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May 11, 1999     The Ortonville Independent
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Area news digest MILBANK, SD-About 350 Otter Tail Communications cable TV customers were without service for a few hours Friday evening as a result of some lines going down in the vicinity of the old drive-in theater. Kevin Kouba, Otter Tail Power Company Milbank Division manager said some electrical and cable lines were pulled down at about 5 p.m. on Friday. Three streetlights in the area also were affected. Cable service was restored after about three hours, he said. Businesses in the area were questioned, but no one witnessed the cause of the disruption, Kouba said. DAWSON-A tree planting ceremony in memory of Vern Stevens, former Dawson-Boyd Principal, was held Friday, April 30 in the front of the Elementary School. Students in the elementary and high school donated money to the tree fund and Madison-Marietta-Nassau Elementary School also gave a $50 donation for the tree. Superintendent Brad Madsen did the introductions and read poems in his honor. Andy Kubat also talked about The Renewable Resource. A plaque will be purchased and placed on the outside of the school. Any leftover funds will be donated to the Lac qui Parle Prairie Chicken restoration. MONTEVIDEO-Kevin and Cheryl Lee appeared before the City Council with a proposal to install an 18-hole miniature golf course in Smith Park. The course would also include a portable concession stand and would be located at the south corner of the park, not far from where the horse shoe pits,and bear cage used to be. Some concern was voiced about letting a private party use public land for profit. The council, however, seemed to think it would be a good addition to the community, particularly for the youth. Council members voted to give the go-ahead, providing a contract and lease arrangement could be worked out as well as the need for the Lees willingness to pay for utilities. Kevin indicated they would like to have a three-year lease. If everything is ironed out, the course could be up and running by the end of May. The course could accommodate about 100 players per hour. Seeds of New UM Soybean varieties available Soybean growers can now purchase certified seed of two new high yielding soybean varieties released by the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES). MN1401 was jointly released by the MAES and the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. It is classified as a mid Group 1 soybean variety developed by MAES plant breeder Jim Orf. Relative maturity is two days earlier that Parker and four days later than Lambert. MN1401 has cut yielded Lambert by approximately 10 percent with yields similar to Parker. MNI401 has better lodging and chlorosis scores than Parker and is higher in protein. IA2036 is a soybean cyst nematode resistant variety released jointly by the MAES and the Iowa State University Research Foundation. It is an early Group 2 variety with relative maturity of one to two days later than IA2021. It has yielded very well in both infested and non-infested sites. Certified seed of these new varieties is available for 1999 planting. Farmers who wish to buy certified seed should consult the Minnesota Crop Improvement Association Directory. Contact Roger Wippler at the MCIA office (800- 510-6242) for additional information and/or a copy of the directory. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS Rural DFLers: house ag bill is silent on price crisis The bill funding state farm pro- grams for the next two years is shock- ingly silent on the farm price crisis and corporate concentration in agri- culture, state Reps. Doug Peterson and Ted Winter said after the Minnesota House passed the measure Tuesday. "I support most of what is in this bill, and if this were not a crisis year, this would not be a bad bill," Peterson (DFL-Madison), Lead Democrat on the House Agriculture Finance Committee, said. "But this is a crisis year. We are in the midst of the worst farm economy in 50 years, and farm- era were looking for answers. But this bill has no answers on price and mar- ket reform. It is silent on the growing corporate concentration in agricul- ture. And it is silent in response to farmers who are looking for an open, free and fair market, not a handout." The bill provides $I38.8 million for state farm programs, of which about $52 million goes to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture and about $75 million is devoted to ethanol support. "The problem is not what is in this bill, but what is not in it," said Winter (DFL-Fulda), who has been working with lawmakers in Midwestern states to shape a regional response to the cri- sis. "In South Dakota, they have banned corporations from raising livestock. In Nebraska, they are look- ing at state-level anti-trust laws. In Iowa, they are talking about price reporting and an end to secret con- tracts. But here in Minnesota, we are passing a bill that is strictly business as usual." Winter offered proposals to estab- lish minimum