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May 11, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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May 11, 1999
 

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Editorial comment CL onversatins 1 WITH THE II anct00, Farmers are well advised to take care with the biotech corn seeds they plant because ADM has decided that the Europeans may well be serious and is therefore taking no chances on being stuck with corn it cannot sell. Farmers are therefore advised to be careful which of the latest agri- mira- cle seeds they plant so that they don't end up being stuck with a crop they can't sell. This is in itself a new concept since we farmers generally don't worry about selling a crop or an animal until we have gotten to the point where we can't figure out what else to do with it. This is really is a new day in agricul- ture! What isn't new of course is that nobody is looking out for us but us. Least of all our government. The European insistence on going slow with bio-engineered crops was transmitted in just a few months time from those governments to major grain companies to the American farmer. The message is clear. Don't grow what you can't sell! Who would have thought? Europe has been doing this kind of thing all along. For several decades now they have been kicking over a fuss about hormone implanted beef imports from the United States. European governments are a little shy about running roughshod over the beliefs and desires of their citizens because European citizens have a ten- dency to use their governments to achieve the big things they can't do individually. And then too, most Europeans are not big believers in the "free market", it having been pretty well demonstrated to them for the last five centuries that the richest are always the freest under that system. So what does our government do? Well, Clinton and his help have the reputation of calling heads of state over in Europe at odd hours of the day or night and screaming threats at them as to what will happen to their economies if they don't loosen up their thinking on biotech. This is called looking out for the American farmer by making sure Monsanto's bottom line stays healthy. And I have a hard time figuring out what it is that our government does besides defending the profits of the large. The government still supports the price of corn. Of course, the support is nothing that will make a success out of a corn grower, but that is not the goal. The goal is to make sure that seed, crop chemicals and fertilizer get bought and paid for. Agribiz's bottom line, again. N/.rltora go V'l'i Japan -ca ,'em  CLUES ACROSS 7. Clueless, slang 8. Possessing 9. Furs 10. Work the soil 11. Plant disease ! 3. House of God 16. Assails verbally 20. Seed 23. Expression of pleasure 24. Cause to lose hearing 25. Part of a group 26. Fully prepare for action CLUES DOWN I. Attack 2. In the air 3. Member of the Round Table 4. Singing voices 5. Hold on to 6. Pub 11. Sheep sound 12. Color property 14. Go quickly 15. Supplement with difficulty 17. Blurred ! 8. Security 19. Mental soundness 20. Made unclear 21. Viewing instruments 22. Earns SOLUTIONS ACROSS 7. As blind as a bat 8. Having 9. Sables 10. Hoe 1 !. Blight 13. Shrine 16. Abases 20. Sesame 23. Aah 24. Deafen 25. Aboard 26. Arm to the teeth SOLUTIONS DOWN 1. Assail 2. Flying 3. Knight 4. Basses 5. Harbor 6. Tavern 11. Baa 12. Hue 14. Hie 15. Eke 17. Bleary 18. Safety 19. Sanity 20. Shaded 21. Scopes 22. Merits C5990001 All-forms of government financial help for farmers are going to have this kind of effect as long as farming is thought to be merely the purchasing of inputs. The government responds to com- plaints about collusion in the markets on both grain and livestock markets by studying it a while longer. Let's not interfere with large bottom lines. Any product that any company wants to sell to farmers is given the bum's rush through FDA testing in order to minimize delays in profit-tak- ing. Canada won't allow BGH in dairy cows. Our government approved it four or five years ago already. Monsanto again. And there are serious questions relating to government involvement with collection and distribution of the various checkoff funds for research and development, in my mind at least. So very much checkoff supported research lines the pockets of the input supply and market companies rather than adding any real wealth to the farms that the checkoff came from. This is really the point that we farmers need to keep uppermost in mind. It is not a matter of opposition to progress, whatever that is. I would- n't speak against hybrid seed corn, for example, or even bio tech seeds, as a general thing. It is just that it becomes obvious after a half century of agricul- tural "progress" that purchased fixes increase the profits of the companies selling them. On the other hand, farmer solutions to farm problems increase farmer wealth. Technology does not add wealth to farmers because everyone