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The Ortonville Independent
Ortonville, Minnesota
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May 4, 1922     The Ortonville Independent
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May 4, 1922
 

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1 PAGE 8 THE ORTONVILjLE INDEPENDF2PT THURSDAY, MAY A @ @ WANT ADS , RATES--Ten cents per line per in- sertion. Minimum charge 25 cents. Payment for want-ads in advance will be appreciated: the book-keep. ero will thus be relieved of the work of keeping many small accounts. LOST--Tire, rim, light and license from Ford car on Wednesday night, some place in Ortonville. License number, A-4160. Finder please re- turn t Casper Wiegand, at Orton- ville postoffice, for reward. 52-2 LOST--Gold wrist watch in leather case, lost in front of Evangelical hospital. Finder return to Hos- pital for reward. "52-1 FOUND--Package containing article of clothing, found on road to Big Stone City. Owner inquire at the Independent. 50-* SALESMAN WANTED--"A Twin Cities manufacturer of Aprons and Wash Dresses desires the services of lady Or gentleman as sales re- presentative at Ortonville and sur- rounding territory to take orders for their goods which are being sold direct from factory to wearer. Our line is very high class and comprises bout twelve styles. Position is -permanent with good pay. Send references with application. Sam- ples may be arranged for by writ- ing J. P. Olson, 616 Exchange Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minnesota." "52-1 WANTED--A young man to canvass the country territory for an estab- lished line of goods, good pay, and must furnish own rig to travel with. For information write to Box No. 86, Ortonville, Minn. "51-2 WANTED--Girl for general house- work. Call 282. "52-1 PASTURAGE--Will take in your cat- tie for the season, and not over- stock. Three fine pastures with fine water, south, east and northeast of Ortonville. A. B. Kaercher & Co., Ortonville, Minn. 52-2 PASTURAGEHave pasturage for 25 head ef cattle and horses. Henry Thiel, Ortonville, Minn. "52-2 CORN FOR SALE--Near Clinton; in- quire of A. B. Kaercher & Co. '152-2 TIMOTHY SEED--Rave about 1000 lbs of clean Timothy Seed or sale. Inquire of A. B. Kaercher & Co. *52-2 FOR SALE--White Dent Seed Corn, 100 per cent teat, at $2.25 per bush- el. "Phone 5-F-32. Mrs. Otto Rubi- schum. "52-1 FOR SALE---Six room house wth bath, electric lights, hot air furnace, hot and cold water, large garage, hen house, and one acre of land. In- quire of John F. Witte, OrtonviUe Minn. * 5 -' :FOR RENT--Three room cottage, furnls]$ed, w i t h large screene6 porch, t located near Foster. Fire fishing, beautiful SlXt Inquire el Miss Grace KaercheOrtonviUe, Minn. *50-tf FOR SALE--Hatching eggs from prize-winning Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. Price per 15, $1.50. Mrs. J. P. Johnson, Ortonvirle, Minn. Phone 195. SCHOOL NOTES SENIOR REPORTERS Nora Mortenson Edwin Carlson ;afldred Waldo JUNIOR REPORTERS Verna Kamlah Reuben Marfinson Kussell Bertelson Field work opened in earnest this week. Joan Barsema expects to be abseni ,all week. Come to the "Pixies." It's going to be good. Saturday night is the date set for the Junior-Senior party. Track elimination contests were held in the Junior high school Wed- nesday. Every day brings us closer to the nd of this school ter, m. Let's make vse of the four weeks left. The 7th grade has another mem- i ")er added to its roll. Ronald Pouzar has joined our happy family. We arc sorry, to hear that Harold and Marjorie Hahn have been obliged to drop school because of ill health. Troop No. 2 had a talk and exhibi- tion on rope throwing by Floyd Bol- sta at their meeting Monday night. The two groups of Camp Fire Girls postponed their regular Tuesday night meeting because of their other work. A $500.00 reward is offered to any one finding Francis Walker in his as- sc,m, bty room seat at nihe o'clock Mon- day, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday morning. Stanley Clarke has been obliged to leave school in order to help his fath- er with the work on their farm in North Dakota. He expects to be back in itme to take his examinations. If some one would like some speci- fic information as to the future of Ortonville, we refer them to the Jun- ior and Senior Civics classes which are drawing maps of the future of Ortonvilte. The state examination schedule, which is to begin, May 26, is posted on the bulletin board. That means some hard work for some of'us. It makes us realize how little time there is left of this school term in which to secure our credits. Dr. Stewart, who is the president of the Flying Squadron gave a very interesting talk to the High School last Thursday afternoon. His talk was an inspiration to his audience. We are always glad to lave speakers like Mr. Stewart come to the high school and talk to us. After weeks of hard work the 7th and 8th grades finished the posters they were making for an operetta, "The Pixies." In the 7th grade the prize winners ,were: Helen Shumaker, first lirtze; Mary Karsten, 2nd prize; Doris Hahn, 3rd prize. In the 8th rade the winners were: Grace Rudd, st prize; Bernice Kruger, 2nd prize; onald Walker, 3rd prize. The Sophomore Training girls are reparing and serving meals this .eek and next. The first meal, a breakfast, "was prepared and served by Agnes Hanson and Mildred Wal- do, Tuesday morning at 8:00 a. m. The guests were: Mr. Palmer, Mrs. Garvey, Mr. Tragcthon, Mr. Knoll, Miss McBride, Mr. Stegner, and Mr. Fitzsimmons. M r. Fitzsimmons, which breakfast tasted the best? Did you have enough, Mr. Tragethon ? FOR SALEEggs for hatching. White Wyandottes ad Barred Ply- mouth Rocks. Both breeds prize winners. $1.00 per Setting, $5.00 per hundred. Mrs. J. H. Chapman, Olnville, Minn., Phone 212-L-2 47-6 TRACTOR FOR SALE--With plows and full equipment. New in 1921. Tems. A snap. Inquire of R. C. Kaercher, Ortonville, Minn. 52-2 RUGS WOVEN--I will weave rag rugs from now on at the home of my son, A. S. Halls. Prices--27 in. wide, 65c; 30 in. wide, 75c. Mrs. S. J. Halls. *47-tf HEMSTITCHINCg--Will do hemstitch- ing: at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. 27-tf-c FOR SALEProgressive Everbearing Strawbe-ty Plants at 25c per doz. Mike Matzoll. Phone 243-J. 51-4 FOR SALE--Camp house on wheels. G. C. Ank, 1316 5th St. S. E, Min- neapolis. *52-2 FOR SALE--One set double driving ham,s with collars. Call 173. 52-1 SUMMER RESORT LOTS. I am offering for sale or rent splendid strip of land located near Sylvan Beach, just a step north of Fos- ter, where fishing cannot be excelled and where water is supplied from min- eral springs. Campers should com- municate with me for particulars. Rent charges will be reasonable as well as sale price. Frank Rosenthai, address Clinton or GraceviUe. 52-4 ONE-ACRE CONTEST FOR MARQUIS WHEAT RAISERS A. D. Haedecke of University Farm announces that the Minnesota Crop Improvement association, of which he is secretary, will conduct a contest for the best acre of marquis wheat raised in Minnesota. Cash prizes amounting to $150 and offered by the Spring Wheat lanu-vement associa- tion, with headquar,2rs in Minneapo Its, will be awarded, Entries may be made any time up to July I. For rules, regulations and conditions, write to Mr. Haedecke at University Farm, St. Paul. CAMPFIRE GIRLS IN PLAY. "A Southern Cinderella To Be Pre- sented at Odessa, May 6. Camp Fire Girls of Odessa will present "A Southern Cinderella," at the village hall, at that place on Sat- urday, May 6. The girls have given considerable of their time toward the presentatiorf of this play and the pub- lic is assured of an evening's enter- tainment well up in the rank of home talent productions. Cast of characters are: Madame Charteris, an 01d aristo- crat .................................. Edna Ferch Enid Betlamy, a southern cinderella .......................................... Leota Bohn Miss Rose Winterherry, a famous settlement worker....Evelya Wagner Miss Johnnie Bell Randolph, a lit- tle coquette ................ Laura Reindl Katherine Hawke, an English nurse ........................................ Laura Calais Caroline Hawke, her sister, an ad- venturess, . ................. Wilma Reindl Mammy Judy Johnson, a black, blue grass widow ........ Elsie Leuenberg PLACE---A Southern Home. ACT ILiving room at Charter's Hall. Enid comes home. ACT II--Same, three days later The burning of the will. ACT III--Same, two years late. Cin- derella goes to the ball. Music by Odessa Orchestra. City "Cop" Can Fill Your Order for Farm Laborers At this season of the year when farm laborers are migrating north- ward in search of work no (me knows better where to lay his hands on the right man than the city cop. W.P. Mittelsteadt, city policeman, has had a number of men apply to him for farn work and other forms of labor the past ten days and up to this time he has secured work for several of the ap- plicants. To aid the unemployment situation it is requested that anyone desiring workhen leave wQrd with him, and two birds will have been kill- ed with one stone. In years past the task of placing transient laborers fell to the lot of the county agent but Since his resig- nation Mittelstedt has volunteered to aid as best he'can in serving as a medium in this work. --Read 'era--the ADS! Wants Her t/iri To Marry A Farmer The Farm Home Is the Safeguard of Family Life, Says Woman Who Won Prize. The farm home is the stronghoht of real family life. That is what Mrs. Minnie Ellingson Topping of Bloom- ington Ferry, Minn., whote in reply to the question: "Would You Want "Your Daughter to Marry a Farmer?" Her letter was one of two letters from Minnesota farm women to win pmzes in a nationwide contest. "There is a special reason why I would like to have my daughter ,marry a farmer," Mrs. Topping wrote from her farm home. "I wish to have her surrounded with interests that will emphasize the best qualities of her soul and make use of the highest capacities for which she, as a woman, is fitted. "The country is an ideal setting for family life. One of our big newspa- pers had recently this headline: "Will the Family Stand?" The very hope of