prices for farmers, to prohibit price discrimination based on the amount of grain or livestock a farmer delivers, and to require price reporting. All were shot down on party-line votes - after Rep. Bob Hess (R-Dassel) called each proposal to help farmers get a fair price "dumb ideas." "We are letting Cargill, Land O'Lakes and Hormel increase their control at the expense of the farmer," Winter said. "In livestock, in dairy or in grain, the producer must go hat-in- hand to a corporation for a contract. Independent producers get the left- overs and must take fire-sale prices. It is long past time to study this issue. It dinner plate." Peterson and Wenzel were among a group of legislators who earlier this year called for devoting 10 percent of the state's budget surplus to agricul- ture and rural relief. Few of their pro- posals were given hearings in the Republican-controlled House. Among their proposals are: * Interest buydown/Loan Guarantees. Loan guarantees of up to 75 percent of the first $100,000 bor- rowed by family farmers and rural small business owners. This will help cash-strapped farmers get the financ- ing they need to plant in 1999 and help "Main Street" businesses survive the crisis. * Fair Prices. Ban volume-based premiums and incentives, which favor large producers. * Cooperative Justice. Bar farmer- is time for action." owned coops from competing against Peters0n offered an amendment to .... theiF0riiaembers. fund an antri-trust investigation of the Cargill-Continental Grain merger by the Minnesota Attorney General's office. However, House Republicans voted to remove any reference to the Cargill-Continental merger from the proposal, leaving it as a study of agribusiness mergers. Some 69 of the 71 Republican legislators voted to delete the reference to Cargill from the proposal. "With this party-line vote, the Republicans said 'hands off Cargill,'" Peterson said. "It puts them on the side of the predatory corporations bent on owning farming from dirt to * Contract Reform. Prices paid to producers should be public and con- tract prices disclosed. * Ownership of Livestock. Bar meatpacking companies from breed- ing, raising or feeding livestock. Peterson said the bill crafted by House Republicans has a "blind spot to reality." "The authors of this bill are latter- day Herbert Hoovers, pretending the farm crisis is just a blip and prosperi- ty is right around the corner," Peterson said. "The only thing that's going away 'is the independent farmer." COMMUNITY SOCIAL SERVICES, MENTAL HEALTH AND TITLE XX BLOCK GRANT Big Stone County Family Services is developing the integrated Biennial Community Social Services Plan including the Mental Health Plans for 2000-01. Citizen participation is invited in the development of the Biennial Plan. The method by which Big Stone County Family Services will provide opportunity for public participation is: providers, community organizations, schools, and other interested parties will be sent written invitations. Any citizen may contact the Agency to provide information or review plans. The integrated proposed Biennial Community Social Services Plan including the Mental Health Plans are to be completed by August 18, 1999 and will be available for public review and comment after that date. Comments may be submitted to: Dan Hanratty, Director Big Stone County Family Services 340 NW 2 *d Street, OrtonviUe, MN. 56278 or by calling (320) 839-2555, Extension 20. The integrated Biennial Community Social Services Plan, that includes the Mental Health Plans and the Title XX Intended Use Report will contain information about community social services, service delivery, eligibility for services, social service funding, program goals and objectives, and projections of expenditures. Copies of the State Title XX Intended Use Report will be available after October 1, 1999 by writing to: Title XX Report Community Services Division Department of Human Services 444 Lafayette Road North St. Paul, MN. 55155-3839 Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage By Rosemary Hendrickson Almost everyone has heard of some type of Native American purification ritual, such as sweat lodges or sweat baths. But did you know that a key ingredient to these rituals was a prairie plant called white sage? It's scientific name is Artemisia ludoviciana - Artemisia (Latin for mugwort) means it's a member of the sunflower family; ludoviciana because it was found in the Louisiana territory. Other names for this plant include wild sage, prairie sage, and Western mugwort. The plant grows to 3 feet, has lance- shaped leaves that are described as "white felty" and has a strong sagebrush odor. Many Native American tribes used sage for purification. Lakota men believed "the essence of the plant" served as protection against evil powers. It was proper to begin any ceremonial by using Artemisia, which was done either by burning the sage like incense to drive away evil spirits or by drinking a ceremonial tea. Bathing in the tea was a way of cleansing and purifying the body. Crows used it as a deodorant. Cheyennes spread white