jumps for it at once and the advantage is gone. Only management increases farm wealth. Management cannot be pur- chased. It must be done the hard way; one idea at a time. The news in the corn market is good for long term farm health, though. Consumers of farm products stood up and said what kind of food they want. This strikes terror into the heart of agribusiness. But it should be a breath of fresh air for any farmer who cares to supply a customer with a good product, who cares about cus- tomer satisfaction, and who itches to have the general public on the farmer's side for once. Too bad it had to be Europeans. American eaters, where Thanks a million Dear Mr. Ross: My greatest concern is for my 3 nieces. The oldest, age 11, recently confided in me that her dad has been sexually molesting her for years. When I confronted their mother (my sister) with what I had learned, she denied everything. I believed my niece, Mr. Ross, and I was not going to let this ordeal pass. When I threatened to get the authorities involved my brother-in- law caved and admitted to his filthy, repulsive acts. Now everyone is in counseling, but there will be no jail time for my brother-in-law. I think this is wrong, but then I don't make the laws. I can't stand the sight of this man. Relations are equally strained with my sister. Finally, these two dull bulbs suggested that my 11 year old niece come to live with me. It will mean registering her in a new school because we live 150 miles apart. I can handle most expenses-I'm single, working and no children. However, I want my niece to continue therapy 3 times a week. My insurance won't cover her so I'll have to pay out of pocket. It will run roughly $420 a month. I feel this is extremely necessary and equally as important as food, clothing and shelter. I'll provide the latter, if you'll help with the former. I'm determined to undo everything her father has done to her. Please help us. Miss M. D .... Community Newspapers, Wayne, MI Dear Miss D.: I don't know if it's possible to ever find forgiveness for the vile acts your brother-in-law has performed on his daughter. Over my 82 years, I've found forgive]ess for many acts I initially found irreconcilable, but child molestation will never be one of them. Granted, stuff can happen during one's childhood, but a parent's role is to protect that child-not to be the source of the shame and guilt inflicted upon the child. It would be easier for me to understand why a person could commit cold-blooded murder, than it is for me to understand child molestation. And I dare say if anyone can change my mind, let them come forward. As for your niece, I'll provide the first 3 months of therapy at $1,260. Keep me posted on her progress. I'm deeply concerned. ***** Dear Mr. Ross: I come to you a broken, dying man. Five years ago I learned I was HIV positive, which eventually turned into full blown AIDS. At the time I was diagnosed, I was married with 2 young boys-2 and 5. Now my boys are 7 and l0 and my wife has long since left me. Actually we divorced and I got full custody of the boys. She's maintained pretty good relations with our children, and after I die the boys will go to live with her. Children can be very perceptive and we've had some long talks about dying. The boys think I have a bad cancer. It's better this way. Society still has a stigma towards AIDS, and their lives are painful enough. My intent is not self-pity, although rereading my letter so far smacks of the "poor me." On to the practical. Health insurance has been pretty good in covering my staggering medical bills. The one financial burden I'm going to leave my family will be burial costs. I would prefer to pre-pay my funeral but a bank loan is out of the question for obvious reasons. Cremation and a simple service can be done for about $2,200, including a headstone. I don't know if asking you is the right thing. I guess I've run out of having answers. Mr. J. B .... The Shopper, Tucson, AZ Dear Mr. B.: Something struck me about your request and that is there is no room for negotiating. Many times I can meet an individual halfway or show an alternative route. Not so with death. Make your necessary arrangements, pre-paid, be cause I'm sending the $2,200. I'm truly sorry your young life has been cut short. I also feel for your boys. A father is so important in molding young minds. May your legacy continue through them. are you? Karelsaccepted at Aerosol cans should be Moorhead State U emptied before disposing Matthew T. K.are!s, a !999  The following article is the hear air releasing from the container. graduate of Ortonville High_ School, has been accepted to Moorhead $tat last in a series of articles in preparation for the Big Stone County Household Hazardous Waste Collection to be held on Saturday, May 15th from 10am 2pro at the Big Stone County Highway Garage in Ortonville: Aerosol containers should be com- *pletely empty and depressurized before they are thrown in the trash because they can explode and injure 'trash collectors and equipment. The best way to ,empty an aerosol contain- er is to use the remaining liquid and depress the nozzle until you no longer University. Karels, the son of Betty Karels and Phillip Karels, Ortonville, intends to major in business management. ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Dale Lolmes Mrs, Doug Fett Irvin & Madys Jessen Do not use or give away banned peS- ticides in aerosol containers. To avoid aerosol container dispos- al problems, buy pump sprays instead of aerosol containers. Each time after using an aerosol container, hold it upside down and spray for several seconds to prevent the nozzle from plugging up. Aerosol containers that are not empty can be brought to the HHW collection on Saturday, May 15th. For more information on other household hazardous wastes contact the Big Stone County Environmental Services Office at (320)839-3136. Karen Johnson Frank McLaughlin Donald Carrick Verlyn Shelstad Doris Erode Mrs. Harold Kalberg Terry Kalberg Orvin Vaage R & D of Big Stone Inc. Adeline Overberg Arthur Hoernemann Gerald Adelman Ethel Anderson Watertown Public Opinion Edna F. Myron Leona Martin Hortense Ische Lawrence Dhaemers Verna Anderson Marilyn Storm Frank Vinopal Alice Paul Gwen Erdald Bertlna Erdahl Dan Jurgem Marlys Johnson Myron Scholberg Inez Thompson Duane Bagans Carol Koosman Jay Lindald Elsie Jaeobson Hillman Bros. Norma Buhoiz Arlene Eckberg Richard Eckberg Art Lee Leon Schndeg Jan UIHch Mrs. A.E. Pederson Patrick Kvidera Grace Van Hout Steve Erode Leslie Kutil Raymond Karels Alvin Block Tom Iverson Mrs. James McDonough Howard Von Eschen Joel Von Esehen Elda Von Eschen Florence Bergstrom James Heinecke Mrs. Minnie Merritt MarJorie Bid Dale Emde Marvin Berpeth We need your help In June the Big Stone County Dream Team will once again travel to the University of Minnesota to partic- ipate in the Minnesota Special Olympic Summer Games for three days. The team consists of: David Maus, Tim Maus, Joan Maus, Lyle Golden, Kim Kallen and Dermic Adelman. In the past the Dream Team has been supported through monetary donations by individuals, businesses and service organizations. These monetary donations are once again needed to be able to participate. The funds are used for registration fees, lodging and transportation. If you have any questions about the Dream Team or would like to make a monetry donation please con- tact one of the following volunteer coaches: Ron or Ginger Athey at 839- 2280, David or Deb Ellingson at 839- 6269, Lynne Giese at 839-3685, Sharon Scoblic at 862-8530 or Tim Swanson at 839-3924. Special Olympic Oath: Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt. $1.00 off 24 or 36 exposure processing Liebe Drug/Variety ] Ortonville, MN 320-839-3825 Offer good on single or double prints. 35mm, APS Coupon good: May 10-15, 1999 I - COUPON - I Lm m m mm m mm m m m mm m m mm lm mm m m m m m mm m m mm m m mm m m mm Page 4 00INDEPENDENT l The Inde (U.S.P.S. e JEANEI-rE Publisher JAMES D. Managing EdltOt SUZETTE Editor, SARA J. Ad and Printing Plant Manager Offlco KATHIE Computer and Com TAM RYAN Repoder/Ad MIKE BILL DWYER & Pressmen Camera Collator cocoa Tues., May 11, 1999 co Puld Ev Pkxls Pom SUBSCRIPTION $25.00psr year in Parle, Traverse Minnesota, in South Dakota. $29; counties in Dakota. All others, Postmaster: Send The OrtonvIIle Ortonville, B,oStOne, Lac c unties in Roberts in February .............. 21;.00 March .................. 22.89 April .................... 20.81 May ..................... 18.73 June .................... 1(5.65 July ...................... 14.1;7 ALL ( February ............. 29.00 March .................. 2S.61 April .................... 24.19 May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.31; July ...................... 16.93 February .............. 33,00 March .................. 30.21; So April .................... 27.1;0 May ..................... 24.71; June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 19.21; "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher shall slight changes or that do not lessen advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement In or the refund of any advertisement. Church Display Correspondence Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Fdda, (Any ad brought in later I classify.) OFFICE HoUII6 A Thursday: ts a.m. A Fflday: 8 a.m.