i- stackers an,] fe*lers, A few small a, Inc. cmmittee, the Senate, aftel Its of good and choice yearling listening to a speh by Senator Ke]- beex brought $8,26 to &S.75, with iota, voted 37 to 16, to rai the fund the best ill load lots selling at $7.7 panies have been bondl to pteef ig .districts, will from $200,0OO to $500,fJ0. The Sen. anti $,.00. Bulk of fl strs so[<l th e shippers, An amendrent to th which will. n te con,nittce already had added fro m $6.75 to $7.50, very few as Io federal law now has been hltroduee %+ a special $ 5209 to the sum provided in the as $6.50. in congss to guartee the continu. psed the House. A few of the best light and handi ante of this supervision by the stat made ap Spring Wheat Imperiled. weight young cows on the heifer or government, and hearings on th In his speech Senator Kellog (let and heifers sold at $7,00 to $8.00 amendment have been hedu]l, urn d that the splint wheat Jndu*2 with bulk of th butcher she *toc'M Th e state fa buau has aske N. E. Chap. tly will be wiped out in a few year bringing $4,50 to $6.75. Canners ant the elected officlgls of nty Fa il: ffeetJve war J8 nat made againsl poultry specialist of the Urxi therr # bush. cutters sold largely from $3.00 t Bureaus to aeertaln the opinion oJ $4"00' blgna bulls largely $4'00 t heir members as quickly as possible s, i]] Chaerman MeNary, Senator lnol $4.50. The market for veal ealve and port to their state organic- I otponents o hehi steady, best lights practilly all' lion. The ut of this refend admitted t,le ravag ' e]]ing from $6.50 to $7.00, a few up flm the barberry bush, hul to $7.,50. Son<ls brought mostly $4. will be laid befo coat.as when hearings on the pposed endment the states shot, ld provide[andS 4.50- bean el'adition. They contend, t Goo d choice stk and feCd- ith a n detab] ed the ates have not done their !era said fm $6.75 to $7.50 -/th the , erles ass a o shoe e later Kellogg met this rg bulk at $5,q5 to $6.75, very few an- Don t expeet relyno te d It a well the eo operation aud" back unt by saying the people oniy  de $5 50, and nothing fier the $5 00 as you think you n do It ourlf. MinneSota Farm Breat eenfly had become fully aware of the mark. not even yourself. d the unty Fa Bu I danger of the barberry bh. In the With a fairly liberal supply of 10,- egg marketing. ! futur sto Id!u: + g of the North. 000 hogs on sale, the market sagged OR T COURS"  as th e Federa I goveent is aske d on medi nod hvy butchers and "$'O UILDI$tV[I "tOU- pFERD EEKPER a pvJde he said , about steady on light hogs and pk- UIR OR ILLED oney for Education. i0 oo few 10 10 d lnstrtion greet  t'ul Senator Kellogg explainl that tile from. $95O to $ . , a . $ . , zd Homemakcra' a ederal fund is to be u ed foreduea packing sows Igely $8,+a lug h Farm in the sdtte o tional purpoa not o employ men stags $7.00, good pigs mosly $ , is to be info  by I to d' u the barberr b h. Sheep and lbs are eomllxg lfi ex- which wi tphaai lg p  rrry o tmely light supply and little change a of the indtry. ti FARMER s ADVID TO is natal in the rket eompmmd with | | ...... + + ..................... _ -- /l00ll ofihe division of bee cu]- Dimeulty is being experienced b 19151d Jenks e home drunk university and mbe my faers in obtainin wor again last night. asses ed by Charles D. horses needed this sprln . This ft 1921--Old Jenks left homo dk chief of tile animal husbandry division I- n g th her of mq ulxie cotni"g  LSt iIgh 0 We f ]q , S.rlntlme of tile UnversRy of Mnnta, by . nil of l" uor" * * ,y nqu es m e where +lid you get it? --------o- -- courts aanged special by A the tilting station, *'am lmar. Fonoon sslons will be the available sRpply of fa all elates of beekeepers. Prteal Mter--I bet you've been at my "The isn't an nou. a ior .e T d hoe yard te nber f salts whiskey. James! Butler--Beg pardon, sir, but I never ided every forenoon. Bee foul brood diseases, tat have died," +, methyls of sa s pfessor Peters. "Is the inevit- g, and the hun- a sult of this condition alady of colonist for the production making iLse If evident? and eomh honey will he of wink Imrses i hound to salt. We 1 Highest [12s "Faers who ha gd sound lop Old Iron, Copier, to