Amerca today is in the family. Anything that 'disrupts it makes for anarchy. "Romance plays a good part in young life. Last winter I went with a neighbor on the milk route. Cross- roads being drifted, teams met the truck, with their cans of milk. These teams were often driven by boys, khaki-clad and fur-clad" from head to foot. They have had their thrills at first hand. Young  princes of the farms that they were, they might have been envied by any city boy. "The boys and girls who go with their father to the barn these early spring mornings are introduced to nature's secrets thru the new calf, lamb or colt that has taken up its abode over night. Sex lessons are taught right, because naturally. "My daughter, having been reared with close attention to the fact that water and heat in the home are neces- sary to health, would be expected to embody these conveniences in the plans she makes for her home, with her farmer-husband, and to insist that sanitation and convenience be the rule in the house as well as in the barn. From childhood, my daughter has had a small amount of money tel control, and by this has learned the I value of money. I would expect her / to formulate some system of finance i with her husband that would bringI her a share of the earnings of the] farm it may be a budget system, a side line--like chickens, milk or gar- denor direct share of the fanm,'s output. It must be something, recog- nizing her partnership in the enteg- prise, and adequate to maintain her independence and selfrespect. "She should be logical enough to meeb emergencies in a sensible man- ner; if this meant the climbing of a windmill, or hitching up a fractious team of other outside work, I should expect her to do it efficiently. In her devotion to husband and home, she would not forget that she is a social being, functioning for community bet- terment thru the mediums of health- ful amusements, mental alertness and spiritual uplift. "Believing that the country is the very best place for putting into prac- tice the ideals that have developed with her character, for furthering principles of industry, and the intelli- gent administration of homely but worthy tasks, for fostering a love for simple things, and for loving service to her own and others, I would be very glad to have my daughter mar- School Will Send Trhck Team to Fargo Tourney Entry was made today by Coach Stegner, of a team of four, to repre- sent the local school at the Fargo track meeting which is to be held May 11, 12, and 13 of this moth. The team c(mposed of Milton Grice, Rob- eft Hasslen, Howard Kaercher, and Lyle Stotesbery, will participate in the quarter mile, half mile lelay, and mile runs and also in the short dashes and high jumping. The material this year is especially promising for-the short dashes and high jumping events, in the opinion of Mr. Stegner, and the boys are going into the tourney with pep and vim of seasoned veterans. Entry will also be made at the state tournaments to be conducted at the University of Minnesota campus and at Carleton College at Northfield, May 27. Lake Front Near Pavilion Designated as City Park Property comprising block two and three, locatad on the lakeshore north and south of the Eahtonka Pavilion, was designated as a city park on Mon- day evening by the city council at their regular meeting. This tract was purchased last year by the city from the Milwaukee Rail- road for $1,200.00 and its designation as a city park is believed without question a step in the right direction. Very little other business came be- fore the meeting except that F. L Hgffman secured, the sprinkling and street grading work for the year. This w/m formerly done by O. H. Minick. A permit was Igranted to Fred Pe- terson and Son to erect a team scale and the laying of a two inch water main for private users was authorized on Washington Avenue from second street to the hospital. New Subscribers Recently Add- ed to the Independent List Casseo, Wm. Stomn, Sam GowaJ:, John Byh:'e. E. E. Eischen. Nick Spink, Jerome HoLman. F. H. Shradcr, Victor Shannon tIote] Plmm ',or. E. M. Bolsta. Dr. Chas. Peterson, Otto E. Shelver, Dr. H. J. Ortonville Drug Co. - .............. 4t Two Men Forced Thru Top When Sedan Hits Tree Two men were forced thru the top of a Ford Sedan and the driver pinned against the steering wheel when the car in which they were riding col- lided with a sturdy elm elm tree on second street here, near Halls Garage, on Tuesday morning. All three es- caped without serious injury altho the car, a new one, was badly damaged. According to the driver of the car they were not traveling more than 12 miles an hour when the accident occured. "I had turned around to talk to the two men in the rear seat and must have pulled the steering wheel with me when I did so for there was nothing defective about the car to cause it to swerve from it's course," the driver said. The car hit an elm tree ,measuring a foot and a half in diameter. When the impact came the car was forced over on it's side and the two men riding in the back seat were forced thru the top. Their es- cape vithott serious injury is con- sidered miraculous. All three of the men were strangers. Lakeside Club to Meet. On Wednesday evening, May 10th, the Lakeside Farmers' Club will hold a meeting in the schoolhouse, District No. 21, known as the Erickson school- house, 8 tmiles north of Ortonville, for the purpose of giving their orders for oils and greases, and all members of the club and also non-members are requested to attend. The club has been given a special price in quan- tity lots. Do not forget the date and place. I LEGAL NOTICES I OMORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SAL Default having been made in the] pa:maent of the sum of One thousand] one hundred seventy-one and 40-1001 Dollars, ($1,171.40), which is claimed] to be due and is due at the date of this notice upon a certain Mortgage, duly executed and delivered by John Pullis and Hana Puilis, his wife, mort- gagors to The Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Corretl, Minnesota, bearing date the 1st day of March, 1920, and with a power of sale there- in contained, duly recorded in the of- fice of the Register of Deeds in and for the County of Big Stone and State of Minnesota, on the 22nd day of March, 1920, at 9:00 o'clock, a. rm m Book 54 of Mortgages, on page 240. Which said Mortgage, together with the debt secured thereby, was duly assigned by said Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank of Correll, Mort- gagee, to John H. Mayne by written assignment dated the 24th day of March, 1920, and recorded in the of- fice of said Register of Deeds, on the 25th day of March, 1920, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in Book 46 of Mort- gages on page 192. And whereas the said John H. Mayne, the assignee, Mortgagee, and holder of said Mortgage, has duly elec- ted and does hereby elect to declare the whole principal sum, of gaid Mort- gage, due and payable at the date of this notice, under the terms and con- ditions of said Mortgage and the power of sale therein contained; and whereas there is actually due and claimed to be due and payable at the date of this notice the sum of nine thousand three hundred eleven and 69- 100 ($9,311.69) Dollars including prin- cipal, interest, and delinquent taxes, and whereas the said power of sale has become operative, and no action or proceeding having been instituted, at law or otherwise, to recover the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any part thereof: Now, therefore, notice is hereby given: that by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided, the said Mort- gage will be foreclosed by a sale of the premises described in and con- veyed by said Mortgage, viz: The Southwest Quarter (SW), of Section Nine (9), Township one hun- dred twenty-two (122), Range forty- four (44), and containing one hundred sixty (160)) acres more or less, - cording to the survey thereof, ::d sCttmted in Big Stone County and State of Minnesota, with the heredi- ments and appurtenances which sale will be ,made by the sheriff of said Big Stone county, at the front door of the Court House in the City of Or- tonville in said County and State, on the 19th day of June, 1922, at 10:00 o'clock a. m., f that day, at pblic vendue, to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt of nine thousand three hundred eleven and 69-100 Dollars ($9,311.69.00), and interest and the taxes, if any, on said prem- ises, and Seventy-five Dollars ($75.00), Attorney's fees, as stipulated in and by said Mortgage in case of foreclosure, and the disbursements allowed by law; subject to redemption at any time within one year from the date of sale, as provided by law. Dated April 25 A. D." 1922. JOHN H. MAY'NE, Assignee of Mortgage. W. C. PREUS, Attorney for Assignee of Mortgage. Ortonville, Minn. I (First Pub. May 4 6w) i PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND NEWS ITEMS Mrs. Alice Runnings arrived Sun- day from Minneapolis and visited un- til Monday night with her son, Paul Runnings. Mrs. N. Rin(lerle, who is visiting at the M. J. Hurley home in this city, was the guest of Milbank friends over the week-end. Harry Gun&erson. accompanied by his sister, Mrs. E. Peterson, drove to Wheaten the latter part of the week for a short visit with relatives. Paul Runnings, accompanied by his mother, Mrs. Alice Runnings of Min- neapolis, left Monday night for Red- tamed, following the first shower accompanied by play. Showers that fell grass, urged it to new life, forth leaves, and caused buds trees t swell with a promise before many more days, and a big help to growing grain. The rain was accampanied by flashes of lightning, together sample lot of hailstones. St. Paul's New Mayor Browns Valley Arthur E. Nelson, newly mayor of St. Paul by an mg majority over William labor candidate, was born at fie!d, Minn.. for a visit of several days Valley, Minnesota. Mr. with friends and relatives, quite thirty years old, and is Miss Vera Geier, who has been exception the youngest mayor nursing in a Fargo hospital for some has had. Mr. Nelson time, arrived home the latter part of public schools at Browns the week, and will visit