sage along the borders in a ceremonial lodge. It was used to purify implements, utensils, weapons and horses. Medicinally, White sage tea was used for stomach trouble, to reduce phlegm and for lung ailments, for tonsillitis and sore throat. Often they simply rolled up the leaves and stem and chewed them, swallowing the juice. It was used externally, in tea form or as a poultice, to treat itching, rashes, skin eruptions, swelling, boils, sores and fevers. Several tribes used dry, powdered leaves as a snuff, inhaling it into the nostrils to treat nosebleeds, sinus ailments and headache. Pawnee and Arileara women drank white sage tea for menstrual problems. Blackfeet used the tea of fresh sag.e leaves to abort difficult pregnancies - so it would not be an herb to take during pregnancy or lactation. Mesquakies made a smudge of fresh sage leaves to drive away mosquitoes - now I would try that! The European herb known as mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris, has a documented history going back to the first century in Rome. It is interesting that the Native Americans here put the prairie sages to much the same J medicinal uses as tl?! did their native ..a=s even more interestil had the same kind L' about Artemisians d k similar rites and c 1 New World, and ia the lives of natives and vitally related populations. Does it Ia' that we should cent awareness of and aPl Prairie Heritage? Extension report John Cunningham, County Extension Director It's still coming. Yes, the Y2K is still coming. (Almost sounds like a modern day Paul Revere.) As January 15t approaches we will see countdowns, talk shows, and people preparing themselves for whatever is going to happen. Now, I'm not going out and buying wood nor am I on a waiting list for a generator but, we have smoke alarms in our houses in case of a fire. Maybe we should have a plan for and if something happens? We as Minnesotan's are lucky for the fact that we are ready for a big disaster every year. (No it's not mosquitoes.) Every year we prepare ourselves for a blizzard. Growing up on a farm we were trained how to buy food for a week if we couldn't get to town. If we look at the Y2K as a big blizzard we will probably be OK. But we need to prepare ourselves for another type of disaster. The SCAM. We need to be careful when we are preparing for the Y2K. Like any disaster there are people who prey on the innocent. We need to safe guard ourselves against people who want to make money off others. For one thing, we need to watch how we prepare for tbis to happen. We all do not need to go out and buy a generator. (It would be hard because of the 6 to 9 month waiting list for them.) We do not need to buy special equipment to find out if your equipment is Y2] make decisions rigJ around and check int0 you buy! What you# yourself ready ! Making ourselV require a few thin| foremost, make se documentation for have dealt with. F01 should be seeing le notc electric, and ohone a that things s'hould!  Once you have recl_ information file it_.,miakle I There are web sites,ll.L " from certain compe your cameras, vide lellth etc. Here are a few: er , Canon 1 -8(3 www.usa.canon.con ' ,,e Kodak 1-800" , year, www.kodak.com/US/ dex.shtml Minolta www.mi  IIs "d, mol8/menu.html  'a Panasonic wwW. MECA/y2k/index.htl. egard RCA 1-800 o3y ibk www.nipper.com/Y2IC  re, If you have a pr listed here call the    bought it from. DorJ) ,n, your coffee pot or. lth things that have a t)t n. and date. D Remember, GENERAL NOTIC TO CONTROL OR ERADICATE NOXI WEEDS AND GRASSHOPPERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN this 6th day of May, 1999, pursuant to Minnesota S 18.83, Subd. 7, (1992), that all persons in Big Stone County, Minneeota, shall control Jl. Control of.. I111 all noxious weeds on land they own, occupy or are required to maintain.  may be accomplished by any lawful method but the methods may need to be re prevent the spread of viable noxious weed seeds and other propagating parts Failure to comply with the general notice may mean that an individual notice will be individual notice may be appealed wtthin two working days of receipt to the appeljg  the county where the land is located. Failure to comply with the individual notice ww the inspector having jurisdiction may either hire the work done or seek a misdem'r,',; against the person(s) who failed to comply. If the work is hired done by the inspector,l[l be placed as a tax upon the land and collected as other real estate taxes are G statewide noxious weeds are: Field Bindweed, Hemp, Poison Ivy, Leafy Spurge, ptdive Thistle, Canada Thistle, Musk Thletle and Plumeless Thistle. In Big Stone County, the .-.dll  ( noxious weeds also: Wild Sunflower, Velvet Leaf, Wild Proso, Millet and Black NIg .1]1[ ch, Local Weed Inspectors are township supervisors, city mayors or their appointed assild=i- NOTICE IS ALSO HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Section 18.02.'