miss this + mares wi]] find it profitable to breed as it sptlng it beekeeping may attend by stratio fee of $ NOW: HERE'S RECIPE up time at u can be made of a good eoended by pple, #s  fel- bhel of fresh llme h boitlag waar, veng the re. lid thre a fine aleve, and add fine It, previously dis. water;  pounds ef boiled o a thin pte and 1 pound el white glue, Id water until swol- , then eafully melted over fire. o th mixture add five gallons ef stud covered for s befo v.Int. WHICH WILL MAKE TE CALF o tbag to nembet feedLg dairy ealv," says E. A idsio of the Uni d must eupph lh building raaterial so they will b fds, he ys, dover h'y, For calves under Jn good condition d a R, r hide a mlxture oats, 30 pounds bran and I0 oilal, fed tee ta five daly is oneded by Mr. A mixture of tirty grod earn, 20 pounds gr oLmd 4O p0uads ground oats and I0 %llmeal, also fed at the rate tree to five pounds a da, is ealv in truer condition. ff's appetite, L dean sell n a el- calf may eat ef otlf wll eat up dean. calves or yearlings to h tl herd." de& Hea/Brass, Rags. them. This will he particularly true Rtlbber Tes. Jf the ma,s n be mated to a good ound stallion af desirable draft tyro. In communities ,here +ueh a stalUon Pipe Fitting, Brass Goods. , half Belting a.d He carried iu prof-! tk. Ae*tyleae Welding. purcha an6 keep such a -- -- The Ortonville Foundry --THE INDEPENDENT IS $2.OO W.F. MULLICA, pro Phe 23 A YEAP-AND WORTH IT. IDYA 74578 SIRE--Coco 60171 and traces back to the Great Picador belonging to the Ftnch Government. DAM--Rigolette 49958 House now ready for se-iee and will b9 stood at the C. W. Merchant farm and also the W. G. Von- Eschen farm in Yellowbank Township. Horse will be traveled and further stands made to accommodate those in the vldnity. TERM%--To insu intruding colt, $15.00. In case mare Is sold following, fee becomes due and payable. C. W. Merchant,-Owner Handled by W. G. VaN ESCHEN Ortonville, Minnesota. Farm Bureaus Vote +ooo  .... o [ ,. ...... l ...... ,. LOST this sate, btt the fitr*s a no dubt I SAVE PIG NOW rsenabl close to the tth n Mi In mmenting upon the reu]ts of nesota. Why should the be sh On Stockyards Law ......................... I .................... f __ I the pigs on 62 Indiana fas were Iqt I them are pventabl ? S a ew de Re erendum Launched ( a EhL twin fan'wing d weaning time, ".One of the .principal eues for p , F. Fernn of he an ma husbandry o g aunt p gs s k of good Bill TO reveal AbOlltno of d. - wtn e welt g, sota sas: dirty, dusty sheds d whe the small Publ e We h n vlslon of the Umversty of IImne- shelter. Too y sows fan The Minnesota Farm Buau Fed i = oration, which last 3,eat polled the] largest number of faer votes in the' Alnerle Farm Burea iferenduml on proposed legislatlor h is taking auother refend. It has asked the presidents, s- taries and state dirtor s of alI comity Farm Bureaq to expss their opin- ion about a bill ntly introduced in congress te end the new federal act regulating packers and stoekyatds, The bill has bn drawn up to prent tile abolition of public weighing of livestk at the South St. Pau? market under the supe-ision of the Stat Raihd and Warehouse eo/dsslon The fleral act supersedes all stat regulation+ Under the state law, weighing oJ livestock has been ,lone by the state conmson, and coronaission m- lathe an of the Fear wh birds build nests, vthearts build plans for the futum and grown p men and wamen build homes, we have every Ib for every building purpo ad i is priced at a figure that should start yo building at once. Geier L.mber Co. Ortonville Minn. DIS'r-00 INOUI,00ffl- ING CHAR- ACTER- LMore Thousands of salesmen now using Ford Runabouts have in- creased their earning RMpacity up to 35%--and more. A point well worth your serious consid- oration. The entire expense-- including operation and main- tenance rsxely exceeds railroad fares. Let us prove how a Ford Runabout will help you earn more money. Terms if desired. J. ARTHUR MATTHEW'S i Or tonvllh, Minn. AT the base of our good relations with our ,de- positors are the frankness and competence of our officers--each of whom is endeavoring to make the Citizens National Bank the most helpful