indefinitely after graduation in 1909 entered with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Mister College, St. Paul, and Geier. took a course at the St. Paul of law. Mrs. Milton Malmquist and baby arrived Saturday afternoon frcm. Red Wing, Minn., where they have visited --Try a Want Ad--they Get relatives for a week, and will visit suits. for a time at the John Malmquist home here. Mrs. Mary K Hubbart and daugh- ter, Helen, arrive(| the fore part of the week from Pasadena, Calif., have opened up their cottage on peninsula, where they will remain the summer. Joe Leighton, who visited friends here Friday, informs us he has resigned his position Appleton Press, and has similar position at Milwaukee, He left for there Friday night; Ortonville Doffs Dusty Garb for Brightest All campaigners in the bi cleamup drive to make Ortonville city beautiful were outdone by ture on Tuesday v-hen_.the dull g attire of early spring was doffed a rainment of brightest green hue E DAY WAS 24th having Sales A Specialty Mott er's Day May 14th The day set aside to honor the best mother that ever lived--your mother. Wear a flower in her honor. We have a fine assortment of ROSES LILIES TULIPS DAFFODILS CARNATIONS SWEET PEAS Any variety is appropriate. O. M. OS:[:N FLORIST Phone 6-L Ortonville, Minn i As a tribute to the De )arted, we offer you the choice of our com ete array of cut and uncut Stones at prices well wthin the reach of all. Stones ordered now will be set before Memorial Day. Write for our design book, furnished free upon request. Manufacturers of ORTONVILLE RUBY RED GRANITE 0RTOR1tt[ MOR00bI[00I JOHNSON & LINDHOLM, Props. 1 PAGE 8 THE ORTONVILjLE INDEPENDF2PT THURSDAY, MAY A @ @ WANT ADS , RATES--Ten cents per line per in- sertion. Minimum charge 25 cents. Payment for want-ads in advance will be appreciated: the book-keep. ero will thus be relieved of the work of keeping many small accounts. LOST--Tire, rim, light and license from Ford car on Wednesday night, some place in Ortonville. License number, A-4160. Finder please re- turn t Casper Wiegand, at Orton- ville postoffice, for reward. 52-2 LOST--Gold wrist watch in leather case, lost in front of Evangelical hospital. Finder return to Hos- pital for reward. "52-1 FOUND--Package containing article of clothing, found on road to Big Stone City. Owner inquire at the Independent. 50-* SALESMAN WANTED--"A Twin Cities manufacturer of Aprons and Wash Dresses desires the services of lady Or gentleman as sales re- presentative at Ortonville and sur- rounding territory to take orders for their goods which are being sold direct from factory to wearer. Our line is very high class and comprises bout twelve styles. Position is -permanent with good pay. Send references with application. Sam- ples may be arranged for by writ- ing J. P. Olson, 616 Exchange Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minnesota." "52-1 WANTED--A young man to canvass the country territory for an estab- lished line of goods, good pay, and must furnish own rig to travel with. For information write to Box No. 86, Ortonville, Minn. "51-2 WANTED--Girl for general house- work. Call 282. "52-1 PASTURAGE--Will take in your cat- tie for the season, and not over- stock. Three fine pastures with fine water, south, east and northeast of Ortonville. A. B. Kaercher & Co., Ortonville, Minn. 52-2 PASTURAGEHave pasturage for 25 head ef cattle and horses. Henry Thiel, Ortonville, Minn. "52-2 CORN FOR SALE--Near Clinton; in- quire of A. B. Kaercher & Co. '152-2 TIMOTHY SEED--Rave about 1000 lbs of clean Timothy Seed or sale. Inquire of A. B. Kaercher & Co. *52-2 FOR SALE--White Dent Seed Corn, 100 per cent teat, at $2.25 per bush- el. "Phone 5-F-32. Mrs. Otto Rubi- schum. "52-1 FOR SALE---Six room house wth bath, electric lights, hot air furnace, hot and cold water, large garage, hen house, and one acre of land. In- quire of John F. Witte, OrtonviUe Minn. * 5 -' :FOR RENT--Three room cottage, furnls]$ed, w i t h large screene6 porch, t located near Foster. Fire fishing, beautiful SlXt Inquire el Miss Grace KaercheOrtonviUe, Minn. *50-tf FOR SALE--Hatching eggs from prize-winning Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. Price per 15, $1.50. Mrs. J. P. Johnson, Ortonvirle, Minn. Phone 195. SCHOOL NOTES SENIOR REPORTERS Nora Mortenson Edwin Carlson ;afldred Waldo JUNIOR REPORTERS Verna Kamlah Reuben Marfinson Kussell Bertelson Field work opened in earnest this week. Joan Barsema expects to be abseni ,all week. Come to the "Pixies." It's going to be good. Saturday night is the date set for the Junior-Senior party. Track elimination contests were held in the Junior high school Wed- nesday. Every day brings us closer to the nd of this school ter, m. Let's make vse of the four weeks left. The 7th grade has another mem- i ")er added to its roll. Ronald Pouzar has joined our happy family. We arc sorry, to hear that Harold and Marjorie Hahn have been obliged to drop school because of ill health. Troop No. 2 had a talk and exhibi- tion on rope throwing by Floyd Bol- sta at their meeting Monday night. The two groups of Camp Fire Girls postponed their regular Tuesday night meeting because of their other work. A $500.00 reward is offered to any one finding Francis Walker in his as- sc,m, bty room seat at nihe o'clock Mon- day, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday morning. Stanley Clarke has been obliged to leave school in order to help his fath- er with the work on their farm in North Dakota. He expects to be back in itme to take his examinations. If some one would like some speci- fic information as to the future of Ortonville, we refer them to the Jun- ior and Senior Civics classes which are drawing maps of the future of Ortonvilte. The state examination schedule, which is to begin, May 26, is posted on the bulletin board. That means some hard work for some of'us. It makes us realize how little time there is left of this school term in which to secure our credits. Dr. Stewart, who is the president of the Flying Squadron gave a very interesting talk to the High School last Thursday afternoon. His talk was an inspiration to his audience. We are always glad to lave speakers like Mr. Stewart come to the high school and talk to us. After weeks of hard work the 7th and 8th grades finished the posters they were making for an operetta, "The Pixies." In the 7th grade the prize winners ,were: Helen Shumaker, first lirtze; Mary Karsten, 2nd prize; Doris Hahn, 3rd prize. In the 8th rade the winners were: Grace Rudd, st prize; Bernice Kruger, 2nd prize; onald Walker, 3rd prize. The Sophomore Training girls are reparing and serving meals this .eek and next. The first meal, a breakfast, "was prepared and served by Agnes Hanson and Mildred Wal- do, Tuesday morning at 8:00 a. m. The guests were: Mr. Palmer, Mrs. Garvey, Mr. Tragcthon, Mr. Knoll, Miss McBride, Mr. Stegner, and Mr. Fitzsimmons. M r. Fitzsimmons, which breakfast tasted the best? Did you have enough, Mr. Tragethon ? FOR SALEEggs for hatching. White Wyandottes ad Barred Ply- mouth Rocks. Both breeds prize winners. $1.00 per Setting, $5.00 per hundred. Mrs. J. H. Chapman, Olnville, Minn., Phone 212-L-2 47-6 TRACTOR FOR SALE--With plows and full equipment. New in 1921. Tems. A snap. Inquire of R. C. Kaercher, Ortonville, Minn. 52-2 RUGS WOVEN--I will weave rag rugs from now on at the home of my son, A. S. Halls. Prices--27 in. wide, 65c; 30 in. wide, 75c. Mrs. S. J. Halls. *47-tf HEMSTITCHINCg--Will do hemstitch- ing: at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. 27-tf-c FOR SALEProgressive Everbearing Strawbe-ty Plants at 25c per doz. Mike Matzoll. Phone 243-J. 51-4 FOR SALE--Camp house on wheels. G. C. Ank, 1316 5th St. S. E, Min- neapolis. *52-2 FOR SALE--One set double driving ham,s with collars. Call 173. 52-1 SUMMER RESORT LOTS. I am offering for sale or rent splendid strip of land located near Sylvan Beach, just a step north of Fos- ter, where fishing cannot be excelled and where water is supplied from min- eral springs. Campers should com- municate with me for particulars. Rent charges will be reasonable as well as sale price. Frank Rosenthai, address Clinton or GraceviUe. 52-4 ONE-ACRE CONTEST FOR MARQUIS WHEAT RAISERS A. D. Haedecke of University Farm announces that the Minnesota Crop Improvement association, of which he is secretary, will conduct a contest for the best acre of marquis wheat raised in Minnesota. Cash prizes amounting to $150 and offered by the Spring Wheat lanu-vement associa- tion, with headquar,2rs in Minneapo Its, will be awarded, Entries may be made any time up to July I. For rules, regulations and conditions, write to Mr. Haedecke at University Farm, St. Paul. CAMPFIRE GIRLS IN PLAY. "A Southern Cinderella To Be Pre- sented at Odessa, May 6. Camp Fire Girls of Odessa will present "A Southern Cinderella," at the village hall, at that place on Sat- urday, May 6. The girls have given considerable of their time toward the presentatiorf of this play and the pub- lic is assured of an evening's enter- tainment well up in the rank of home talent productions. Cast of characters are: Madame Charteris, an 01d aristo- crat .................................. Edna Ferch Enid Betlamy, a southern cinderella .......................................... Leota Bohn Miss Rose Winterherry, a famous settlement worker....Evelya Wagner Miss Johnnie Bell Randolph, a lit- tle coquette ................ Laura Reindl Katherine Hawke, an English nurse ........................................ Laura Calais Caroline Hawke, her sister, an ad- venturess, . ................. Wilma Reindl Mammy Judy Johnson, a black, blue grass widow ........ Elsie Leuenberg PLACE---A Southern Home. ACT ILiving room at Charter's Hall. Enid comes home. ACT II--Same, three days later The burning of the will. ACT III--Same, two years late. Cin- derella goes to the ball. Music by Odessa Orchestra. City "Cop" Can Fill Your Order for Farm Laborers At this season of the year when farm laborers are migrating north- ward in search of work no (me knows better where to lay his hands on the right man than the city cop. W.P. Mittelsteadt, city policeman, has had a number of men apply to him for farn work and other forms of labor the past ten days and up to this time he has secured work for several of the ap- plicants. To aid the unemployment situation it is requested that anyone desiring workhen leave wQrd with him, and two birds will have been kill- ed with one stone. In years past the task of placing transient laborers fell to the lot of the county agent but Since his resig- nation Mittelstedt has volunteered to aid as best he'can in serving as a medium in this work. --Read 'era--the ADS! Wants Her t/iri To Marry A Farmer The Farm Home Is the Safeguard of Family Life, Says Woman Who Won Prize. The farm home is the stronghoht of real family life. That is what Mrs. Minnie Ellingson Topping of Bloom- ington Ferry, Minn., whote in reply to the question: "Would You Want "Your Daughter to Marry a Farmer?" Her letter was one of two letters from Minnesota farm women to win pmzes in a nationwide contest. "There is a special reason why I would like to have my daughter ,marry a farmer," Mrs. Topping wrote from her farm home. "I wish to have her surrounded with interests that will emphasize the best qualities of her soul and make use of the highest capacities for which she, as a woman, is fitted. "The country is an ideal setting for family life. One of our big newspa- pers had recently this headline: "Will the Family Stand?" The very hope of Amerca today is in the family. Anything that 'disrupts it makes for anarchy. "Romance plays a good part in young life. Last winter I went with a neighbor on the milk route. Cross- roads being drifted, teams met the truck, with their cans of milk. These teams were often driven by boys, khaki-clad and fur-clad" from head to foot. They have had their thrills at first hand. Young  princes of the farms that they were, they might have been envied by any city boy. "The boys and girls who go with their father to the barn these early spring mornings are introduced to nature's secrets thru the new calf, lamb or colt that has taken up its abode over night. Sex lessons are taught right, because naturally. "My daughter, having been reared with close attention to the fact that water and heat in the home are neces- sary to health, would be expected to embody these conveniences in the plans she makes for her home, with her farmer-husband, and to insist that sanitation and convenience be the rule in the house as well as in the barn. From childhood, my daughter has had a small amount of money tel control, and by this has learned the I value of money. I would expect her / to formulate some system of finance i with her husband that would bringI her a share of the earnings of the] farm it may be a budget system, a side line--like chickens, milk or gar- denor direct share of the fanm,'s output. It must be something, recog- nizing her partnership in the enteg- prise, and adequate to maintain her independence and selfrespect. "She should be logical enough to meeb emergencies in a sensible man- ner; if this meant the climbing of a windmill, or hitching up a fractious team of other outside work, I should expect her to do it efficiently. In her devotion to husband and home, she would not forget that she is a social being, functioning for community bet- terment thru the mediums of health- ful amusements, mental alertness and spiritual uplift. "Believing that the country is the very best place for putting into prac- tice the ideals that have developed with her character, for furthering principles of industry, and the intelli- gent administration of homely but worthy tasks, for fostering a love for simple things, and for loving service to her own and others, I would be very glad to have my daughter mar- School Will Send Trhck Team to Fargo Tourney Entry was made today by Coach Stegner, of a team of four, to repre- sent the local school at the Fargo track meeting which is to be held May 11, 12, and 13 of this moth. The team c(mposed of Milton Grice, Rob- eft Hasslen, Howard Kaercher, and Lyle Stotesbery, will participate in the quarter mile, half mile lelay, and mile runs and also in the short dashes and high jumping. The material this year is especially promising for-the short dashes and high jumping events, in the opinion of Mr. Stegner, and the boys are going into the tourney with pep and vim of seasoned veterans. Entry will also be made at the state tournaments to be conducted at the University of Minnesota campus and at Carleton College at Northfield, May 27. Lake Front Near Pavilion Designated as City Park Property comprising block two and three, locatad on the lakeshore north and south of the Eahtonka Pavilion, was designated as a city park on Mon- day evening by the city council at their regular meeting. This tract was purchased last year by the city from the Milwaukee Rail- road for $1,200.00 and its designation as a city park is believed without question a step in the right direction. Very little other business came be- fore the meeting except that F. L Hgffman secured, the sprinkling and street grading work for the year. This w/m formerly done by O. H. Minick. A permit was Igranted to Fred Pe- terson and Son to erect a team scale and the laying of a two inch water main for private users was authorized on Washington Avenue from second street to the hospital. New Subscribers Recently Add- ed to the Independent List Casseo, Wm. Stomn, Sam GowaJ:, John Byh:'e. E. E. Eischen. Nick Spink, Jerome HoLman. F. H. Shradcr, Victor Shannon tIote] Plmm ',or. E. M. Bolsta. Dr. Chas. Peterson, Otto E. Shelver, Dr. H. J. Ortonville Drug Co. - .............. 4t Two Men Forced Thru Top When Sedan Hits Tree Two men were forced thru the top of a Ford Sedan and the driver pinned against the steering wheel when the car in which they were riding col- lided with a sturdy elm elm tree on second street here, near Halls Garage, on Tuesday morning. All three es- caped without serious injury altho the car, a new one, was badly damaged. According to the driver of the car they were not traveling more than 12 miles an hour when the accident occured. "I had turned around to talk to the two men in the rear seat and must have pulled the steering wheel with me when I did so for there was nothing defective about the car to cause it to swerve from it's course," the driver said. The car hit an elm tree ,measuring a foot and a half in diameter. When the impact came the car was forced over on it's side and the two men riding in the back seat were forced thru the top. Their es- cape vithott serious injury is con- sidered miraculous. All three of the men were strangers. Lakeside Club to Meet. On Wednesday evening, May 10th, the Lakeside Farmers' Club will hold a meeting in the schoolhouse, District No. 21, known as the Erickson school- house, 8 tmiles north of Ortonville, for the purpose of giving their orders for oils and greases, and all members of the club and also non-members are requested to attend. The club has been given a special price in quan- tity lots. Do not forget the date and place. I LEGAL NOTICES I OMORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SAL Default having been made in the] pa:maent of the sum of One thousand] one hundred seventy-one and 40-1001 Dollars, ($1,171.40), which is claimed] to be due and is due at the date of this notice upon a certain Mortgage, duly executed and delivered by John Pullis and Hana Puilis, his wife, mort- gagors to The Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Corretl, Minnesota, bearing date the 1st day of March, 1920, and with a power of sale there- in contained, duly recorded in the of- fice of the Register of Deeds in and for the County of Big Stone and State of Minnesota, on the 22nd day of March, 1920, at 9:00 o'clock, a. rm m Book 54 of Mortgages, on page 240. Which said Mortgage, together with the debt secured thereby, was duly assigned by said Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank of Correll, Mort- gagee, to John H. Mayne by written assignment dated the 24th day of March, 1920, and recorded in the of- fice of said Register of Deeds, on the 25th day of March, 1920, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in Book 46 of Mort- gages on page 192. And whereas the said John H. Mayne, the assignee, Mortgagee, and holder of said Mortgage, has duly elec- ted and does hereby elect to declare the whole principal sum, of gaid Mort- gage, due and payable at the date of this notice, under the terms and con- ditions of said Mortgage and the power of sale therein contained; and whereas there is actually due and claimed to be due and payable at the date of this notice the sum of nine thousand three hundred eleven and 69- 100 ($9,311.69) Dollars including prin- cipal, interest, and delinquent taxes, and whereas the said power of sale has become operative, and no action or proceeding having been instituted, at law or otherwise, to recover the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any part thereof: Now, therefore, notice is hereby given: that by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided, the said Mort- gage will be foreclosed by a sale of the premises described in and con- veyed by said Mortgage, viz: The Southwest Quarter (SW), of Section Nine (9), Township one hun- dred twenty-two (122), Range forty- four (44), and containing one hundred sixty (160)) acres more or less, - cording to the survey thereof, ::d sCttmted in Big Stone County and State of Minnesota, with the heredi- ments and appurtenances which sale will be ,made by the sheriff of said Big Stone county, at the front door of the Court House in the City of Or- tonville in said County and State, on the 19th day of June, 1922, at 10:00 o'clock a. m., f that day, at pblic vendue, to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt of nine thousand three hundred eleven and 69-100 Dollars ($9,311.69.00), and interest and the taxes, if any, on said prem- ises, and Seventy-five Dollars ($75.00), Attorney's fees, as stipulated in and by said Mortgage in case of foreclosure, and the disbursements allowed by law; subject to redemption at any time within one year from the date of sale, as provided by law. Dated April 25 A. D." 1922. JOHN H. MAY'NE, Assignee of Mortgage. W. C. PREUS, Attorney for Assignee of Mortgage. Ortonville, Minn. I (First Pub. May 4 6w) i PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND NEWS ITEMS Mrs. Alice Runnings arrived Sun- day from Minneapolis and visited un- til Monday night with her son, Paul Runnings. Mrs. N. Rin(lerle, who is visiting at the M. J. Hurley home in this city, was the guest of Milbank friends over the week-end. Harry Gun&erson. accompanied by his sister, Mrs. E. Peterson, drove to Wheaten the latter part of the week for a short visit with relatives. Paul Runnings, accompanied by his mother, Mrs. Alice Runnings of Min- neapolis, left Monday night for Red- tamed, following the first shower accompanied by play. Showers that fell grass, urged it to new life, forth leaves, and caused buds trees t swell with a promise before many more days, and a big help to growing grain. The rain was accampanied by flashes of lightning, together sample lot of hailstones. St. Paul's New Mayor Browns Valley Arthur E. Nelson, newly mayor of St. Paul by an mg majority over William labor candidate, was born at fie!d, Minn.. for a visit of several days Valley, Minnesota. Mr. with friends and relatives, quite thirty years old, and is Miss Vera Geier, who has been exception the youngest mayor nursing in a Fargo hospital for some has had. Mr. Nelson time, arrived home the latter part of public schools at Browns the week, and will visit indefinitely after graduation in 1909 entered with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Mister College, St. Paul, and Geier. took a course at the St. Paul of law. Mrs. Milton Malmquist and baby arrived Saturday afternoon frcm. Red Wing, Minn., where they have visited --Try a Want Ad--they Get relatives for a week, and will visit suits. for a time at the John Malmquist home here. Mrs. Mary K Hubbart and daugh- ter, Helen, arrive(| the fore part of the week from Pasadena, Calif., have opened up their cottage on peninsula, where they will remain the summer. Joe Leighton, who visited friends here Friday, informs us he has resigned his position Appleton Press, and has similar position at Milwaukee, He left for there Friday night; Ortonville Doffs Dusty Garb for Brightest All campaigners in the bi cleamup drive to make Ortonville city beautiful were outdone by ture on Tuesday v-hen_.the dull g attire of early spring was doffed a rainment of brightest green hue E DAY WAS 24th having Sales A Specialty Mott er's Day May 14th The day set aside to honor the best mother that ever lived--your mother. Wear a flower in her honor. We have a fine assortment of ROSES LILIES TULIPS DAFFODILS CARNATIONS SWEET PEAS Any variety is appropriate. O. M. OS:[:N FLORIST Phone 6-L Ortonville, Minn i As a tribute to the De )arted, we offer you the choice of our com ete array of cut and uncut Stones at prices well wthin the reach of all. Stones ordered now will be set before Memorial Day. Write for our design book, furnished free upon request. Manufacturers of ORTONVILLE RUBY RED GRANITE 0RTOR1tt[ MOR00bI[00I JOHNSON & LINDHOLM, Props. PA WANT ADS  I J SCHOOL NOTES RATES--Ten nts per line per in.[ SENIOR REPORTERS ertion. Min mum charge 25 con  I Nora Mot n Edwin Car son Payment for wantlds in advancl :,nldred Waldo w be appriated; the bk.k-I JUNJOR REPORTERS ell will th be relined of the work l Vea Kam ah Reuben Mart n LOST--Tire, rim, light and linsell F. d k " e t frnm Ford car on wednesday zdght,,[ wee r opene m ca s zne place in Ortonvlle. Licen! j " B t t b ----- mm' zor rewa o- be good LOST--Gold wrat watch in leather Saturday night is the hospital Fader turn to HOe- Track eli] ,inati ease, lost in flnt of Evangelil the Junior-Sorrier party. pita] ler ward. "52 [ held in th e u nior -- __1 nesday. POUND--Package containing article EveFy day bring of elothh,g, found on a to Big nd of *his school to. Stne City. Owner inq uire at the ce of tile four weks left. lndepemlent. o.* Th e 7th SALESMAN WANTED--"A qvin )er addl to its roll, Cities anufaotur of Aprons and] has joined our happy fmily. Wash Dresses desires the rs We a sorry to of Iady br gentleman * sales  and Marjorie Hahn have been obliged prentJttie at Ortonville and sar- Lo drop hool beeau of ill health. undblg territol T t9 Cake orders Troop for their goods which a being acid lion on rope throwing by Floyd BOJ- die front ftory to wr. Our ta at their mting Monday night. line is very high class and comprises The two grous of Cp Fire Girls .'bout twelve stpl position is postponed their regular Tuesday night eent with good pay. Send meeting bause of their other work. fens with applition. S- A 5fl0 $ .00 ard Is offed to any p es may be aanged for by . one fl d ing J. P O on 616 Exchange Bk n mg Franms Walker in his - , . uembJy m t at nme o'clock Non Bldg. St Pan Minnesota." "52-1 ,a T .... . ........................ t. y, uday, Wednesday, Thursday, WANTED--A yog man to cvs and Friday moing. the country territory for an estab- Stanley Clarke has been obliged to ]ished ]ie of goods, good pay d ]ve hoo] in order to he]p his fath- mt furnish n dg to travel withA er with the For iaoation ite to BOX Nm[ North Dakota. 86, Orfnville, Minn. "51-2 If meone wouM like some poe. WANTED--Girl, for general house- [ fl . f . i c in ormatlon as to the futu of work. C[ 282. 52- j Ortonville, we refer th m to the Jun- ou. [ ior and Senior Civies d ...... hich tl e fo r th e on, d not or.[are drawing maps of the ture of tock. Thee fie pasture with fine Ortonvile. Water, south, east and norLha of The state examinmtlon schedule, Ortonville. A* B. Kaereher & Co., w]eh is to begin, May 26, is posted Ortenville, Minn. B2-g on the bulletin board. That PASTURAGE-Have pasturage for 25 hd sf chttle and horses. HenIT ThieL Ortonville, Minu. *2-2 CORN FOR SALF-Near Clinton" in- qui of A.  Kaeher & Co. 2-2 TIMOThy SEED--Knee about I000 Ibs of cle Timothy ed or sald. Inqu, of A. B. Kaerehr & Co. *52-2 FOR ALF-Whlte Dent Send Corn, 100 per cent test, at $22.5 pr bush- st. Phone 5-F2. M. Otto RUbl- FOR SALF--Six om hou wth bath, eltrc liht,, hot air fuma. hot n4 COld water, 18rge-g4, hen house, and one  of land. In. qm of John F. Wltte. Ortoaville h. "5> FOR RENT--ne m tge, ferreted, with large scee porch lted n Foster. Fro, flshg beautiful Inquire ot SALE--Hatching egg from prlze:-winning Single Comb Rhode Island Rode. Price per 15, $1,50, M. J P. Johnr.. Ortonine. Mn Phone 195. FOR $ALE--Egs far hatching White Wydott ad Barred Ply- mouth Rks, Both breeds pri winer $1.00 per ttitlg, 00 per ]und]. M& J', H. Chspman Ortnlte. Minn.. Phone 212-L-2. TRACTOR FOR SALEWith plows and full lmpmeno New in IL 'lza. A snap. lnqt of R. C. Kaehe Ortonville Minn* 52-2 RUGS WOVEN--I will weave rag tugs from n on at the home of my so., . S. Halls. p27 in. w de, 65c; 8O in. wide. 75 M. S. J. Hall " "47-t HEM STITCmNC--WI do hemstlteh- ig at 10 per yar M. A. L Ilg SALtessive Everrmg Stawb Plants at e per do. ME Matdl Phone 24aJ 1 FOR 8ALE--Camp 1 on whl. G C. Ank. 1316 5th St* 8. E.. Min- neallls. *52-2 FOR SAL4311e st double drttng has "Mth eolian, Call 17. 524 SUMMER RERT LOTS, I am offerg for ale or mn a splendid stp of land Itd n Sylvan Beh,atthof Fos- ter, whe fishing nnot be elIed and where water is suppliod from min- eral sponge. Cpers should oom- mmdte with me for parti1. R,mt eharas Viii be asonle Well  le pri. Frk Rosenthal, addrs Clinton or Geville. 54 ONE-ACRE CONTEST FOg MARQUIS WHEAT RAISERS A. D. Hadke of Unlversit Fa announce mat th Minraota Crop Imprevent soelatlon. of whh he is eretary, li ondx't a cons for the bet ae of marcels wht raised in Minneta. Ch pliz smarting to $10 and offe by the 8ing Wha Im-vmeno a nun, with headqxrs In np" ts. wilt be ard04 Eniee may be made any time Up to July 1, Par les. mdaflon* tad audtl0. write to Mr Radke at Universl Fa. at. Paul --Read 'em--the ADal Sh W tsHe 6il .................... e all r r New Subriber. R.atly Add. PERSONAL, SOCIAL accompanie b: .d to ,h I.d,penaent List AND NEWS ITEMS lay. To M y A Fame " .......... r Case, Wm. torch leaves, Storm, San] Farm Home-t the S f g d of Gmq John L[I Monday night with her son, Paul bolero many e  a e ear Bhte, E.E. Runnings. a big hplp to growing glu. Family Life, Says Woman  Eschcn' Nick Mrs. N, Rinderlo, who s visiting at The ir Who Won pri, , Sl'ink, derom j. Hurley hom in this city, flaslls of lightning, to Holman, F.H. was tho guest of Mflbank frmnds over amP Io lot of hailstune*, Shradc r, Viet or The fa/ home is the Shaanon lintel of real family lifo* T at i l,]uml/er, E.M. Harry Gund.rson, accompanied by St Paul's New Mayor minme Elhngn Topping of ]]lom" Bolsto' Dr. Chas. his sister, Mrs. E. Peteron, drovn to BFOWIL Valley in.ton Ferry, Minn., hote in repl) peterson, Otto E. to the question: "Wouht You Wahl Shelver, Dr H.J. Ielatives. A*har ,. Nelson, newl tour Daughter to Marzy a Fast, el.?' Ortonvil/f Dg Co. Paul Runnings, accompanied by his mother, Mrs, Alice Runmngs ing majority over prize: y night labor candidate, fiod, Mh,n., ally, Minnesota. Mr. Nelsoni '*Thoz* is a sla] reason why I wlth friends and latives. y daughter y When Sedan Hits Tree Ms Veva Geier,  xegi ion the young est mayor 1 a farmer," Mrs, Topping wrote from nursing in a Two men were ford thru th top intezests that will f a Ford S dan nd tile driver pinned the week, anti will visit indefinitely the best qualities of her agamst the strafing wheel when the with hr paints, Mr. and Mrs. D.E. College, Paul, make use of the highest car in which they we riding col. Geier. lidod with a stmdy elm elm Mrs. Milton" Malmquist aml baby second stt,t her, near Halls Garage, Saturday afternoon frr Red "The country i an ideal setting for on Tuesday moing. All thee as. Wing. Minn.. whe they have vited --Try a Want Ad--they Get fily life. One of our big ewspa- cape d without s*-rious injury altho the relatives for a week, and will sit prs had ntiy this headline: "Will car, a new one, was badly damaged, for a tl at the John Malmquist the Eami]y Stand?" The very hope of Ameba today is in the famiiy. Aol'g to the home he. Anything that -dispts It makes they were not travpling Mrs. Malt K Huhbart anti daugh- 12 miles an hour snahy, tot, helen, arrved the fore part "Rom plays a good palt in the week fm Pasadena, Calif., young life t mt r I  ent with have opened up their cottage on a neighbor on tim milk ute. Cross- must have