. I all persons owning, occupying, or in charge of the maintenance of land |' w' grasshoppers by any lawful method on land located in designated control zoneS..le used may need to be repeated to prevent the movement of grasshoppers to adPjr , Failure to comply with the general notice may mean the Inspector having JurisdictiOn  Failure to individual notice, comply with the individual notice may mean that the InsP_zl JaU;ipS:Jtpi :cs ill p: e: t: ntlai:ks d;frl)h: nr aP I::;o ;h rc taas: ;:lLenUxPusth t Grasshopper Inspectors are township supervisors or their appointed assistants. BY ORDER OF THE TOWNSHIP AND INSPECTORS IN BIG STONE COUNTY-- TOWNSHIP OF AKRON Roger Rheingens, Chairman ................. Correll Warren Wlese, Clerk ......................... Ortonvflle Rick Wilkenlng, Treasurer .................. Appleton Richard Guse ......................................... Corrsll John Jensen ........................................... Correll TOWNSHIP OF ALMOND Ronald Chase, Chairman ...................... Clinton Gregory Bmndt, Clerk ........................... Clinton Donald Karsky, Treasurer ...................... Clinton Greg Athey ............................................ Clinton Gene Moberg ........................................ Clinton TOWNSHIP OF ARTICHOKE Jacob Danlelson, Chalnnan ................... Correll gay Stenstuen, Clerk ............................. Cormll Forrest Johnson, Treasurer ................... Correll Milton Stenstuen .................................... Corm, Steve Jagow ........................................... Corral TOWNSHIP OF BIG STONE Johnny Larson, Chairman .: ............... Ortorwllle Patrick Greuel, Clerk ......................... Ortonvltle James Hippie, Treasurer ................... Ortonvtlle Marlyn Schumacher .......................... Ortonvtlle Rex George ....................................... Ortonvllle TOWNSHIP OF BROWNS VALLEY Steve Syverson, Chairman ............... Beardsley Nancy Deutsch, Clerk ....................... Beardsley Dorothy Heanen, Treasurer .............. Beardsley Michesl Spindler ........................ Browns Valley MeMn Shultoff .................................. Beardsley TOWNSHIP OF FOSTER Wilbur Athey, Chairman ......................... Clinton Edward Holker, Clerk ........................ Beardsley LeRoy Schoon, Treasurer ................ Beardsley Doneven Tesch ...................................... Clinton Bruce Eastman ................................. Beardsley TOWNSHIP OF GRAOEVILLE Jon Pansch, Chairman ..................... Grecevllle Karen Meanum, Clerk. ...................... Grecevltle Paul Haugeo, Treasurer ................... Graceville Reymond Pansch ............................. Grecevllle James Reynolds ............................... Gracevllle TOWNSHIP OF MALTA Terry Glllespie, Chairman ...................... Clinton Curries D. Cleon, Clerk .......................... Clinton Kent Morrill, Treasurer ........................... Clinton Vad Glllespte ......................................... Clinton Bruce Moberg ........................................ Clinton TOWNSHIP OF MOONSHINE Stan Weeding, Chairman ...................... Chnklo Diane Vogt, Clerk .................................. Choklo Richard Meuch, Treasurer ..................... Chokio Wally Wulff ............................................. Choklo Roberl Vogl .......................................... Choldo TOWNSHIP OF ODESSA Harley Helgeson, Chairmen .............. Ortonvllle Robert Rothl, Clerk ............................ Ortonvllle Janet Stock, Treasurer ......................... Odessa Ruaeall Thymlen ................................ Ortonvllle Ead Holgerson ..................................... Odessa TOWNSHIP OF ORTONVILLE Orlend Folkans, Chairman ................ Ortonvllle Ruth Dlttes, Clerk/Treasurer .............. Ortonvllle Bruce Hoememann ........................... Ortonvllle Donald Schumachar .......................... Ortonvllle TOWNSHIP OF OTREY Ronald Thompson, Chairman ........... Ortonvllle Eugene Nelson, Clerk ....................... Ortonvflle Rlchard Thomson, Treasurer ............ Ortonvllle Robert Thompeon .............................. Ortonvllle l-len Hansan ................................. .OrtorMtle TOWNSHIP OF PRIOR Wade Athay, Chairman ..................... Grecevllle David Weber, Clerk ........................... Ortonvllle Lind== Brandt, Treasurer ........................ Clinton Dale Johnson .................................... Ortonvllle Lester W. Hanson ............................. Grecevtlle TOWNSHIP OF TOQUA Thomas Heck, Chalm',an .................. Gracevllte John H. Klelndl, Clerk ....................... Gracevllle David Arena, Treasurer .................... Gracevllte Mark Klelndl ...................................... Gracevllle Jeffery "rafts :. .................................... Gracevllle Edward Taffe, Nolle Gary, Roger Ncebusc, h, Kathy Shlde, Debre Maher, CITY PeuI Koepp, Sandra Dlene Audrey Mar Gledys CITY OF, James Andrew Elelne Johnerud Larry Spauldlog, Catherine Haas, Beth nklererg. David Elllngson, c,y ofr=e .................. Jeanne Krueger, ; David Torgerson, : Bruce Swerd. Alvin Maes, 51h The Board of County Commissioners asks your in this weed and grasshopper control