-12 A Holidays Letters to the community issues Letter wdters should Independent and/or condense paper also reserves publish which It Letters printed or typed = address and tel( Addresses and not be published. Letter writers themselves to one Please keep letter over 350 words AD vs. The Ortonvllle determlnln Is If an Individual zatlon char event, be considered newspaper. would cease to paper receives for single paper sales ink and paper product. It no Ionge paper cost cost of ink and a products to the and anderwear particular business ,business. ADS: We advertlsln A News: Our rroQm e' other stimulate our readers. editor are those of other expressed in tlona may be own views, general Interest. Call 320-839-3761 elasalfled Orlonvllle Editorial comment CL onversatins 1 WITH THE II anct00, Farmers are well advised to take care with the biotech corn seeds they plant because ADM has decided that the Europeans may well be serious and is therefore taking no chances on being stuck with corn it cannot sell. Farmers are therefore advised to be careful which of the latest agri- mira- cle seeds they plant so that they don't end up being stuck with a crop they can't sell. This is in itself a new concept since we farmers generally don't worry about selling a crop or an animal until we have gotten to the point where we can't figure out what else to do with it. This is really is a new day in agricul- ture! What isn't new of course is that nobody is looking out for us but us. Least of all our government. The European insistence on going slow with bio-engineered crops was transmitted in just a few months time from those governments to major grain companies to the American farmer. The message is clear. Don't grow what you can't sell! Who would have thought? Europe has been doing this kind of thing all along. For several decades now they have been kicking over a fuss about hormone implanted beef imports from the United States. European governments are a little shy about running roughshod over the beliefs and desires of their citizens because European citizens have a ten- dency to use their governments to achieve the big things they can't do individually. And then too, most Europeans are not big believers in the "free market", it having been pretty well demonstrated to them for the last five centuries that the richest are always the freest under that system. So what does our government do? Well, Clinton and his help have the reputation of calling heads of state over in Europe at odd hours of the day or night and screaming threats at them as to what will happen to their economies if they don't loosen up their thinking on biotech. This is called looking out for the American farmer by making sure Monsanto's bottom line stays healthy. And I have a hard time figuring out what it is that our government does besides defending the profits of the large. The government still supports the price of corn. Of course, the support is nothing that will make a success out of a corn grower, but that is not the goal. The goal is to make sure that seed, crop chemicals and fertilizer get bought and paid for. Agribiz's bottom line, again. N/.rltora go V'l'i Japan -ca ,'em  CLUES ACROSS 7. Clueless, slang 8. Possessing 9. Furs 10. Work the soil 11. Plant disease ! 3. House of God 16. Assails verbally 20. Seed 23. Expression of pleasure 24. Cause to lose hearing 25. Part of a group 26. Fully prepare for action CLUES DOWN I. Attack 2. In the air 3. Member of the Round Table 4. Singing voices 5. Hold on to 6. Pub 11. Sheep sound 12. Color property 14. Go quickly 15. Supplement with difficulty 17. Blurred ! 8. Security 19. Mental soundness 20. Made unclear 21. Viewing instruments 22. Earns SOLUTIONS ACROSS 7. As blind as a bat 8. Having 9. Sables 10. Hoe 1 !. Blight 13. Shrine 16. Abases 20. Sesame 23. Aah 24. Deafen 25. Aboard 26. Arm to the teeth SOLUTIONS DOWN 1. Assail 2. Flying 3. Knight 4. Basses 5. Harbor 6. Tavern 11. Baa 12. Hue 14. Hie 15. Eke 17. Bleary 18. Safety 19. Sanity 20. Shaded 21. Scopes 22. Merits C5990001 All-forms of government financial help for farmers are going to have this kind of effect as long as farming is thought to be merely the purchasing of inputs. The government responds to com- plaints about collusion in the markets on both grain and livestock markets by studying it a while longer. Let's not interfere with large bottom lines. Any product that any company wants to sell to farmers is given the bum's rush through FDA testing in order to minimize delays in profit-tak- ing. Canada won't allow BGH in dairy cows. Our government approved it four or five years ago already. Monsanto again. And there are serious questions relating to government involvement with collection and distribution of the various checkoff funds for research and development, in my mind at least. So very much checkoff supported research lines the pockets of the input supply and market companies rather than adding any real wealth to the farms that the checkoff came from. This is really the point that we farmers need to keep uppermost in mind. It is not a matter of opposition to progress, whatever that is. I would- n't speak against hybrid seed corn, for example, or even bio tech seeds, as a general thing. It is just that it becomes obvious after a half century of agricul- tural "progress" that purchased fixes increase the profits of the companies selling them. On the other hand, farmer solutions to farm problems increase farmer wealth. Technology does not add wealth to farmers because everyone jumps for it at once and the advantage is gone. Only management increases farm wealth. Management cannot be pur- chased. It must be done the hard way; one