polled the steenng wheel peninsula, wh tnoy will lmtn WA S made being drlftd, tea t the tek, with their cans of milk. These nothing defective about the er to Joe Leighton, who visited te we often driven by boys, te se from it's court." dead he Friday, inform said. The r hit an etm h has resigned hla I )sit] ft,khakl'cladThe']and fancied' from head to tree m*asuring a foot and a half in Appleton Pres and has first hand. Youngprlns oi no When the impact canto th similar poition at Milwauk, fawns that they were, they might have foed over on it's ther e Friday pJghk ' f. been envied by any city boy. "The boys and girls who go with th the top. their father to the ba the early cap. withom serou s iuur ie n_ Ortonville sp1ng moings a introdud to sideIM miculous. ALl th of the ere1. th the new calf. strangers. that h taken up its All eampaigne abode over night. Sex lessons Lakeaid Club to Meet. clean-ul taught right, bee naturally. On Wednesday evening, blay 10th, city beautiful wera ouhlo by "My daughter, having bn with elo attention a mtlng in the schoolhouse, District some hm'd work for some of'us. It makes us alize how little time the to health, would be expected to hou, 8 iles north of Ortonvflle, for is left of this embody these ennniences in th the purpo of giving to sure our credit pls she mes for her home, with oils and greases, Dr. Stewart, who is the psident her fehusband, and to insist the club aml also non-mpmbers a of the Flying Squadron gave a very 1squealed to attend. The club h intestng tIk to the High School ae in the bn given a special price in quan lagt Thursday a/toon. His talk ba. Fm childhood, my daughter try lots. Do not forget the date and was an inspltion to his audien, has had a saul] ot place. We am Jwaye glad to have speakers contmt, and by tis as ]od the llke Mr. Stewart come to the hig h v of oney. I .on,d ., er .' r' ............... f ............... .... - LEGAL NOTICES Mothe Alter wks of with her husbd that would bflng S her a share of the emg of the ........................  ........ Day ,'Th e Pixies." In the 7th grade --Ilk, , tekem, milk or ga> dit sham of the prize winners we: Helen ffi-t 0rl; Matt Xaten, Doils ($1,171.40}, v 14th Dolls Hahn , 8r d pri. in th e 8t h nizing her partnershi p in to be .n, s ... ,viay thL uoti upon a rain Mortga e, w the winne we: Gr Rudd. prise, and deqte to m d]y exited d delived by Jn st prize; Bei Kger 2nd ize I independen and sdfspect, pu]lls and Ha PuPils, his wife, mort The day t ide to honor the beat onald Walker. 8rd prize, "She should be logical enough to 8ago to The Fae & Mrchants ever ]ived--our mother. The $ophomo Tl$iulng girl e . State Bank of Coe , Mnnota, nor. if thle meant the climbing of a b date the let day of Mah Wear a flower in her honor. lcpaHng d erdng mtls hls ., , . earing windmill, or hitching up a fcttous 1920 and with, a power of sate th eek d k The fit meal, a dotion to husband d home, she for the Coty of B!" Stone and Stat Wehaveaflneassrtmentn bkat, -w prepa d d ed team of other nut$id work, I Should n contained, duly rded in the of- by Agnes Uann and Mildred Wai. expect her to do it efficiently. In hr fi d the Register of Deeds in and ROSES LILIES do. Tuesday moing mt 8:00 a. m, woul d act forget that se is a ial of Man.eta, osn0ne TULIPS The gusts : Mr. palmer, M. DAFFODIL  Gamey, Mr. Tmgth0u. Mr. Knoll, being, functioning for unity bet- March, 1920, at . CARNATIONS Miss McBride, Mr Stegner, and Mr, SWEET PEAS - Fltzsions. M r eplltlml uplift, assigned If/ said Fae Any variety ia apploprinte. you have enough, Mr. Tragethon? "Believing that the tom,try chants ats Bank of Corll, Mort, ............ O.M. OSEN CAMPFIRE GIRLS IN PLAY flee the dee e hat haw assignment dated the 24th day el " with her ehaeter, for faheHu8 Mah, 1920, and eoled in the of FLORIST sen ed a )desk. May 6. gent alnlstrauon oz uomey i , . , 6, M rt orth task clk a, m,, in Book 4 of o -. y s. f r fostsrm a lo e fo Cp F GlEe of edema wil  . v r gag on page 192 pt "A Southe CInde][" a lmp Io things, and for lovmg zc And whe the enid Job H, t her own tad others 1 wouM be Man the as  Mort a  and the iUage hall, at that pl on Sat- , yn, sign g g urday, May 6. The girls have 'ven very pied, to have my daughter ma te dholderandof docssaid Mortgageheby lthastdulYeela elee" pwntattort of this play and the pub- hool Will SIrld Trkek the who]e pncip gage, due and payable at the date of tie is aured of Team to Fargo Tourney his noti, under the tes and u- taiamt well up ditions of id Mortgage and the talent produefion Entry was made today by Coach power of sale therein eontalned; and ct of characters are: Mad Chartoris. an old aristo* Stegner, of a team of four, to p- whe the is alty due and elaim.d to be due and payable at the at .................................. Edna Fh sent the Ial hl at the Fargo date of tbl noti the s of td Enid Belier a southe eindella trek mtlng which ie to be held May thousand th hm&r ed eleven and 89- . .-7. ................................... Lento Bohn 11, 12, ard 1S of thi moth. The 100 ($9311.60 Do]laIneludlngpldn- - Mi RO WinterherlT, a famou te compo of Milton GH, Rob- elpai, in*rst, d de[int taxs, E lt ,  d t . err Hlen Howard Kaerdaer, d and whereas the said power of sMe has settlement worker Ewly Wagner Lyle Stotosbe. will participate in become operative and no afioa o  ! dn haing been itltated at Mi Johnnle Bell RandoIph, a lit- th e quarter mile, half mile lay, ad l w or olerwlse t to rvor the ebt KatheHnetle eoqot.eHawke, ................ an EngHhura n/ eReidl andmile high jping.d al in the short dash secure d by [mid Mot tgg, r y pttr thereof ............................... Laura Calais The tutorial this year is especially Now, thmfox% notl is he.by Camline hawks her Mter, an ad- venture,. ................. Wilton Reindl pmising fo the hort dash and give: that by irtue of the power of My :lady Johnson, a blk, blue high jping ens, in the opinion of ea]e ntained m id Mortgage, and grass widow.... Elsie Leuenberg Mr. Stearin, and the boys a going lmrmat to the statute in sh case ,., Into the tourney Wlth pep and vim of made and provided, the sld Mo PLACF-A Soaeher Home, soned veters, gage will be folod bF a sale of the rte described in d n- ACT I-Avlng morn at Charr's Entry will al be made at the e by said Mortgage, vi: Hall. Enid come hom ste toomamente to be ndtsd at The So thwest Quarter .(SW%), of ACT II-- thr days later, the University of Minnesota caius Section ine 9 Tnship orm hun- Ta burnin 8 of the dll and at Csrleton College at Northfleld, dd twenty-twn 1), Range forty- I[[ ACT JIIe, two yes ]ater , Cin. derella go to the ball. May 27. fr (44), and entatnmg on hundred [[l slxt (160)) res mo or less, - M by Odessa Orchestra. Lke Front Near Pavilion oong to the suey thef, and dtted in Big Stone County nd City "Cop" Can Fill Your Designated as City Park stats of mnn, ith the herdi. -- monte and ap Urtenances which le Order for Farm Laborers Property m block two and win be e  the ,i a d AS a tribute to the Departed, we offer Big Stone county, at the front door yOU the ehoice of our complete array of cut At thls sson of the year when thr, loca on the ]akeho north of the Court oue in the City of O f laborers are migrating north- and south of the Eahtouka Pavilion, and uncut Stones at prices well within the ward in search of work no e kmows was designated as a city park on Mon- tcnvillo in said Coty and State. e th 19th day of June, 1922, at 10: reach of an. betr where tq lay his hands on the ,ly eyeing by the city council at their o'eIoek  m. of that da, at ubli rht a than the city enp. W.P. gu]ar meeting, vends, to the big heat bld for ] Stones ordered now will be set before Mittelstead L city policeman, has had a This tract w purchased lt year to pay said debt of vine thousan number of m apply to him for am by the err from the Milwaukn Raft- th hdd eleven and 89-10C Memorial Day. Write for our design book, road for $1,200.0 d its deeignat furnished free upon request. , Dollars $9311.69.00 d lnte worksndother formoflvorP d the tax, if any on id n ten dy and ap to thi time he has  a city park is elteved wlthnut e, and Seventy-five ]lla $.00, l Attoey's foes as etipdated in  [ Mal[lufaLturrs Of " ...................... V ........ the .............. by said Mortgage In case (' AN -l itdaUou it is reqsted that yone fore the meeting expt that F. I foreclosing, and the dsburseme ORTONVr RUY RD R H  ured, the sprnk]itf mad allowed by law; je to redption stt grading work for the year This at any tim within one ye.r fm the hLm. and tree brda will hve 1en kiLL date of sale,  vdod b law. ed with 0o ton$. wm fomerly done by O. H. Mirdek 2 &, D," I2g. In yearn pvt the tak of plaing A peIt was ted to Fred Pc- Dated Aprll the county agent but ne MS redg, and th layLg of a wo inch wataz Algnee of ortg4 w. c. eP.us, JOHNSO LINDHO , nation Jttsls t has lmltmteered to main for prit ers was authoiz Attorney f Aign* of Mar tgage. aid  best he'u in serving  ten Waehington Avenue fr0m second Ornille, n. in lhls work.  to tha hospital. (First Pub. May 4 , 6w 1 PAGE 8 THE ORTONVILjLE INDEPENDF2PT THURSDAY, MAY A @ @ WANT ADS , RATES--Ten cents per line per in- sertion. Minimum charge 25 cents. Payment for want-ads in advance will be appreciated: the book-keep. ero will thus be relieved of the work of keeping many small accounts. LOST--Tire, rim, light and license from Ford car on Wednesday night, some place in Ortonville. License number, A-4160. Finder please re- turn t Casper Wiegand, at Orton- ville postoffice, for reward. 52-2 LOST--Gold wrist watch in leather case, lost in front of Evangelical hospital. Finder return to Hos- pital for reward. "52-1 FOUND--Package containing article of clothing, found on road to Big Stone City. Owner inquire at the Independent. 