work. Harold J, Nelson COUNTY RAL INSPECTOR Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT Area news digest MILBANK, SD-About 350 Otter Tail Communications cable TV customers were without service for a few hours Friday evening as a result of some lines going down in the vicinity of the old drive-in theater. Kevin Kouba, Otter Tail Power Company Milbank Division manager said some electrical and cable lines were pulled down at about 5 p.m. on Friday. Three streetlights in the area also were affected. Cable service was restored after about three hours, he said. Businesses in the area were questioned, but no one witnessed the cause of the disruption, Kouba said. DAWSON-A tree planting ceremony in memory of Vern Stevens, former Dawson-Boyd Principal, was held Friday, April 30 in the front of the Elementary School. Students in the elementary and high school donated money to the tree fund and Madison-Marietta-Nassau Elementary School also gave a $50 donation for the tree. Superintendent Brad Madsen did the introductions and read poems in his honor. Andy Kubat also talked about The Renewable Resource. A plaque will be purchased and placed on the outside of the school. Any leftover funds will be donated to the Lac qui Parle Prairie Chicken restoration. MONTEVIDEO-Kevin and Cheryl Lee appeared before the City Council with a proposal to install an 18-hole miniature golf course in Smith Park. The course would also include a portable concession stand and would be located at the south corner of the park, not far from where the horse shoe pits,and bear cage used to be. Some concern was voiced about letting a private party use public land for profit. The council, however, seemed to think it would be a good addition to the community, particularly for the youth. Council members voted to give the go-ahead, providing a contract and lease arrangement could be worked out as well as the need for the Lees willingness to pay for utilities. Kevin indicated they would like to have a three-year lease. If everything is ironed out, the course could be up and running by the end of May. The course could accommodate about 100 players per hour. Seeds of New UM Soybean varieties available Soybean growers can now purchase certified seed of two new high yielding soybean varieties released by the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station (MAES). MN1401 was jointly released by the MAES and the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. It is classified as a mid Group 1 soybean variety developed by MAES plant breeder Jim Orf. Relative maturity is two days earlier that Parker and four days later than Lambert. MN1401 has cut yielded Lambert by approximately 10 percent with yields similar to Parker. MNI401 has better lodging and chlorosis scores than Parker and is higher in protein. IA2036 is a soybean cyst nematode resistant variety released jointly by the MAES and the Iowa State University Research Foundation. It is an early Group 2 variety with relative maturity of one to two days later than IA2021. It has yielded very well in both infested and non-infested sites. Certified seed of these new varieties is available for 1999 planting. Farmers who wish to buy certified seed should consult the Minnesota Crop Improvement Association Directory. Contact Roger Wippler at the MCIA office (800- 510-6242) for additional information and/or a copy of the directory. CLASSIFIED ADS BRING QUICK RESULTS Rural DFLers: house ag bill is silent on price crisis The bill funding state farm pro- grams for the next two years is shock- ingly silent on the farm price crisis and corporate concentration in agri- culture, state Reps. Doug Peterson and Ted Winter said after the Minnesota House passed the measure Tuesday. "I support most of what is in this bill, and if this were not a crisis year, this would not be a bad bill," Peterson (DFL-Madison), Lead Democrat on the House Agriculture Finance Committee, said. "But this is a crisis year. We are in the midst of the worst farm economy in 50 years, and farm- era were looking for answers. But this bill has no answers on price and mar- ket reform. It is silent on the growing corporate concentration in agricul- ture. And it is silent in response to farmers who are looking for an open, free and fair market, not a handout." The bill provides $I38.8 million for state farm programs, of which about $52 million goes to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture and about $75 million is devoted to ethanol support. "The problem is not what is in this bill, but what is not in it," said Winter (DFL-Fulda), who has been working with lawmakers in Midwestern states to shape a regional response to the cri- sis. "In South Dakota, they have banned corporations from raising livestock. In Nebraska, they are look- ing at state-level anti-trust laws. In Iowa, they are talking about price reporting and an end to secret con- tracts. But here in Minnesota, we are passing a bill that is strictly business as usual." Winter offered proposals to estab- lish minimum prices for farmers, to prohibit price discrimination based on