idea at a time. The news in the corn market is good for long term farm health, though. Consumers of farm products stood up and said what kind of food they want. This strikes terror into the heart of agribusiness. But it should be a breath of fresh air for any farmer who cares to supply a customer with a good product, who cares about cus- tomer satisfaction, and who itches to have the general public on the farmer's side for once. Too bad it had to be Europeans. American eaters, where Thanks a million Dear Mr. Ross: My greatest concern is for my 3 nieces. The oldest, age 11, recently confided in me that her dad has been sexually molesting her for years. When I confronted their mother (my sister) with what I had learned, she denied everything. I believed my niece, Mr. Ross, and I was not going to let this ordeal pass. When I threatened to get the authorities involved my brother-in- law caved and admitted to his filthy, repulsive acts. Now everyone is in counseling, but there will be no jail time for my brother-in-law. I think this is wrong, but then I don't make the laws. I can't stand the sight of this man. Relations are equally strained with my sister. Finally, these two dull bulbs suggested that my 11 year old niece come to live with me. It will mean registering her in a new school because we live 150 miles apart. I can handle most expenses-I'm single, working and no children. However, I want my niece to continue therapy 3 times a week. My insurance won't cover her so I'll have to pay out of pocket. It will run roughly $420 a month. I feel this is extremely necessary and equally as important as food, clothing and shelter. I'll provide the latter, if you'll help with the former. I'm determined to undo everything her father has done to her. Please help us. Miss M. D .... Community Newspapers, Wayne, MI Dear Miss D.: I don't know if it's possible to ever find forgiveness for the vile acts your brother-in-law has performed on his daughter. Over my 82 years, I've found forgive]ess for many acts I initially found irreconcilable, but child molestation will never be one of them. Granted, stuff can happen during one's childhood, but a parent's role is to protect that child-not to be the source of the shame and guilt inflicted upon the child. It would be easier for me to understand why a person could commit cold-blooded murder, than it is for me to understand child molestation. And I dare say if anyone can change my mind, let them come forward. As for your niece, I'll provide the first 3 months of therapy at $1,260. Keep me posted on her progress. I'm deeply concerned. ***** Dear Mr. Ross: I come to you a broken, dying man. Five years ago I learned I was HIV positive, which eventually turned into full blown AIDS. At the time I was diagnosed, I was married with 2 young boys-2 and 5. Now my boys are 7 and l0 and my wife has long since left me. Actually we divorced and I got full custody of the boys. She's maintained pretty good relations with our children, and after I die the boys will go to live with her. Children can be very perceptive and we've had some long talks about dying. The boys think I have a bad cancer. It's better this way. Society still has a stigma towards AIDS, and their lives are painful enough. My intent is not self-pity, although rereading my letter so far smacks of the "poor me." On to the practical. Health insurance has been pretty good in covering my staggering medical bills. The one financial burden I'm going to leave my family will be burial costs. I would prefer to pre-pay my funeral but a bank loan is out of the question for obvious reasons. Cremation and a simple service can be done for about $2,200, including a headstone. I don't know if asking you is the right thing. I guess I've run out of having answers. Mr. J. B .... The Shopper, Tucson, AZ Dear Mr. B.: Something struck me about your request and that is there is no room for negotiating. Many times I can meet an individual halfway or show an alternative route. Not so with death. Make your necessary arrangements, pre-paid, be cause I'm sending the $2,200. I'm truly sorry your young life has been cut short. I also feel for your boys. A father is so important in molding young minds. May your legacy continue through them. are you? Karelsaccepted at Aerosol cans should be Moorhead State U emptied before disposing Matthew T. K.are!s, a !999  The following article is the hear air releasing from the container. graduate of Ortonville High_ School, has been accepted to Moorhead $tat last in a series of articles in preparation for the Big Stone County Household Hazardous Waste Collection to be held on Saturday, May 15th from 10am 2pro at the Big Stone County Highway Garage in Ortonville: Aerosol containers should be com- *pletely empty and depressurized before they are thrown in the trash because they can explode and injure 'trash collectors and equipment. The best way to ,empty an aerosol contain- er is to use the remaining liquid and depress the nozzle until you no longer