institution in Ortonville. MAY 4, 1922 FARMERS PAGE i DEVOTED ESPECIALLY TO THE ACTIVITIES OF THE FARMERS AND FARMERS' ORGANIZATIONS. Own Firm. Will Market Eggs Creameries Association Conference On Cheaper Distribution, Better Price. J thousands of Minnesota Farm who raise chickens will be ca- interested in a co-operative conference taking place in on April 28 and 29. conference wilt make plans for co-operative marketing of eggs! the Minnesota Co-Operative association, Inc. The di- of the creamery association and expert fiehl ,men employed in marketing ,districts, will part in the meeting, which will in the Old Capitol. will be outlined bs; a special on co-operative egg mar- made up o William Harpel John Brandt of Litehfield Arena of Jordan and C. L..Mc- Dodge Center. N. E. Chap. poultry specialist of the Uni- extension service, will lead consignments mark" '"  eastern markets rates with a considerable The creameries association have the co-operation and" back- f the MinneSota Farm Bureau and the county ,Farm Bu- in egg marketing. SHORT COURSF-. -" OFFERED EEKIEpERS instrtictlon give timing and Homemakers' week at Farm in the sdaee of is to be reinforced by a course which will emphasize phases of the industry. This course is to be held at Univer- May 2 o z  -ancls (the division of bee cul- of the university, and members staff, assisted by Charles D. Minnesota state bee inspector, be the instructors in charge. courses within the course have so arranged that special work offered beginners ahd ;s. Forenoon sessions will be all classes of beekeepers. Practical in the laboratory and bee yard provided every forenoon. Bee mgement, foul brood diseases, hives and frames, methods of of swarming, and the han- of colonie. for the production extracted and comb honey will be beekeepers cannot al- to miss this great course. Com- as it does in the spring it offers opportunities for study demonstration. Anyone interest- beekeeping may attend by pay- the registration fee of $2, H usEFuL  NOW; HERE'S RECIPE the annual clean up time at good use can be made of a good of whitewash. A standard re- for such, as recommended by: Farrn. people, is as fol- one-half bushel of fresh lime boiling wter, covering the re- to keep in the steam. Strain liquid thru a fine sieve, and add of fine salt, previously dis- in warm water; 3 pounds of rice, boiled to a thin paste and in; 1 pound of white glue, first in cold water until swol- then carefully melted over fire. this mixture add five gallons of water and let it stand covered for  before using. WHICH WILL MAKE THE CALF GROW are two things to remember feeding dairy calves," says E. A. dairy specialist with the agri- extension division of the Uni-i of Minnesota. "The feed must them grow and must supply building material so they will be condition." Growing feeds, he says, consists of clover hy, oats, bran and The fattening feeds are corn and oilmeal. For calves under months old in good condition and a soft,, mellow hide a mixture 80 pounds ground corn, 80 pounds oats, 30 pounds bran and 10 oilmeal, fed three to five daily is recommended by Mr. A mixture of thirty ground corn, 20 pounds ground 40 pounds ground oats and 10 "oilmeal, also fed at the rate three to five pounds a day, is for calv in poor condition. improves the calf's appetite, i keep a box with clean salt in a abel- place where the calf may eat of Mr. Hanson advises. "Pro- all the good clover or alfalfa hay calf will: eat up clean. Never al- the calves or yearlings to ran the herd." Chicago will export failed to make own will before he dial. KELLOGG WINS ANOTHER FIGHT FOR FARMERS A victory for the wheat growers was won in the Senate recently by Senator Frank B. Kellogg of Minne- sota, when he obtained an increase to $500,000 in the agricultural appro- priation bill for the fund to eradicate the barberry bush in the war on black rust. Senator Kellogg, who fiever speaks unless he is thoroly informed upon hi subject, made one of his customary vigorous and able fights in the senate for a bill which is of great benefit to the Northwest in general, and the far- mers in particular. Over the protests of the appropri- ations committee, the