50-* SALESMAN WANTED--"A Twin Cities manufacturer of Aprons and Wash Dresses desires the services of lady Or gentleman as sales re- presentative at Ortonville and sur- rounding territory to take orders for their goods which are being sold direct from factory to wearer. Our line is very high class and comprises bout twelve styles. Position is -permanent with good pay. Send references with application. Sam- ples may be arranged for by writ- ing J. P. Olson, 616 Exchange Bank Bldg., St. Paul, Minnesota." "52-1 WANTED--A young man to canvass the country territory for an estab- lished line of goods, good pay, and must furnish own rig to travel with. For information write to Box No. 86, Ortonville, Minn. "51-2 WANTED--Girl for general house- work. Call 282. "52-1 PASTURAGE--Will take in your cat- tie for the season, and not over- stock. Three fine pastures with fine water, south, east and northeast of Ortonville. A. B. Kaercher & Co., Ortonville, Minn. 52-2 PASTURAGEHave pasturage for 25 head ef cattle and horses. Henry Thiel, Ortonville, Minn. "52-2 CORN FOR SALE--Near Clinton; in- quire of A. B. Kaercher & Co. '152-2 TIMOTHY SEED--Rave about 1000 lbs of clean Timothy Seed or sale. Inquire of A. B. Kaercher & Co. *52-2 FOR SALE--White Dent Seed Corn, 100 per cent teat, at $2.25 per bush- el. "Phone 5-F-32. Mrs. Otto Rubi- schum. "52-1 FOR SALE---Six room house wth bath, electric lights, hot air furnace, hot and cold water, large garage, hen house, and one acre of land. In- quire of John F. Witte, OrtonviUe Minn. * 5 -' :FOR RENT--Three room cottage, furnls]$ed, w i t h large screene6 porch, t located near Foster. Fire fishing, beautiful SlXt Inquire el Miss Grace KaercheOrtonviUe, Minn. *50-tf FOR SALE--Hatching eggs from prize-winning Single Comb Rhode Island Reds. Price per 15, $1.50. Mrs. J. P. Johnson, Ortonvirle, Minn. Phone 195. SCHOOL NOTES SENIOR REPORTERS Nora Mortenson Edwin Carlson ;afldred Waldo JUNIOR REPORTERS Verna Kamlah Reuben Marfinson Kussell Bertelson Field work opened in earnest this week. Joan Barsema expects to be abseni ,all week. Come to the "Pixies." It's going to be good. Saturday night is the date set for the Junior-Senior party. Track elimination contests were held in the Junior high school Wed- nesday. Every day brings us closer to the nd of this school ter, m. Let's make vse of the four weeks left. The 7th grade has another mem- i ")er added to its roll. Ronald Pouzar has joined our happy family. We arc sorry, to hear that Harold and Marjorie Hahn have been obliged to drop school because of ill health. Troop No. 2 had a talk and exhibi- tion on rope throwing by Floyd Bol- sta at their meeting Monday night. The two groups of Camp Fire Girls postponed their regular Tuesday night meeting because of their other work. A $500.00 reward is offered to any one finding Francis Walker in his as- sc,m, bty room seat at nihe o'clock Mon- day, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday morning. Stanley Clarke has been obliged to leave school in order to help his fath- er with the work on their farm in North Dakota. He expects to be back in itme to take his examinations. If some one would like some speci- fic information as to the future of Ortonville, we refer them to the Jun- ior and Senior Civics classes which are drawing maps of the future of Ortonvilte. The state examination schedule, which is to begin, May 26, is posted on the bulletin board. That means some hard work for some of'us. It makes us realize how little time there is left of this school term in which to secure our credits. Dr. Stewart, who is the president of the Flying Squadron gave a very interesting talk to the High School last Thursday afternoon. His talk was an inspiration to his audience. We are always glad to lave speakers like Mr. Stewart come to the high school and talk to us. After weeks of hard work the 7th and 8th grades finished the posters they were making for an operetta, "The Pixies." In the 7th grade the prize winners ,were: Helen Shumaker, first lirtze; Mary Karsten, 2nd prize; Doris Hahn, 3rd prize. In the 8th rade the winners were: Grace Rudd, st prize; Bernice Kruger, 2nd prize; onald Walker, 3rd prize. The Sophomore Training girls are reparing and serving meals this .eek and next. The first meal, a breakfast, "was prepared and served by Agnes Hanson and Mildred Wal- do, Tuesday morning at 8:00 a. m. The guests were: Mr. Palmer, Mrs. Garvey, Mr. Tragcthon, Mr. Knoll, Miss McBride, Mr. Stegner, and Mr. Fitzsimmons. M r. Fitzsimmons, which breakfast tasted the best? Did you have enough, Mr. Tragethon ? FOR SALEEggs for hatching. White Wyandottes ad Barred Ply- mouth Rocks. Both breeds prize winners. $1.00 per Setting, $5.00 per hundred. Mrs. J. H. Chapman, Olnville, Minn., Phone 212-L-2 47-6 TRACTOR FOR SALE--With plows and full equipment. New in 1921. Tems. A snap. Inquire of R. C. Kaercher, Ortonville, Minn. 52-2 RUGS WOVEN--I will weave rag rugs from now on at the home of my son, A. S. Halls. Prices--27 in. wide, 65c; 30 in. wide, 75c. Mrs. S. J. Halls. *47-tf HEMSTITCHINCg--Will do hemstitch- ing: at 10c per yard. Mrs. A. L. Waddans. 27-tf-c FOR SALEProgressive Everbearing Strawbe-ty Plants at 25c per doz. Mike Matzoll. Phone 243-J. 51-4 FOR SALE--Camp house on wheels. G. C. Ank, 1316 5th St. S. E, Min- neapolis. *52-2 FOR SALE--One set double driving ham,s with collars. Call 173. 52-1 SUMMER RESORT LOTS. I am offering for sale or rent splendid strip of land located near Sylvan Beach, just a step north of Fos- ter, where fishing cannot be excelled and where water is supplied from min- eral springs. Campers should com- municate with me for particulars. Rent charges will be reasonable as well as sale price. Frank Rosenthai, address Clinton or GraceviUe. 52-4 ONE-ACRE CONTEST FOR MARQUIS WHEAT RAISERS A. D. Haedecke of University Farm announces that the Minnesota Crop Improvement association, of which he is secretary, will conduct a contest for the best acre of marquis wheat raised in Minnesota. Cash prizes amounting to $150 and offered by the Spring Wheat lanu-vement associa- tion, with headquar,2rs in Minneapo Its, will be awarded, Entries may be made any time up to July I. For rules, regulations and conditions, write to Mr. Haedecke at University Farm, St. Paul. CAMPFIRE GIRLS IN PLAY. "A Southern Cinderella To Be Pre- sented at Odessa, May 6. Camp Fire Girls of Odessa will present "A Southern Cinderella," at the village hall, at that place on Sat- urday, May 6. The girls have given considerable of their time toward the presentatiorf of this play and the pub- lic is assured of an evening's enter- tainment well up in the rank of home talent productions. Cast of characters are: Madame Charteris, an 01d aristo- crat .................................. Edna Ferch Enid Betlamy, a southern cinderella .......................................... Leota Bohn Miss Rose Winterherry, a famous settlement worker....Evelya Wagner Miss Johnnie Bell Randolph, a lit- tle coquette ................ Laura Reindl Katherine Hawke, an English nurse ........................................ Laura Calais Caroline Hawke, her sister, an ad- venturess, . ................. Wilma Reindl Mammy Judy Johnson, a black, blue grass widow ........ Elsie Leuenberg PLACE---A Southern Home. ACT ILiving room at Charter's Hall. Enid comes home. ACT II--Same, three days later The burning of the will. ACT III--Same, two years late. Cin- derella goes to the ball. Music by Odessa Orchestra. City "Cop" Can Fill Your Order for Farm Laborers At this season of the year when farm laborers are migrating north- ward in search of work no (me knows better where to lay his hands on the right man than the city cop. W.P. Mittelsteadt, city policeman, has had a number of men apply to him for farn work and other forms of labor the past ten days and up to this time he has secured work for several of the ap- plicants. To aid the unemployment situation it is requested that anyone desiring workhen leave wQrd with him, and two birds will have been kill- ed with one stone. In years past the task of placing transient laborers fell to the lot of the county agent but Since his resig- nation Mittelstedt has volunteered to aid as best he'can in serving as a medium in this work. --Read 'era--the ADS! Wants Her t/iri To Marry A Farmer The Farm Home Is the Safeguard of Family Life, Says Woman Who Won Prize. The farm home is the stronghoht of real family life. That is what Mrs. Minnie Ellingson Topping of Bloom- ington Ferry, Minn., whote in reply to the question: "Would You Want "Your Daughter to Marry a Farmer?" Her letter was one of two letters from Minnesota farm women to win pmzes in a nationwide contest. "There is a special reason why I would like to have my daughter ,marry a farmer," Mrs. Topping wrote from her farm home. "I wish to have her surrounded with interests that will emphasize the best qualities of her soul and make use of the highest capacities for which she, as a woman, is fitted. "The country is an ideal setting for family life. One of our big newspa- pers had recently this headline: "Will the Family Stand?" The very hope of Amerca today is in the family. Anything that 'disrupts it makes for anarchy. "Romance plays a good part in young life. Last winter I went with a neighbor on the milk route. Cross- roads being drifted, teams met the truck, with their cans of milk. These teams were often driven by boys, khaki-clad and fur-clad" from head to foot. They have had their thrills at first hand. Young  princes of the farms that they were, they might have been envied by any city boy. "The boys and girls who go with their father to the barn these early spring mornings are introduced to nature's secrets thru the new calf, lamb or colt that has taken up its abode over night. Sex lessons are taught right, because naturally. "My daughter, having been reared with close attention to the fact that water and heat in the home are neces- sary to health, would be expected to embody these conveniences in the plans she makes for her home, with her farmer-husband, and to insist that sanitation and convenience be the rule in the house as well as in the barn. From childhood, my daughter has had a small amount of money tel control, and by this has learned the I value of money. I would expect her / to formulate some system of finance i with her husband that would bringI her a share of the earnings of the] farm it may be a budget system, a side line--like chickens, milk or gar- denor direct share of the fanm,'s output. It must be something, recog- nizing her partnership in the enteg- prise, and adequate to maintain her independence and selfrespect. "She should be logical enough to