the amount of grain or livestock a farmer delivers, and to require price reporting. All were shot down on party-line votes - after Rep. Bob Hess (R-Dassel) called each proposal to help farmers get a fair price "dumb ideas." "We are letting Cargill, Land O'Lakes and Hormel increase their control at the expense of the farmer," Winter said. "In livestock, in dairy or in grain, the producer must go hat-in- hand to a corporation for a contract. Independent producers get the left- overs and must take fire-sale prices. It is long past time to study this issue. It dinner plate." Peterson and Wenzel were among a group of legislators who earlier this year called for devoting 10 percent of the state's budget surplus to agricul- ture and rural relief. Few of their pro- posals were given hearings in the Republican-controlled House. Among their proposals are: * Interest buydown/Loan Guarantees. Loan guarantees of up to 75 percent of the first $100,000 bor- rowed by family farmers and rural small business owners. This will help cash-strapped farmers get the financ- ing they need to plant in 1999 and help "Main Street" businesses survive the crisis. * Fair Prices. Ban volume-based premiums and incentives, which favor large producers. * Cooperative Justice. Bar farmer- is time for action." owned coops from competing against Peters0n offered an amendment to .... theiF0riiaembers. fund an antri-trust investigation of the Cargill-Continental Grain merger by the Minnesota Attorney General's office. However, House Republicans voted to remove any reference to the Cargill-Continental merger from the proposal, leaving it as a study of agribusiness mergers. Some 69 of the 71 Republican legislators voted to delete the reference to Cargill from the proposal. "With this party-line vote, the Republicans said 'hands off Cargill,'" Peterson said. "It puts them on the side of the predatory corporations bent on owning farming from dirt to * Contract Reform. Prices paid to producers should be public and con- tract prices disclosed. * Ownership of Livestock. Bar meatpacking companies from breed- ing, raising or feeding livestock. Peterson said the bill crafted by House Republicans has a "blind spot to reality." "The authors of this bill are latter- day Herbert Hoovers, pretending the farm crisis is just a blip and prosperi- ty is right around the corner," Peterson said. "The only thing that's going away 'is the independent farmer." COMMUNITY SOCIAL SERVICES, MENTAL HEALTH AND TITLE XX BLOCK GRANT Big Stone County Family Services is developing the integrated Biennial Community Social Services Plan including the Mental Health Plans for 2000-01. Citizen participation is invited in the development of the Biennial Plan. The method by which Big Stone County Family Services will provide opportunity for public participation is: providers, community organizations, schools, and other interested parties will be sent written invitations. Any citizen may contact the Agency to provide information or review plans. The integrated proposed Biennial Community Social Services Plan including the Mental Health Plans are to be completed by August 18, 1999 and will be available for public review and comment after that date. Comments may be submitted to: Dan Hanratty, Director Big Stone County Family Services 340 NW 2 *d Street, OrtonviUe, MN. 56278 or by calling (320) 839-2555, Extension 20. The integrated Biennial Community Social Services Plan, that includes the Mental Health Plans and the Title XX Intended Use Report will contain information about community social services, service delivery, eligibility for services, social service funding, program goals and objectives, and projections of expenditures. Copies of the State Title XX Intended Use Report will be available after October 1, 1999 by writing to: Title XX Report Community Services Division Department of Human Services 444 Lafayette Road North St. Paul, MN. 55155-3839 Native Prairie Our Natural Heritage By Rosemary Hendrickson Almost everyone has heard of some type of Native American purification ritual, such as sweat lodges or sweat baths. But did you know that a key ingredient to these rituals was a prairie plant called white sage? It's scientific name is Artemisia ludoviciana - Artemisia (Latin for mugwort) means it's a member of the sunflower family; ludoviciana because it was found in the Louisiana territory. Other names for this plant include wild sage, prairie sage, and Western mugwort. The plant grows to 3 feet, has lance- shaped leaves that are described as "white felty" and has a strong sagebrush odor. Many Native American tribes used sage for purification. Lakota men believed "the essence of the plant" served as protection against evil powers. It was proper to begin any ceremonial by using Artemisia, which was done either by burning the sage like incense to drive away evil spirits or by drinking a ceremonial tea. Bathing in the tea was a way of cleansing and purifying the body. Crows used it as a deodorant. Cheyennes spread white sage along the borders in a ceremonial lodge. It was used to purify implements, utensils, weapons