Senate, after listening to a speech by Senator Kel- logg, voted 37 to 16, to raise the fund from $200,000 to $500,000. The Sen- ate com,mittee already had added $52,800 to the sum provided in the measure as it passed the House. Spring Wheat Imperiled." In his speech, Senator Kellogg warned that the spring wheat imtus- try will be wiped out in a few years war is not made against bush. Chai:cman McNary, Senator Lenroot of WSsconsin, and other otponents of admitted Gm ravages from the barberry bush, but insisted the states shovld provide funds for eradication. They contend- ed the states have not done their share. Senator Kellogg met tbis arg- ument by saying the people only re- cently had become fully aware of the i danger of the barberry bush. In the futurg sta*, legi-!:tu,.   of the North- west will spend fully as much money as the Federal government is asked to provide, he said. Money for Education. Senator Kellogg explained that the Federal fund is to be used for educa- tional purposes, not to employ men to dig up the barberry hush. FARMERS ADVISED TO RAISE MORE COLTS Difficulty is being experienced by many fa]:mers in obtaining work horses needed this spring. This fact has been made clear to W. H. Peters, chief of the animal husbandry division of the University of Minnesota, by the number of inquiries coming co the division and also by inquiries made by him and members of his staff a to i the available supply of far, work horses. I "There isn't any doubt that for the l last two years the number of colts] raised in Minnesota has been less than the number of horses that have died,"i says professor Peters. "Is the inevit- able result of this condition already making itself evident? If this condi- tion is maintained an acute shortage of work horses is bound to result. "Farmers who have good sound mares will find it profitable to breed them. This will be particularly true !if the mares can be mated to a good sound stallion of desirable draft type. In communities where such a stallion is not available any farmer with half a dozen or more fares will tirol it prof- itable to purchase and keep such a horse." THE INDEPENDENT IS $2.00 A YEAR--AND WORTH IT. THE ORTONVILLE INDEPENDENT Good Demm3.d For [Farm Bureaus Vote Feedm00 Cattlei On Stockyards Law Light Supply and Good Demand for Feeding Cattle Boost Prices Mostly 25 Cents. Tuesday's Closing-- Cattle 2,500. Closing strong to 25c higher. B:st feeder steers $7.50, bulk $5.75 to $6.75. Best fat steers $7.75 to $8.75. Calves 3,000. Steady. Best lights largely $6.50 to $7.00, few $7.50. Hogs 10,000. Steady to 25c lower bulk better grades $9.50 to $10.00 few 160 to 170 pound hogs $10.10, packing sows mostly $8.75. Good pigs $11.00. Sheep 100. Steady. South St. Paul, Minn., May 2, 1922. -- with the supply of stockers and feeders continuing light, with some improvement in the demand from the country for these classes prices 'came in for a boost of mostly 25c. Fat cat- te prices were also strong to 25e high- er, being helped by the demand for stockcrs and feeders. A few small lots of good and choice yearling beeves brought $8.25 to $8.75, with the best in load lots selling at $7.75 and $8.00. Bulk of fed steers sold from $6.75 to $7.50, very few as low as $6.50. A few of the best light amt handi- weight young cows on the heifer or- der and heifers sold at $7.00 to $8.00, with bulk of the butcher she stock bringing $4.50 to $6.75. Canners and I cutters soht largely from $3.00 to : $4.00, bologna bulls largely $4.00 to $4.50. The market for veal calves held steady, best lights practically all selling from $6.50 to $7.00, a few up to $7.50. Seconds brought mostly $4. and $4.50. Good and choice stockers and feed- ers sohl from $6.75 to $7.50, with the bulk at $5.75 to $6.75, very few un- der $5.50, and nothing under the $5.00 mark. Statewide Referendum Launched On Bill To Prevent Abolitio. of Public Weighing. PAGB The Minnesota Farm Bureau Fed- eration, which last year polled the largest number of farmer votes in the American Farm Bureaus referendum on proposed legislation, is takingl another refendum. 