University. Karels, the son of Betty Karels and Phillip Karels, Ortonville, intends to major in business management. ONCE AGAIN... MANY THANKS Recent new and renewal sub- scribers to The Independent which we gratefully acknowledge with thanks for your loyalty: Dale Lolmes Mrs, Doug Fett Irvin & Madys Jessen Do not use or give away banned peS- ticides in aerosol containers. To avoid aerosol container dispos- al problems, buy pump sprays instead of aerosol containers. Each time after using an aerosol container, hold it upside down and spray for several seconds to prevent the nozzle from plugging up. Aerosol containers that are not empty can be brought to the HHW collection on Saturday, May 15th. For more information on other household hazardous wastes contact the Big Stone County Environmental Services Office at (320)839-3136. Karen Johnson Frank McLaughlin Donald Carrick Verlyn Shelstad Doris Erode Mrs. Harold Kalberg Terry Kalberg Orvin Vaage R & D of Big Stone Inc. Adeline Overberg Arthur Hoernemann Gerald Adelman Ethel Anderson Watertown Public Opinion Edna F. Myron Leona Martin Hortense Ische Lawrence Dhaemers Verna Anderson Marilyn Storm Frank Vinopal Alice Paul Gwen Erdald Bertlna Erdahl Dan Jurgem Marlys Johnson Myron Scholberg Inez Thompson Duane Bagans Carol Koosman Jay Lindald Elsie Jaeobson Hillman Bros. Norma Buhoiz Arlene Eckberg Richard Eckberg Art Lee Leon Schndeg Jan UIHch Mrs. A.E. Pederson Patrick Kvidera Grace Van Hout Steve Erode Leslie Kutil Raymond Karels Alvin Block Tom Iverson Mrs. James McDonough Howard Von Eschen Joel Von Esehen Elda Von Eschen Florence Bergstrom James Heinecke Mrs. Minnie Merritt MarJorie Bid Dale Emde Marvin Berpeth We need your help In June the Big Stone County Dream Team will once again travel to the University of Minnesota to partic- ipate in the Minnesota Special Olympic Summer Games for three days. The team consists of: David Maus, Tim Maus, Joan Maus, Lyle Golden, Kim Kallen and Dermic Adelman. In the past the Dream Team has been supported through monetary donations by individuals, businesses and service organizations. These monetary donations are once again needed to be able to participate. The funds are used for registration fees, lodging and transportation. If you have any questions about the Dream Team or would like to make a monetry donation please con- tact one of the following volunteer coaches: Ron or Ginger Athey at 839- 2280, David or Deb Ellingson at 839- 6269, Lynne Giese at 839-3685, Sharon Scoblic at 862-8530 or Tim Swanson at 839-3924. Special Olympic Oath: Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt. $1.00 off 24 or 36 exposure processing Liebe Drug/Variety ] Ortonville, MN 320-839-3825 Offer good on single or double prints. 35mm, APS Coupon good: May 10-15, 1999 I - COUPON - I Lm m m mm m mm m m m mm m m mm lm mm m m m m m mm m m mm m m mm m m mm Page 4 00INDEPENDENT l The Inde (U.S.P.S. e JEANEI-rE Publisher JAMES D. Managing EdltOt SUZETTE Editor, SARA J. Ad and Printing Plant Manager Offlco KATHIE Computer and Com TAM RYAN Repoder/Ad MIKE BILL DWYER & Pressmen Camera Collator cocoa Tues., May 11, 1999 co Puld Ev Pkxls Pom SUBSCRIPTION $25.00psr year in Parle, Traverse Minnesota, in South Dakota. $29; counties in Dakota. All others, Postmaster: Send The OrtonvIIle Ortonville, B,oStOne, Lacc unties in Roberts in February .............. 21;.00 March .................. 22.89 April .................... 20.81 May ..................... 18.73 June .................... 1(5.65 July ...................... 14.1;7 ALL ( February ............. 29.00 March .................. 2S.61 April .................... 24.19 May ...................... 21.77 June .................... 19.31; July ...................... 16.93 February .............. 33,00 March .................. 30.21; So April .................... 27.1;0 May ..................... 24.71; June ................... 22.00 July ..................... 19.21; "PUBLISHER'S The Publisher shall slight changes or that do not lessen advertisement. The for other errors or connection with an strictly limited to advertisement In or the refund of any advertisement. Church Display Correspondence Pictures - 5 p.m. Friday News - Fdda, (Any ad brought in later I classify.) OFFICE HoUII6 A Thursday: ts a.m. A Fflday: 8 a.m.-12 A Holidays Letters to the community issues Letter wdters should Independent and/or condense paper also reserves publish which It Letters printed or typed = address and tel( Addresses and not be published. Letter writers themselves to one Please keep letter over 350 words AD vs. The Ortonvllle determlnln Is If an Individual zatlon char event, be considered newspaper. would cease to paper receives for single paper sales ink and paper product. It no Ionge paper cost cost of ink and a products to the and anderwear particular business ,business. ADS: We advertlsln A News: Our rroQm e' other stimulate our readers. editor are those of other expressed in tlona may be own views, general Interest. Call 320-839-3761 elasalfled Orlonvllle