and horses. Medicinally, White sage tea was used for stomach trouble, to reduce phlegm and for lung ailments, for tonsillitis and sore throat. Often they simply rolled up the leaves and stem and chewed them, swallowing the juice. It was used externally, in tea form or as a poultice, to treat itching, rashes, skin eruptions, swelling, boils, sores and fevers. Several tribes used dry, powdered leaves as a snuff, inhaling it into the nostrils to treat nosebleeds, sinus ailments and headache. Pawnee and Arileara women drank white sage tea for menstrual problems. Blackfeet used the tea of fresh sag.e leaves to abort difficult pregnancies - so it would not be an herb to take during pregnancy or lactation. Mesquakies made a smudge of fresh sage leaves to drive away mosquitoes - now I would try that! The European herb known as mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris, has a documented history going back to the first century in Rome. It is interesting that the Native Americans here put the prairie sages to much the same J medicinal uses as tl?! did their native ..a=s even more interestil had the same kind L' about Artemisians d k similar rites and c 1 New World, and ia the lives of natives and vitally related populations. Does it Ia' that we should cent awareness of and aPl Prairie Heritage? Extension report John Cunningham, County Extension Director It's still coming. Yes, the Y2K is still coming. (Almost sounds like a modern day Paul Revere.) As January 15t approaches we will see countdowns, talk shows, and people preparing themselves for whatever is going to happen. Now, I'm not going out and buying wood nor am I on a waiting list for a generator but, we have smoke alarms in our houses in case of a fire. Maybe we should have a plan for and if something happens? We as Minnesotan's are lucky for the fact that we are ready for a big disaster every year. (No it's not mosquitoes.) Every year we prepare ourselves for a blizzard. Growing up on a farm we were trained how to buy food for a week if we couldn't get to town. If we look at the Y2K as a big blizzard we will probably be OK. But we need to prepare ourselves for another type of disaster. The SCAM. We need to be careful when we are preparing for the Y2K. Like any disaster there are people who prey on the innocent. We need to safe guard ourselves against people who want to make money off others. For one thing, we need to watch how we prepare for tbis to happen. We all do not need to go out and buy a generator. (It would be hard because of the 6 to 9 month waiting list for them.) We do not need to buy special equipment to find out if your equipment is Y2] make decisions rigJ around and check int0 you buy! What you# yourself ready ! Making ourselV require a few thin| foremost, make se documentation for have dealt with. F01 should be seeing le notc electric, and ohone a that things s'hould!  Once you have recl_ information file it_.,miakle I There are web sites,ll.L " from certain compe your cameras, vide lellth etc. Here are a few: er , Canon 1 -8(3 www.usa.canon.con ' ,,e Kodak 1-800" , year, www.kodak.com/US/ dex.shtml Minolta www.mi  IIs "d, mol8/menu.html  'a Panasonic wwW. MECA/y2k/index.htl. egard RCA 1-800 o3y ibk www.nipper.com/Y2IC  re, If you have a pr listed here call the    bought it from. DorJ) ,n, your coffee pot or. lth things that have a t)t n. and date. D Remember, GENERAL NOTIC TO CONTROL OR ERADICATE NOXI WEEDS AND GRASSHOPPERS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN this 6th day of May, 1999, pursuant to Minnesota S 18.83, Subd. 7, (1992), that all persons in Big Stone County, Minneeota, shall control Jl. Control of.. I111 all noxious weeds on land they own, occupy or are required to maintain.  may be accomplished by any lawful method but the methods may need to be re prevent the spread of viable noxious weed seeds and other propagating parts Failure to comply with the general notice may mean that an individual notice will be individual notice may be appealed wtthin two working days of receipt to the appeljg  the county where the land is located. Failure to comply with the individual notice ww the inspector having jurisdiction may either hire the work done or seek a misdem'r,',; against the person(s) who failed to comply. If the work is hired done by the inspector,l[l be placed as a tax upon the land and collected as other real estate taxes are G statewide noxious weeds are: Field Bindweed, Hemp, Poison Ivy, Leafy Spurge, ptdive Thistle, Canada Thistle, Musk Thletle and Plumeless Thistle. In Big Stone County, the .-.dll  ( noxious weeds also: Wild Sunflower, Velvet Leaf, Wild Proso, Millet and Black NIg .1]1[ ch, Local Weed Inspectors are township supervisors, city mayors or their appointed assild=i- NOTICE IS ALSO HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Minnesota Statutes, Section 18.02.'