1 It has asked the presidents, secre-I taries and state directors of all county I Farm Bureaus to express their opin-! ion about a bill recently introduced i in congress to amend the new federal act regulating packers and stockyards. The bill has been drawn up to prevent the abolition of public weighing of livestock at the South St. Paul market under the supervision of the State Railroad and Warehouse commission. The federal act supersedes all state regulation. Under the state law, weighing of livestock has been done by the state cmmnission, and commission com- panies have been bonded to protect the shippers. An amendment to the federal law now has been introduced in congress to guarantee the continu- ance of this supervision by the state government, and hearings on the amendment have been scheduled. q he " state farm bureau has  asked the elected officials of county Farm Bureaus to ascertain the opinion of heir member} as quickly as possible, and report to their state organiza- tion. The resu of this referendum will be laid before congress when hearings on the proposed amendment begin. Don't expect anyone to do it as well as you think you can do it yourself, not even yourself. With a fairly li,beral supply of 10,- " 000 hogs on sale, the market sagged ll[ll ' ......... ' again today, being weak to 25c lower I:)|NTII |$ TH "I'IM | on medium and heavy butchers and (|i'O ,U|LD-'HA VI= ._? | about steady on light hogs and pack- ]|| I-IIp_I-OIDI,__|LD | ing sows. Bulk of better grades sold from $9.50 to $10.00, a few $10.10, packing sows largely $8.75, rough stags $7.00, good pigs mostly $11.00. Sheep and lambs are coming in ex-llf'- " " "" j b), lq trernely light supply and little change is noted in the market e0hapared with I| last week. [J again last night. GOOD CARE WOULD SAVE PIGS NOW LOST In commenting upon the results of a survey showing that 44 per cent of the pigs on 62 Indiana farms were lost between farrowing and weaning time, E. F. Ferrin of the animal husbandry division of the University of Minne- sota says: "Possibly such losses do not occur in this state, but the figures are no doubt reasonably close to the truth in Min- nesota. Why should there be such heavy losses, and what percentage of them are preventable? "One of the principal causes for loing young pigs is lack" of good shelter. Too many sows farrow in dirty, (lusty sheds and where the small 1921Old Jenks left home drunk last night. Last night you were full of liquor; where did you get it? At the filling station, yea' honor. MasterI bet you've been at whiskey, James! ButlerBeg pardon, sir, but I never bet. We Highest Prices for Pd Iron, Copper, Heavy Brass, Rags, Rubbers, Tires. Pipe Fittings, Brass Goods, Belting and Hose carried in stock. Acetylene Welding. The Ortonville Foundry W. F. MULLICA, Prop. Phone 23 ,i I i ii i iii i1,,i i IDYA 74578 Salesmenl Earn More SIRE--Coco 60171 and traces back to the Great Picador belonging to the French Government. DAM--Rigolette 49958 Home now ready for service and will be stood at the C. W: Merchant farm and also the W. G. Von- Eschen farm in Yellowbank Township. Horse will be traveled and further stands made to accommodate those in the vicinity. TERMS----To insure standing colt, $15.00. In case mare is sold following, fee becomes due and payable. C. W. Merchant, Owner Handled by W. G. VON ESCHEN Ortonville, Minnesota. Thousands of salesmen now using Ford Runabouts have in- creased their earning capacity up to 35%--and more. A point well worth your serious consid- eration. The entire expense Springtime is the season of the year when bixxts build nests, sweethearts build plans for the future and grown up men and women build homes. We have every lumber for every buikling purpose and St is priced at a figure that should start your building at once. Geier Lumber Co. Ortonville Minn. including operation and main- tenance rarely exceeds railroad fares. Let us prove how a Ford Runabout will help you earn more money. Terms if desired. J. ARTHUR MATTHEWS Ortonville, Minn. T the base of our good relations with our .de- positors are the frankness and competence of our officers each of whom is endeavoring to make the Citizens National Bank the most helpful institution in Ortonville.