meeb emergencies in a sensible man- ner; if this meant the climbing of a windmill, or hitching up a fractious team of other outside work, I should expect her to do it efficiently. In her devotion to husband and home, she would not forget that she is a social being, functioning for community bet- terment thru the mediums of health- ful amusements, mental alertness and spiritual uplift. "Believing that the country is the very best place for putting into prac- tice the ideals that have developed with her character, for furthering principles of industry, and the intelli- gent administration of homely but worthy tasks, for fostering a love for simple things, and for loving service to her own and others, I would be very glad to have my daughter mar- School Will Send Trhck Team to Fargo Tourney Entry was made today by Coach Stegner, of a team of four, to repre- sent the local school at the Fargo track meeting which is to be held May 11, 12, and 13 of this moth. The team c(mposed of Milton Grice, Rob- eft Hasslen, Howard Kaercher, and Lyle Stotesbery, will participate in the quarter mile, half mile lelay, and mile runs and also in the short dashes and high jumping. The material this year is especially promising for-the short dashes and high jumping events, in the opinion of Mr. Stegner, and the boys are going into the tourney with pep and vim of seasoned veterans. Entry will also be made at the state tournaments to be conducted at the University of Minnesota campus and at Carleton College at Northfield, May 27. Lake Front Near Pavilion Designated as City Park Property comprising block two and three, locatad on the lakeshore north and south of the Eahtonka Pavilion, was designated as a city park on Mon- day evening by the city council at their regular meeting. This tract was purchased last year by the city from the Milwaukee Rail- road for $1,200.00 and its designation as a city park is believed without question a step in the right direction. Very little other business came be- fore the meeting except that F. L Hgffman secured, the sprinkling and street grading work for the year. This w/m formerly done by O. H. Minick. A permit was Igranted to Fred Pe- terson and Son to erect a team scale and the laying of a two inch water main for private users was authorized on Washington Avenue from second street to the hospital. New Subscribers Recently Add- ed to the Independent List Casseo, Wm. Stomn, Sam GowaJ:, John Byh:'e. E. E. Eischen. Nick Spink, Jerome HoLman. F. H. Shradcr, Victor Shannon tIote] Plmm ',or. E. M. Bolsta. Dr. Chas. Peterson, Otto E. Shelver, Dr. H. J. Ortonville Drug Co. - .............. 4t Two Men Forced Thru Top When Sedan Hits Tree Two men were forced thru the top of a Ford Sedan and the driver pinned against the steering wheel when the car in which they were riding col- lided with a sturdy elm elm tree on second street here, near Halls Garage, on Tuesday morning. All three es- caped without serious injury altho the car, a new one, was badly damaged. According to the driver of the car they were not traveling more than 12 miles an hour when the accident occured. "I had turned around to talk to the two men in the rear seat and must have pulled the steering wheel with me when I did so for there was nothing defective about the car to cause it to swerve from it's course," the driver said. The car hit an elm tree ,measuring a foot and a half in diameter. When the impact came the car was forced over on it's side and the two men riding in the back seat were forced thru the top. Their es- cape vithott serious injury is con- sidered miraculous. All three of the men were strangers. Lakeside Club to Meet. On Wednesday evening, May 10th, the Lakeside Farmers' Club will hold a meeting in the schoolhouse, District No. 21, known as the Erickson school- house, 8 tmiles north of Ortonville, for the purpose of giving their orders for oils and greases, and all members of the club and also non-members are requested to attend. The club has been given a special price in quan- tity lots. Do not forget the date and place. I LEGAL NOTICES I OMORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SAL Default having been made in the] pa:maent of the sum of One thousand] one hundred seventy-one and 40-1001 Dollars, ($1,171.40), which is claimed] to be due and is due at the date of this notice upon a certain Mortgage, duly executed and delivered by John Pullis and Hana Puilis, his wife, mort- gagors to The Farmers & Merchants State Bank of Corretl, Minnesota, bearing date the 1st day of March, 1920, and with a power of sale there- in contained, duly recorded in the of- fice of the Register of Deeds in and for the County of Big Stone and State of Minnesota, on the 22nd day of March, 1920, at 9:00 o'clock, a. rm m Book 54 of Mortgages, on page 240. Which said Mortgage, together with the debt secured thereby, was duly assigned by said Farmers & Mer- chants State Bank of Correll, Mort- gagee, to John H. Mayne by written assignment dated the 24th day of March, 1920, and recorded in the of- fice of said Register of Deeds, on the 25th day of March, 1920, at 9:00 o'clock a. m., in Book 46 of Mort- gages on page 192. And whereas the said John H. Mayne, the assignee, Mortgagee, and holder of said Mortgage, has duly elec- ted and does hereby elect to declare the whole principal sum, of gaid Mort- gage, due and payable at the date of this notice, under the terms and con- ditions of said Mortgage and the power of sale therein contained; and whereas there is actually due and claimed to be due and payable at the date of this notice the sum of nine thousand three hundred eleven and 69- 100 ($9,311.69) Dollars including prin- cipal, interest, and delinquent taxes, and whereas the said power of sale has become operative, and no action or proceeding having been instituted, at law or otherwise, to recover the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any part thereof: Now, therefore, notice is hereby given: that by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such case made and provided, the said Mort- gage will be foreclosed by a sale of the premises described in and con- veyed by said Mortgage, viz: The Southwest Quarter (SW), of Section Nine (9), Township one hun- dred twenty-two (122), Range forty- four (44), and containing one hundred sixty (160)) acres more or less, - cording to the survey thereof, ::d sCttmted in Big Stone County and State of Minnesota, with the heredi- ments and appurtenances which sale will be ,made by the sheriff of said Big Stone county, at the front door of the Court House in the City of Or- tonville in said County and State, on the 19th day of June, 1922, at 10:00 o'clock a. m., f that day, at pblic vendue, to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt of nine thousand three hundred eleven and 69-100 Dollars ($9,311.69.00), and interest and the taxes, if any, on said prem- ises, and Seventy-five Dollars ($75.00), Attorney's fees, as stipulated in and by said Mortgage in case of foreclosure, and the disbursements allowed by law; subject to redemption at any time within one year from the date of sale, as provided by law. Dated April 25 A. D." 1922. JOHN H. MAY'NE, Assignee of Mortgage. W. C. PREUS, Attorney for Assignee of Mortgage. Ortonville, Minn. I (First Pub. May 4 6w) i PERSONAL, SOCIAL AND NEWS ITEMS Mrs. Alice Runnings arrived Sun- day from Minneapolis and visited un- til Monday night with her son, Paul Runnings. Mrs. N. Rin(lerle, who is visiting at the M. J. Hurley home in this city, was the guest of Milbank friends over the week-end. Harry Gun&erson. accompanied by his sister, Mrs. E. Peterson, drove to Wheaten the latter part of the week for a short visit with relatives. Paul Runnings, accompanied by his mother, Mrs. Alice Runnings of Min- neapolis, left Monday night for Red- tamed, following the first shower accompanied by play. Showers that fell grass, urged it to new life, forth leaves, and caused buds trees t swell with a promise before many more days, and a big help to growing grain. The rain was accampanied by flashes of lightning, together sample lot of hailstones. St. Paul's New Mayor Browns Valley Arthur E. Nelson, newly mayor of St. Paul by an mg majority over William labor candidate, was born at fie!d, Minn.. for a visit of several days Valley, Minnesota. Mr. with friends and relatives, quite thirty years old, and is Miss Vera Geier, who has been exception the youngest mayor nursing in a Fargo hospital for some has had. Mr. Nelson time, arrived home the latter part of public schools at Browns the week, and will visit indefinitely after graduation in 1909 entered with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Mister College, St. Paul, and Geier. took a course at the St. Paul of law. Mrs. Milton Malmquist and baby arrived Saturday afternoon frcm. Red Wing, Minn., where they have visited --Try a Want Ad--they Get relatives for a week, and will visit suits. for a time at the John Malmquist home here. Mrs. Mary K Hubbart and daugh- ter, Helen, arrive(| the fore part of the week from Pasadena, Calif., have opened up their cottage on peninsula, where they will remain the summer. Joe Leighton, who visited friends here Friday, informs us he has resigned his position Appleton Press, and has similar position at Milwaukee, He left for there Friday night; Ortonville Doffs Dusty Garb for Brightest All campaigners in the bi cleamup drive to make Ortonville city beautiful were outdone by ture on Tuesday v-hen_.the dull g attire of early spring was doffed a rainment of brightest green hue E DAY WAS 24th having Sales A Specialty Mott er's Day May 14th The day set aside to honor the best mother that ever lived--your mother. Wear a flower in her honor. We have a fine assortment of ROSES LILIES TULIPS DAFFODILS CARNATIONS SWEET PEAS Any variety is appropriate. O. M. OS:[:N FLORIST Phone 6-L Ortonville, Minn i As a tribute to the De )arted, we offer you the choice of our com ete array of cut and uncut Stones at prices well wthin the reach of all. Stones ordered now will be set before Memorial Day. Write for our design book, furnished free upon request. Manufacturers of ORTONVILLE RUBY RED GRANITE 0RTOR1tt[ MOR00bI[00I JOHNSON & LINDHOLM, Props.