. I all persons owning, occupying, or in charge of the maintenance of land |' w' grasshoppers by any lawful method on land located in designated control zoneS..le used may need to be repeated to prevent the movement of grasshoppers to adPjr , Failure to comply with the general notice may mean the Inspector having JurisdictiOn  Failure to individual notice, comply with the individual notice may mean that the InsP_zl JaU;ipS:Jtpi :cs ill p: e: t: ntlai:ks d;frl)h: nr aP I::;o ;h rc taas: ;:lLenUxPusth t Grasshopper Inspectors are township supervisors or their appointed assistants. BY ORDER OF THE TOWNSHIP AND INSPECTORS IN BIG STONE COUNTY-- TOWNSHIP OF AKRON Roger Rheingens, Chairman ................. Correll Warren Wlese, Clerk ......................... Ortonvflle Rick Wilkenlng, Treasurer .................. Appleton Richard Guse ......................................... Corrsll John Jensen ........................................... Correll TOWNSHIP OF ALMOND Ronald Chase, Chairman ...................... Clinton Gregory Bmndt, Clerk ........................... Clinton Donald Karsky, Treasurer ...................... Clinton Greg Athey ............................................ Clinton Gene Moberg ........................................ Clinton TOWNSHIP OF ARTICHOKE Jacob Danlelson, Chalnnan ................... Correll gay Stenstuen, Clerk ............................. Cormll Forrest Johnson, Treasurer ................... Correll Milton Stenstuen .................................... Corm, Steve Jagow ........................................... Corral TOWNSHIP OF BIG STONE Johnny Larson, Chairman .: ............... Ortorwllle Patrick Greuel, Clerk ......................... Ortonvltle James Hippie, Treasurer ................... Ortonvtlle Marlyn Schumacher .......................... Ortonvtlle Rex George ....................................... Ortonvllle TOWNSHIP OF BROWNS VALLEY Steve Syverson, Chairman ............... Beardsley Nancy Deutsch, Clerk ....................... Beardsley Dorothy Heanen, Treasurer .............. Beardsley Michesl Spindler ........................ Browns Valley MeMn Shultoff .................................. Beardsley TOWNSHIP OF FOSTER Wilbur Athey, Chairman ......................... Clinton Edward Holker, Clerk ........................ Beardsley LeRoy Schoon, Treasurer ................ Beardsley Doneven Tesch ...................................... Clinton Bruce Eastman ................................. Beardsley TOWNSHIP OF GRAOEVILLE Jon Pansch, Chairman ..................... Grecevllle Karen Meanum, Clerk. ...................... Grecevltle Paul Haugeo, Treasurer ................... Graceville Reymond Pansch ............................. Grecevllle James Reynolds ............................... Gracevllle TOWNSHIP OF MALTA Terry Glllespie, Chairman ...................... Clinton Curries D. Cleon, Clerk .......................... Clinton Kent Morrill, Treasurer ........................... Clinton Vad Glllespte ......................................... Clinton Bruce Moberg ........................................ Clinton TOWNSHIP OF MOONSHINE Stan Weeding, Chairman ...................... Chnklo Diane Vogt, Clerk .................................. Choklo Richard Meuch, Treasurer ..................... Chokio Wally Wulff ............................................. Choklo Roberl Vogl .......................................... Choldo TOWNSHIP OF ODESSA Harley Helgeson, Chairmen .............. Ortonvllle Robert Rothl, Clerk ............................ Ortonvllle Janet Stock, Treasurer ......................... Odessa Ruaeall Thymlen ................................ Ortonvllle Ead Holgerson ..................................... Odessa TOWNSHIP OF ORTONVILLE Orlend Folkans, Chairman ................ Ortonvllle Ruth Dlttes, Clerk/Treasurer .............. Ortonvllle Bruce Hoememann ........................... Ortonvllle Donald Schumachar .......................... Ortonvllle TOWNSHIP OF OTREY Ronald Thompson, Chairman ........... Ortonvllle Eugene Nelson, Clerk ....................... Ortonvflle Rlchard Thomson, Treasurer ............ Ortonvllle Robert Thompeon .............................. Ortonvllle l-len Hansan ................................. .OrtorMtle TOWNSHIP OF PRIOR Wade Athay, Chairman ..................... Grecevllle David Weber, Clerk ........................... Ortonvllle Lind== Brandt, Treasurer ........................ Clinton Dale Johnson .................................... Ortonvllle Lester W. Hanson ............................. Grecevtlle TOWNSHIP OF TOQUA Thomas Heck, Chalm',an .................. Gracevllte John H. Klelndl, Clerk ....................... Gracevllle David Arena, Treasurer .................... Gracevllte Mark Klelndl ...................................... Gracevllle Jeffery "rafts :. .................................... Gracevllle Edward Taffe, Nolle Gary, Roger Ncebusc, h, Kathy Shlde, Debre Maher, CITY PeuI Koepp, Sandra Dlene Audrey Mar Gledys CITY OF, James Andrew Elelne Johnerud Larry Spauldlog, Catherine Haas, Beth nklererg. David Elllngson, c,y ofr=e .................. Jeanne Krueger, ; David Torgerson, : Bruce Swerd. Alvin Maes, 51h The Board of County Commissioners asks your in this weed and grasshopper control work. Harold J, Nelson COUNTY RAL INSPECTOR Page 2b 00INDEPENDENT